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COMUNICARE LIMBA ENGLEZA INITIERE SUPORT DE CURS

THE ALPHABET

1.The English alphabet (Aa,Bb,Cc...) + Names

The English alphabet has 26 letters:Aa Ii Qq Yy Bb Jj Rr Zz Cc Kk Ss Dd Ll Tt Ee Mm Uu Ff Nn Vv Gg Oo Ww Hh Pp Xx

The alphabet is made up of: Vowels A and Consonants B L V C M W D N X F P Y G Q Z H R J S K T E I O U

The Rhyming Alphabet may help your pronunciation:-

The following letters rhyme with each other


sound A H J K sound B C D E G P T V e sound F L M N S X sound I Y O y sound Q U W R Z

The Phonetic Alphabet may help you with your spelling:When spelling (especially over the phone) use the phonetic alphabet to avoid confusion.

A C E G I K M O Q S U W Y Names

Alpha Charlie Echo Golf India Kilo Mike Oscar Quebec Sierra Uniform Whisky Yankee

B D F H J L N P R T V X Z

Bravo Delta Foxtrot Hotel Juliet Lima November Papa Romeo Tango Victor X-Ray Zulu

First Name/Christian Name Elizabeth John

Middle Name Mary Wesley

or

(Middle Initial) M W

Last Name/Surname Windsor Sinclair

Naturally speaking

When two letters appear next to each other we say "double __" Follow the dialogue.

What's your full name please. Sorry , what was your last name again? I'm sorry I don't understand. Could you repeat that more slowly please. How do you write that? Could you spell it please? And your first name please? Pardon? And what is your telephone number please? Thank you.

My first name is Sonja and my last name Pascalli Pascalli. Pasc-all-i.

o o

P-a-s-c-a-double l-i Sonja Sonja - S-o-n-j-a. 2-3-8-7-1-8 You're welcome.

o o o

II. GREETINGS
Everyday Greetings

"Good morning."

"Good afternoon."

"Good evening."

"Goodbye."

"Good night."

"Good night."

Special Greetings 6

"Happy Christmas." or "Merry Christmas."

00.01 - 1st January

"Happy New Year!"

"Happy Easter."

"Good Luck!" or etc....

"Congratulations!" or "Well done!"

or

etc...

"Get well soon."

Shaking Hands

When meeting someone formally for the first time, we shake their hand and say "How do you do?" or "Pleased to meet you." "How do you do?" isn't really a question, it just means "Hello".

When young people meet informally they sometimes say "Give me five!" and slap their hands together (high five).

Generally we do not shake hands with people we know well.

Naturally speaking

You say hello, and I say goodbye! Follow the dialogue. Mr Bean meets Mrs Breuer, one of his students, and her husband in the street.
Mr Bean: Mrs Breuer: Mr Bean: Mrs Breuer: Mr Breuer: Mr Bean: Mr Breuer:

Good morning, Mrs Breuer. Good morning, Mr Bean. How are you? I'm fine thanks, and you? Not too bad. Mr Bean, this is my husband Michael, Michael this is Mr Bean my English teacher. Pleased to meet you. Pleased to meet you too. Are you from Germany, Mr Breuer? Yes, East Germany, from Dresden. And you, are you from London?
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Mr Bean: Mrs Breuer: Mr Bean:

No, I'm from Derby, but I live in London now.


Well, goodbye Mr Bean, it was nice to see you. Yes, goodbye.

Formal to Informal Greetings and Introductions First meetings Formal Introducing yourself

Introducing others

Responding to an introduction

How do you do? My name is Mrs Hand.

Mrs Hand, may I introduce my boss, Mr Smith.

Pleased to meet you Mrs Hand.

Hello, Lynne Hand. I'm the owner of this web site.

Lynne, I'd like you to meet John Smith, our salesman. John, this is Lynne Hand.

Pleased to meet you Lynne.

Lynne Hand, the owner.

Lynne, meet John, my husband. John, this is my friend Lynne.

Hi, Lynne. How are you?

Informal Subsequent meetings Formal

Greeting Hello, Mrs Hand. It's nice to see you again.

Responding What a pleasant surprise! How are you? It's been a while.

Good morning Mrs Hand. How are you today?

I'm very well thank you. And you?

Good afternoon, Mr Reed. It's good to see you.

Thank you. It's nice seeing you too. How are things going?

Hello Petra. How are you doing?

Fine thanks. What's new with you?

Hi, Dieter! How's it going?

Not too bad, busy as ever.

Informal

!Note - on first meetings say, "It's nice to meet you". For future meetings say, "It's nice to see you again".

3.Am/is/are + what? + who?


Full form (written) I am you are he is she is it is are not is not = = = = = = = I'm you're he's she's it's aren't isn't Short form (spoken)

Questions - What/Who is it?

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What ....? = things Who .....? = people Full form (written) What is Who is It is = = = Short form (spoken) What's Who's It's

Who's your teacher?

"Hello. I'm Lynne. I'm your teacher."

"What's this?"

"It's an apple."

"Who's it for?"

"It's for the teacher."

+ a or an? a = b, c, d ... an = a, e, i, o, u

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an apple, an elephant, an a banana, a car, a dog... igloo, an orange, an umbrella This / these a / an

"What's this?"

"It's an apple."

"And this?"

"It's a pear."

"And what's this?"

"It's a car."

"And what are these?"

"They're biscuits."

"And these?"

"They're eggs."

"Who's this?"

"It's Mr. Bean."

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English numbers (1,2,3...10)


Numbers Whole numbers 1 to 10 Symbol 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Word Nought One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten

More numbers (10, 11, 12 ...20)


Whole numbers 10 to 20
Symbol 10 11 12 13 14 15 Word Ten Eleven Twelve Thirteen Fourteen Fifteen Pronounce It

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16 17 18 19 20

Sixteen Seventeen Eighteen Nineteen Twenty

More numbers (21 - 1000)


Whole numbers 21 to 1000
In figures 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 101 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 In words twenty-one twenty-two twenty-three twenty-four twenty-five twenty-six twenty-seven twenty-eight twenty-nine thirty fourty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety a hundred a hundred and one two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred six hundred seven hundred eight hundred nine hundred a thousand

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Ordinal numbers (1 - 1000)


Ordinal Numbers
Cardinal numbers express quantity: two eggs (2 eggs), thirty-five people (35 people) etc... Ordinal numbers indicate order or rank: first (1st), second (2nd), third (3rd) etc... The definite article"the" normally goes in front of any ordinal number: e.g. "Queen Elizabeth the second." For most ordinal numbers, the ending '-th' is used, with one or two exceptions for those inevitable irregular numbers:CARDINAL NUMERAL 1 2 3 5 9 12 IN WORDS one two three five nine twelve ORDINAL NUMERAL 1st 2nd 3rd 5th 9th 12th IN WORDS the first the second the third the fifth the ninth the twelfth

Ordinal numbers 1 to 19
In figures 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th In words the first the second the third the fourth the fifth the sixth the seventh the eighth the ninth the tenth the eleventh the twelfth

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13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th

the thirteenth the fourteenth the fifteenth the sixteenth the seventeenth the eighteenth the nineteenth

Ordinal numbers such as 21st, 33rd etc are formed by combining a CARDINAL ten with an ORDINAL unit. The "y" of "twenty", "thirty", "forty", etc. is changed to "ieth":In figures 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 40th 50th 60th 70th 80th 90th 100th 101st 1000th In words the twentieth the twenty-first the twenty-second the twenty-third the twenty-fourth the twenty-fifth the twenty-sixth the twenty-seventh the twenty-eighth the twenty-ninth the thirtieth the fortieth the fiftieth the sixtieth the seventieth the eightieth the ninetieth the hundredth the hundred and first the thousandth

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4. Colours
Black White Red Blue Yellow Orange Green Purple Pink For example:The Union Jack is red, white and blue.

The German flag is black, red and yellow.

Penguins are black and white.

Aubergines are purple.

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Lettuces are green.

Lemons are yellow.

Oranges are orange!

A rainbow is multi-coloured

5. Days of the week


The days of the week:The working week Monday Mon Tuesday Tue Wednesday Wed Thursday Thu Friday Fri The weekend Sunday Saturday (the Sabbath) Sat Sun

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6. Time
Twelve o'clock Six o'clock

One o'clock

Seven o'clock

Two o'clock

Eight o'clock

Three o'clock

Nine o'clock

Four o'clock

Ten o'clock

Five o'clock

Eleven o'clock

The times of the day:Morning Afternoon Evening s Night

00.01 - 12.00

12.01 to 18.00

18.01 to 22.00

22.01 - 24.00

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Twelve fifteen Twelve o'clock Quarter past twelve or

Twelve thirty or

Twelve fortyfive or

Half past twelve Quarter to one

Naturally speaking Exactly or about


Exactly 14.00 It's exactly 2.00pm. How to ask the time

About 14.28 It's about 2.30pm.

It's exactly eight o'clock.

Excuse me. What time is it please? or


It's eight.

It's half past twelve.

Excuse me. Do you have the time please? or

It's twelve thirty.

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It's about half past eleven.

Excuse me. Could you tell me the time please? or

It's about eleven thirty.

7. Seasons
In the UK we have four seasons:Winter Spring Summer Autumn

December January February March April May June July August September October November Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov

More time expressions


Days of the week
The past Monday Last Monday Tuesday The day before yesterday Wednesday Yesterday The present Thursday Today Friday Tomorrow The future Saturday The day after tomorrow Sunday Next Sunday

Months of the year


The past The present The future

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July Last July

August The month before last

September Last month

October This month

November Next month

December The month after next

January Next January

Years
The past 2001 Three years ago 2001 The year before last 2002 Last year The present 2003 This year 2004 Next year The future 2005 The year after next 2006 In three years time

Today is . Yesterday was . The day before yesterday was . Tomorrow will be . The day after tomorrow will be . This month is . Last month was . The month before last was . Next month will be .

Follow the dialogue.

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Mr Bean is finding out about his student's birthdays. Mr Bean: Student: Mr Bean: Student: Mr Bean: Student: Mr Bean: Student: Mr Bean: Sally: Mr Bean: Sally: Mr Bean and Sam: Sally: Sam, when is your birthday? It is on the 22nd of September. Oh, really! But today is the 23rd of September. Yes. That means your birthday was yesterday! Yes it was. Well, happy birthday for yesterday Sam. Thank you. Sally, when is your birthday? My birthday is on the 24th of September. No. Yes. It's my birthday tomorrow! Happy birthday for tomorrow Sally. Thank you.

8.People and places + where?


Questions
Who? What? = = People Things

Where?

Places

CAPITALISATION RULES

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Rule

For example

People's names always start with a CAPITAL LETTER.

My name is Lynne Hand.

Countries always start with I come from England. a CAPITAL LETTER. Cities always start with a CAPITAL LETTER. Nationalities always start with a CAPITAL LETTER.
I live in Darmstadt.

I am English.

Where is this?
Is this Germany? Is England in Poland? What is the capital of England?

No, this isn't No, England isn't in The capital of Germany. This is Poland. England is England is England. in Britain. London.

Is Wales in Is this France? Germany?

What is the capital of Wales?

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No, this isn't France. This is Wales.

No, Wales isn't in The capital of Germany. Wales is Wales is in Britain. Cardiff.

Is this Spain?

Is Scotland in France?

What is the capital of Scotland?

No, this isn't Spain. This is Scotland.

No, Scotland isn't The capital of in France. Scotland Scotland is is in Britain. Edinburgh.

Is this Italy?

Is Northern Ireland in Italy?

What is the capital of Northern Ireland?

No, this isn't Italy. This is Northern Ireland.

No, Northern Ireland isn't in Italy. Northern Ireland is in the United Kingdom.

The capital of Northern Ireland is Belfast.

Is the United Where is this? Kingdom in America?

Tell me more.

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No, the United Kingdom isn't in This is the America. The United Kingdom. United Kingdom is in Europe.

England, Wales and Scotland are countries in Britain. England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are countries in the United Kingdom. London, Belfast, Edinburgh and Cardiff are capital cities. London is the capital of Britain.

This is England.

Q - Is England a city? A - No, England isn't a city. England is a country. Q - And London. Is London a city or a country? A - London is a city, a capital city. London is the capital city of England. Q - Is London in Germany? A - No, London isn't in Germany. London is in England.

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Now you - make up the same dialogue for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Q - Is Wales .......... ? A - No, Wales ........... .

Who is this?/Who are they?


Who is this? What is her name? Her name is Ingrid Bergman What is his name? His name is Napolean Bonaparte. What are their names? Where does she come from? She comes from Sweden Where does he come from? Where What does she nationality live? is she? She's Swedish What nationality is he? He's French.

It's Ingrid.

She's dead.

Who is this?

Where does he live?

It's Napoleon.

He comes from He's dead. France. Where do they come from?

Who are they?

What Where do nationality they live? are they? John Lennon and George Harrison are dead. They're Paul lives British. in England and Ringo lives in Monte Carlo.

They're 'The Beatles'.

Their names are John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison.

They come from England.

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Note:
Where do you come from? = Where were you born or raised.

Where do you live? = Where do you live now.

For example: Me: - "I come from England, but I live in Germany."

What to say
Question "What's your name?" "Where do you come from?" "Where do you live?" "What nationality are you?" Short answer "It's Lynne Hand." "From England." "In Darmstadt." "I'm English." Long answer "My name is Lynne Hand." "I come from England." "I live in Darmstadt." "My nationality is English."

When asked questions about themselves people often give short one-word answers:Question "What's your name?" "Where do you come from?" "What country do you come from?" "Where are you from?" "Where do you live?" Short one - word answer "Lynne Hand." "England." "England" "England" "Darmstadt."

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"What nationality are you?"

"English."

Naturally Speaking
Follow the dialogue. What's your name please? Do you come from London? Do you live in Derby? Are you English? Thank you. Mr. Bean. No I come from Derby. No, I live in London. Yes, I am. You're welcome.

9. Present Simple - "I do." vs. Present Continuous - "I am doing."

! "What do you do?" = What is your job? vs. "What are you doing?" = What are you actually doing right
now? For example: Q - What do you do? A - I'm a teacher. Q - What are you doing? A - I'm teaching.

The Present Simple vs. Present Continuous - when do we use them?


Regular and repeated actions (always, often, sometimes, never). "I always boil the kettle before I make the tea."

Things that are always true.

General facts about our lives.

Something that is happening now.

Temporary situations.

To describe change, development, progress.

"Water boils at 100 degrees." "English is a popular

"The kettle isn't boiling." "I am in my lesson, so I'm

"I am studying

"Is the kettle boiling yet?" "My English is improving."

"I always "I like speak English English."

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language in business." "It never snows in Germany in the summer."

in my lessons."

speaking English." "It isn't snowing, the sun is shining.

English for a year at University." -

"It often snows in the winter."

"I enjoy snow."

Let's ask a few questions about Mr Bean.

Q- "What does Mr Bean do?" A- "He's a teacher." Q- "Is he sitting?" A- "No, he isn't sitting, he's standing.

Q- "What does he teach?" A- "He teaches English." Q- "What is he doing?" A- "He's holding a flag."

Q- "Where does he work?"


A- "He works at a language school in London."

Q- "Is he working there today?"


A- "No, he isn't working there today, it's shut."

Q- "What is he doing today?. A- "He's driving to Nottingham." Q- "Does he often drive to Nottingham." A- "No, he usually takes the train."

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10.Adjectives for people, places and things


Adjectives to describe someone's appearance
beautiful (women only) handsome (men only) pretty (girls only) good looking (men/women/boys) ugly (men and women)

attractive

(men, women, boys or girls)

An adjective is a word that modifies a noun to tell you more about it. Adjectives never change. They are never plural. For example:This is a nice cake. Adjectives go before their nouns. They're nice people. Adjectives go before their nouns.

Adjectives for people and places - appearances


beautiful pretty ugly

Adjectives for personality (people) or characteristics (places and things)


lovely nice OK all right horrible terrible awful

Questions for people, places and things


For people Question Answer

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Appearance

What does David look like? What is he like? (What's he like?)

Oh, he's a handsome man. He's tall with fair hair. He's a lovely man.

Personality

For places Appearance

Question What is Tuscany like? (What's Tuscany like?) What is Tuscany like? (What's Tuscany like?)

Answer Oh, it's a very pretty place.

Characteristics

It's a lovely place.

For things

Question What is the new Jaguar car like? (What's the new Jaguar car like?)

Answer

Appearance

Oh, it's a beautiful car.

What is the new Jaguar car like? Characteristics (What's the new Jaguar car like?)

It's a very comfortable car.

Opposites
big / large "It's a large animal." small "It's a small animal."

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clean "She's a clean little girl."

dirty "She's a dirty little girl."

friendly "They're friendly people."

unfriendly "They're unfriendly people."

expensive "It's an expensive car."

cheap "It's a cheap car."

good "He's a good boy."

bad "He's a bad boy."

tall "He's a tall man."

short "He's a short man."

long "She has long hair."

short "She has short hair."

comfortable "It's a comfortable chair."

uncomfortable "They're uncomfortable chairs."

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happy "It's a happy face." new "It's a new car."

sad "It's a sad face."

old "It's an old car."

Naturally Speaking

Follow the dialogue. Mr Bean meets Mr Breuer again at a party. Mr Bean: Mr Breuer: Mr Bean: Mr Breuer: Mr Bean: Mr Breuer: Mr Bean: Mr Breuer: Mr Bean: Hello, Mr Breuer. It's nice to see your again. Mr Bean, what a nice surprise! How are you? I'm fine thanks, and how is Mrs Breuer? She's OK thank you. She's getting a new teacher next week, a Miss Burton. What's she like? Don't worry she's very nice. She's really friendly. Oh that's good to know. You come from Derby, don't you Mr Bean? Yes, that's right. What's it like? It's a big city in the Midlands. It's a really nice city to live in and the people their are very friendly. What's Dresden like? Dresden is a very large city in the East of Germany. It's beautiful in parts but quite ugly in others. There have been a lot of changes recently. Yes, I can imagine.

Mr Breuer:

Mr Bean:

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Note !
all right, awful, bad, beautiful, big, cheap, clean, comfortable, dirty, expensive, friendly, good, happy, horrible, large, long, lovely, new, nice, OK, sad, short, small, tall, terrible, uncomfortable and unfriendly are all adjectives - they describe nouns very, quite, really and slightly are all modifiers - they change (modify) the adjectives

11. Likes, Dislikes and Invitations


Do you like ...?
To talk about liking or disliking something, you can use verb + -ing with:-

enjoy | like | love | hate


Asking and answering questions:-

Question Do you enjoy learning English? Does he like living in Germany?

Answer

Answer No, I hate it.

Yes, I love it. Yes, he loves it.

No, he hates it.

Did you love the Beatles in the 60s? Yes, I loved them. No, I hated them. Do you hate football? Yes, I hate it. No, I love it.

To invite someone to do something, you can use verb + -ing with:feel like | fancy Asking and answering questions:-

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Question

Answer

Answer

Do you feel like going out tonight? Yes, I'd love to. No, I don't feel like it. Do you fancy going for a drive? Yes, I'd love to. No, I don't feel like it.

Love - Hate
After some verbs (love, like, don't/doesn't mind, hate) you can use a noun, a pronoun or a verb +ing.

Don't mind Love Noun (coffee) I love coffee. Like I like coffee. I don't mind coffee. I don't mind him. I don't mind flying. Hate I hate coffee.

Pronoun (him) I love him.

I like him.

I hate him.

Verb (flying)

I love flying.

I like flying.

I hate flying.

How about doing something? vs Would you like to do something?


To invite someone to do something you can also use:-

Question How about going out tonight?

Answer

Answer

Yes, I'd love to.

No, I don't feel like it. No, I don't feel like it. No, thanks.

Would you like to go out tonight? Yes, I'd love to. How about having a drink? Would you like to have a drink? Yes, I'd love to.

Yes, I'd love one. No, thank you.

Note. 'How about ...' is informal. 'Would you like to ...' is formal.

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Now let's see how Mr Bean does it...


Mr Bean is at home when his wife comes in... Mr Bean: Mrs Bean: Mr Bean: Mrs Bean: Mr Bean: Mrs Bean: Hello, darling. Do you fancy going out tonight? Oh, no thanks, I don't really feel like it tonight. How about renting a film instead. OK. Do you feel like watching the new Bruce Willis film, Die Hard 13? Oh, no. I hate him. Do you like Julia Roberts? I don't mind her. Well I really like her. Let's rent her new film then.

12. Offering, Accepting and Refusing Politely


Would you like ...?
How to offer a cup of coffee to someone else:

Offering Formal Informal Very informal Would you like a cup of coffee? A cup of coffee? Coffee?

Yes/No
How to accept or decline a cup of coffee:

Accepting Formal Yes, please.

Refusing No, thank you.

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Informal Very informal

Yes, I'd like some. I'd love one.

No, thanks. No, thanks.

How do you take it?


Saying how you would like your coffee...

Black with sugar, please.

White, no sugar, please.

White with sugar, please.

Black, no sugar, please.

A little milk, but no sugar, please.

Now let's see how Mr Bean does it...


Mr Bean is in the staff room at school. He is making a cup of coffee. Miss Smith comes in ... Mr Bean: Miss Smith: Mr Bean: Miss Smith: Hello, Miss Smith. Would you like a cup of coffee? I'm just making some. Oh, yes please, that would be lovely. How do you take it? With milk and sugar please.

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Mr Bean makes the coffee Mr Bean: Miss Smith: Here you are. Thank you.

Their colleague Mr Martin comes in Miss Smith: Mr Martin: Mr Bean: Mr Martin: Good morning Mr Martin, coffee? Oh, great! Yes please, I'd love one. Milk and sugar? A little milk and no sugar, please.

An English family says 'Hello!' Mr and Mrs Bell are married.

This is Mary Bell.

Mrs Bell:
"Hello I'm Mary Bell, George's wife. George is my husband." This is George Bell.

Mr Bell:
"Hello I'm George Bell, Mary's husband. Mary is my wife."

Mr and Mrs Bell:


"Here are our children. We are their parents."

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This is Carol.

Carol:

"Hello! I'm Carol Bell."

"This is Robert. He's my big brother. I'm his

Carol:
This is Robert.

sister."

"Hello! I'm Robert Bell. I'm her brother. She's

Robert:

my little sister."

Carol and Robert :


"Here are our parents. We're their children."

Carol and Robert:


You have already met Mary.

"This is our mother."

"I'm Robert and Carol's mother. Carol is

Mrs Bell:

my daughter and Robert is my son."

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Carol and Robert:


You have already met George.

"This is our father."

"I'm Robert and Carol's father. Carol is

Mr Bell:

my daughter and Robert is my son."

The Bell Family Do you remember Mr and Mrs Bell and their children Carol and Robert? Mr Bell's parents are dead and he doesn't have any brothers and sisters, he was an only child. Mrs Bell's parents are still alive, she has a younger sister and an older brother. Let's learn some more about them:

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Here are Mary's parents. Mr and Mrs Richards, Emily and Edgar. She's their daughter. "Hello. We are Carol and Robert's grandparents. Carol and Robert are our grandchildren." Mr Richards: "I'm their grandfather. Carol is our granddaughter and Robert is our grandson. " Mrs Richards: "I'm their grandmother. We're George's in laws. I'm his mother-in-law and Edgar is his father-in-law. George is our son-in-law."

This is Mr and Mrs Robert's other daughter Anne, Miss Richards.

"Hello. I'm Anne. I'm Mary's younger sister. That makes me Carol and Robert's aunt. Carol is my niece and Robert is my nephew. Mary's husband George is my brother-in-law, I'm his sister-in-law. I'm not married, I'm single."

And this is their son Charles.

"Hi. I'm Charles. I'm Mary's older brother. That makes me Carol and Robert's uncle. Carol is my niece and Robert is my nephew. Mary's husband George is my brother-in-law, I'm his brother-inlaw too. I was married, but not any more, I'm divorced. I have one child, a baby girl."

This is Emma. She is Charles' baby. Charles is her father. She is Carol and Robert's cousin, they are her cousins too. Mary and Anne are her aunts, she is Mary and Anne's niece. George is her uncle, she is his niece. 42

DIRECTIONS
Simple Directions

Right

Left

Straight ahead

For example

The factory is straight ahead. The office block is on the left. You are here. The train station is on the right.

Ask the right question Question


Where is the office block please? Could you tell me where the factory is, please?

Answer
It's on the left. It's straight ahead.

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Excuse me. Do you know where the train station is?

It's on the right.

Where is ... in the town?

Where is the church?


The church is on the far left.

Where is the train station?


The train station is to the right of the church.

Where is the school?


The school is in the middle.

Where is the airport?


The airport is to the left of the hospital.

Where is the hospital?


The hospital is on the far right.

or...
The church is next to the train station. The train station is between the church and the school. The school is between the station and the airport. The airport is between the school and the hospital. The hospital is next to the airport.

near

far

Movement

Over the bridge

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Through the tunnel

Along / Down the road

Go upstairs

Go downstairs

Take the lift up / down.

Ask the right question More Questions


How do I get to ... ? What's the best way to ...? Is it near? Is it far?

Vocabulary

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A bottle of ..... A bowl of .....

A cup of .....

A glass of ..... A pot of ..... A slice of ...

The waiter is coming. In his right hand he is carrying a tray. On the tray is a bottle of wine and two glasses. He has a napkin over his left arm. He has dark hair. He is wearing black shoes, a pair of black trousers and a grey waistcoat over a white shirt with a black bow tie.

A waiter/waitress takes your order. or or or

"Are you ready to order?" "Would you like to order?" "May I take your order?" "What would you like?"

Can you think of anything else a waiter might say to take your order?

Naturally Speaking

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Now let's see how Mr Bean does it...

Mr Bean is at a cafe with his colleague Mr Smith. They are sitting at a table. The waiter comes to take their order. Waiter: Mr Bean: Waiter (to Mr Smith): Mr Smith: Waiter: Mr Smith: Waiter: Mr Bean: Waiter: Are you ready to order? Yes, I'd like a cup of coffee and a doughnut, please. And what would you like? Oh, I'll have a pot of tea and a slice of apple pie. Would you like cream with your pie? No, thank you. Could I have ice cream with it instead? Yes, of course. And may I have a glass of water too? Certainly.

Paying in a cafe
Questions
Who? What? Where? When? People Things Places Time

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Paying in a cafe Note! To drink is a verb and drink is a noun. To order is a verb and order is a noun.
Vocabulary

The customer chooses from the menu. The waiter takes the order. The waiter brings the food and drink.

The customer eats the food and drinks the drink. The customer bill. The customer asks for the pays the bill. The customer leaves a tip.

Mr Bean is a customer.

This is a waiter. 1 x cup coffee 1 x doughnut 1 x pot tea 1 x slice apple pie

This is food.

To eat.

This is a bill.

To pay.

This is a tip.

This is a menu.

This is an order.

This is drink.

To drink

Mr Bean and Mr Smith are finishing their drinks. They have to go back to work now. Mr Bean offers to pay for the coffee.

When you want to pay. or

"I'll pay." "My treat."

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or

"This is on me."

Can you think of anything else you might say when you want to pay?

Naturally Speaking Now let's see how Mr Bean does it...

Mr Bean is at a cafe with his colleague Mr Smith. They are sitting at the table when the waiter comes to take their order.
Mr Smith : Mr Bean: Mr Smith: Mr Bean (to the waiter): Waiter: Mr Bean: Waiter: Mr Bean: Waiter: Shall we get the bill? Yes, I'll pay though, my treat. Thank you, that's very kind. I'll get it next time. Excuse me. Could we have the bill please? Certainly. Do you want to pay together or separately? Together please. How much is that? Here you are. That's 5.50, please. Here you are - 6.00, keep the change. Thank you.

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English numbers (1,2,3...10)


Numbers Whole numbers 1 to 10 Symbol 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Word Nought One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten

More numbers (10, 11, 12 ...20) Whole numbers 10 to 20 Symbol 10 11 12 13 14


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Word Ten Eleven Twelve Thirteen Fourteen

Pronounce It

15 16 17 18 19 20

Fifteen Sixteen Seventeen Eighteen Nineteen Twenty

More numbers (21 - 1000) Whole numbers 21 to 1000 In figures 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 101 200 300 400 500 600
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In words twenty-one twenty-two twenty-three twenty-four twenty-five twenty-six twenty-seven twenty-eight twenty-nine thirty fourty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety a hundred a hundred and one two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred six hundred

700 800 900 1000

seven hundred eight hundred nine hundred a thousand

Ordinal numbers (1 - 1000) Ordinal Numbers Cardinal numbers express quantity: two eggs (2 eggs), thirty-five people (35 people) etc... Ordinal numbers indicate order or rank: first (1st), second (2nd), third (3rd) etc... The definite article"the" normally goes in front of any ordinal number: e.g. "Queen Elizabeth the second." For most ordinal numbers, the ending '-th' is used, with one or two exceptions for those inevitable irregular numbers:CARDINAL NUMERAL 1 2 3 5 9 12 IN WORDS one two three five nine twelve ORDINAL NUMERAL 1st 2nd 3rd 5th 9th 12th IN WORDS the first the second the third the fifth the ninth the twelfth

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Ordinal numbers 1 to 19 In figures 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th In words the first the second the third the fourth the fifth the sixth the seventh the eighth the ninth the tenth the eleventh the twelfth the thirteenth the fourteenth the fifteenth the sixteenth the seventeenth the eighteenth the nineteenth

Ordinal numbers such as 21st, 33rd etc are formed by combining a CARDINAL ten with an ORDINAL unit. The "y" of "twenty", "thirty", "forty", etc. is changed to "ieth":In figures 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th
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In words the twentieth the twenty-first the twenty-second the twenty-third the twenty-fourth the twenty-fifth the twenty-sixth the twenty-seventh the twenty-eighth

29th 30th 40th 50th 60th 70th 80th 90th 100th 101st 1000th

the twenty-ninth the thirtieth the fortieth the fiftieth the sixtieth the seventieth the eightieth the ninetieth the hundredth the hundred and first the thousandth

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