Sie sind auf Seite 1von 4

Curriculum planning chart Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Metamorphosis

Concept* ("The student will understand") (The big idea, the "enduring understanding" [Wiggins, 1998]; a broad way of making sense of the world, or a life lesson) Living things change over time. From PA Academic Standards for Science and Technology: 3.1.K.A3 - Observe, compare, and describe stages of life cycles for plants and/or animals. Standard Assessment (How will you have evidence that they know it?) Life cycle diagrams Create their own informational text* Science Observation Journals* Sequence and define each stage using what they know and learned about the life cycle Facts ("The students will know") Definitions from student generated words on the Science Word Wall Compare life cycles between frogs and butterflies Descriptive words to record their observations* Tadpoles and caterpillars metamorphosis into frogs and butterflies*

Subject: Science
Skills ("The students will be able to") Identify each stage of the life cycle Learn how to record data using observation skills Distinguish phases of the life cycle Sequences the phases of the life cycle Problems to pose ("Guiding questions" or "unit questions") Why are the tadpoles tails less important as it matures? Where do tadpoles/frogs live? What do butterflies/caterp illars eat? What are some descriptive words that we can use to observe?* How can we record our observations?* How are frogs and butterflies similar? Different?*

Name: Heidi
Activities:

Add a nonfiction book about butterflies and frogs into their Book Box for independent reading* Create a class book on facts about either frogs or butterflies* Create a KWL chart and a fact web* Attend a field trip to the Academy of Natural Sciences Generate 2 Science Word Walls as an ongoing task as they are introduced to more words throughout the week Students will

Central problem / issue / or essential question (intended to "get at" the concept; the motorvator) How do living things change and grow over time?

observe their classroom butterflies twice a week by recording their observations into their Science Observation Journals* Create a butterfly life cycle diagram using a paper plate and other materials Use interactive online activity where students will sequence both life cycles by table during Reading and Writing Workshops Play a board game based on the frogs life cycle

* It is important to note that the concept might remain the same across subjects (e.g., the concept on the math curriculum table might be the same as the concept on the social studies curriculum table), OR it might be different.

Curriculum planning chart Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Metamorphosis


Concept* ("The student will understand") (The big idea, the "enduring understanding" [Wiggins, 1998]; a broad way of making sense of the world, or a life lesson) Living things change over time. Standard Assessment (How will you have evidence that they know it?) Facts ("The students will know") How to describe individual phases for both life cycles Descriptive words to record their observations* Tadpoles and caterpillars metamorphosis into frogs and butterflies*

Subject: Literacy
Skills ("The students will be able to") Identify informational text elements such as table of contents, glossary, index, captions, etc. Cooperatively work with peers in forming their own informational text Input information onto graphic organizers Identify rhyming words, spell basic words such as frog, log, hop, etc. from Frog In A Log Research information using nonfiction text independently Problems to pose ("Guiding questions" or "unit questions") How can we use informational text to gather facts? How can we find answers to questions while reading informational text? What elements are in an informational text? Did the texts have any similarities? Differences? What are some descriptive words that we can use to observe?* How can we record our observations?*

Name: Heidi
Activities:

From PA Common Core ELA Standards:


Reading Informational Text CC.1.2.K.A - With prompting and support, identify the main idea and retell key details of text. CC.1.2.K.E - Identify parts of a book (title, author) and parts of a text (beginning, end, details) CC.1.2.K.F - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. CC.1.2.K.G - Answers questions to describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear. CC.1.2.K.I - With prompting and support, identify basic

Create their own informational text* Science Observation Journals* Sequence and define each stage using what they know and learned about the life cycle

Add a nonfiction book about butterflies and frogs into their Book Box for independent reading* Create a class book on facts about either frogs or butterflies* Create a KWL chart and a fact web* Conduct lessons on identifying and discussing informational text elements Use fiction and nonfiction text to compare similarities and differences Students will observe their classroom

Central problem / issue / or essential question (intended to "get at" the concept; the motorvator) How do living things change and grow over time?

similarities and differences between two texts (read or read aloud) on the same topic. CC.1.2.K.J - Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading, and being read to, and responding to texts. Writing CC.1.4.K.G - Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces on familiar topics. CC.1.4.K.I - Support the opinion with reasons. CC.1.4.K.J - Make logical connections between drawing and writing. CC.1.4.K.V - Participate in individual or shared research projects on a topic of interest. CC.1.4.K.W - With guidance and support, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

How are frogs and butterflies similar? Different?*

butterflies twice a week by recording their observations into their Science Observation Journals Life cycle sentence strips to define each stage using index cards

* It is important to note that the concept might remain the same across subjects (e.g., the concept on the math curriculum table might be the same as the concept on the social studies curriculum table), OR it might be different.