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The

Verona Press

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Vol. 48, No. 43

Verona, WI

Hometown USA

ConnectVerona.com

$1

Spring election 2013

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Ave., Verona www.lsmchiro.com and Many oTHerS. UN273366 Photo by Amy Smith Incumbent District 4 alder Evan

Photo by Amy Smith

Incumbent District 4 alder Evan Touchett spars with challenger Heather Reekie (far right) during Monday night’s candidate forum. Though the candidates took a few noticeable pot shots at one another and had clearly differing opinions on what current alders are doing to keep the community involved, they generally delivered succinct, cordial comments about their views on how the city should be run.

Candidates share future vision

The lack of contested elections have made the current council, at least in some respects, complacent. I hope to change that.

Luke Diaz, Dist. 3 challenger

MARK IGNATOWSKI

Unified Newspaper Group

The eight candidates for Verona Common Council share the same views on some aspects of city govern- ment, but differ on where the city has been and where it is headed. The candidates answered ques- tions at a forum Monday hosted by the Verona Press and Verona Area Chamber of Commerce. It was taped by local cable-access channel VHAT- 98 and will be televised this week, with extra copies distributed to the library and the video posted on the library’s YouTube channel. The four incumbents up for re-elec- tion each face a challenger this year,

up for re-elec- tion each face a challenger this year, Read each candidate’s responses to our

Read each candidate’s responses to our election questionnaires.

ConnectVerona.com

giving voters what observers believe is the most contested ballot in the city’s history. While all the candidates agreed the city should continue to fund the library at least at its current level and that the city’s downtown plan involves some tough choices, differ- ing opinions arose when asked about how well the city communicates with constituents, how to shape the city’s core business district and what sort of affordable housing might be needed in the future.

While there were a few swipes at opponents’ voting records, experience or connection with voters, the evening was a mostly respectful and polite affair. In general, incumbents Clark Solo- wicz (Dist. 1), Steve Ritt (D-2), Rick Streich (D-3) and Evan Touchett (D-4) touted their past success and experience as council members. Respective challengers Elizabeth Doyle, Dale Yurs, Luke Diaz and Heather Reekie focused on their desire for more communication between leaders and constituents and the need for new representation on the council. See page 8 to read what candidates had to say about a few key issues.

Our city government runs so well that we get few complaints. By and large, they’re able to communicate with me at home and through email.

Rick Streich, Dist. 3 incumbent

Fire district

Split done, leaves staffing issues

City moving forward with new department after district dissolves

MARK IGNATOWSKI

Unified Newspaper Group

After months of discussion, the city and town have agreed to dissolve the Verona Fire District and operate the department as a city-run entity. But the work is far from over, and the department could even be temporary, winding up as part of a larger, regional district. The city and town both voted unani- mously last Monday and Tuesday,

Turn to Fire/Page 5

In brief

The city and town of Verona approved a dissolution agreement for the Verona Fire District, effective Jan. 1, 2014, last week and signed a contract for at least 30 years of fire protection for the town. In the coming months the city will need to:

• Hire a fire chief

• Hire full-time firefighters and fill paid on-call and paid-on-premises positions

• Continue regionalization talks with Fitchburg and Oregon

Verona Area School District

Berge leaving NCS for warmer climes

SETH JOVAAG

Unified Newspaper Group

New Century School is

looking for a new director.

n

Group New Century School is looking for a new director. n Berge L y of n

Berge

L

y

of

n

Berge, direc-

tor

K-5

ter

since 2009, i n f o r m e d

parents last week that she is resigning effective July 1.

the

char-

school

Her “difficult” decision was fueled in part by the brutal winter weather. She said she and her husband John, also a former princi- pal in Verona, “have decid- ed that we have spent our

last winter in Wisconsin for

a while” and want to spend

future winters in Florida. “I cannot think of any-

thing that would have been

a more rewarding way to

spend these last four years,

Turn to NCS/Page 7

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March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

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Photos by Anthony Iozzo Let’s play at the midway The Verona Area High School student council

The Verona Area High School student council put on its second annual kids carnival Saturday in the K-Wing. All benefits went to the Family Assistance Fund.

Top left, Erike Sey, 6, of Madison shows off her whiskers at the face- painting station.

Top middle, Grayer OBryant, 5, of Verona picks out a candy prize.

Left, Molly Massey, 2, of Verona plays with a beach ball and a football.

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Below, Amelia Parker, 4, of Madison attempts to spin a Frisbee with a cup into a net to win a prize.

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OTE April 2 nd O Ed Fallone ● Wisconsin Supreme Court Tony Evers ● State
OTE April 2 nd
O
Ed Fallone ● Wisconsin Supreme Court
Tony Evers ● State Superintendent of Public Education
Elizabeth Doyle ● Verona City Alder, District 1
Dale Yurs ● Verona City Alder, District 2
Luke Diaz ● Verona City Alder, District 3
Heather Reekie ● Verona City Alder, District 4
Pat McPartland ● Verona Area School Board
Absentee ballots are available at City and Town Halls!
paid for by Verona Area Progressives
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ConnectVerona.com

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

3

UN273387

Town of Verona

Board tables Epic power line decision

Mark IgnatowskI

Unified Newspaper Group

The Town Board voted Tuesday to hold off on a decision about allowing Epic to run a power line from its wind farm in the Town of Springfield to its campus in the City of Vero- na. Plan Commission chair Sup. Manfred Enburg said he wanted to have a meet- ing with City of Verona officials and the compa- ny before approving the

underground transmission line. The company had hoped

to use about a mile of town

right of way to pipe in elec- tricity from its 10-megawatt farm, which it commis- sioned in December after picking up a previously planned project in Spring- field, northwest of the City

of Middleton.

According to documents provided to the town from the company, Epic had intended to start construc- tion in April and finish by

July or August. The line would be buried about four feet underground and would

also house space for a fiber- optic communications line. Company plans show the line coming down Woods Road to County Hwy. PD. The main route would then take the line down Nine Mound Road to just north of Northern Lights Road. Much of that last leg is an area that would need rebuilding, anyway, accord- ing to the draft of a traffic study released last week by

ing to the draft of a traffic study released last week by Photo by Jim Ferolie

Photo by Jim Ferolie

The annual Ironman Wisconsin triathlon brings thousands of spectators to Verona for a few hours on the second Sunday in September.

Ironman back through 2018

JIM FerolIe

Verona Press editor

Love it or hate it, Iron- man is going to be around for a while. The grueling test of endurance, which draws both elite competitors from all around the globe and

locals who want to test their own abilities, has been

a fixture in Verona since

2002.

The 112-mile bicycle loop passes through the heart of the city twice, mak- ing Verona a good spot for people to hang out and wait

for their favorite competi- tors to make an appearance. On Friday, the Greater Madison Convention and Business Bureau announced that the City of Madison has extended its deal with the World Triathlon Corpo- ration to keep the Ironman Wisconsin Triathlon in the Madison area through 2018. “We are thrilled to announce the contract extension of Ironman Wis- consin through 2018,” Deb Archer, CEO of the Madi- son Area Sports Commis- sion (MASC), an arm of the GCMVB, said in a news release. “Over the past 12 years, we have built a

strong and mutually ben- eficial relationship with the event’s organizers, World Triathlon Corporation.” Known as one of the most spectator-friendly courses of the 30 events in the glob-

al Ironman series, Ironman

Wisconsin features over 45,000 spectators who line the course through Wiscon- sin farmland and the down- town streets of Madison.

What’s the Ironman?

2.1-mile swim 112-mile bicycle race 26.2-mile marathon

“Ironman Wisconsin

is an exciting event for

our entire region, includ- ing communities such as Verona and Cross Plains that have played an integral part in the event’s success,” Archer said in the release. “Together with these com- munities, the thousands of eager volunteers from the Madison area and the des-

tination’s natural assets, we have built this event into one of the premier races on the Ironman schedule.” In Verona, the bicycles enter early in the morning on the second Sunday of September after the Lake Monona swim, heading down Whalen Road and leaving on Locust Street,

as neighborhood residents,

race supporters and others gather on folding chairs, beach towels or in tents. After traveling a long course in western Dane County, the riders return

to Verona, flying down

a closed-off North Main

Street before making their way back to Whalen and Locust to do another loop.

A few hours later, they

return and head back to Madison for the marathon. The MASC, which is par- tially funded by Verona’s hotel tax, is dedicated to bringing recreational events

to Dane County in order to land increased business for the hospitality and service industries. Since its incep- tion nearly three years ago, it has helped bring several events to the Verona area, including the cyclo-cross national championships the past two Januaries, the ultimate Frisbee collegiate championships this May

and the U.S. Lacrosse Cen- tral Championships in June. At a council meeting in January, Diane Morgen- thaler, vice president of GMCVB, said those last two events are expected to combine for about 7,500 spectators and competitors. S h e a l s o r e p o r t e d improvement over the past year in hotel occupancy and average daily rate received by hoteliers throughout the county. “Both are positive sig- nals for our hotel com- munity and speak well for what we’ve been able to achieve,” she said. “We were actually coming out of the slump we had in 2008

and 2009 and seeing some recovery for the hotel busi- ness.” As for Ironman itself, the Verona Common Coun- cil has the final word on whether the event can pass

through Verona’s streets, as

well as which streets it can use; however the city has shown support in the past, with only sporadic contro-

versy. MASC chair Vince Swee- ney said in the release that keeping Ironman here helps the Madison area continue to be a “premier sports des- tination.”

an engineering firm hired by the city. An alternative route would continue the line along County PD to Coun- try View Road and then back east towards the Epic Campus along property lines. Town planner/adminis- trator Amanda Arnold told the Verona Press that the power line won’t be dis- cussed at the Town Board level until its next regu- lar meeting, April 9. She said the town and city are

looking to schedule a date to discuss planning issues related to Epic.

Other action

The town board last Tuesday also:

• Voted to draft a long- term agreement with Pel- litteri Waste Systems to contract for garbage and recycling collection in the town. A longer contract could realize some savings for the town. • Recommended the use of Ayer Associates as a

consultant on the Old PB bridge replacement project. The move still has to be approved by the Wisconsin Department of Transporta- tion.

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4 March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

Opinion

ConnectVerona.com

Letters to the editor

Behnke deserves to continue to serve Verona Area School District board

The purpose of this letter is to share the outstanding qualities Ken Behnke has demonstrated as a Verona Area School District board member. Behnke was elected to the Board in 1995. I had the privilege of learning from him and working with him when I was an elemen- tary principal at Stoner Prairie and Country View as well as the District Administrator prior to my retirement in 2005. I have worked with hundreds of school board members in five school districts throughout my 40 years in education. I have always had a special place in my heart for individual school board mem- bers who provide the inspiration and direction for the people who I believe have the most important job in the world–our teachers. The determination, dedication and encouragement that Ken has provided our teachers over the years serves as a model for board members throughout Wisconsin. Behnke is focused on student learning and understands the

crucial role that all school staff members play in the continu- ous improvement of our educa- tional system. As our district has become more diverse he has rec- ognized the value of that diversity and the need we have to improve learning with fewer dollars. I especially appreciate the fact that his leadership and support for the district have never been clouded by political perspectives or per- sonal agendas. He serves all children and our community with passion, integrity and common sense. Though board members come and go over the years, few leave their mark as clearly and as pro- foundly as Behnke. He is the kind of individual we need to lead us through the chal- lenges we face in the future. Your vote for him on April 2 will be a vote replete with possibilities for every student in our district.

William Conzemius Retired administrator Verona Area School District

Benhke is an open-minded leader

I served nine years on the Verona School Board with Ken Benhke. I found him to be honest, fair, and opened minded. In these times of take sides politics Ken will be a strong

independent voice for the tax’s payers. Please join me by voting Ken Benhke April 2. Tom Duerst

Town of Verona

Submit your letters online:

ConnectVerona.com

Verona Press

Thursday, March 21, 2013 • Vol. 48, No. 43

USPS No. 658-320

Periodical Postage Paid, Verona, WI and additional offices. Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Verona Press, 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593.

Phone: 608-845-9559 FAX: 608-845-9550 e-mail: veronapress@wcinet.com

ConnectVerona.com

This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.

General manager Lee Borkowski lborkowski@wcinet.com

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Verona Press Oregon Observer • Stoughton Courier Hub

$45 Verona Press Oregon Observer • Stoughton Courier Hub Letters to the editor Luke Diaz will

Letters to the editor

Luke Diaz will be a Verona leader for years to come

I enthusiastically support Luke Diaz for Verona City Council. Diaz and his wife live and work in Verona and are raising their family here. He is exactly the type of leader our community needs right now. He is someone who is a dedicated member of our community and will be for years to come.

Diaz believes in responsible spending, strong public safety, a clean environment, and planning that encourages growth within our downtown. Those values have led him to be supported by countless citizens, community leaders, and organizations who have publicly endorsed his candi- dacy for Verona City Council in

District 3. For our families and our com- munity, I urge you to vote for Luke Diaz on April 2.

Erika Hotchkiss Dane County Board Supervisor; District 32 Verona

Reekie has the right leadership qualities for Verona

I

met Heather Reekie when

a

down-to-earth fashion. The

she lives. She has told me that

she became my La Leche League leader after the birth of my first child over five years ago. I was quite ill, at that time, and my child had been born with a seri- ous health condition. As a leader,Reekie was the personification of reliability,

information that she provided to me was accurate and I am certain that her help directly impacted the health and well-being of my family in a positive way. I know from first-hand expe- rience that she possesses a fine character. There is no doubt in

she enjoys listening to different points of view and having her ideas challenged in a constructive manner. I endorse Heather Reekie’s candidacy for city council whole- heartedly.

integrity and compassion. She

my mind that her run for office

Suzanne Olajos

always communicated with me

is

due to a deep-seated desire to

Verona

promptly, respectfully, and in

help the community in which

Keep Judge St. John on the Dane County bench

I am writing to urge Dane

County voters to join me on Tuesday, April 2 in going to the polls to vote for Dane County Circuit Court Judge Rebecca St. John. St. John is eminently qualified and highly respected as a judge, as evidenced by the fact that doz- ens of judges have endorsed her,

including 15 current and former Dane County Circuit Court judg- es. She has dedicated her career to public service, working with chil- dren and caretakers in abuse and neglect cases for a non-profit, among other things, and she is deeply concerned about issues such as domestic violence and

racial disparity in our courts. Her integrity, independence, and dedication are what are need- ed in a judge. Let’s keep her on the bench serving the citizens of Dane County.

Kay Sievers Town of Verona

FromConnectVerona.com

RE: Alders should be decided based on their qualifications, not gender

I’m not surprised that your

interpretation is associated with what the candidate looks like. When someone says that an all- male group isn’t representing everyone's interests, it doesn’t mean anything about how the person looks, but rather how the person thinks and interacts with the community.

It is significant that Verona is

under-represented by women. It’s not that we expect special consid- eration when it comes to elected positions, but rather equal con- sideration. Many of the current alders have been appointed or had the luxury of running unopposed in the past. That is not how the election pro- cess is meant to be. Becoming a representative is never a guaran- teed position. Each election cycle incumbents should have to prove

their qualifications, not sit idly by, complaining about the fact that they might have to expend effort to run a campaign or that because someone happens to be in office that they are uniquely qualified for that position. Nor does the fact that others can’t be good representatives with- out experience. Otherwise none

of these guys would have been elected in the first place. Remem- ber that each incumbent was at their beginning, the challenger. Diversity is what our com- munity is. Our elected officials should represent that diversity not only in the positions and poli- cies that they support and foster, but in the unique experiences that they bring to the table. I know that any 8 people in a room will have interesting conversations, but I believe that putting the same

8 people in the room year after year expecting better solutions rarely happens. It requires new thoughts, different perspectives, unique voices, and a bit of unbri- dled enthusiasm. Don’t presume that bringing new ideas and new people into these positions is something that shouldn’t be fostered. Being dif- ferent represents a different per- spective. This is essential. I will continue to vote for candidates that look forward and not back- ward or hold on tightly to the sta- tus quo, as there is always more than one solution to any given problem.

Edna Kunkel

Editor's note: Kunkel has volunteered for some of the chal- lengers’ campaigns this election.

ConnectVerona.com

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

5

Fire: Hiring a chief is next

Continued from Page 1

respectively, on a pair of agreements, one to termi- nate the district and allocate its assets and the other to have the town contract for services with the city for at least the next 30 years. But several key personnel issues need to be resolved before the city takes over Jan. 1, 2014. City administrator Bill Burns told the Verona Press last week that there is not yet a definitive time- line of what needs to take place and when. But he and fire chief Joe Giver planned to meet this week to brain- storm everything that needs to be done in order to ensure a smooth transition at the beginning of the year. “We want to get started right away,” Burns said. “I think there will be a lot of procedural things.”

Personnel issues

The foremost issue is hir- ing a chief. Since the dis- trict will no longer exist, the current firefighters and chief will be unemployed as of Dec. 31. State statutes require the city to hire a fire chief through the Police and Fire Commission. Burns said he’s had a pre- liminary discussion with the commission chair about how that body will proceed with hiring a new staff. “In a general sense, they would need to go through the process for hiring the chief,” Burns said. “They would work with the chief designee to hire the rest of the staff.” That would all happen before the end of the year to ensure a smooth transition. While the town and city expressed few reservations about the change last week after several closed-session meetings on it, some fire- fighters have expressed concern that their current jobs might end at the end of this year. During the commission’s February meeting, person- nel committee member Bill Krell said morale in the department was low because of the uncertainty. Town Chair Dave Combs, the fire district chair, said last Tuesday he hopes the city hires a chief and staff soon so current staff mem- bers don’t have to search for new jobs. “To retain the good peo- ple in our staff, we need to move quickly,” Combs said. Giver said he hopes knowing how the process works will help ease some of those concerns. But the process has yet to be decid- ed. He said that in his 34 years in the fire service, he’s seen a lot of different police and fire commissions use different tactics for hir- ing. Some places have used an open recruitment process in which any candidate can apply and be considered for the position, Giver said. This can be time-consum- ing and be potentially more expensive to post descrip- tions and vet candidates. Other departments have only taken applicants from within the department and others still have simply

‘To retain the good people in our staff, we need to move quickly.’

Dave Combs

Fire Commission

president

appointed a chief. “They can do pretty much anything they want,” Giver said of how the commission wants to fill the position. “Their rules will determine how long it takes.” Giver thought it could take between two and three months to hire a new chief and possibly another few months to finalize the rest of the staff. The new department structure will help realize some efficiency, Giver said, particularly on the adminis- trative side. For example, the depart- ment will only have to pres- ent a budget to the council, rather than going through the fire commission and the Town Board. At times in the past, those entities have had clashes about what direction the department should head. The department’s payroll, billing and human resources services will all fall under city purview, too.

Agreement approved

The dissolution was approved without dis- agreement last Tuesday at the Town Board’s regular meeting, which had been delayed a week due to a blizzard. The Common Council had approved the agreements the day before. Both municipalities were familiar with the documents as their respective admin- istrators had spent months drafting the agreements and attorneys had reviewed them, as well. In short, the town gives up its claim to the land and building the fire station sits on and the city plans to use that money toward the con- struction of a new station. The town has an annual payment that varies based on population, equalized value and numbers of calls for service. A fixed annual payment of $30,000 will also increase based on the Consumer Price Index. While the length of the contract ensures that there will be ample coverage for the town and city in the long term, some regional agreements could bring changes to the department in coming years. The city has been part of a discussion that started last year with a consolida- tion feasibility study done by the UW-Madison La Follette School of Pub- lic Affairs. Burns said the three municipalities might consider looking at further studies about continued col- laboration and possible full consolidation. “We’re going to keep talking with Oregon and Fitchburg,” Burns said. “One possibility is that the new city department could continue to collaborate. … Complete consolidation is an option in the future. There’s a whole continuum of working together.”

City of Fitchburg

Splash Pad could be open as early as July

Kurt GutKnecht

UNG correspondent

Construction of a long- planned splash pad at McKee Farms Park can go ahead after the city gave its approval. The council approved construction of the splash pad March 12, which means it should be open by July. A groundbreak- ing ceremony will be held at 10:30 a.m. March 26 at McKee Farms Park. The $655,000 project includes $170,000 from the Fitchburg Optimists Club, $235,000 from the City of Fitchburg and $250,000 from Dane County. Under the agreement with the county, Fitchburg will construct a road in the Town of Madison (which will eventually annexed by Fitchburg) in exchange for the $250,000 donation. The agreement was necessary because the county cannot legally pay for a road in a

because the county cannot legally pay for a road in a A rendering of part of

A rendering of part of Phase 1 that’s expected to be completed by July shows an overhead view of the Splash Pad.

township. Optimist member and project leader Joan Mohr said without that funding, “it would not have hap- pened this year.” She said the group aims to keep fundraising to buy

more water jets, shade structures, benches, bike racks and other amenities. “This is going to be such a great facility for children of all abilities,” she said. “I am so proud that we can do this for all the kids.”

Optimists are shooting for a July 4 grand opening, Mohr said.

Unified Newspaper Group reporter Victoria Vlisides contributed to this story.

Group reporter Victoria Vlisides contributed to this story. Topart Top student artists from each Verona school

Topart

Top student artists from each Verona school were recognized this month during a school board meeting.

Students were nominated by their teachers. Winners include (front, from left) Joanna Mena, Sugar Creek Elementary; Delaney Wepking, Glacier Edge Elementary; Connor Doeppers, VAIS; Christopher Lofts, Core Knowledge Charter School; (back, from left) Taylor Kalish, Country View Elementary; Samantha Freson, VAHS; Brooke Felsheim, VAHS; Max Fink Badger Ridge Middle School; Tiffani Lewis, VAHS; Angelique Stepanenkov, Savanna Oaks Middle School. Not pictured:

Addie Coombs-Broekema, New Century School, and Marina Frazier, Stoner Prairie Elementary.

Photo by Seth Jovaag

 
 
 
 
 
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RE-ELECT

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See website for information on other classes and more www.springdaleyoga.com 437-4082
See website for
information on other
classes and more
www.springdaleyoga.com
437-4082

Meditation 101

Sun., April 7, 14 & 21 4:30-6:30 p.m.

New Monthly Class

2-Hour Joint Movement Flow Sat., April 13, 10:30 a.m.

Free Newcomers Class

Sat., April 6, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Beginning Yoga Classes

Tues. 6:30 p.m. & Fri. 8:30 a.m.

8435 Cty. Rd. PD Between Verona &Mt. Horeb

6

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Coming up

Hunting banquet

The Black Earth Creek Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation will host their annual Hunting Heri- tage Banquet Saturday, March 23, at The Heights Event Center. For reservations and tickets, contact Heather Sutcliffe at 795-0152 or hsut- cliffe@centurylink.net.

Easter for kids

Resurrection Lutheran Church, 6705 Wesner Road, will host an Eas- ter for Kids event from 10-11:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 23. Children of all ages are welcome, but the pro- grams will be aimed at the 3-10 age range. The activities will include sev- eral crafts, a cupcake snack, a short game or two and an Easter Egg hunt. Registration is not necessary and there is no charge, but if you plan to attend, register on our website at rlcverona.org by clicking on the Eas- ter for Kids Banner. For more information call 848-4965 or email: resurrection@tds.net.

Consignment sale

The Just Between Friends consign- ment sale will take place this week- end at the Verona Athletic Center. The sale is open to everyone and features many products essential for raising children at 50 to 90 percent off retail prices. The sale runs 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. on

Friday, March 22, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 23, and 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 24. Low-priced bicycle helmets, fit- tings and car seat info will be avail- able from 11 a.m - 2 p.m. Saturday, March 23. Visit danecounty.jbfsale.com for info.

Puppet Production

Make a puppet and star in a musi- cal about using the library in this pro- gram for tweens ages 9-12 years old from 2-4 p.m. Monday, March 25. Don’t care for singing? You don’t have to, so don’t sweat it. The fin- ished video will go up on the library website for all to see!

American Girl tea party

Author Kathleen Ernst, creator of seven American Girl books about Caroline Abbott will be visiting the library to talk about her latest book, a new Caroline mystery, “Traitor in the Shipyard” from 1-2 p.m. Tuesday, March 26. Door prizes include a Caroline doll donated by American Girl. The pro- gram is for ages 6-10 years old and dolls are welcome.

Healthy gluten-free lifestyle

Learn how to live a happy, healthy, gluten-free life with Certified Nutri- tion Educator Hallie Klecker at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, at the Verona

Public Library. Participants will enjoy samples of gluten-free baked goods, and books will be available for sale and signing. This free program is sponsored by a grant from Epic. Registration is required and is limited to 40 partici- pants. Register online at veronapub- liclibrary.org.

Magic show

Jason Love’s magic show, slated for 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, at the library, is both hilarious and amazing. All ages are welcome.

Superfoods class

Yoga teacher April Wahl will be hosting a superfoods class at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, March 27, the Verona Senior Center. Learn how certain foods can be powerful in improving health and enjoy samples and recipes in the $25 class. Call Wahl to sign up or more info at

445-9454.

Anime movie marathon

Teens, come sit back and relax at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the library. Enjoy a pizza dinner while watch- ing Japanese animated films from three different decades. The program is for ages 13-18.

Community calendar

Thursday, March 21

• 9:30 a.m., Egg hunt, Verona Public Library, 845-

7180

•12:30 p.m., Scarf workshop, Verona Senior Center,

845-7471

• 7 p.m., Raising chickens in your backyard, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

Friday, March 22

• 11 a.m., Pizza and a movie, Verona Senior Center,

845-7471

• 11 a.m. - 8 p.m., Just Between Friends consignment

sale, Verona Athletic Center, danecounty.jbfsale.com

Saturday, March 23

• 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Just Between Friends consignment

sale, Verona Athletic Center, danecounty.jbfsale.com

• 10-11:30 a.m., Easter for kids, Resurrection Lutheran, 848-4965

Sunday, March 24

• 8 a.m. - 2 p.m., Just Between Friends consignment

sale, Verona Athletic Center, danecounty.jbfsale.com

Monday, March 25

No school - VASD spring break

• 2-4 p.m., Puppet musical: video production, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

• 6:30 p.m., Bible discussion, Resurrection Lutheran Church, 6705 Wesner Road, 848-4965

• 6:30 p.m., Finance committee, City Center

• 7 p.m., Common Council, City Center

Tuesday, March 26

No school - VASD spring break •1-2 p.m., American Girl tea party, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

• 7 p.m., Gluten-free lifestyle workshop, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

Wednesday, March 27

No school - VASD spring break

• 10:30 a.m., Superfoods class, Verona Senior Center,

845-7471

• 4 p.m., The magic of Jason Love, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

Thursday, March 28

No school - VASD spring break

• 10 a.m., Women’s group, Verona Senior Center,

845-7471

• 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., Blood drive, State Bank of Cross Plains - Verona, 800-733-2767

• 3-8:45 p.m., Anime movie marathon, Verona Public Library, 845-7180

What’s on VHAT-98

Thursday, Mar. 21

Hospital at Senior Center

10 a.m. - Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

7

a.m. – 911 at Senior Center

10

p.m. - Memorial Baptist at Historical

3 p.m. - Daily Exercise

9

a.m. - Daily Exercise

Society

4 p.m. – 2013 Candidates Forum at

10 a.m. - Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

11 p.m. - Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

Senior Center

3 p.m. - Daily Exercise

6

p.m. - Resurrection Church

4 p.m. – 2013 Candidates Forum at

Sunday, Mar. 24

8

p.m. - Words of Peace

Senior Center

7

a.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour

9

p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber

6 p.m. - Salem Church Service

9

a.m. – Resurrection Church

10

p.m. - Memorial Baptist at Historical

7 p.m. - Words of Peace

8 p.m. - Daily Exercise

9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber

10 p.m. – Memorial Baptist at Historical

Society

Friday, Mar. 22

7 a.m. – 2013 Candidates Forum at Senior Center

1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber

3 p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s Hospital at Senior Center

5 p.m. - 2011 Wildcats Football

8:30 p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s Hospital at Senior Center

10 p.m. - 911 at Senior Center

11 p.m. – Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

Saturday, Mar. 23

10 a.m. - Salem Church Service

Noon - Common Council from 3-11-13

3 p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s

Hospital at Senior Center

4:30 p.m. - Memorial Baptist at Historical Society

6 p.m. – Common Council from 3-11-13

9 p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s Hospital at Senior Center

10 p.m. – Memorial Baptist at Historical

Society

11 p.m. - Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

Monday, Mar. 25 7 a.m. – 2013 Candidates

Senior Center

Forum at

Society

Wednesday, Mar. 27

7 a.m. – 2013 Candidates Forum at Senior Center

1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber

3 p.m. – Acupuncture & Children’s

Hospital at Senior Center

5

p.m. – Common Council from 3-11-13

7

p.m. - Capital City Band

8

p.m. –Acupuncture & Children’s

Hospital at Senior Center

10 p.m. - 911 at Senior Center

11 p.m. – Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

Thursday, Mar. 28

1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber

7

a.m. – 911 at Senior Center

3

p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s

9

a.m. - Daily Exercise

Hospital at Senior Center

10

a.m. – Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

8

a.m. – Common Council from 3-11-13

5

p.m. - 2011 Wildcats Football

3 p.m. - Daily Exercise

11 a.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s

9

p.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour

4 p.m. – 2013 Candidates Forum at

Hospital at Senior Center

10 p.m. – 911 at Senior Center

Senior Center

1 p.m. - 2011 Wildcats Football

4:30 p.m. – Memorial Baptist at Historical Society

11 p.m. – Jerry Zelm at Senior Center

Tuesday, Mar. 26

6

p.m. - Salem Church Service

8

p.m. - Daily Exercise

9

p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber

6

p.m. – Common Council from 3-11-13

7

a.m. – 911 at Senior Center

10

p.m. – Memorial Baptist at Historical

9

p.m. - Acupuncture & Children’s

9

a.m. - Daily Exercise

Society

Churches

ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH

2951 Chapel Valley Road, Fitchburg

(608) 276-7729 allsaints-madison.org Pastor Rich Johnson

THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG

2833 Raritan Road, Fitchburg, WI

Fr. William Vernon, pastor SATURDAY 5 p.m. Sunday Vigil, St. Andrew, Verona SUNDAY 7:30 a.m., St. William, Paoli

9 and 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona

Daily Mass: Tuesday-Saturday at 8 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona

53711

(608) 271-2811

ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

livelifetogether.com

427

S. Main Street, Verona

Sunday Worship: 8 and10:45 a.m.

(608) 845-6922

www.stjamesverona.org

THE CHURCH IN VERONA

Verona Business Centre

535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona.

(608) 271-2811 livelifetogether.com Sunday Worship: 9 a.m.

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC

5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg

Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter Narum

Service

5 p.m., Saturday

8:30 and 10:45 a.m., Sunday

SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

502 Mark Dr., Verona, WI

(608) 273-1008 • memorialucc.org

Phone: (608) 845-7315

SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN

Phil Haslanger

Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA (608) 271-6633 Central: Raymond Road & Whitney Way SUNDAY 8:15, 9:30 & 10:45 a.m. Worship West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine

Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry www.salemchurchverona.org 9:00AM Sunday School (for all ages) 10:15AM Worship Service Staffed nursery: 8:45am-11:30am 11:30AM Fellowship Hour

CHURCH-ELCA

Mound Road, Verona

2752

Town Hall Road (off County

SUNDAY

ID)

9

& 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Worship

(608) 437-3493

LIVING HOPE CHURCH At the Verona Senior Center

springdalelutheran.org Pastor: Jeff Jacobs SUNDAY

108 Paoli St. • (608) 347-3827

livinghopeverona.com, info@living- hopeverona.com SUNDAY

10 a.m. Worship

MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH

201 S. Main, Verona

(608) 845-7125 MBCverona.org Lead pastor: Jeremy Scott SUNDAY 10:15 a.m. Worship

REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

102 N. Franklin Ave., Verona

Pastor Dwight R. Wise

(608) 848-1836 www.redeemerbible- fellowship.org SUNDAY

10 a.m. Family Worship Service

RESURRECTION LUTHERAN CHURCH Wisconsin Synod, 6705 Wesner Road, Verona (608) 848-4965 • rlcverona.org

Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant Pastor: Timothy Rosenow THURSDAY 6:30 p.m. Worship SUNDAY

9 a.m. Worship Service

ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC PARISH

301 N. Main St., Verona

(608) 845-6613

Stchristopherverona.com

8:45 a.m. Communion Worship

SUGAR RIVER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

130 N. Franklin St., Verona

(608) 845-5855 sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org, sugarriverumc.org Pastor: Gary Holmes SUNDAY 9:00 & 10:30 Contemporary worship with chil- dren’s Sunday school. Refreshments and fellowship are between services.

WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH

2920 Hwy. M, Verona, WI 53593

Sunday (nursery provided in a.m.) 9:15 a.m. - Praise and worship

10:45 - Sunday School (all ages)

6 p.m. - Small group Bible study

ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST – Located at Hwy. 92 & Ct. Road G, Mount Vernon (608) 832-6677 for information Pastor: Brad Brookins SUNDAY 10:15 a.m. Worship

ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF

CHRIST – At Hwy. 69 and PB, Paoli (608) 845-5641 Rev. Sara Thiessen SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship

Calling all churches

Is your service time changing? See a change that has yet to be made? Please let us know so we can have the correct listing in our church directories. Call Victoria at 845-9559 ext. 249 or email communityreporter@wcinet.com.

Time is a Spring

Time is a Spring

Every day is a new day! Each day is literally a new creation, the unfolding

Every day is a new day! Each day is literally a new creation, the unfolding of something divine. The sun rises and sets with only slight variations every day, just as the seasons return at their appointed time each year. Time literally pulses or oscillates, like a perpetual spring. Even the longer periods of time appear to have this characteristic oscillation. The universe is expanding, and will eventually reach the point of maximum expansion and start contracting, only to contract back to the point of a giant cosmic implosion, which will set the universe expanding again. But, time is also like a spring from which life-giving water flows. That is, time is a never-ending source of being. It continually flows and all beings arise within the fabric of time. Only the ultimate Being, God, is outside of time. As finite, temporal beings we cannot wrap our minds around the nature of time, and we might feel a bit like Einstein when he remarked that “the only reason for time is so that everything doesn’t happen at once.” Presumably for God all things are experienced simultaneously, but we can only imagine what that might be like. Time is truly a spring, a never-ending source of wonder.

“Whatever is has already been, and what will be has been before; and God will

“Whatever is has already been, and what will be has been before; and God will call the past to account.” Ecclesiastes 3:15

and God will call the past to account.” Ecclesiastes 3:15 430 E. Verona Ave. 845-2010 Call
and God will call the past to account.” Ecclesiastes 3:15 430 E. Verona Ave. 845-2010 Call

430 E. Verona Ave.

845-2010

to account.” Ecclesiastes 3:15 430 E. Verona Ave. 845-2010 Call 845-9559 to advertise on the Verona

Call 845-9559 to advertise on the Verona Press church page

Call 845-9559 to advertise on the Verona Press church page
Call 845-9559 to advertise on the Verona Press church page

ConnectVerona.com

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

7

ConnectVerona.com March 21, 2013 The Verona Press 7 Photos by Victoria Vlisides Wellness fair at Savanna
ConnectVerona.com March 21, 2013 The Verona Press 7 Photos by Victoria Vlisides Wellness fair at Savanna

Photos by Victoria Vlisides

Wellness fair at Savanna Oaks

Left, sixth-grader Madeline Perrin ven- tures up the rock climbing wall at the Savanna Oaks Middle School Wellness Fair on March 7. The fair also housed the SOMS science fair, with a matching theme.

Right, many informational booths lined the commons and gym, including this one on healthy eating by aspiring dietitian and UW-Madison student Alisa Klassy, who served hummus samples.

Above, Chondra Dobson of the Madison Police Department gave a guest lecture on cyber safety for kids.

Department gave a guest lecture on cyber safety for kids. Schools go purple for epilepsy awareness

Schools go purple for epilepsy awareness

Recent research shows that epilepsy will strike one in 26 people at some point in their lifetime. Badger Ridge Middle School and Sugar Creek Elementary School students will flaunt purple Friday, March 22, in support of Lily’s Fund for Epilepsy Research, which is a local organization of volunteers whose mission is to sup- port and celebrate epilepsy research at UW-Madison. To spread epilepsy awareness, Lily’s Fund has joined forces with local schools and businesses to celebrate international Purple Day, which was cre- ated by 9-year-old Cassidy Megan of Nova Scotia, who lives with epilepsy. The Epilepsy Association of Nova Scotia and the Ani- ta Kaufmann Foundation helped spread her idea. International Purple Day is March 26, 2013, but Lily’s Fund will cel- ebrate Purple Day locally on March 22, due to spring break for many participat- ing schools. As an extra incentive, Lily’s Fund volunteers will deliver purple cupcakes to the first five Madison-area organizations that post a picture of people in their organization donning purple on the Lily’s Fund Facebook page beginning at 8 a.m. March 22. Fliers to promote Purple Day are available for post- ing, and participation stick- ers will be delivered to pur- ple-donning groups. Fact sheets with helpful infor- mation about epilepsy and seizures will also be avail- able for schools. For information, visit lilysfund.org.

Verona Chiropractic opens, hosts open house

Verona Chiropractic, 413 W. Verona Ave., will

host an open house from 4

to 7:30 p.m. March 27.

The event will also include a ceremonial rib- bon cutting at the clinic organized by the Verona Area Chamber of Com- merce at about 4:30 p.m., according to the chamber. The clinic opened its doors earlier this month and features two doctors – Tara Osterholz and Lind- sey Reitzner. Osterholz grew up in Platteville and attended the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, where she obtained her bachelor’s degree before attending Palmer College of Chiropractic in Daven- port. She graduated from there in 2008, according to the clinic website. Reitzner grew up in

a small town in South- west Wisconsin and also

grew up in a small town in South- west Wisconsin and also Photo by Jim Ferolie

Photo by Jim Ferolie

Verona Chiropractice is in a new building on the former laundromat location on West Verona Avenue.

attended UW-Platteville. She graduated from Palm- er College in 2011. Services from Verona Chiropractic include chi- ropractic care, massage therapy, nutrition therapy and rehabilitation. For information about the clinic, visit the clin- ic website at verona chiropractic.com, find it on Facebook or call 497-

3000. The clinic is open Monday through Friday.

UN276844
UN276844

Berge: Retired from Stoner Prairie in 2009

Continued from Page 1

and I am honored to have had the opportunity to work together with you and with your children,” she wrote in the school’s newsletter last week. Berge’s career in educa- tion started as a seventh- grade language-arts teach- er in Tomah and spanned more than 20 years in Verona, including time as a counselor and as princi- pal at Stoner Prairie Ele- mentary School from 1999 until 2008, when she first retired. That retirement didn’t last long. She was appoint- ed by superintendent Dean Gorrell as interim director of New Century in 2009, when the school’s long- term viability was being questioned in the face of district-wide budget cuts.

As interim director, Berge helped parents develop a plan to convert NCS into Dane County’s first “green” charter school in 2010. She was hired as the permanent director that year from a field of 41 can- didates. New Century was “very lucky” to have Berge, who was great with students and provided a strong voice representing the school that now has around 115 students, said school site council member Kris- tina Navarro-Haffner. “Having her expertise was wonderful,” she said. “She will be very missed.” Berge’s position at NCS was less than half-time and paid her $52,800 in 2012, according to the state Department of Public Instruction. A timeline for choosing

her successor has not been finalized, but the district expects to hire someone before Berge’s contract runs out this summer, said district human resources director Jason Olson. Berge’s husband retired in 2005 after a 16-year run as principal at Verona Area Middle School and later Badger Ridge Middle School. Lynn Berge prefers the term “resign,” as she doesn’t feel “ready for full- time retirement,” she said in an email. She said she and her husband haven’t determined yet their next steps. “We do love Madison and are Badger fans, so it is difficult to decide whether we will move elsewhere permanently or just winter in Florida,” she said.

New Student Special! 8 weeks of professional karate lessons taught by our staff of State
New Student Special! 8 weeks of professional karate lessons taught by our staff of State
New Student Special! 8 weeks of professional karate lessons taught by our staff of State

New Student Special!

8 weeks of professional karate lessons taught by our staff of State Certified Instructors, your karate uniform, and your first belt for only $99!

Call us at 845-1333 to get started!

www.kaverona.com

8

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Verona Common Council candidate forum

Selected quotes: March 18, Verona Senior Center

Communication

Dist. 1 Solowicz: “My informa- tion is very accessible. Any- body can call me at any time. I’m very proud of when Epic started again, we had pre- planning meetings so that the residents could hear each other talk about what their concerns were about Epic. There’s new and innovative ways to reach out to people – all these things need to be looked at from the city’s per- spective.”

Doyle: “I’ve also found that reaching out to people in the district that a lot of them don’t know who their alder is. I support having monthly listening sessions. I do believe (local government meetings) should be online. The more opportunities we create for people to come together, the stronger the community becomes.”

to come together, the stronger the community becomes.” Luke Diaz (speaking) and Dale Yurs. Photos by

Luke Diaz (speaking) and Dale Yurs.

Photos by Amy Smith

Dist. 2 Ritt: “I am out there and I am available for my constitu- ents every day. What I’ve found … is that most of the folks … don’t necessarily want me ringing their door- bells. If they have questions and have concerns, they’ve reached out and have been given timely responsiveness

on my part.”

Yurs: “I really want com- munity involvement. I’ve been knocking on doors and

I find that there’s this thirst.

A thirst for involvement; a

thirst for enthusiasm. The best way that Verona can

serve its constituents is that

if as many as possible have

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a voice in this community.

As a councilman, I will go

Dist. 2 Ritt: “We can’t just wish

assisted/senior living hous- ing. We have about a 60/40

to

you and I will ask you to

for a vibrant downtown.

mix

of single-family residen-

come to me.”

We can’t pick and choose

tial

house to multifamily. I

the people that are going to

think that’s a good mix.”

Dist. 3 Streich: “The city does

develop here. We can work with them and try to attract

Doyle: “I do support

a

decent job communicat-

them. You attract them with

affordable housing. There’s

ing with its citizens. It could always do better. (Verona

Press editor and forum mod-

a process that is fair and pre- dictable. I don’t think we can ignore the business parks that

some value in having some diversification with some townhomes or duplexes. You

erator) Jim (Ferolie) does

we have – some are referring

still

want to focus on having

an

excellent job in the paper

to them as sprawl. I disagree

a

diversified tax base. You

on

his lengthy articles about

with that. I look at those as

have to make sure you’re

Dist. 2

Ridge – it is either that or it

what’s going on with the city. Our city government runs so well that we get few complaints. By and large, they’re able to communicate

with me at home and through email. I respond promptly.”

catalysts. The difficult deci- sion is going to be public- private collaboration; that is finding a location downtown for parking purposes.”

balancing things and serving the needs of the community.”

Ritt: “We have a very diverse housing stock. We have a wide variety of apart-

Diaz: “Good communi- cation is one of the most important things any leader

Yurs: “My goal for the downtown is to make it con- venient and walkable. I see the wealth of history, espe- cially in downtown Verona.

ments at various levels of income. In terms of future apartments, I think we need to be consistent … in terms

can do for their constituents.

I’ve worked with the histori-

of raising the bar. Any future

If

elected, I pledge to send

cal society … to get the his-

development needs to look

out a newsletter and make myself available to … any-

torical markers marked. Put the hometown in Hometown

at the West End and Siena

one who wants to bend my ear. The lack of contested

U.S.A.”

is

better.”

elections have made the cur- rent council, at least in some respects, complacent. I hope

to change that.”

Dist. 4 Touchett: “(Communi- cating with constituents is) really hit and miss. Very few people want to give up their email address. It can always be better. A lot of

residents are like, ‘the city is good. Please keep it good.’

A lot have called me since

I became alder. I’m really

happy the city is putting out

a newsletter now.

Reekie: “My job is to help others become better com- municators. I made com- munication my career, and

I think that I can be a rep-

resentative communicator for the people in my district.

I’d set up a website, set up a blog – anything to reach out

to people.”

Downtown plan

Dist. 1 Solowicz: “A vibrant downtown is all about prep- aration. We have Liberty Park, we have the West End and we have downtown. We

should tie those together not focus all on one entity – we need to focus across the city lines. I think the Economic Development Corporation is

a

huge incentive for Verona.

Doyle: “I know the ben- efits of a thriving downtown. My family and I live right smack in downtown. We

don’t have that historic infra- structure that we simply fill

in; it will require a lot of hard

work and tough decisions.

We do have some anchors to

be explored.”

Dist. 3 Streich: “If you know downtown, there’s not a lot

of land available. Downtown is extremely limited. East and west of Verona have a lot of potential for develop- ment. One thing I don’t want to do is impose additional taxes … just to make down- town look better.”

Diaz: “The development of downtown is the most

important issue to help the

city develop a good commer- cial tax base. It is a tremen-

dous challenge … but I’m eager for that kind of chal- lenge. We can do it while doing right by the neighbors. We can do it by keeping the TIF open. The city needs

flexibility to do it.”

Dist. 4 Touchett: “For me the goal is communication. Traf-

fic is a big deal; it’s a mess. We have to work with our neighbors and protect our neighbors and businesses … and put in some public space. The challenge is spending.”

Reekie: “The downtown redevelopment is a top prior- ity. I think we could consider other options other than rede- veloping the main intersec- tion downtown. Perhaps just getting rid of street parking could add an extra lane and

adding a parking lot so peo- ple could walk around down there are options that haven’t been considered.”

Housing

Dist. 1 Solowicz: “I think what’s important here is keeping people in the community … One of the sectors of hous-

ing that we really lack is that

Yurs: “I want to work

with seniors of Verona to

see if that need (for senior

living facilities) is here today. Those homes that (the seniors are) in now, there’s another way we can entice Epic people … to lay down stronger roots here.”

Dist. 3 Streich: “The issue in Harmony Hills woke up the

Common Council. I do agree

that we need a nice balance

of apartments. All future apartment complexes should be of high quality standards.”

Diaz: “I think it’s impor- tant for the city to have a

variety of different places for people to live. I admire the residents of Harmony Hills who did an excellent job of demanding better spacing (of the apartments). The

city needs to do a better job

of communicating to people before they buy their homes of what might happen.”

Dist. 4 Touchett: “Apartments …

it’s really been an interesting issue. I think they have their place and they are feeders

for a community, but they

also have their difficulties. What’s happened in Harmo- ny Hills, I think it’s worked

out very well so far. The les-

son for me is you gotta tell

their residents before they

buy

Reekie: “If you want to

entice Epic employees to live in Verona, that might entail having more upscale apart- ments for them to live in. I think the Harmony Hills com- plex ended up to be a good idea, but I wish that it had been better communicated

with the existing residents.”

their home.”

Heather Reekie (speaking), with Rick Streich to her left and (obscured) Dale Yurs and Steve Ritt to her right.

home.” Heather Reekie (speaking), with Rick Streich to her left and (obscured) Dale Yurs and Steve

Jeremy Jones, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor

845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com

Fax: 845-9550

SportS

Thursday, March 21, 2013

The

9

Verona Press

For more sports coverage, visit:

ConnectVerona.com

Football

For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectVerona.com Football Photo submitted Verona Area High School football players

Photo submitted

Verona Area High School football players signed National Letters of Intent to play football in college Feb. 6 in the Commons. Pictured (from left) are Derek Witte (St. Cloud State), Bilal Louzati (Southwest Minnesota State), Andrew Terwilliger (Southwest Minnesota State) and Nick Fish (Illinois State).

Varsity bonds continue

Louzati, Terwilliger to team up again at Southwest Minnesota State

Anthony Iozzo

Assistant sports editor

Seniors Bilal Louzati and Andrew Terwilliger have played football together since middle school. The last few years, they were key contributors on the Verona Area High

School football team, which finished in the Level 4 and Level 3 playoffs in

2011 and 2012, respectively.

Being close friends the whole way, the two athletes will continue to grow with football together as both signed

National Letters of Intent to play foot- ball at Southwest Minnesota State University on Feb. 6. “We both helped each other out and are going to be roommates,” Louzati

It is just amazing to be able

said. “

to play with one of your close friends and continue to play together.” Louzati and Terwilliger did have other choices, but they both visited Southwest Minnesota’s campus and said they liked the atmosphere, close- knit community and the coaching staff. And that vibe echoed the Verona Area High School atmosphere both athletes have come to know the past two seasons. “That was what I was looking for at

a college,” Terwilliger said. “Meeting

the guys on the team and having them talk, we got to have a little Q and A and we got to ask all the questions we wanted. I felt that when you come on

their team, it isn’t like it is their team.

It is everyone’s team.

“They are all buds, and I think it reminded me of Verona.” Both Louzati and Terwilliger will most likely redshirt their first year at the Division II school. Louzati expects to play outside linebacker on defense, while Terwilliger expects to be a tackle on the offensive line. Terwilliger talked to some coaches, and with most of Southwest Minneso- ta’s lineman being seniors, he expects to contribute as soon as the following season.

“I am hoping to get a shot my sophomore year,” he said. “If not, hopefully a little later. It is hard to tell right now, but I am looking forward to school and looking forward to get my grades to be good.”

Louzati also said he would like to

contribute his sophomore year. “I will take what I can get, and I am a very competitive person,” he said. “So I will see when I get there and who I am going up against, and hope- fully, I will get a better spot.” That competitive nature is some- thing Louzati said was what the Vero- na program prepared him for the best. “I can speak for Andrew and all the football players, that it is amaz- ing to bring a bunch of guys together our junior and senior years like we did,” Louzati said. “It wasn’t just us or athletes. We had some non- athletes step up, and it just came together. It was amazing what the coaching staff was to do for us.” Southwest Minnesota’s camp begins in August.

Local archers shoot to success at youth tourney

Kyle Hammer, Elliot Clubb and Kate Davis all placed Saturday at the 2013 Youth Archery Tournament at the Oregon Sportsman’s Club. The tournament went from about 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with around 80 youth from all over, from Poynette to Mon- roe to Verona to Marshall. Hammer finished first in Tier 2 of the 12-and-over outlaw bracket, while Clubb took third in that and the 12-14 years old unlimited bracket. Davis took third place in the 8 and under bracket. The tournament utilizes National Field Archery Asso- ciation (NFAA) blue and white 5-spot or single-spot targets and allows shoot- ing 60 arrows from 10 or 20 yards (depending on age / bracket), for a total of 300 points, according to the Ore- gon Sportsman’s Club web- site. Any child can participate up to the age of 18. There are four age brackets with three categories in each age bracket plus two advanced / outlaw brackets. For full results, go to ore- gonsportsmans.com/archery/ youthtournament.html. Here is a list of definitions to understand the types of archery at the tournament.

Fin-

ger shooting, no sights

• Limited - Fin -

ger shooting, no restric- tions on sights/stabilizers

• Unlimited - Release

shooting, no restric- tions on sights/stabilizers

• Outlaw - 12 years old and

older any equipment 10 yards

• Advanced Under 12 -

Any equipment 20 yards

– Victoria Vlisides

• Bare

Bow

-

Girls basketball

Kant, Richardson earn spots on second-team all-conference

Verona Area High School senior forward Shannon Kant and junior forward Lexi Rich-

ardson both made the second- team All-Big Eight Conference girls basketball team this sea- son. Kant, who led Verona with

233 points, and Richardson,

who scored 217 points, both were key in the Wildcats’ run that finished a game back of conference champion Janes- ville Parker. Kant averaged 10 points and 3.5 rebounds a game and shot 52 percent from the field. Rich- ardson averaged nine points

and four rebounds a game and shot 58 percent from the field. Verona finished 19-5 overall (16-2 conference) with the only Big Eight losses coming to Parker (21-4, 17-1) and Madi- son La Follette (19-6, 15-3), which knocked off both teams in the second half of the season to force a split. Also making the list were honorable mentions senior guard Jamie Hintz and junior guard Jenni LaCroix. Hintz scored 174 points this season and shot 73 percent from the free-throw line, while LaCroix picked up 124 and

averaged two assists a game. LaCroix and Richardson both return next season to lead the Wildcats. Senior guard Marissa Mears, who finished with 164 points, did not make the list. The Wildcats’ season ended in the regional final with a loss to Sun Prairie, which it defeat- ed twice in the regular season. Verona was picked to finish near the bottom of the confer- ence in the preseason. The rest of list includes Player of the Year McKayla

Turn to All-conference/Page 10

Player of the Year McKayla Turn to All-conference /Page 10 File photos by Anthony Iozzo Senior

File photos by Anthony Iozzo

Senior forward Shannon Kant (right) and junior forward Lexy Richardson (above) earned spots on the second-team All-Badger South Conference squad this season.

and junior forward Lexy Richardson (above) earned spots on the second-team All-Badger South Conference squad this

10

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Track and field

Richardson, Dietlin pace Wildcats in season opener

Jeremy Jones

Sports editor

W h i l e

still

in season opener Jeremy Jones Sports editor W h i l e still Richardson snow c

Richardson

snow

c o v e r e d

t r

throughout

the state, the Verona boys and girls track and

field teams headed to UW-Whitewater’s indoor facility Saturday for the large school division of the Nel- son-Daniel Classic. The Wildcats’ 4x400-

meter relay quartet of junior Lexy Richardson, freshman Cheyenne Trilling, Kylie Schmaltz and senior Katy Miller led the way for the Wildcats, who took sixth with 19.5 points. With the addition of sev- eral freshmen, head caoch Mark Happel said the 4x2

and 4x1 relays should also benefit from the most talent- ed sprint group he’s coached

at Verona. Still, the Wildcats

showed the ability to score points in a number of ways. “We had a nice mix of scoring with points coming from everywhere,” Happel said. “A lot of these girls were doing events for the very first time, so I was very pleased to finish sixth out of 25 teams.” Richardson, who helped lead the 1,600-meter relay to third in 4 minutes, 18.15 seconds, turned in the team’s top individual finish, clearing 5 feet to tie for fourth place in the high jump. Teammate

a

c

k

s

Ogi Ifediora also reached 5 feet, taking sixth on jumps. Having been unable to get outside so far this sea-

son, junior Nikki Zimbrick

tied for fifth in the pole

vault, reaching 8-6. Jenni LaCroix took seventh in the 800-meter run (2:31.58), while Trilling finished eighth in the 400 (1:05.03). Cary Grove (Cary, Ill.) held off Milwaukee King to win the meet, 65.5-64. Verona boys head coach Joff Pedretti said the main goal of his team was, “to show the enthusiasm and effort of a championship team.” Interestingly, all of Vero- na’s 19 points were scored over a bar.

Matt Diet- l i n t o o k third place in the vault, reaching
Matt Diet-
l i n
t o o k
third place
in the vault,
reaching 13
feet – a full
foot
above
his personal
best.
Dietlin

S h o r t l y afterward, Dietlin and Steven Queoff added a second- and fourth- place finish in the high jump, clearing 6-2 – a lifetime best for Queoff.

Oconomowoc (54) bested Arrowhead (51) for top team honors, while Middleton finished fourth. Fellow Big 8 rivals Madison LaFollette and Janesville Craig also fin- ished ahead of Verona. “We hope to use that as motivation to keep getting better as the season contin- ues,” Pedretti said.

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The Beat(a) plays on as Nelson breaks national age group record

Jeremy Jones

Sports editor

Shattering records in the pool is nothing new for Verona Area High School freshman Beata Nelson. H a v i n g a l r e a d y smashed a pair of state records at the WIAA Division 1 girls state

swimming meet back in early November, Nelson upped the ante last week, breaking the National Age Group Record for the 100-yard butterfly with a time of 53.36 seconds at the National Club Swimming Associa- tion Jr. National meet in Orlando, Fla. The record, which had stood since 2009, broke a tie between a pair of collegiate stars: Stanford’s All- American Felicia Lee (2006) and USC’s Kendyl Stewart, who matched the time of 53.44. Nelson became only the second National Age Group record holder from the state of Wisconsin in the process and the first female. Mitch Stoehr has held the 10-and-under 200 yard free record since 2003. “I kind of knew I had broken the record and I thought it was pretty

of knew I had broken the record and I thought it was pretty Nelson cool, but

Nelson

cool, but I didn’t really put it into perspective,” said Nelson who has been trying to set an age group record for the past four years. “There have been so many fast people from Wis- consin, who I looked up to. “To be the first female from the state to get an age group record is something I can’t put it into words. It’s just insane.” Nelson, who swims for the Dane County YMCA, broke the record in Fridays prelims. She ended up going a tenth of a second slower in the finals and finished third in the 100 fly (53.46). The top 32 times from across the country were divided into four finals (A, B, C and D) at the event which lasted from Tuesday through Satur- day. Nelson, who qualified in a total of eight events, (50, 100 and 200 back- troke; 50 and 100 fly; 50 and 100 free and the 200 IM), made the A finals in five events and the B finals in the other three. At 14 years old, she was the young- est swimmer in the A, B, or C finals. Nelson won the Division 1 state 100 backstroke title four months ago with a time of 53.73, breaking for- mer University of Wisconsin swim- mer Maggie Meyer’s UW Natatori- um pool-record of 54.16 and adding

another state record in the 50 free- style (22.97). Nationals, with around 1,700 com- petitors, was a totally different feel- ing, however. “I competed at the Y Nationals two years ago for the experience and fin- ished 12th,” Nelson said. “This time around I felt I stood a chance.” Nelson, as well as, 16-year-olds Janet Hu (NCAP program) and Kylie Stewart of Dynamo Swim Club in Atlanta, highlighted the meet, featur- ing the next generation of Olympic hopefuls trying to follow in the steps of Missy Franklin. Hu and Nelson went head-to-head in a number of events with Hu break- ing the 15-16 age group record in the 50 free prelims. Stewart meanwhile, destroyed the rest of the field in the 200 backs, clipping Elizabeth Pelton’s 15-16 NAG record from 2010 in the pro- cess. With the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Sum- mer Olympics three years away, Nel- son said, “It feels closer than that. “High school swimming is fun, but I know I’m going to have to get more into lifting and start thinking about winter and senior nationals swimming at meets where someone like Missy Franklin is going to be competing.”

VAGSA hosts pre-season warm-up softball clinic

Verona Area Girls Softball Asso- ciation (VAGSA) will be hosting a preseason warm-up clinic from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, April 7, at Country View fields behind Country View Elementary School. In the event of inclement weather or snow still on the ground, the clinic will be held in the VAHS gym. Ath- letes will be separated by age into two-hour clinics. The cost for the clinic is $25 with advance registra- tion or $30 on the day of the clinic (register at event). The clinic will offer personal,

high-level, hands-on instruction and drills by experienced coaches and players. This clinic is also an excel- lent opportunity to warm up prior to VAGSA’s skill evaluations, which will be hosted the following week- end. Skill evaluations are used to create recreation and competitive teams for the coming summer girls fastpitch softball season. Athletes should be prepared to play by bringing their cleats/gym shoes, sweats/ sweatshirt, fielding glove, batting gloves, water bottle and a snack, if needed.

Additional information (including times by age) and registration form for the clinic is available at vagsa. org. VAGSA is a nonprofit organiza- tion committed to providing opportu- nities for recreation and competitive fastpitch softball to all girls in the Verona Area School District. Last year, 150 athletes enjoyed the opportunity of being part of one of the most comprehensive softball pro- grams in Wisconsin. For more infor- mation, visit VAGSA on the web or e-mail vagssawi@gmail.com.

All-conference: Hintz, LaCroix named honorable mentions

Continued from page 9

Yentz of Sun Prairie, who was on the first team. The

page 9 Yentz of Sun Prairie, who was on the first team. The Get Connected Find

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other first-teamers are senior Ashley Hartwig (Janesville Parker), juniors Nicole New- man (Madison La Follette) and Liz McMahon (Middle- ton) and sophomore Ebo- ny Nettles-Bey (Madison West). Joining Kant and Richard- son on the second team are senior Dani Fugate (Janes- ville Parker) and juniors Alysha Justice (Madison East) and Amelia Grahn (Madison La Follette). The third team includes seniors Kristi Crandall (Janesville Craig), Ali Smith

(Madison La Follette), Katie Villa (Janesville Craig), Bridget Jost (Madison Memorial), Kea Whitting- ton (Beloit Memorial) and sophomore Alison Hughes (Janesville Craig). Finally, the other honor- able mentions joining Hintz and LaCroix are senior Marissa Hoyer (Madison Memorial), juniors Shannon McCauley (Middleton) and Jenna Conom (Sun Prairie) and sophomores Morgan McCulloch (Janesville Park- er) and Shaquita Lee (Madi- son West).

Sports Shorts

Moore wins free-throw contest

Verona’s Madison Moore hit 17 of 25 free throws Satur- day, March 9 to win the Wis- consin Knights of Columbus’

annual state free throw com- petition at Wisconsin Rapids Assumption High School.

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March 21, 2013 The Verona Press 11

Patricia McPartland

Age: 61 Hometown: raised in Pennsylvania, Verona resident for 28 years Address: 6681 Sunset Dr.

Occupation:

resident for 28 years Address: 6681 Sunset Dr. Occupation: Retired special education teacher, current substitute

Retired special education teacher, current substitute teacher Education: bachelor’s of science, West Chester (Pa.) University, certi- fication work at Penn State, master’s degree from UW-Madison Family: Husband, Jerry Mathson, and three children, Kristin, Jenny and Alex Mathson Public office experience: None Community/volunteer experience:

Founding member of Dane County Transition Coalition; advisory board for self-advocacy curriculum at Southwest Wisconsin Technical College; Madison College K-16 partnership committee; tutor and teacher of Sunday school and confirmation through church.

Ken Behnke

Incumbent Age: 64 Hometown: Verona Current address: 912 Cedar Court Occupation: Realtor for over nine years. Retired from U.S. Postal Service management. Education: Graduate of Verona Area High School (valedictorian); bachelor of business administration degree, UW-Madison, 1971 Family: wife, Marsha; adult children are Lauren Behnke and Jessica Callaway. Public office experience: School board member since 1995 (chair of personnel com- mittee and board clerk); former member of Verona Town Board for eight years; former member of Verona Fire District Commission. Community/volunteer experience: Verona Area Education Foundation member; Verona Area Chamber of Commerce member; City of Verona election poll worker; former member of Wisconsin Army National Guard; former church council member and president, Salem United Church of Christ; former Verona Community Betterment member.

former church council member and president, Salem United Church of Christ; former Verona Community Betterment member.

What we asked

What makes you qualified to serve on the school board? What stake do you have in Verona schools?

School budgets are always tight. What should the school board do to ensure schools remain strong despite limited funding?

Besides budgeting, what do you see as another critical issue facing Verona schools, and how would you address it?

Next fall, the district will have four charter schools, and charter school enrollment here has been rising for years. Is that, in your view, a good thing?

Amy Almond

Incumbent, unopposed Age: 43 Hometown: Fitchburg Current address: 2564 Roanoke Cir., Fitchburg Occupation:

Administrative assistant

Education: Bachelor’s degree in busi- ness administration from Central Michigan University Family: Husband Mark, three children ages 17, 15 and 9 Public office experience: 7 years on the school board. Community/volunteer experi- ence: Church volunteer (food pantry, care team, Sunday school, youth events, fun- draising); school volunteer (reading tutor, classroom and library help, special events); PTA (former vice president, volunteer coor- dinator, chair of many committees); Habitat for Humanity, City of Fitchburg (appointed to ad hoc committee); United Way Schools of Hope tutor, Jamestown Neighborhood Association (member, volunteer)

(appointed to ad hoc committee); United Way Schools of Hope tutor, Jamestown Neighborhood Association (member, volunteer)

McPartland

I come to the board with

a unique set of qualifi-

cations. I have lived in the

district for 28 years, and have watched as Verona has grown. My three children attended the Verona schools – Sugar Creek, Savanna Oaks and VAHS – so

I have the perspective of a

parent who is grateful for the excellent educations my chil- dren have received. In my career I have worked with students who struggle academically; I understand the extent of needs these students have. Finally, I have been a teacher and never con- sidered this merely a career, but a passion. I have served on many interagency com- mittees to improve student outcomes for all children. I wrote a book, “Implementing Transition Plans in the IEP;

a Student-Driven Approach to

IDEA Mandates,” that is used

in college education programs.

I have a deep and earnest

commitment to the quality of education for all children in Verona.

I think Verona needs

to set itself apart from

other schools by being rec- ognized as a school district that demands excellence and will not accept mediocrity. The school board can do this by insisting that administration, staff, parents, and community members work collaboratively to solve problems. New poli- cies should address specific issues and be customized by the people implementing the policies. Parents and com- munity members should be encouraged to report how effective policies are. The last two years have been very discouraging for staff, and many are choosing to leave education. Verona needs to recognize and respect staff so that talented educators will choose to come to Verona and veteran staff will choose to continue. A school district is only as good as its staff and the current departure of staff does not bode well for the future of education in the dis- trict.

2

1

3 Another critical issue fac- ing Verona schools is

maintaining the quality of edu-

cation Verona is known for, for all students. Verona is facing

a significant achievement gap between white students and

students of color, students who are economically disad- vantaged and students with

disabilities. In addition, Verona has been identified as a district that over-identifies minority students as needing special education. Verona needs to provide rel- evant and challenging curricu-

lum that will enable students to be prepared for employment, apprenticeships, the military, technical college and tradi- tional colleges. All require that students have proficient basic skills of reading, writing and math. I would insist that students know the requirements of their post high school goals and that they be provided with the means to attain these goals. Students should be encour- aged to choose classes that will prepare them for post high school goals rather than

just amassing the 22.5 credits needed for graduation.

4 Parents and students should have choices in the

type of educational experience that best fits the child. I think the district should be diligent

that the charter schools are attracting students that mir- ror the make-up of the dis- trict. Charter schools should address a need in the district that has been identified by par- ents and the community, but we need to ensure that new charter schools don’t deplete resources from the traditional schools that educate most of Verona’s students. Charter schools should be closely monitored to ensure that stu- dents are reaching academic goals. While Verona has a strong tradition of district charters, I want to be clear that I do not support school vouchers and non-instrumentality char- ter schools that are run inde- pendently of the local school district, and which do drain scarce resources away from the local school district.

Behnke (Incumbent)

1 I have been a board mem- ber since 1995 and have

the knowledge and experience to deal with the complexities of governing our district. As a fifth-generation, lifelong resi- dent of Verona, I understand the values and opinions of our community and its com- mitment to excellent schools.

Everyone actually has a stake in the schools. Excellent schools

How they answered

and student success contrib- ute to the economic, social and cultural well-being of the community and well beyond. For example, I believe that the reputation of our schools helps keep property values strong for everyone. My children were the fourth generation to attend Verona schools. I feel an obli- gation to help assure that our schools become even stronger for the current and future gen- erations. My background and experience particularly suits me for balancing the interests of students, district residents and the school staff.

2 Funding is limited by the Legislature. A referendum

can override tax limits, but we should only request additional taxes as a last resort. The Board needs to: 1,

expect accountability at all lev- els for effective use of funds. Staff, with board oversight, needs to continually determine

if programs and methods are

producing cost-effective out- comes; 2, continue to sup- port and encourage teacher innovation in the classrooms to increase student achieve- ment within budgetary con- straints; 3, accept as many open-enrollment students as possible from other districts without increasing costs. Last

year our district received over $1.7 million for open enroll- ment students; 4, continue to maintain strong reserves and

a high bond rating (Aa2) to

reduce the amount and cost

of short-term borrowing (nec-

essary because of tax and state aid timing), and to avoid borrowing for unanticipated needs; 5, continue to restruc- ture debt from past building projects when possible to decrease interest costs.

3 In my opinion, the most critical issue facing our

schools is the achievement

gap. This is not unique to our schools. We have a wonderful, dedi- cated teaching staff and most

of our students are doing fine.

But too many of our students are not performing as well as

they could. I believe that every child must be successful and that the district can do more

to help these students do the

best they can. Recent board discussions have centered around personalized learning plans that would be developed by teachers with input from parents or other advocates

for the student. The hope is that increased recognition of individuals’ learning styles, interests and passions in these plans will inspire students to succeed. Personalized learning plans could help students at all levels of achievement. This is not a quick fix and would require a long-term district commitment.

4 Rising enrollment in our charter schools demon-

strates that some parents want programming choice for their

children. I think offering choic- es to parents and students is

a good thing as long as we

can do it within our budgetary constraints. In some cases, parents may feel that they can satisfy their children’s needs better by matching their learning style with a charter school program. I think that offer- ing these choices persuades some families to move to our

school district. Besides being

careful of the financial impact, we need to keep an eye on the enrollment. The school board requires charter schools to have an enrollment that matches approximately the percentage

of students from lower-income

households in the entire dis- trict. I am not in favor of the state diverting public school funds to voucher programs or charter schools operating outside the jurisdiction of the

public schools.

Almond (incumbent, uncontested)

1 I have served on the board for a number of

years now. I have a great

stake in Verona Area schools.

I have three children – one in elementary and two in high

school. I am also committed to performing responsibly while serving my community on the board. What I do today will impact all of our community.

I have always been interested and concerned about edu-

and

cation for all students

teachers, too. Education is the key to success. The better job we do educating our youth the stronger our community will be.

2 We have four primary things to be mindful of:

students, staff, facilities and taxpayers. Balancing all those needs is never easy. I hope we will be able to

remove some current barri-

ers to give us more flexibility

in how education is delivered.

Innovations and technology are ways I think we can get creative in removing barriers. There are opportunities net- working with the community

that we can utilize to help stu- dents continue to learn and grow in and out of school. We can be deliberate with repairs

to buildings that also improve

energy efficiency. We can cre- ate flexible learning spaces that can be changed and modi- fied for multiple uses.

3 I don’t believe in 50 years we will be teaching as we

are today. I think we will have

to change the way we deliver

education. Holding on to tra-

ditional models will leave us behind.

I often wonder what edu-

cation will look like. I think there are great models out there to explore. We must key into programming that has been proven to not only be

a great program but that is

complementary to the skill set

of our staff and values of the

community. There are many great programs and we have talented staff and supportive

community, but if they do not complement each other, the results will not materialize. I don’t have all the answers today, but I am happy and excited to explore all options.

4 I believe our common schools are amazing, cre-

ative and supportive environ- ments for most students.

I don’t believe one way of

delivering education is better than another. I have three chil- dren, and they all learn differ- ently. Students have varying

degrees of investment in their education. Engaged students

perform better. Charters are optional programs that give families a choice, especially if their child is struggling. I am excited about the high school project-based learn- ing program. This program evolved from challenges that some students were having in the traditional high school set-

ting. Our staff recognized the need and has been visiting a variety of schools, researching options and expanding their knowledge to meet the needs of the students. The result is the Exploration Academy. Charter or common school, the thing that matters most

to me is giving the children the tools they need to become invested, engaged and pas- sionate about their future.

Legals

STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO

CREDITORS (INFORMAL ADMINISTRATION) IN THE

MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN M. BECkER

Case No. 13PR162

PLEASE TAkE NOTICE:

1. An application for Informal Admin-

istration was filed.

2. The decedent, with date of birth

October 20, 1930 and date of death Feb- ruary 10, 2013, was domiciled in Dane County, State of Wisconsin, with a mail-

ing address of 119 N. Main Street, Verona, WI 53593.

3. All interested persons waived no-

tice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim

against the decedent’s estate is June 14,

2013.

5. A claim may be filed at the Dane County Courthouse, Madison, Wiscon- sin, Room 1005

Lisa Chandler Probate Registrar March 11, 2013

Atty. Marilyn A. Dreger 200 W. Verona Avenue

Verona, WI 53593

608-845-9899

Bar Number: 1001608

Published: March 21, 28 and April 4,

2013

WNAXLP

* * *

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12

March 21, 2013 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Legals

VERONA AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD Of EDuCATION MEETINg MINuTES DECEMBER 3, 2012

The Verona Area Board of Educa- tion met on Monday, December 3, 2012 in the District Administration Building. Board President Dennis Beres called the meeting to order at 7: 05 p.m. Clerk Ken Behnke confirmed the meeting was properly noticed. Present: Dennis Beres, Joanne gauthier, Renee Zook, John McCulley, Ken Behnke, Jeannie Porter, and Amy Almond (joined at 8:11). Student Council Presentation – Karen Wong and Abbie Home attended to talk about the many activities going on at the high school. They reported that this is the last week of the food drive and they are coming in under their goal of 30,000 pounds. They are currently at 16,000 pounds. Junior Career Days were held on November 27th, 28th, and 29th. Students interview with someone from a career that they were interested in. They had 363 career matches this year. In ad- dition, student council is focusing a lot on community service this year. In Janu- ary and February, students will be mak- ing meals for the families at Ronald Mc- Donald House. Some students have also signed up to shovel snow for several families. They are also working with St. Mary’s Nursing Home to decorate their beauty salon and make holiday crafts. Student council is working with other area food pantries to stock shelves as well. The girls reported that FFA is hav-

ing their annual toy collection again this year. They encouraged everyone to do- nate to the toy drive. Another idea stu- dent council has is “Calling the Elves”. Students would “take over” the office and answer calls from children to see what they want for Christmas. The Mul- ticultural Showcase tryouts will be held

in the next couple of weeks. The show is

in february. They also reported that Mr. Becker, and the art department, is hav- ing a ceramics sale. The sale started on 30th and goes until winter break during school hours. A group of students are attending the CESA 1 youth advisory council next week in Pewaukee. They will be meeting with kids around the CESA 1 area and learning about ways to personalize learning. The Model uN

team will be going to Chicago this week- end for a conference and the yearbook members recently took a trip to Chicago. Audience portion – there was no one present to speak to the Board. Announcements – Dean thanked the community members who partici- pated in the Junior Career Days. Joanne announced that The Best Christmas Pageant Ever presented by the Verona Area Community Theatre was amazing. Dean noted that Board members should have received an email invite from Kaleem Caire to attend the Educate

to Elevate conference this week. There

is an educational forum at the Alliant Center on Thursday from 2:00 – 3:00 and then an educational summit on friday at the Monona Terrace from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. John McCulley indicated he is planning to attend. BOARD BuSINESS Consider approval of minutes – Mo- tion (Zook) second (Porter) to approve the minutes from the November 5, 2012 Board meeting with several changes under the Exploration Academy report:

Students are allowed to take up to two traditional courses (add per semester) and change Explore to Exploration. Mo- tion carried (6-0). first reading of proposed changes to Board policy 447, Seclusion and Restraint - Erin Schettler attended to walk through the changes to the exist- ing policy and walk through the newly developed Board Rule. The need for these changes and the new rule are due to legislative changes that specify rules school districts must follow. Erin re- viewed the policy and rule and indicated

that we have a very small incident rate or seclusion or restraint at Verona. This is the first reading so there was no action. Consider action on 66:0301 agree- ment with MMSD on School to Career / Youth Apprenticeship program – Dean noted that the district has been par- ticipating in this for a number of years though we have never had a high num- ber of students participating. This year we have a total of five students for a cost of around $6000. Motion (gauthier) second (Zook) to approve the 66:0301 agreement with MMSD on School to Career / Youth Apprenticeship program. Motion carried (6-0). Consider action on updated con- tract language with PreK providers - Donna Behn explained that they are getting geared up for the 2013-14 Pre-K program and want to send out the Model

III agreement. Directors have been work-

ing throughout the year and have made

a few suggestions. Jon Anderson also

reviewed and made some suggestions. Donna reviewed the changes with the Board. There is language that needs to be clarified so the vote was tabled to the next meeting. Review of 2013 - 2014 District Cal- endar – Dean reviewed the draft 2013-14 District Calendar that was included in the Board packet. He noted that spring break was moved to the third week of March as Easter is late in 2014. June 11 would be the last day for students. Dean indicated that a copy was sent to the unions but they have not had a chance to discuss. The Board asked for an up- date on the graduation date. Discussion of innovation grants - The Board is interested in sponsoring innovation grants again this year. Re- nee, John, and Joanne will work on the committee with Dean. Review of enrollment projections

for 2013 – 2014 – A draft district enroll- ment summary from Applied Population Lab was included in the Board packet. There are four different models that project enrollment: Baseline, five Year Trend, Two Year Trend and Kindergar- ten Trend. Dean reported that the four different projections are much closer than they have been in the past. Based on the projections, we are estimating an increase of between 50 and 60 students (K – 12) for next year. The Board asked the Bg&T committee to take a look at the capacity study to see what it would look like with an increase of students at each site. Review of potential changes to VAHS daily schedule – Brian Boehm at- tended to talk about a potential change to the high school daily schedule. A com- mittee is exploring alternative schedules similar to what Middleton and Monona Grove have moved to which is a block schedule. Having less passing time would allow staff more collaborative time for staff and possible construction of an all school resource (targeted study hall where students get specific help). This would not change start or end time for the school day. The committee will be visiting Middleton and Monona grove

to review their schedules. There will also

be a point where they put together par- ent forums for input. There is potential

for a move for the next school year but it

is more likely this would be for the 2014-

15 school year. SuPERINTENDENT’S REPORT update on global Academy – Dean reported that there are 26 kids enrolled in the Principals of Biomed Science, which is taught on site by Terry Tess- man. There are 22 kids enrolled in the Engineering strand, which is taught by Rick Boehm here at Verona. There are two students enrolled in Medical Inter- ventions, which are taught at Middleton. Dean announced that it looks like Terry Tessman will no longer be teaching at our site possibly as soon as the conclu- sion of the 1st semester. She is full time at Middleton and it is getting to be too much for her to do in terms of timing.

The district will likely fill that teaching assignment with one of our staff. We need to be sure it doesn’t impact our students’ ability to receive college credit for taking the course if not taught by

a teacher certified in Project Lead the

Way. Dean indicated that they are hav- ing conversations about what criteria is needed to be certified in the Engineer- ing strand. We currently do not have a 66:03 with Middleton until we work out the situation with Terry for this year. In addition, we are still trying to pin down the 66:03 Agreement with Madison from last year. Districts included in the global Academy include Madison, Verona, Mid- dleton and Belleville. update on Exploration Academy – Dean informed the Board that they had initially planned to have the first reading of the contract tonight but are not at a point to do that yet. They are collecting data from University / College Regis- trars to see where there might be issues for students getting into colleges after graduating from the Academy. Reminder of Bill Daggett visit on December 12th – Dean reminded the Board of the Daggett presentation De- cember 12th from 4:00 until 7:00 in the

PAC. Update on interviews with Wipfli – Dean reported that the interviews were

completed last week. They did a total of

38 interviews. Wipfli will provide a writ- ten summary and then a Board presen- tation to go over the results. The intent is to have this information prior to the Daggett presentation if possible. PERSONNEL ITEMS There were no personnel items. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS/MEETING DATES As listed on the agenda. COMMITTEE REPORTS Building grounds and Transporta- tion Committee – Has not met but will be meeting this week. finance Committee – Has not met. Personnel Committee – Has not

met. Adjourn to closed session – Motion (Porter) second (Almond) to adjourn to closed session at 8:55 p.m. under WI Statute 19.85 (1) (c) and (e) for the purpose of discussion of a possible response to proposal from the Verona Area Education Association (VAEA) and the Verona Educational Support Person-

nel Association (VESPA) to enter in to a

Comprehensive Memorandum of Agree- ment to Amend the 2012 - 2013 Collec- tive Bargaining Agreement. Roll call vote: McCulley-yes; Zook-yes; Beres- yes; Behnke-yes; gauthier-yes; Porter- yes; Almond-yes. Motion carried (7-0). Adjourn – Motion (Porter) second (Zook) at 9:20 p.m. Motion carried (7-0). Published: March 21, 2013 WNAXLP

* * *

VERONA AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD Of EDuCATION MEETINg MINuTES DECEMBER 17, 2012

The Verona Area Board of Educa- tion met on Monday, December 17, 2012 in the District Administration Building. Board President Dennis Beres called the meeting to order at 7: 05 p.m. Dep- uty Clerk Jeannie Porter confirmed the meeting was properly noticed. Present: Dennis Beres, Joanne gauthier, Renee Zook, John McCulley, Jeannie Porter, Amy Almond and Ken Behnke (joined at 7:40). Moment of Silence – Denny Beres asked for a moment of silence in honor of the victims of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut.

Student Recognition – glacier Edge

– Students from Glacier Edge were rec-

ognized at the Board meeting. Cassan- dra Stone, Sophie Petta, Karla Paredes, gustavo Mendoza-Coria, Alyssa Spen- cer, Leslie Tlahuel, Jorge Soto-Aleman, Ella Chorlton, and Hunter Krueger re- ceived certificates of achievement. Audience portion – Denny read comment cards from Paul Driftmier, Cathy Driftmier, Sharon White, Kurt Pat- rick, Kate Sebastian, Teresa Hall, and Mackenzie Hall expressing support for

the Exploration Academy. Denny indi-

cated he also received emails in support

of the Exploration Academy as well.

Announcements – Amy gave a special thank you to the Country View SPARK group and Mr. Yurs for inviting Chief Justice Abrahamson to Country View. Amy overheard her saying she was impressed the students knew so much about government. It was a won- derful experience. Amy announced that she will be running for re-election to the School Board. BOARD BuSINESS Consider approval of minutes –

Motion (gauthier) second (Zook) to ap- prove the minutes from the December

3, 2012 Board meeting with one change;

add vote count to the Board minutes ap- proval. Motion carried (6-0) Review of extended day / extended year initiatives at glacier Edge, Sugar Creek and Badger Ridge - David Jennings, Todd Brunner, Lindsey Snow, Theresa Taylor, and Jenny Schultz attended the meeting to

talk about some of the steps being taken

at those sites related to their identifica-

tion as focus schools. Each of the sites has started an extended day program for targeted students. The focus of the extended time is math instruction and DreamBox, an online math program will be used in support. In addition, Jenny Schultz is doing homework club at Na- koma Heights. She currently has 43 students participating in three different programs. All three sites have transpor- tation through first Student. In addition, they have had discussions with the Boys and Girls Club to partner with them to provide educational coordinators for tutoring and activities after school. They hope to start the end of January. The sites have started looking at ideas for summer school activities as well which could include DreamBox. First Review of Proposed Explora- tion Academy Charter School Contract – Mike Murphy, Sheila Stenseth, Chad Welty and Alexa Butzbaugh attended to talk to the Board about the Exploration Academy. The Board and design team discussed the terms of the contract and the educational program. The Board had

voiced concerns at a previous meeting

about college admission with a non-tra-

ditional grading structure. Mike talked with area colleges and overall, admis- sion directors felt this would not cre-

ate a disadvantage to students coming to their institution. The Board also had questions about students in the current VIP program and if they would be grand- fathered into the charter school. The Board would like staff to be able to in-

vite a student into the school if the need arises. There were some minor language changes in the contract. The Exploration Academy contract will be on the January 7th Board meeting agenda. Consider action on Board policy

and rule 447, Seclusion and Restraint

– Motion (Zook) second (Porter) to ap-

prove Board Policy and Rule 447, Seclu- sion and Restraint. Motion carried (7-0). Consider action on the 2013-2014 school calendar – Motion (gauthier) second (Almond) to move spring break to the week of March 24 – 28th in com- pliance with other school districts. Mo- tion failed (1-6). Motion (Porter) second (Zook) to approve the 2013-2014 school

calendar as written. Motion carried (6-1). Consider action on updated con-

tract language with PreK providers

– Motion (McCulley) second (Zook) to

approve the PreK contract with the up- dated wording under Restrictions on Ad- vertising and Promotion. Motion carried (7-0). Donna Behn indicated that they have scheduled the first parent infor- mation meeting for January 23rd in the PAC, 4:30-5:30 and 6:30-7:30. They will also be scheduling a meeting at Head Start. SuPERINTENDENT’S REPORT WASB resolutions – Dean reported that the resolutions were sent out elec- tronically. The resolutions will be dis- cussed at the next Board meeting. WASB Convention – Dean gave one last reminder to let Carmen know if any Board members would like to attend the WASB Convention. Update on interviews with Wipfli – Dean reported that we do not have a report yet. Wipfli representatives are planning to come to the first meeting in January for a face-to-face report. The goal is to have a written report prior to

that. PERSONNEL ITEMS Consider approval of early retire- ment – Motion (gauthier) second (Zook) to approve the request for early retire- ment for Michael Cahill, and Hollis Di- onne. Motion carried (7-0). Consider approval of release from contract – Motion (Zook) second (Al- mond) to approve the request for re- lease from contract for Estela Ohlrogge and Jill Binon. Motion carried (7-0). FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS/MEETING DATES As listed on the agenda. COMMITTEE REPORTS Building grounds and Transporta- tion Committee – Amy reported that the committee met on December 6th. They discussed a partnership with the Boys and girls Club for after school program- ming. They talked about dedicating some space for after school programs and identified a few rooms for that could be used. They would like to arrange the space so students feel like they are tran- sitioning to a Boys and girls Club room. The district would cover cost to remod- el. The Boys and Girls Club would pro- vide staff and programming. This would be by invitation only (to students) to see how it goes. They would use late buses and or a Boys and girls Club van for transportation. The committee also talk- ed about sitting down with the Finance Committee to talk about the Vandewalle growth study, the Plunkett capacity study, enrollment projections and the H&H study to discuss options for plan- ning these out strategically to see what can overlap for efficiency. There was also a discussion on purchasing a new service vehicle to replace a van. There was a brief update on bussing. Lastly, Ken Kietzke built three ticket booths by the stadium that turned out very nice. finance Committee – Renee re- ported that the committee met this eve- ning at 6:00. They received a refinancing update. They asked PMA to run more data for this month and come back in January. The district could save more by waiting if the rates continue to decline. The committee reviewed the annual au- dit report. Our audits were unqualified which means there were no significant findings. One finding that does come up each year is about having more qualified staff for internal reporting. The answer to that is that we do not have the finan- cial resources to hire that position but

the district does have internal process-

es/manager review of reports in place. Renee noted that the H&H energy audit results are in. The finance committee would like to look at specific project in- formation and cost saving potential in a joint meeting with the BG&T Committee. Motion (Zook) second (McCulley) to approve payment of bills in the amount of $3,556,425.77. Motion carried (7-0). Personnel Committee – Has not

met. Adjourn – Motion (Almond) second (Zook) at 9:55 p.m. Motion carried (7-0).

The Board did not go into closed ses-

sion as indicated on the agenda. Published: March 21, 2013 WNAXLP

* * *

VERONA AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD Of EDuCATION MEETINg MINuTES JANuARY 7, 2013

The Verona Area Board of Educa- tion met on Monday, January 7, 2013 in the District Administration Building. Board President Dennis Beres called

the meeting to order at 7: 10 p.m. Clerk Ken Behnke confirmed the meeting was properly noticed. Present: Dennis Beres, Joanne gauthier, Renee Zook, John McCulley, Jeannie Porter, Amy Almond and Ken Behnke. Recognition of Adult School Cross- ing guards – Dean announced that January 14 - 18th is adult school cross-

ing guard recognition week. The school crossing guards were invited to the Board meeting. Representing the cross- ing guards were Kristin Gavigan and Bob Zuege. Dean thanked them and all of the crossing guards for the work they do to keep our students safe. Kristin in- dicated that this is her 10th year serv- ing as a crossing guard. She asked that the bus drivers slow down. Bob noted that this is his first year. He noted that it is pretty exciting and also asked driv- ers to go slow. Dean read the names of the crossing guards that were not in at- tendance: Steve Berry, frederick fore- man, Barbara Meuer, John Braun, Lau- rie Tackett, Sam Nowland, Clint Dahlk, Kimberly Lewis, Donald Kazda, Larry Krueger, Ken Anderson, James Meuer, Sue Dahlk, Ronda Bambrough, gretch- en Cropp, Jean Raspel, Eleanor John- son, Mary Lou Black and Mary Hudson. Recognition of National Mentoring Month - Jen Murphy and Teresa Voss at- tended to talk about National Mentoring Month. January was declared National Mentoring Month a few years ago. Some districts are making it more known. Jen distributed a draft letter to mentors and the Board agreed sending the letter was

a great idea and thanked Jen for the sug- gestion. Student Council Presentation

– Karen Wong presented a student

council update. She indicated that they are extending their reach to the middle school. They have a few students going

to Savanna Oaks student council tomor-

row to talk about what they are doing at the high school and the “I Won’t Stand for…” campaign and to make students aware of how student council at the high school works. They hope to get more freshman involvement next year. Student council had a candy-gram sale before Christmas break which due to the

snow days, were delivered to students a

little late. They also had students volun- teer to shovel snow at 4-5 homes after the snowfall. Student council is start- ing to plan for the Polar Plunge which is february 9th. Mr. Zimmerman and Mr. Dow will be organizing this year. The money raised goes to the Special Olympics. Each participant in the team needs to raise $75 dollars for an entry fee. Overall, VASD raised $14,405 last year. This year they would like to break

the 2010 record of 225 plungers. Karen

announced that Intramural Basketball

starts next week. She also reported that the Science Olympiad Team attended a meet on December 15 where they partic- ipate in different science related events. The team took 5th place. The next meet

is february 2nd and again on february

16th in Milwaukee. Lastly, Mr. Knoll and his government and Policies classes are running a mock election. The elec- tion is next Tuesday before the semester ends. Audience portion – Denny read a comment card from Kate Sebastian in- dicating her support for the high school Exploration Academy. Announcements – Denny an- nounced that Amy and Ken filed their nomination papers for the School Board election. Ken has a challenger; Pat McPartland. Amy is running unopposed. BOARD BuSINESS Consider approval of minutes – Mo- tion (Zook) second (gauthier) to approve the minutes from the December 17, 2012 Board meeting. Motion carried (7-0) Review of field trip to Chicago for Model uN - Jason Knoll and three of his students attended to talk about the field

trip to Model uN. The trip is set for feb- ruary 7th through the 10th in Chicago.

It is on a volunteer basis for Mr. Knoll

and for his students. The trip is costly

at close to $400 per student. They do

some fundraising to help cover the cost. Students have about two months to pre- pare. They meet Thursday and friday morning at 7:15 a.m. for an hour. The students all indicated they felt Model uN challenges them more than any other

activity and indicated that there is noth- ing that prepares you for the real world like the Model uN. They learn all of the skills needed in social sciences; critical reading skills, writing skills, debating skills, public speaking skills. They feel it’s important to keep this going and that

as many students as possible have this

opportunity. Consider action on contract for the Exploration Academy – Mike Murphy, Sheila Stenseth, Chad Welty and Alexa Butzbaugh attended to talk about up- dates to the Exploration Academy con-

tract. The first was transportation. They indicated that this will be coordinated based on the individual student needs similar to how it is done with the VIP students currently. It will not cost the district additional money. The second item was about the current VIP students. They indicated that current VIP students would be grandfathered in to the Ex- ploration Academy (if they want to be). Mike distributed a flow chart showing current practices in meeting the needs

of students at the high school. He indi-

cated that students who might fit in the VIP program have many additional op- tions and resources. The last item was

about transferring credits. If a student is transferring in, they will recognize their transcripts. They will give them initial credits for classes previously taken and use diagnostic tests to determine where they still need work. For students trans- ferring out, we will provide Carnegie unit conversion suggestions. The Board had

a question about future students not

getting in because of the lottery. The plan is that if a student is not able to

get in the first wave, they will continue

to move kids in as they are able to. The

contract allows for a lot of fluidity with the high school staff and they will ex- pand to the needs of the kids. The Board also questioned if the contract language

is strong enough if the current adminis-

trative staff changes, that the relation- ship continues to exist. Dean indicated that they feel it is. Motion (Almond) second (Behnke)

to approve the contract for the Explora-

tion Academy. Motion carried (6-1). first reading of proposed changes to Board Rule 460 - Student Awards and Scholarships - Tabled until next meet- ing. We will have staff attend to explain. Discussion of WASB resolutions - Denny indicated that each year we get a packet that has the adopted resolutions from the previous year and the propos-

als for the current year. Traditionally, our Board has given the latitude to support

or not support the resolutions based on

who attends the conference and their interpretations. Renee is the WASB del- egate this year. Renee asked the Board to provide her feedback on each of the proposed resolutions to give her a sense of the Board. SuPERINTENDENT’S REPORT update on innovation grants – Dean indicated that the Innovation grant deadline is this friday. There have been six or seven submitted so far but he anticipates many more. Following the deadline, Dean will meet with the sub- committee to review. update on global Academy – Dean reported that we were finally able to settle with MMSD on the bill from last year. The bill was at $25,800 which was close to what was budgeted last year. This resulted in about $1000 per student to take the classes. This year we have Terry Tessman in our classroom teach- ing. She will be concluding her service with us the end of this semester and one of our teachers will be taking over. They will go through training for certification over the summer. PERSONNEL ITEMS Consider approval of teaching con- tract – Motion (Behnke) second (gauth- ier) to approve the teaching contract for Katherine Schmitt. Motion carried (7-0). Consider authorization of Prelimi- nary Notice Of Non-Renewal Of Adminis- trative Contract – Motion (Behnke) sec- ond (Zook) to approve the authorization of “Preliminary Notice Of Non-Renewal Of Administrative Contract” for those administrators hired for one-year posi- tions. Motion carried (7-0). FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS/MEETING DATES Denny noted that he will be attend- ing the IDAC committee meeting on Monday morning. If anyone has any in- put, let him know. COMMITTEE REPORTS Building grounds and Transporta- tion Committee – Has not met finance Committee – Has not met. They will meet on the 21st. Personnel Committee – Has not

met. Adjourn – Motion (Zook) second

(Porter) at 8:20 p.m. to adjourn to closed

session under WI Statute 19.85 (1) (c)

and (e) for the purpose of discussing:

1. The terms of the superintendent’s employment contract and establishing

negotiation parameters related thereto. 2. Consideration of employment and em- ployment terms of three specific individ- ual administrative employees. Roll Call Vote: Almond-yes; Porter-yes; Behnke- yes; Beres-yes; gauthier-yes; Zook-yes; McCulley-yes. Motion carried (7-0). Motion (Porter) second (Almond) to go back into open session at 9:32 p.m. Motion carried (7-0). Consider action on modification to administrative contract language - Mo- tion (Behnke) second (gauthier) to ap- prove the modification to administrative contract language allowing the Board of Education to unilaterally reopen said contracts where the provision of any of the benefits required contained within may reasonably subject the District to

an excise tax, penalty, fine or any ad-

ditional financial obligation of any kind

as imposed by local, state and/or federal

law, rule or regulation. Motion carried

(7-0).

Adjourn – Motion (gauthier) second (Zook) to adjourn at 9:34 p.m. Motion carried (7-0). Published: March 21, 2013

WNAXLP

* * *

VERONA AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD Of EDuCATION MEETINg MINuTES JANuARY 21, 2013

The Verona Area Board of Educa- tion met on Monday, January 21, 2013

in the District Administration Building. Board President Dennis Beres called the meeting to order at 7:05 p.m. Clerk Ken Behnke confirmed the meeting was properly noticed. Present: John McCulley, Jeannie Porter, Joanne gauthier, Renee Zook, Dennis Beres, Ken Behnke, Amy Al- mond. Student Recognition – Students from Core Knowledge Charter School were recognized by the Board. Stu- dents receiving certificates included:

Levi Walmer, grace Thiesenhusen, Erik Ehlenback, Cat grimm, Aariya gopal,

Wesley Briquelet, Nathan Elias, Zach Waddell, Adam Murphy and Deja’na Davis. Audience Portion – There was no one present to speak to the Board. BOARD BuSINESS Consider approval of minutes – Mo- tion (gauthier) second (Beres) to ap- prove the minutes from the January 7, 2013 Board Meeting. Motion carried (7- 0). Motion (gauthier) second (Zook) to approve the minutes from the January

7, 2013 Board / Admin Retreat. Motion

carried (7-0).

Presentation of PIE (Partners in Ed-

ucation) partnership with UW Whitewa- ter – Pam Hammen introduced Jodi gal- van from UW Whitewater. She explained the process whereby students can earn college credit for certain courses taken that are approved as a PIE quali- fied course and taught by an approved instructor. Courses are offered to high school students at half the price they would pay as a college student. This program encourages career and college readiness. It also keeps students chal- lenged and helps lower the cost of quali- fied courses for parents. It prepares stu- dents for college in teaching them what will be expected. Presentation of extended day part- nership with the Boys and Girls Club –

Nathan Beck and John Suggs from the Boys and girls Club explained to the Board what they are hoping to achieve in partnership with the Verona Area School

District. They are currently offering after school programs at both Stoner Prairie and the High School. The Boys and girls Club would like to offer after school services at both Savanna Oaks and Badger Ridge/Core Knowledge. They propose an afterschool program run at the middle schools. This program would

include providing mentors, tutors with

homework, and gym activities. There will also be field trips and speakers that are relevant to upcoming school cur-

riculum. All activities would be coordi- nated with Administrators of the school. Amy Almond asked about background checks for their volunteers. John Suggs assured her that the background checks

performed by the Boys and girls Club are very thorough. They check both state and federal information. There is

a lengthy background and interview

process before anyone can volunteer.

They are anticipating having some pro- gramming this spring with the majority of their programming starting this fall. John Suggs explained that as far as

the cost to the district goes, if would be offset through donations. Dean gorrell stated that the Club are “Rock Stars” to work with. Pam Hammen also said they are great to work with. Update from Core Knowledge on curriculum audit – Brett Stousland spoke to the Board regarding the prog-

ress of the committee deciding whether

to go through with the audit in order to

maintain their Core Knowledge Char- ter School accreditation or to not go through the audit process. If not done the school name would need to be

changed. The cost of the audit, over the 3-4 years it would take, would be ap- proximately $12,000.00. Brett will con- tinue to keep the Board informed. update from high school on schedule planning – Pam Hammen and Brian Boehm presented informa- tion to the Board on plans to change the high school schedule for next year. Brian stated that they have narrowed the schedule down from 4 to the 1 they believe they would incorporate. It would

be an A-B day, block schedule with the

8th hour on one of those days teachers would be available to students and there would be other offerings for students as well. Denny asked if there could be an app that students could use to person- alize their schedule on their electronic

device. Pam and or Brian will check with Rita Mortenson. first Reading on proposed changes

to Board Rule 460 – Student Awards and

Scholarships – Carrie Hale was present to discuss the scholarship committee’s proposed change to the process of how

to break a tie. The old process was very

confusing and lent itself to human er- ror. The new process would be 1)ACT scores, 2)number of credits, 3)draw the name out of a hat. This will be brought back for the second reading at the next Board meeting. SuPERINTENDENT’S REPORT update on global Academy – Dean provided a brief update on the global Academy. Angie Midthun-Hensen is now teaching the project lead the way bio- medical class at the high school. update on Summer School –Dean indicated we are proposing to hold sum- mer school at the fitchburg campus as both buildings have A/C (partial at SP). We will have more information in about a month. 4th Annual Hearts for Helping Event on february 22nd – Boys and girls Club

– Dean discussed the Hearts for Help-

ing event with the Board. It is a Wine and Cheese Tasting event, held febru- ary 22nd at the Concourse Hotel. Board members have attending in the past and

felt it was a very worthwhile event that helps the Boys and girls Club offer ser- vices to local students. PERSONNEL ITEMS Consider teaching contracts for – Motion (Behnke) second (gauthier to approve the teaching contracts for Mar- garet Kryka and Capri Thongnuam. Mo- tion carried (7-0). FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS / MEET- INg DATES

As listed.

COMMITTEE REPORTS Building, grounds and Transporta- tion Committee – Amy Almond reported about the numerous security updates being made at various schools. She stated that these plans had been in the works and are just now underway. They are considering electronic interior locks where allowed by current configura-

tion, so various doors within the build- ing could be locked down electronically

when needed, to limit access to other areas. The card entry system would be very advantageous when issuing ac- cess to outside individuals. There will be cameras and a “buzz in” process at entrances where there is no line of site from the office to the main entrance. finance Committee – Renee Zook reported that she and John met with Chris Murphy prior to the start of this meeting. Chris is still waiting on the debt limit from the State. Motion (Zook) second (McCulley) to approve the bill payments of $4,238,621.08. Motion car- ried (7-0). Personnel Committee – Ken Behn- ke reported that the Superintendent’s contract will be discussed in closed session tonight. Also discussed at the committee meeting was the different ed- ucator effectiveness models. There are two models for this rating system being worked on, one by the DPI and one by CESA 6. A decision will need to be made by September of this year, as to which model we will use. (More information on this will be coming out in the next few weeks). IDAC Committee – Dennis Beres gave an update from the IDAC Com- mittee. Verona reported that there were 64 new single homes built for the 2012 year. They anticipate 60 for 2013. Scenic Ridge will be in the Parade of Homes this year. There are still 200 lots available between Scenic Ridge and Cathedral Point subdivisions. The Bruce Street

TIF will likely close in the next year. It is unknown if there will a balance to dis- tribute. A committee is being formed for a downtown TIF study. The new brewery has its approvals and is almost done. EPIC is promoting a plan to buy numer- ous lots in the Meister addition and to seal off the edge of their campus by re- locating Northern Lights Drive. There is

a TIf committee being formed regarding

the Arrowhead TIF (NE quadrant of PD & Verona Rd.) We would need a represen- tative to this committee. Our representa- tive would be Renee Zook. ADJOuRN – Motion (Zook) second (Behnke) to adjourn to closed session at 9:35 p.m. for the purpose of: A. Pre- liminary consideration of issues cre- ated by the Affordable Care Act relative to contract compliance and available options/alternatives concerning the provision of post retirement benefits to certain employees currently eligible for same as authorized by Section 19.85 (1) (c), (e) and (f). Wis. Stats., B. Seeking Board guidance and direction concern- ing the terms, and the strategies to be employed in negotiating the terms, of a new initiative for students as authorized by Section 19.85 (1) (e) Wis. Stats. C. Discussing the terms of the superinten- dent’s employment contract and estab- lishing negotiation parameters related thereto as authorized by section 19.85 (1) (c) and (e) Wis. Stats. Roll call vote. McCulley-yes; Zook-yes; gauthier-yes; Beres-yes; Behnke-yes; Porter-yes; Almond-yes. Motion carried (7-0). Published: March 21, 2013 WNAXLP

* * *

TOWN Of VERONA BOARD PuBLIC HEARINg

NOTICE IS gIVEN that a public hearing will be held at the Town of Ve- rona Hall, 335 N. Nine Mound Rd. on

Tuesday, April 16 beginning at 7:00 p.m. The following matters will be heard:

Amendment of the future land use plan changing the land use designation of 2778 Prairie Circle and removing the neighborhood plan designation from the

surrounding area. The change would in- volve changing 40.28 acres from a Rural Residential designation to an Agricul- ture designation. Interested persons may submit comments in writing on the amend- ment during the 30 day comment period. These comments should be mailed to the Town of Verona, 335 N. Nine Mound Road, Verona, WI 53593. Oral comments will be heard during the public hearing on April 16th and written comments will be read aloud and entered into the record. Members of the Town Board will consider possible action upon conclu-

sion of the public hearing at the Town Board meeting immediately following. A recommendation to the County of Dane by the Town Board will follow.

A draft future land use map can

be viewed at the Town Hall offices or at www.town.verona.wi.us . Contact Amanda Arnold, Planner/Administrator at aarnold@town.verona.wi.us or 608- 845-7187 for more information.

If an interpreter, materials in al-

ternate formats, or other accommoda- tions are needed to access this meet- ing, please contact the Town Hall at the number above. Please do so at least 48 hours prior to the meeting so that proper arrangements can be made.

Published: March 21, 2013 WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE ELECTORS Of THE CITY & TOWN Of VERONA

Notice is hereby given that the Pub-

lic Test of the Automatic Tabulating and

Electronic Voting Equipment to be used for the APRIL 2, 2013 Spring Election in the City and Town of Verona will be

conducted on Thursday, March 28, 2013

@ 10:30 A.M. at the respective municipal buildings. This test is open to the general public.

Kami Lynch City of Verona 111 Lincoln Street Verona, WI 53593

608-845-6495

John Wright Town of Verona 335 N Nine Mound Road Verona, WI 53593

608-845-7187

Published: March 21, 2013 WNAXLP

* * *

March 21, 2013 - The Verona Press - 13

Ask the Verona
Ask the Verona
Matt Gerlach Financial Advisor INVESTMENTS Q. It’s time for spring cleaning. This year, why not

Matt Gerlach

Financial Advisor

INVESTMENTS

Q. It’s time for spring cleaning. This year, why not go beyond your house and yard and “spruce up” your financial situation?

A. For starters, clean your portfolio of “clutter” — those investments that no longer meet your needs. You also might want to consolidate all your investments in one place. This could help you reduce fees and expenses. Even more importantly, it might make it easier for you to follow

a central, unified investment strategy. And, just as your spring cleaning may include checking

gutters for leaks and sidewalks for cracks, you’ll want to help protect your financial foundation by ensuring that you have adequate life and disability insurance. Finally, some of your spring cleaning jobs, such as deep cleaning a carpet, may require professional assistance. Similarly,

handling some of the more complex investment tasks, such as creating and maintaining a suitable portfolio, might require you to work with an investment professional. These spring cleaning tips may help put some sparkle and shine into your financial “house.”

This article was written by Edward Jones for the use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

for the use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Matthew Gerlach, AAMS ® 1053 N.

Matthew Gerlach, AAMS ®

1053 N. Edge Trail • Verona, WI 53593 (608) 848-8801 • Member SIPC matt.gerlach@edwardjones.com

ATTORNEYS

Q. How can I help my teen utilize safe driving practices involving drinking and driving?

A. Parents and teens should have a “Teen Driving Contract,” a written agreement between parents

and teens outlining specific rules regarding safe driving practices. This contract explicitly states expectations and binding terms that, if broken, result in the teen forfeiting driving privileges for a period of time (determined by parent)—in addition to penalties imposed by any tickets. Since we can’t predict every situation, agree on a “Leave the Car/No Questions Asked” rule. Through this

clause, your teen agrees to call you if they’ve been drinking or need to get out of a bad situation. As

a parent, you agree: your teen can leave the car and call you – or another adult – to pick them up. But you agree no questions asked. This encourages your teen to make the right decisions – i.e. to not

drive. Respect your teen for making the right decision. Print a sample Teen Driving Contract online at www.axley.com/john-walsh. Sit down with your teen in a nonthreatening environment and have an honest conversation about safe driving. Make your rules practical and doable. Discuss appropriate behavior and options.

and doable. Discuss appropriate behavior and options. Attorney John Walsh 2 E. Mifflin St., Ste. 200,

Attorney

John Walsh

appropriate behavior and options. Attorney John Walsh 2 E. Mifflin St., Ste. 200, Madison WI 53703

2 E. Mifflin St., Ste. 200, Madison WI 53703 • 608.257.5661 law@axley.com • www.axley.com

PRESCHOOL Q. My child makes our weekly grocery shopping trip a nightmare! What can I
PRESCHOOL Q. My child makes our weekly grocery shopping trip a nightmare! What can I

PRESCHOOL

Q. My child makes our weekly grocery shopping trip a nightmare! What can I do?

A. If your child is very young, you may want to avoid taking him/her altogether for awhile. If your child is a little older or it’s not an option to not include them, plan ahead. Try to make it more interesting by

including them in a game. As you pass the produce aisle, challenge them to name 5 different fruits. Give them the names of three kinds of cereal and ask them to rank them in order of preference. Put them to work trying to spot a label or package that has a picture of some kind of animal on it. Give them a letter of the alphabet and try to find as many items in the store as you can that start with that letter. Simple games can keep your child occupied and lessen the stress on both of you!

your child occupied and lessen the stress on both of you! The Caring Center/Verona Montessori House

The Caring Center/Verona Montessori House 402 W. Verona Ave. • Verona • (608) 845-8620

www.caringcenter.com

Dave Kaltenberg HEATING/COOLING Q . How do I select a whole house high efficiency air
Dave Kaltenberg HEATING/COOLING Q . How do I select a whole house high efficiency air
Dave Kaltenberg HEATING/COOLING Q . How do I select a whole house high efficiency air
Dave Kaltenberg HEATING/COOLING Q . How do I select a whole house high efficiency air
Dave Kaltenberg HEATING/COOLING Q . How do I select a whole house high efficiency air

Dave Kaltenberg

HEATING/COOLING

Q. How do I select a whole house high efficiency air cleaner?

A. Several different types of air cleaners are available today. The most basic

types are made just to keep the HVAC equipment clean. The next type of air cleaner provides equipment protection like the first type, and filters out pol- lens, mold spores, and pet dander. These filters were originally developed for people with allergies, but are often used as a good general purpose air

cleaner. The last type of air cleaner is the electronic type. They filter out the smallest of particles like smoke, viruses and bacteria. These are the best choice for anyone with asthma, or otherwise interested in providing the clean- est environment. Beyond efficiencies, the frequency of maintenance should be considered when selecting an air cleaner. For help with selecting the right air cleaner for your home contact Dave at OK Hating and Air Conditioning.

air cleaner. For help with selecting the right air cleaner for your home contact Dave at

161 Horizon Dr., Suite105 • Verona, WI (608) 845-8494

161 Horizon Dr., Suite105 • Verona, WI (608) 845-8494
161 Horizon Dr., Suite105 • Verona, WI (608) 845-8494
Susan Armstrong, MPT Physical Therapist PHYSICAL THERAPY Q. I have a small tear of my

Susan Armstrong, MPT Physical Therapist

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Q. I have a small tear of my meniscus and my knee is very painful. Is there anything that Physical Therapy can do to decrease the pain while it is healing?

A. Some people think that Physical Therapy involves only exercise. Strengthening and stretching

exercises can be extremely beneficial during PT sessions, but there are many other types of treatment that will decrease inflammation and pain, promote tissue healing and repair, and improve mobility while protecting the injured joint during the healing process. Infrared light, ultrasound, electrical

stimulation, myofascial release, lymphatic drainage and the use of kinesiotape would be likely choices to promote an optimum healing environment in the joint capsule. Once the pain and inflammation are decreased, the range of motion and strength will also be addressed. A home exercise program with self- help instructions would be provided and progressed as tolerated. This program would be app