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THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Activity: Grammar for Halloween Skill: Commonly Confused Words

Among vs. Between


Use among if youre referring to a group.
Examples:
Speaking loudly is a common trait among the four
brothers in that family.
The rose is my favorite among all the beautiful
flowers at the botanical gardens.

Use between if youre referring to


1) two people, places, or things
2) any number of distinct, individual items
Examples:
Between you and me, I still watch Sesame Street.
Babbette couldnt decide between the mystery, the
romance, or the science-fiction novel.

Directions: Circle the correct boldface word in each sentence below.


1. Halloween falls among/between Labor Day and Thanksgiving.
2. Brent had a hard time deciding among/between his many costume ideas.
3. Granny said that Hurricane Irene was among/between the most destructive hurricanes shed seen.
4. Ashish exclaimed in frustration, How do you expect me to choose among/between playing pitcher
and first base? You all know I want to play catcher!
5. Among/Between all the chores she had to do, Korina disliked folding socks the most.
6. Mr. Kramer asked Samantha to explain the difference among/between frogs and toads.
7. Nancy and Liz vowed to keep the secret just among/between the two of them.

Directions: For each sentence below, fill in the blank with among or between. Then write your own sentence
using among or between.
8. Sioban couldnt decide _______________ hot fudge, sprinkles, or nuts as a topping for her ice cream sundae.
9. _______________ all the gods and goddesses on Mount Olympus, Zeus was the most powerful.
10. Aaron is sitting _______________ Julia and Leslie.
11. _______________ the many available colors, my favorites are light blue and purple.
12._____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

The words among and between are often confused and misused. Figuring out which one to use is often as easy as
determining how many people or things are in your sentence.

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

NONFICTION: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Reading Comprehension

Directions: Read the nonfiction article Whispers From the Grave in this issue of Scope. Then answer the
multiple-choice questions below.
1. Which of the following best describes the mood
of the first section of the article?
A silly, lighthearted, energetic
B gloomy, pessimistic, somber
C sensational, tense, foreboding
D peaceful, sad, quiet
2. Which literary device is used in the line Outside,
rain lashed angrily at the windows?
A simile
B alliteration
C analogy
D personification
3. What is one theory why the Winchester House was
designed to include staircases that lead nowhere?
A to keep the construction workers busy
B to convince people that the house was haunted
C to make the house a popular tourist attraction
D to confuse the ghosts that were chasing Sarah
4. The word supernatural includes the Latin root
super, which means
A above.
B heavy.
C inside.
D ancient.
5. Sarah Winchester can best be described as
A supernatural.
C gullible.
B eccentric.

6. Which of the following is the most accurate


summary of the section A Cursed Obsession?
A The ghost of Sarahs husband gave her advice
about how to design the Winchester House.
B There are multiple theories about what really
happened to Sarah Winchester, and why she
built her house the way she did.
C The Winchester House is now a popular
tourist attraction.
D Sarah was told if she ever stopped building
her house, she would die.
7. The writer includes the detail that there are
currently more than 10 shows about ghost
hunting on TV as support for the idea that
A scientists have recently proved that ghosts exist.
B the quality of TV shows has sharply declined
over the past 10 years.
C people today are very interested in ghosts.
D the Winchester House is not haunted.
8. Valerie Worth most likely wrote the poem
Haunted House to
A terrify the reader.
B prove that ghosts are real.
C capture the feeling of an old house that is filled
with memories of its former owners.
D advise the reader against living in a house
that might be haunted.

D ghostly.

Directions: Answer the questions below on the back of this page or on another piece of paper.
9. Explain why so many people are fascinated by
ghosts, even though their existence has never
been proved.

10. W
 hat does the author mean by the last sentence
of the article, The Winchester House stands as a
haunting monument to a broken heart?

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Whispers From the Grave Quiz

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Critical Thinking

Critical-Thinking Questions
1. According to legend, why did Sarah Winchester build her mansion? Why did she accept what
Adam Coons told her?

2. Why do you think the author included the section Hunting for Ghosts?

3. How could believing in ghosts be harmful?

4. The last section is called A Tragic Legacy. Explain how the title applies to the section.

5. In the poem Haunted House, what is the speakers attitude toward the former owners of
the house?

Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Whispers From the Grave

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition page 1 of 2

Vocabulary:

1. allegedly (uh-LEJ-id-lee) adverb; having been stated as fact without proof; reportedly
example: Brooke and Mary are in the principals office. They allegedly made some inappropriate
comments about Kari, although I have never heard them say anything mean about anyone.

2. alluring (uh-LOOR-ing) adjective; very attractive or tempting; enticing


example: I cannot wait another second to sink my teeth into this alluring chocolate cake.

3. blueprint (BLOO-print) noun; a detailed plan or outline


example: The contractors who are remodeling our kitchen did not follow the blueprint; they put
the space for the refrigerator on the wrong wall.

4. eccentricity (ek-suhn-TRIS-ih-tee) noun; oddness; peculiarity; unusualness


example: I would hate it if Uncle Ralph put away his brightly colored clothes and crazy hats and
started dressing like everyone else. I love his eccentricity!

5. paranormal (par-uh-NAWR-muhl) adjective; not scientifically explainable; supernatural


example: This Halloween, my friends and I are going to be ghost hunters, searching for paranormal
activity in the abandoned house near the railroad tracks.

6. rattled (RAT-uhld) adjective; unnerved, frightened, or confused


example: On Halloween night, a strange creature with glowing eyes ran in front of Jakes car,
causing him to swerve violently. Jake was so rattled that he missed his next turn.

7. recluse (REK-loos) noun; a person who lives apart from society


example: The character in the story that I am writing is a recluse; he lives in a small cabin on a
mountain and has no contact with the outside world.

8. skepticism (SKEP-tuh-siz-uhm) noun; doubt that something is true; disbelief


example: I understand your skepticism, but I swear I had a conversation with an alien last night.

9. tuberculosis (too-bur-kyuh-LOH-sis) noun; a highly contagious bacterial disease that usually


affects the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, kidneys, or spine
example: Tuberculosis can be spread through coughing, speaking, laughing, singing, or sneezing.

10. v engeful (VENJ-fuhl) adjective; desiring or seeking revenge


example: When Claire returned from a long trip, her vengeful cat threw up in Claires shoe.
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY october 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Whispers From the Grave

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition page 2 of 2

Vocabulary Practice:
Directions: In each group of words, circle the word that does not belong.
11.

hostile

vengeful

forgiving

spiteful

12.

recluse

socialite

solitary

hermit

13.

certainty

belief

confidence

skepticism

14.

eccentricity

ordinariness

normality

commonness

Directions: Choose a word from the Word Bank that has the same, or nearly the same, meaning as the boldface
word in each sentence. Write the word on the line that follows the sentence.

Word Bank
allegedly

blueprint

rattled

alluring

paranormal

vengeful

15. He wrote the enticing first line of the story.

____________________________

16. The thunder disturbed the dog. ____________________________


17. They were supposedly questioned by the police.

____________________________

18. She looked at the plan for the new building.

____________________________

19. Erics unforgiving sister is waiting for him at home. ____________________________


10. Sophie loves to read books about the unexplained. ____________________________
Directions: Use each pair of words below in a sentence.
11. rattled, paranormal _______________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
12. allegedly, tuberculosis _____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY october 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Whispers From the Grave

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Reading Comprehension, page 1 of 2

Read, Think, Explain


Exploring the facts and ideas in a nonfiction article will help you understand it better. Use this worksheet to help
you understand Whispers From the Grave in the October 31, 2011, issue of Scope.

A. BEFORE READING
1. Read the title, or headline, of the article. Write it here:___________________________________________________
Now look at the photographs and read the captions. What do you predict the story will be about? Circle one of
the choices below and explain.
A person If so, who?________________________________________________________________________________
An event If so, what?_______________________________________________________________________________
Something else If so, what?_________________________________________________________________________
2. Look at the photograph on pages 4-5. What does it show? What is the mood of this photograph?
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

B. DURING READING
Read the subtitle, or heading, of each section. Then complete the following.
3. The first section is the introduction. It is mainly about (summarize):_____________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
4. The second section is called ______________________________. It is mainly about (summarize): _________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
5. The third section is called ______________________________. It is mainly about (summarize):___________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
6. The fourth section is called ______________________________. It is mainly about (summarize):_________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
7. The fifth section is called ______________________________. It is mainly about (summarize):___________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
8. The sixth section is called ______________________________. It is mainly about (summarize):___________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ .
Continued on Next page >
Scholastic sCOPE activity OCTOBER 31, 2011

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Identifying Nonfiction Elements

Nonfiction: Whispers From the Grave Skill: Reading Comprehension, page 2 of 2

C. AFTER READING
9. Write down three facts from the article that you didnt know before you read it.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

10. What is the main purpose of the article? (circle one)


to convince the reader
that ghosts are real

to explain who Sarah


Winchester was

to explore our enduring


fascination with ghosts


11. What is the connection between the main article and the poem on page 9? _______________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

12. Summarize what type of information is presented in Ghosts by the Numbers. _________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

D. TEXT STRUCTURE
13. Sequencing: Number the following 1-6 in the order in which they happened.

Sarah meets
with Adam
Coons.

The
Winchester
House is
declared a
landmark.

The Civil War


starts.

Sarah spends
$5.5 million
building her
mansion.

Sarahs
husband dies.

Sarah moves
to San Jose.

E. MAKING CONNECTIONS

14. Heres how this article relates to (fill in at least two):



Something else I read: _____________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Something else I know about:______________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Something in my own life: _________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE activity OCTOBER 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.


___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Poetry: Haunted House Skill: Analyzing Poetry

Directions: Reread Valerie Worths poem Haunted House on page 9 of the October 31, 2011, issue of Scope.
Refer to the poem as you answer the questions below. (Use a separate sheet of paper for your answers.) These
questions do not have right or wrong answers; they are about how you interpret the poem!
11. Does the poet use simple or complex language? What do you notice about the lengths of the lines?
About the length of the poem?
12. Consider the description of the house in the first stanza. Does this stanza suggest that the house is
full of belongings and that people are currently living there, or does it suggest that the house is empty
and has not been used for some time? Explain your answer with specific details from the poem.
13. The poet describes the houses stairs as aching and its doors as having gone stiff at the hinges.
What literary device is the poet using? Besides a house, what do these phrases make you think of?
What is the poet describing besides the house?
14. The poet writes that the former owners of the house are leaning in the closet like that curtain
rod, and sleeping on the cellar shelf like this empty jelly jar. She could have written a curtain
rod and an empty jelly jar, but instead she chose to write that curtain rod and this empty
jelly jar. Why do you think the poet chose to refer to a specific curtain rod and jelly jar? What does
this choice suggest about the location of the poems speaker and the reader? How does this choice
affect the readers experience?
15. Which two verbs in stanzas 3 and 4 describe what the houses former owners are doing? What are
the qualities of the actions these verbs describe? For example, do they describe actions that are
energetic, joyful, sad, loud, etc.?
16. Consider the two objects with which the speaker compares the former owners of the housea
curtain rod in the closet and an empty jelly jar in the cellar. What do these objects have in
common?
17. What is the speaker saying about the former owners of the house by comparing them to the curtain
rod and the jelly jar?
18. Do the dead owners of the house seem threatening or scary in any way? Explain.
19. What is the tone of this poem? In other words, what is the poets attitude toward the subject
matter? Is she angry? Frightened? Amused? Explain what in the poem led you to your conclusion.
10. Do you think that the ghosts of the owners are literally haunting the houseis there really a ghost
in the closet and a ghost sleeping on the cellar shelf? Or is the house haunted in some other way?
Explain.
Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Visiting a Haunted House

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

PLAY: Worked to the Bone Skill: Reading Comprehension

Worked to the Bone Quiz

1. Which of these events happens first in the play?


A Marthas hand gets caught in the spinner.
B Child labor is outlawed.
C Hine goes to the textile factory where Martha
and Leo work.
D Floyd is excited to start working in the factory.

2. Lewis Hine is referred to as a crusader. What does
crusader mean?
A a person who tries to rescue children
B a person who works only for himself
C a person who fights for a cause
D a person who doesnt mind breaking the law
3. How are Lewis Hine and Tyler Hicks similar?
A Both were shot at while taking photographs in
dangerous places.
B They have both taken photographs to bring
attention to problems in the world.
C They both worked for The New York Times.
D They both traveled around the world as part of
their job.
4. T
 he author includes the scene between Hine and
the boss of the glassworks factory to show that
A Hine was willing to speak up for child workers.
B factory bosses did not want the public to see
how hard the children were working.
C Hine put himself in danger by taking
photographs at these factories.
D all of the above

5. Read this sentence from the play:


The frowns on their faces speak otherwise
frowns Hine has made sure to capture.
In which of the sentences below does capture
have the same meaning as it does above?
A My dad set a trap to capture the mouse in our
kitchen, but I wanted to let it go free.
B The candidate hopes to capture a large
percentage of the vote in the next election.
C Tyrese adores pirate stories because they really
capture his imagination.
D The artist was able to perfectly capture the
beauty of the English countryside in her oil
painting.

6. Most of the events in this play can be described as
A amusing.
C serious.
B meaningless.
D mysterious.
7. Why did so many child workers not know
how to read?
A They were too busy working to go to school.
B They couldnt afford books.
C They werent interested in learning.
D There were no schools in their towns.
8. Which of the following characters would
probably NOT support the Fair Labor
Standards Act?
A Crusader 1
C Martha
B Sara

D Boss

Directions: Answer the questions below on the back of this page or on another piece of paper.
9. At the end of the play, Hine says, Its good to
know the next generation will get to keep their
childhoods. What does he mean by this?

10. W
 hy does it become harder for Lewis Hine to get
into factories with his camera? How does he solve
this problem?

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Directions: Read Worked to the Bone in this issue of Scope. Then answer the multiple-choice questions below.

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

PLAY: Worked to the Bone Skill: Critical Thinking

Critical-Thinking Questions
Worked to the Bone

2. What can you infer happened to Floyd?

3. For a child, what was it like to work in a factory? What risks did child workers face?

4. Do you think Hines crusade was worthwhile? Explain.

5. Are photographs sometimes more powerful than words? Explain.

Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

1. Why did children work in factories in the late 1800s and early 1900s?

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Play: Worked to the Bone Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition, page 1 of 2

Vocabulary:
1. adept (uh-DEPT) adjective; able to do something well; skilled
example: Marcus, who dreams of being in a band, is adept at playing many instruments.

2. bedraggled (bih-DRAG-uhld) adjective; messy, dirty, or untidy


example: We were bedraggled after a long day of hiking in the rain.

3. bobbin (BOB-in) noun; a spool or reel that holds the thread inside a sewing machine or loom
example: My sewing machine stopped working, so I checked the bobbin for tangles.

4. deftly (DEFT-lee) adverb; quickly and skillfully


example: I was impressed by how deftly Janine used her chopsticks. If I had tried to eat those
noodles with chopsticks, it would have taken forever!

5. deplorable (dih-PLOR-uh-buhl) adjective; very bad; deserving disapproval


example: Hanks lazy study habits resulted in a deplorable report card.

6. doffer (DOFF-er) noun; a worker in a textile mill who replaces full bobbins with empty ones
example: Leo is a great doffer. A full bobbin never sits for more than a few seconds before he comes
by to replace it.

7. flash pan (flash pan) noun; in an old-fashioned camera, a small tray to hold powder that is ignited
to create the light for the cameras flash

example: Maria, a collector of antique cameras, searches for old flash pans on eBay.
8. malnourished (mal-NUR-ishd) adjective; unhealthy and weak from not eating enough or from
poor nutrition
example: The survivors of the shipwreck found little to eat on the island, so they became severely
malnourished.

9. mangled (MANG-guhld) adjective; severely deformed or damaged from being crushed, torn, or cut
example: Yesterday I found a mangled cell phone lying in the street.

10. t ripod (TRY-pod) noun; a stand with three legs, used to steady a camera or other piece of
equipment
example: Seth placed his tripod far back from the group so that everyone would fit in the picture.
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY October 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Worked to the Bone

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Play: Worked to the Bone Skill: Vocabulary Acquisition, page 2 of 2

Vocabulary Practice:
Directions: Choose the correct answer, using your knowledge of the vocabulary from Worked to the Bone.
1. Which of the following sentences correctly uses deftly?
A Donald, dancing deftly, stumbled across the dance
floor and seemed like he was about to topple over.
B Everyone in the village was still in shock from the
deftly snowstorm that struck last night.
C The skilled pilot deftly approached the runway and
prepared for landing.
D Martina made pasta so deftly that I knew I wouldnt be
hungry for a week!

2. Which of the following people might use a flash pan?


A an astronaut
B a 19th-century photographer
C a nurse from the 1920s
D a circus clown

4. Someone who is malnourished probably needs

A a doctor.
B a new car.
C a date for the prom.
D a hobby.
5. Which of the following sentences correctly uses tripod?

A I nearly tripod over all of the clothes left on the floor.


B A sturdy tripod would help Walter take less-blurry
pictures.

C Miranda cut her sandwich into tripod shapes.


D The painter dipped his brush into a tripod of
scarlet ink.
6. Another word for mangled is

A disoriented.
B disguised.
C disgusted.
D disfigured.

3. A bobbin can be found in all of the following except:

A a loom
B a sewing machine
C a printing press
D a doffers tool kit

Directions: In each group of words, circle the word that does not belong and explain why.
7.

bedraggled

sloppy

tattered

elegant

Why it doesnt belong: ____________________________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
8.

surgeon

educator

doffer

constructing

Why it doesnt belong: ____________________________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
9.

inadequate

adept

clumsy

unskilled

Why it doesnt belong: ____________________________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
10.

loathsome

satisfactory

reprehensible

deplorable

Why it doesnt belong: ____________________________________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE activity october 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

Worked to the Bone

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

play: Worked to the Bone Skill: Analyzing Photographs, page 1 of 2

In this activity, you will take a good long look at one of the photographs by Lewis Hine that appears in the
play Worked to the Bone. Youll consider what information it conveys and draw conclusions about its power.
Then you will do the same with a picture by contemporary photojournalist Tyler Hicks.

SECTION 1: PHOTO BY LEWIS HINE


1. Choose one of the photos by Lewis Hine listed below. Circle it.
A. the girl in the cotton mill on pages 10-11
B. the photo that inspired the character of Martha on page 12
C. the photo of the two boys who inspired the characters of Leo and Floyd on page 12
D. the boys in the coal mine on page 14
2. Describe the photograph you selected. Who is pictured? How old do they appear to be? What are they
wearing? Where are they? What are they doing? Etc. __________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3. What can you infer about how the subject(s) feelshappy, tired, scared, etc.? ___________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4. What can you infer about the subjects job? Explain.___________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
5. How does this photograph make you feel? In other words, what emotions does it evoke? Why?____________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Continued on Next page >
Scholastic sCOPE activity OCTOBER 31, 2011

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Look and Reflect

play: Worked to the Bone Skill: Analyzing Photographs, page 2 of 2


6. Does this photograph achieve Hines goal of telling the story of child laborers? __________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

action? ___________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

SECTION 2: PHOTO BY TYLER HICKS


1. Look at the photo by Tyler Hicks on page 15. According to the caption, what does this photo show? ________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Describe what you see in the photograph. ____________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
3. How does this photograph make you feel? Why?______________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
4. The sidebar states that Hicks takes photographs that call attention to some of the worlds worst problems.
Does this photo grab your attention? Does it make you want to learn more about the womans situation or
take some sort of action? Explain.___________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE activity OCTOBER 31, 2011

Uses: Copy machine, opaque projector, or transparency master for overhead projector. Scholastic Inc. grants subscribers of Scholastic Scope permission to reproduce this page for use in their classrooms. Copyright 2011 by Scholastic Inc. All rights reserved.

7. Do you think this photograph is powerful? If you saw it in a newspaper, would it make you want to take

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

THEN & NOW: The Horror of Werewolves Skill: Compare and Contrast

The Horror of Werewolves Quiz

1. Which of the following statements is true


for both the Beast of Gvaudan and Scott McCall
of Teen Wolf ?
A They both prey on lone travelers.
B They both blend in with regular society.
C They are both rumored to decapitate people.
D They both transform during a full moon.
2. Which of the following best describes the tone
of A Bloodthirsty Monster as compared with
the tone of Were-Hunk?
A angry vs. excited
B dramatic vs. lighthearted
C horrified vs. outraged
D mysterious vs. apologetic
3. Who or what was responsible for the more
than 80 killings that occurred in the Gvaudan
between 1764 and 1767?
A a werewolf
B a serial killer
C a pack of wolves
D no one knows for sure
4. According to Were-Hunk, why are werewolves
so appealing to kids today?
A Werewolves are funny.
B Many kids find it fun and satisfying to imagine
being a werewolf.
C Werewolves provide an explanation for a
number of horrifying murders that have
recently occurred.
D Werewolves provide a refreshing alternative
to vampires.

5. How are werewolves represented on Teen Wolf ?


A as people who are just like the rest of us in
many ways
B as bloodthirsty teenagers
C as anxious nerds with a strange disease
D as popular kids with no worries
6. Together, the two articles
A solve the mystery of whether werewolves
are real.
B explain why werewolves are not as popular
today as they were in the 1700s.
C explore the publics perception of werewolves
during two different time periods.
D spread fear about werewolves.
7. Which of the following is a way that societys ideas
about werewolves have changed over time?
A People are not as interested in werewolves
as they used to be.
B In the past, werewolves were generally
portrayed as vicious killers; today, werewolves
are often portrayed as likable or even heroic.
C In the past, werewolves were usually adults;
today, they are usually teenagers.
D Werewolves have been captured, so people are
not as afraid of them as they used to be.
8. From the two articles, you can infer that
A werewolves used to exist, but now they
are extinct.
B in the past, more people believed that
werewolves were real.
C in five years, no one will be interested in
werewolves anymore.
D werewolves are more popular than vampires.

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBER 31, 2011

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Directions: Read The Horror of Werewolves in this issue of Scope. Then answer the questions below.

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

THEN & NOW: The Horror of Werewolves Skill: Compare and Contrast

Directions: Use the articles A Bloodthirsty Monster and Were-Hunk to complete the chart below. In each
row, fill in the second and third columns. Then decide whether the information in the two columns is similar or
different (or both) and put a check mark in the appropriate column or columns.

Then

Now

Definition of a
werewolf

What werewolves
look like

Names of wellknown werewolves

What fuels
peoples interest in
werewolves

How werewolves
behave

How the public


reacts to werewolves

(Write your own.)

Now use what you entered in the chart to help you write a brief
essay (on a separate sheet of paper) answering the following question:
How have our ideas about werewolves changed over the years?
Scholastic sCOPE activity October 31, 2011

Similar

Different

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The Horror of Werewolves

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Debate: Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? Skill: Persuasive Essay, page 1 of 5
K

Directions: Read Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? on pages 20-21 of the October 31, 2011, issue
of Scope. Fill in the chart on page 21. Then follow the steps below to write an essay explaining your opinion
of Chris Browns celebrity status.

Step 1: decide what you think


Does Chris Brown still deserve to be famous? Consider what you read in the article as well as your own
experiences. Check the box next to the point of view you will support in your essay. Or write your
own opinion in the space provided.
Yes! All that matters is the music!

No! Pop stars should be role models!

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Find your support


Which of the items that you wrote in the Yes and No columns on page 21 support your opinion?
What are other points that support your opinion? List three to five support items here:
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 3: acknowledge the other side


If you think Chris Brown should get a second chance, summarize the strikes against him. If you believe
supporting Chris Brown is wrong, summarize the reasons some people might still buy his music.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBer 31, 2011

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Write a Persuasive Essay

ESSAY

IT
What
write a you need to
perfect
essay

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Debate: Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? Skill: Persuasive Essay, page 2 of 5

Step 4: CRAFT your thesis


The thesis is where you tell readers what the essay is going to be about. The thesis should be a clear,
strong statement of the opinion you stated in Step 1. The rest of your essay should support your thesis.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 5: Write your hook


The very beginning of your essay is called the hook because it hooks your readers attention. The hook
should relate to the topic of your essay, but it can take many forms. It can be an anecdote (a very short
story), a fact, a quote, or a rhetorical question (a question to which you dont expect an answer). Here are
three ideas for hooks that could work for this topic. Choose one of the ideas below or use your own idea
and write a hook on the lines provided (1-3 sentences).

1. ANECDOTE: Describe a moment from Chris Browns career or describe how you felt when you
learned about Chris Browns crime.

2. SURPRISING FACT: Find a fact that will raise your readers eyebrows. Several surprising facts are
included in the article. You can also do some research and find a surprising fact that is not included
in the article.

3. RHETORICAL QUESTION: Ask your readers to consider what they would think if their favorite actor
was revealed to be guilty of something terrible.

Your hook: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 6: Summarize the issue


Let readers know a little about the issue you will be writing about. This is not your point of view;
its just a very brief summary of the issuein this case, the controversial comeback of Chris Brown after
his assault conviction.
Your summary of the issue: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 7: Start writing


Now that you have the key ingredients for your essay, you are ready to start writing. On the next page,
youll find guidelines for how to organize your ingredients as well as hints about what else youll need to add.
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBER 31, 2011

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Your thesis: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Debate: Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? Skill: Persuasive Essay, page 3 of 5

Directions: Follow the guidelines below to write a strong essay on whether or not Chris Brown deserves
his comeback. You will use what you wrote on the first two pages of this activity.

Open with your hook from Step 5.


Write a transition sentence that relates your hook to the question of whether or not Chris Brown
deserves his comeback. (See Scopes handout Great Transitions for some ways to link your ideas.)
Write your summary of the issue from Step 6.
Finish with your thesis from Step 4.

BODY PARAGRAPH(S)
Heres where you write your supporting points from Step 2. For each one, write 1-3 sentences
that provide additional details. You can put all of your supporting points and detail
sentences together in one paragraph, or you can break them into three paragraphs.
It depends on how much you want to write about each point. Order your supporting points
from weakest to strongest. Readers tend to remember best the details that are presented last.

Acknowledge the other side


Now its time to recognize the other side of the argument. Use what you wrote in Step 3.
Then explain why you think the opposing point of view is wrong.

CONCLUSION
Use 2-3 sentences to remind your readers of your main points.
Finish with a strong final sentence. Looking for an idea? Try referring to your hook,
finding a quote, or inspiring your readers.

Read and Revise


Use Scopes Opinion-Essay Checklist to evaluate and edit what you have written.
Make any necessary changes and write a second draft.
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBER 31, 2011

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INTRODUCTION

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Debate: Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? Skill: Persuasive Essay, page 4 of 5

Transitions are like bridges between your ideasthey help your readers move from one idea to the next.
Here are some transition words and phrases you may wish to use in your essay. Keep in mind that they
can be used at the beginning of a sentence or within a sentence.

If you are adding information or showing similarity between ideas:


additionally

besides

so too

first of all/secondly/thirdly

in addition

also

likewise

to begin with

as well as

another

furthermore

finally

If you are showing that one idea is different from another:


however

even though

in contrast

on the one hand/on the other hand

yet

despite

still

some people say/other people say

but

although

in spite of

regardless

If you are showing that something is an example of what you just stated:
for example

to illustrate

this can be seen

for instance

namely

specifically

If you want to show cause and effect:


as a result

consequently

it follows that therefore

so
eventually

If you want to add emphasis:


in fact

of course

truly

even

Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBER 31, 2011

indeed

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Great Transitions

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

Debate: Does Chris Brown Deserve His Comeback? Skill: Persuasive Essay, page 5 of 5

Directions: Use this guide to check your own essay, or exchange papers with a classmate and use
the list to check each others essays. In the margins of the essay you are checking, make notes about
anything that needs to be revised.

Introduction

3 Does the first sentence grab readers attention?


3 Does the first paragraph provide a general overview of the essays topic?
3 Does the first paragraph include a thesis statement that strongly and clearly states the writers
point of view? Does the thesis clue readers in as to what the essay is going to be about?

Body Paragraphs

3 Do they contain a total of at least three points that support the thesis?
3 Do they provide details to further explain each of the three supporting points?
3 Are the supporting details presented in order from weakest to strongest?
3 D o you acknowledge an opposing point of view and then explain why you think it isnt strong
enough to change your point of view?

Conclusion

3 Does the last paragraph remind readers of the main points of the essay, without going
into too much detail and repeating everything readers just read?

3 Is the conclusion free of new information (such as another supporting point)?
3 Does the last sentence leave readers with a strong final impression?
General

3 Does one idea flow smoothly into the next?


3 Do the sentence structures and lengths vary?
3 Does every sentence relate to the thesis?
3 Does everything make sense?
3 Is the essay convincing?
3 Are the grammar, punctuation, and spelling correct?
Scholastic sCOPE ACTIVITY OCTOBER 31, 2011

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Persuasive-Essay Checklist

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

You Write It: Heroic Rescue on the Mountainside Skills: Main Idea and Details/Paraphrasing page 1 of 2

You Write It

Directions: Follow the steps below to turn our interview with Hunter Nelson into an article.
 he headline Heroic Rescue on the Mountainside tells you the main idea of the interviewand what
T
the main idea of your article should be. But because its a headline, it doesnt have to be a complete
sentence. Write the main idea in your own words as a complete sentence:
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 ewrite each question-and-answer pair as one paragraph. Your paragraphs should be written from
R
the third-person point of view (using he, she, or they to refer to peoplenever using I or we). You should
paraphrase, or rewrite in your own words, what Hunter says. We did the first paragraph for you.

Hunter Nelson and Danny Riat went on a hike. Their plan was to camp at a
Paragraph 1: __________________________________________________________________________________
beautiful spot near Archer Mountain in Washington State. As they hiked through the
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
woods, the trail became steeper and steeper.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 2: __________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 3: __________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 4: __________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 5: __________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 6: __________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Scholastic sCOPE activity october 31, 2011

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Turning an Interview into an Article

You Write It: Heroic Rescue on the Mountainside Skills: Main Idea and Details/Paraphrasing page 2 of 2

 hoose two or three sentences from what Hunter said in the interview to use as direct quotes in your
C
article. A direct quote is a report of another persons exact words.
Direct Quote 1: ________________________________________________________________________________

Direct Quote 2: ________________________________________________________________________________


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Direct Quote 3: ________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Note that when you put direct quotes into your article, you must put them in quotation marks, and you
must make clear who is saying them. Here are three examples of how to do that:
1. Hunter says, Danny was 70 feet above me.
2.  We had spent 45 minutes climbing that cliff, remembers Hunter, and it took me one minute,
maybe two, to get down to him.
3. It was nearly vertical, says Hunter.

 ecide which information in the interview you find the most interesting. You might choose, for example,
D
the information about what it was like for Hunter to see Danny fall, or the information about what Hunter
did while he was waiting for help to arrive.
The information I find most interesting is: _______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 ow its time to put it all together. Write your article on a separate sheet of paper, following the guidelines
N
below.
Opening Paragraph:
Use your first sentence to hook your readers attention. You can do this by stating something that is
surprising, interesting, or moving. Hint: What did you write in Step 4?
Be sure to let readers know what the article is going to be about. In other words, state the main idea of
the article.
Body Paragraphs:
Your paragraphs should flow smoothly from one to the next. You may need to write a transition sentence
at the beginning of some paragraphs.
Dont forget to include the direct quotes that you chose in Step 3.
Conclusion:
Wrap it all up. End your article with a strong sentence that will give your readers something to think
about. One option is to end with a quote. Another is to refer to your hook from the opening paragraph.
Scholastic sCOPE activity october 31, 2011

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_______________________________________________________________________________________________

THE LANGUAGE ARTS MAGAZINE

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date: ______________

WHOLE ISSUE: October 31, 2011 SKILL: Reading Comprehension

Scope Crossword Puzzle


1

9
10

11

12
13

ACROSS

2. Photographs can help

bring the publics ___


to problems in the
world.

5. a person who claims

to be able to speak to
the dead

7. Hunter Nelsons rescue


experience made him
want to ___ people.

8. the Winchester rifle

became famous during


this war

10. Sarah Winchester

thought that ___


spirits were after her.

11. The word between is

often confused with


this word.

12. the Beast of Gvaudan


is part of the folklore
of this country

13. Breathing in a lot of

___ was one of the


dangers of working in
a textile factory in the
early 1900s.

DOWN

1. The play about Lewis


Hine takes place
approximately ___
hundred years ago.

3. G host hunters look

for changes in ___ .

Scholastic sCOPE activity october 31, 2011

4. C hris Browns European


___ was cancelled.

6. Lewis Hines photos

helped bring an end to


___ labor in the U.S.

8. Some people believe

Chris Brown deserves


a second one of these.

9. story, myth

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Directions: See how much you remember from the October 31, 2011, issue of Scope. Put your knowledge to the
test with our crossword puzzle.