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Unit Plan Template

Title of the Unit: Hamlet Length of Unit (# of Hours or Weeks) Approximately 4-6 weeks.
UNIT OVERVIEW Students will find connections between the play Hamlet and the world around them.

Grade (s) Level: 12

FOUNDATIONAL OBJECTIVES / LEARNING OUTCOMES / MAJOR GOALS Please refer to applicable/relevant Saskatchewan Ministry of Education curriculum documents. 1. Students learn writing skills through Journal entries that ultimately help to construct the body of their final unit essay 2. Students develop viewing skills watching Kenneth Branaghs film version of Hamlet. 3. Students learn and develop listening and speaking skills through group discussions on such topics as Revenge, as well as class readings of the play. 4. Students will learn Personal and Social Value Skills through volunteering for a local cause to explore the cost of inaction and the rewards from acting for the betterment of others. 5. Students will develop Critical and Creative Thinking through peer group discussion of ethically difficult questions, where any answer they choose has both positive and negative implications.

PRE-ASSESSMENT / PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Students have experience with Shakespeare from their grade nine and ten English Language Arts classes: ELA 9B and ELA 10B.

DIVERSITY ISSUES

Reading and viewing of each Act of Hamlet

Unit Organizer Hamlet


Group discussion on revenge Journal entry

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart from Sept. 17th -Fox News pundits personas they wish to present vs. actual statements theyve made in the past Students find examples from the world around them that demonstrates the Appearance vs. Reality theme Act 2: Appearan ce vs. Reality Act 3: Loyalty Hamlet Which character(s) is/are the most loyal? Why? Which character(s) is/are the most disloyal? Why? Handout activity - ethical questions and dilemmas to answer.

First 40 lines performed in front of class to assess textual understanding and speaking skills.

Act 1: Revenge First 40 lines of Hamlet

View Shakespeare in Love 5 elements of Elizabethan England and similarities between Film and

Elizabetha n England and the Theatre

Act 4: Act 5: Hypocrisy and/or Acceptance/Fe ar of Death Action vs. Inaction Through community volunteering view, assess, and document in Journals what actions are needed to continue the success of the program and what are the implications of inaction toward this program.

Option #1 - Look at societys obsession with trying to stay young prevent the inevitable. Option #2 - Look for hypocrisy in students lives as well as on a local, national, and global level. Thoughts and opinions to be recorded in Journal entry.

Topics

Outcomes & Indicators

Activities

Materials

Assessment

Adaptations and Differentiations

Topic 1: Elizabethan England and the theatre

View Shakespeare in Love PGG 1.2 Uses a variety of ways to identify and build on student academic, physical, spiritual and social strengths. 1.4 Analyzes the classroom environment and makes adjustments to enhance social relationships and student motivation/engagement .

DVD copy of Shakespeare in Love

Observe and write down 5 elements of Elizabethan England from the film. Write down similarities between the Film and Romeo and Juliet

Topic 2 First 40 lines of Hamlet

PGG 1.4 Analyzes the classroom environment and makes adjustments to enhance social relationships and student motivation/engagement

In groups of 4, students brainstorm a setting other than where the first scene of Hamlet takes place and work together to perform the first 40 lines of Hamlet

Hamlet Play,

Performance of first 40 lines in front of class to assess textual understanding and speaking skills.

1.5 Provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their understandings in multiple ways. Topic 3: Hamlet Act 1: Revenge PGG 4.3 Combines practical and theoretical knowledge with broader life learning to refine a philosophy of education. Students will read along with the teacher Act 1 of Hamlet, looking for possible themes. As a class, students will watch Act 1 of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet to get a visual understanding of the story Students will form groups of 4 and discuss whether Murder as revenge is ever justified. Introduce and discuss the death penalty in the US and Canada Hamlet Play, Copy of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet Student Writing Journals In Student Writing Journals, students reflect on how far would they take revenge? Have they ever taken revenge on someone? If so, when? Journal is collected for formative assessment (comments and suggestions).

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Outcomes & Indicators

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Assessment

Adaptations and Differentiations

Topic 4 Hamlet Act 2: Appearance vs. Reality

Students will read along with the teacher Act 2 of Hamlet, looking for possible themes. As a class, students will watch Act 2 of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet to get a visual understanding of the story. PGG

Hamlet Play Copy of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet Student Writing Journals Data projector Computer Link to the Comedy network The Daily Show with Jon Stewart -

Journal is collected for formative assessment.

As a class we will http://www.thecomedy watch an excerpt from The Daily Show network.ca/shows/TheDaily 6.4 Plans and with Jon Stewart from Show?videoPackage=123699 develops Sept. 17th that engaging and scrutinizes Fox News authentic lessons pundits and the that demonstrate personas they wish to knowledge and present vs. actual confidence in statements theyve subject matter. made in the past. 6.5 Incorporates available technology in pedagogically appropriate ways. Students will then be asked to find examples of their own from the world around them that demonstrates the Appearance vs. Reality theme. Examples and reflection to be documented in a Journal entry

Topic 5 Hamlet Act 3: Loyalty

Students will read along with the teacher Act 3 of Hamlet, looking for possible themes. PGP 3.3 Demonstrates, shares, and assists students in developing critical insights into current issues. 3.4 Empowers students by assisting in development of understandings of democratic action. As a class, students will watch Act 3 of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet to get a visual understanding of the story. In Journal, students comment on whether loyalty is something that is important to them. Using evidence from text, which character(s) is/are the most loyal? Why? Which character(s) is/are the most disloyal? Why? Follow up handout activity where students are given series of ethical questions and dilemmas to answer. Every decision made has a positive and negative consequence.

Hamlet Play Copy of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet Student Writing Journals

Journal is collected for formative assessment.

The students will have an opportunity to then decide which

characters they are closest to ethically in the play. They will compare and contrast this with their original Journal entry about which characters are most loyal or most disloyal

Topic 6 Hamlet Act 4 Action vs. Inaction PGG 3.1 Promotes and engages in the improvement of social and environmental conditions. 5.1 Builds classroom connections with local, national, and global communities

Students will read along with the teacher Act 4 of Hamlet, looking for possible themes. As a class, students will watch Act 4 of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet to get a visual understanding of the story. The assignment is to find something in their community that they can volunteer their time for. Students must view, assess, and document in their Journals what actions are needed to continue the success of the program and what are the implications of inaction toward this

Hamlet Play Copy of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet Student Writing Journal

Journal is collected for assessment.

program.

Topics

Outcomes & Indicators

Activities

Materials

Assessment

Adaptations and Differentiations

Topic 7 Hypocrisy and Death PGP 1.5 Provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their understandings in multiple ways.

Students will read along with the teacher Act 5 of Hamlet, looking for possible themes. As a class, students will watch Act 5 of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet to get a visual understanding of the story. Option #1 Examining Hamlets acceptance of his coming death, Students will look to societys obsession with trying to stay young prevent the inevitable. Thoughts and opinions to be documented in

Hamlet Play Copy of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet Student Writing Journals

Journal is collected for assessment.

Journal entry. Option #2 Examining the Gravediggers scene, students will examine the hypocrisy of giving Ophelia a Christian burial even though she committed suicide. Students will then look for hypocrisy in their own lives as well as on a local, national, and global level. Thoughts and opinions to be recorded in Journal entry.

Topic 8 Hamlet Essay

PGG

Students will use their Hamlet play writing journals to Writing Journal create the body of their essay on whether Hamlet is still a relevant play for high school students to study in the year 2012.

Final essay summative assessment and evaluation.

Topic 9

PGG

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Direct instruction is highly teacher-directed and is among the most commonly used. This strategy is effective for providing information or developing step-by-step skills. It also works well for introducing other teaching methods, or actively involving students in knowledge construction. Structured Overview Lecture Explicit Teaching Drill & Practice Compare & Contrast Didactic Questions Demonstrations Guided & Shared - reading, listening, viewing, thinking Indirect Instruction is mainly student-centered, although the two strategies can complement each other. Indirect instruction seeks a high level of student involvement in observing, investigating, drawing inferences from data, or forming hypotheses. It takes advantage of students' interest and curiosity, often encouraging them to generate alternatives or solve problems. In indirect instruction, the role of the teacher shifts from lecturer/director to that of facilitator, supporter, and resource person. The teacher arranges the learning environment, provides opportunity for student involvement, and, when appropriate, provides feedback to students while they conduct the inquiry (Martin, 1983). Problem Solving Case Studies Reading for Meaning Inquiry

Reflective Discussion Writing to Inform Concept Formation Concept Mapping Concept Attainment Cloze Procedure Experiential Learning is inductive, learner centered, and activity oriented. Personalized reflection about an experience and the formulation of plans to apply learning to other contexts are critical factors in effective experiential learning. The emphasis in experiential learning is on the process of learning and not on the product. Experiential learning can be viewed as a cycle consisting of five phases, all of which are necessary: (1) experiencing (an activity occurs); (2) sharing or publishing (react Concept Attainment Cloze Procedure (3) analyzing or processing (patterns and dynamics are determined); (4) inferring or generalizing (principles are derived); and, (5) applying (plans are made to use learning in new situations). Field Trips Narratives Conducting Experiments Simulations Games Storytelling Focused Imaging Field Observations Role-playing Synetics Model Building Surveys Independent Study refers to the range of instructional methods which are purposefully provided to foster the development of individual student initiative, self-reliance, and self-improvement. While independent study may be initiated by student or teacher, the focus here will be on planned independent study by students under the guidance or supervision of a classroom teacher. In addition, independent study can include learning in partnership with another individual or as part of a small group. Essays Computer Assisted Instruction Journals Learning Logs Reports

Learning Activity Packages Correspondence Lessons Learning Contracts Homework Research Projects Assigned Questions Learning Centers Interactive instruction relies heavily on discussion and sharing among participants. Students can learn from peers and teachers to develop social skills and abilities, to organize their thoughts, and to develop rational arguments. The interactive instruction strategy allows for a range of groupings and interactive methods. It is important for the teacher to outline the topic, the amount of discussion time, the composition and size of the groups, and reporting or sharing techniques. Interactive instruction requires the refinement of observation, listening, interpersonal, and intervention skills and abilities by both teacher and students. Debates Role Playing Panels Brainstorming Peer Partner Learning Discussion Laboratory Groups Think, Pair, Share Cooperative Learning Jigsaw Problem Solving Structured Controversy Tutorial Groups Interviewing Conferencing

Assessment Processes and Practices 1. What types of assessment tools might you use? Teacher made short answer/essay Demonstrating skills or knowledge rather than completing a written test or report.

Recording homework assignments Contracts Presentations Using oral assessment techniques for students with reading or writing disabilities. Examples of students work Effort Improvement over year or term Teacher made multiple choice, true or false or matching tests Portfolios Informal inventories Rating scales Checklists Quizzes Observation or interviews with students Proofreading written work Participation of students Student self-assessment Student peer evaluation Standardized tests Attendance Teacher Journals 2. What are some strategies I might use to help students understand their learning? Provide feedback to students Assign grades to students Reviewing work Grouping students for learning Modifying learning tasks Edit/proofread student work Highlight student motivation and interests Highlight student study habits Discover effective student learning strategies Discuss upcoming quizzes or tests Give class feedback on tests, etc. Discuss assessment criteria when assigning work, i.e. Rubrics Discuss homework completion Collect, mark and keep assignments Collect, mark and return assignments

Feedback on home work to the whole classroom Students mark own homework in classrooms Students exchange assignments and mark in class Use homework towards determining a mark 3. What are some strategies I might use to help students improve their learning? Allowing more time to complete tests and other assignments Stating instructions in simpler terms. Focusing on a smaller number of assessment techniques or changing the frequency of gathering assessment information. Adjusting the type of criteria used for expected responses and the degree of accuracy required in these responses. Reducing weaknesses. Reducing student anxiety by providing familiar surroundings and practice in test-taking strategies. Changing expectations in the amount of work accomplished Requiring higher ability students to provide more than one solution to a problem. Using a word processing program with a spellcheck feature with students who have problems spelling correctly. Modifying the presentation and answer sheets of tests and assignments to accommodate student Adapting the curriculum for diverse student needs Modifying instructional practices for diverse student needs 4. What are some uses for the assessment data that you collect? Interview with students Interview with parents/guardians Teacher conferences or collaborative planning Report cards Teacher/student/parent conferences Talking to other teachers Sharing assessment data with special services personnel (eg. consultants, coordinators) Sharing assessment data with in-school administration Sharing assessment data with school division administration