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Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

CALCULATION OF SEEPAGE DISCHARGE AND SEEPAGE PRESSURE


Seepage discharge calculation
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Sketch the coffer dam on scale. Measure head difference (H). Make flow net. Find nf and nd from flow net. Calculate seepage discharge Q = k.

nf nd

H .b

b = width of channel = 56 cm For calculation, consider H = 20 cm.

Blowout of Coffer dam

Figure 1: Schematic diagram showing liquefaction potential zone 1. Calculate submerged unit weight of soil, .

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

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Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

' =(

Gs 1 ). w 1+ e

Take

Gs = 2.65, e = 0.81

2. Calculate critical gradient, ic.

ic =

' w

3. Calculate head right at the bottom (A) and at D/2 distance from point A of the pile. (D is the depth of the pile). HA = ( H ndA x H) HB = ( H ndB x H) ndA = number of head drops at A, H = head drop for each equi-potential line = H/nd You get values in terms of H 4. 5.

H average = i= D

1 (H A + H B ) 2

H average

6. In order to blowout the dam, i = ic Calculate H for blowout with this.

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

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Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

Seepage
Darcys law is applicable when flow of water is in one direction. In real world problems, seepage occurs in all three dimensions. Solution for 3D problems is complicated and needs advanced mathematical calculations. In many cases, 3D problems are simplified to 2D and seepage flow is calculated accordingly. Equation of 2D Steady Flow Conditions: Darcys law is valid K is same in all dimensions (homogenous material)

Figure 1 Flow through a 2-D system Lets consider a 2-D seepage flow system as shown in figure 1. Darcys Law explains:

Q = k .i. A
At section X+dX

At section X (for 1 m. strip),

q x = k .i x .dy.1
At section Y (for 1 m. strip),

q x + dx = k .i x + dx .dy.1
At section Y+dY

q y = k .i y .dx.1
As the flow is steady, net flow should be 0.

q y + dy = k .i y + dy .dx.1

(q y + dy + q x + dx ) (q y + q x ) = 0
or

(k .i x + dx .dy + k .i y + dy .dx) (k .i x .dy + k .i y .dx) = 0

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

4
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department
or But

(i x + dx i x ).dy + (i y + dy i y ).dx = 0
ix = h x
i x .dx x
and

(1)

iy =

h y
i y y .dy

i x + dx = i x +

and

i y + dy = i y +

Substituting these values in equation (1)

i y i x .dx.dy + .dy.dx = 0 x y
Or Therefore,

h h ( )+ ( ) =0 x x y y 2h 2h + =0 x 2 y 2
(2)

This equation is called Laplace Equation. Solution for Laplace equation: Analytical method (mathematical) Numerical method (Finite Element, Finite Difference) Flow models (sand, glass bead) Analog model (electric, heat) Graphical method (flow net) Graphical method is discussed in this chapter. Graphical Solution (Flow Net) It is quick and simple. No special equipment is needed. Drawing improves understanding. However, for complex problems, finite element is better. Laplace equation requires 2 families of curves that meet at right angle. One is called flow line and the other is called equi-potential line. The network of these lines is called Flow Net (figure 2). Properties of flow net Same flow quantity (q) through each flow channel. Same head drop (h) between each adjacent pair of equi-potential lines (except for partial drop).

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

5
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

Figure 2 Example of flow net beneath a dam structure In figure 2,

q =

q nf

(3)

h =

H nd

(4)

Seepage Calculation Using Flow Net If our flow nets are going to have the properties of the lines mentioned above, we need to draw them in a certain way.

Figure 3 Distribution of equi-potential lines in a flow channel From figure 3,

q = k .i. A

= k.

h .b.1 l

= k .h.

b l

q and h should be the same for every element. Then, element.

b must also be the same for every l

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

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Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

b = side length ratio (same for all elements) l


or

q H b = k. . nf nd l

Therefore, q = k .H . i.e. where,

nf b . nd l b l
(5)

q = k .H .$.

$=

nf nd

However, if we can make

l = 1 by making square flow net grid, b


(6)

q = k .H .$
and Q = q. L

where, L is the length of dam in a perpendicular direction Method of Drawing Flow Net Identify boundaries upstream and downstream surfaces are equi-potential lines as they represent atmospheric pressure. Therefore, all flow lines intersect them at right angle. Body of impervious layer is a flow line, and equi-potential lines intersect them at right angle. Sketch 2 3 flow channels. Sketch equi-potential lines. Iterate, erasing and re-sketching lines to form square with l/b = 1. If required check the square pattern by drawing a circle. Perform seepage computation for q and then calculate Q. Shown in figure 4 is an example of flow net under a sheet pile.

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

7
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

Figure 4 Example of flow net and seepage calculation. Note For k x k y , we make horizontal scale =

ky kx

x vertical Scale

and plot the structure. Then we follow the same procedure. This gives,

q = k x .k y .

H .n f nd

Use of Flow Net Uplift pressure under hydraulic structure From figure 5, nd = 7 Head at A, Uplift pressure Likewise, H=7m = 7/7 = (9 1 x 1) = 8. w = 7. w =1m =8m i.e. UA UB hA

Head Loss at each equi-potential line

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

8
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

Figure 5 Calculation of uplift pressure Method to determine pore pressure and uplift pressure Determine head at point where pore pressure is required. Express the head as a value referred to the point itself as a datum. Calculate pore pressure, UA = hA . w

Caution:
Most common mistake is to be inconsistent about datum. Head = ( a value ) (referenced to) ( a datum ) To calculate a pore pressure, the best datum from the head is the point itself. Count head either to head water or to tail water. = = 0 = uA . Z = i . w . Z = -u (We will have liquefaction)

Effective stress If u = , At liquefaction,

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008

9
Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

Therefore,

(G s 1) w ' 1+ e = i=

Gs 1 1+ e

This is called critical gradient (ic)

ic =

Gs 1 1+ e

(7)

EGCE 324L (Soil Mechanics Laboratory) Instructor: Binod Tiwari, PhD

Spring 2008 Date: 3/24/2008