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Educator Guide

Prepared by: Teachers Andrew Pitoulis, Carinna Pellet and Rachel White Jennifer Martino, Director, OLPC Canada Amanda Stokes, OLPC Canada Program Assistant

Message to Educators
One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Canada, a core program of the Belinda Stronach Foundation (TBSF), aims to empower Aboriginal youth to play an active role in their own education by enhancing access to learning centered technology. TBSF has partnered with Vale, the Bank of Montreal and the Government of Ontario to provide 3600 laptops to children 6-12 years of age in rural, remote and urban communities. OLPC Canada is currently active in 14 schools located in 7 provinces and 2 territories. TBSF has chosen the 1:1 computing model globally implemented by One Laptop per Child to help address the identified educational gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth.1 Students who participate in 1:1 computing initiatives are found to have higher academic achievement and increased engagement.2 By implementing a 1:1 computing model in schools across the country, OLPC Canada seeks to contribute toward the national goal to create an educational climate that will encourage Aboriginal youth to take an interest in learning and build on the proficiency of Aboriginal youth in new technologies.3 The role of the teacher is recognized as a critical factor in the success of 1:1 computing programs. Additional factors critical to student success across 1:1 technology settings include:

Having a strong commitment from school leadership Developing consistent and supportive administrative policies Creating professional development opportunities for teachers, particularly the sharing of best practices4

The Belinda Stronach Foundation appreciates the vital role of educators and community leaders in furthering access to technology among Aboriginal youth. We would like to thank you for participating in the OLPC Canada program and for providing opportunities for students to use the XO laptop at school and at home. It is our hope that this Educator Guide will serve to facilitate integration of the laptop as a tool to further learning and student engagement. Thank you for all that you do!

Jennifer Martino, Director, OLPC Canada The Belinda Stronach Foundation

Tiffani Steer, Executive Director The Belinda Stronach Foundation

1 2 2 3 4

Technology, Learning and Assessment (9:1). Science Daily.

John Richards & Megan Scott (2009, December). Aboriginal Education: Strengthening the Foundations. CPRN. Various Authors (January 2010). Special Edition: Educational Outcomes & Research from 1:1 Computing Settings. The Journal of Various Authors (January 2010). Special Edition: Educational Outcomes & Research from 1:1 Computing Settings. The Journal of Government of Canada (2008, March). Hope or Heartbreak: Aboriginal Youth and Canadas Future. Policy Research Initiative. Boston College (2010, January). A computer per student leads to higher performance than traditional classroom settings.

Table of Contents
Message to Educators ............................................................................................................................................................. 1 The Belinda Stronach Foundation...................................................................................................................................... 4 OLPC Canada............................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Partners ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 5 Pilot Sites ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 British Columbia ................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Alberta ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Saskatchewan ........................................................................................................................................................................ 7 Manitoba.................................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Northwest Territories ........................................................................................................................................................ 7 Nunavut ................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Ontario ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Quebec ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 Newfoundland and Labrador ....................................................................................................................................... 10 Lesson Plans ............................................................................................................................................................................ 11 Classifying Instruments .................................................................................................................................................. 12 Handout: Instrument Families ................................................................................................................................ 14 Self-Evaluation .............................................................................................................................................................. 15 Music Exploration and Creation .................................................................................................................................. 16 Play a song with the XO laptop ............................................................................................................................... 17 Marking Scheme: Musical Composition............................................................................................................... 19 Creating Geometrical Shapes........................................................................................................................................ 20 Worksheet- Creating Geometrical Shapes in Turtle Art ............................................................................... 25 Answer Key - Creating Geometrical Shapes in Turtle Art ............................................................................ 26 Equal Fractions .................................................................................................................................................................. 27 Assessment: Rubric ..................................................................................................................................................... 43 Monthly Budget ................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Example: Monthly Budget ......................................................................................................................................... 48 Assessment ..................................................................................................................................................................... 49 P.o.e.t.r.y. .............................................................................................................................................................................. 50 Dramatic Reading ............................................................................................................................................................. 51 Dramatic Reading Rubric .......................................................................................................................................... 53 Story Prediction ................................................................................................................................................................. 54 Story Prediction Rubric ............................................................................................................................................. 57 Word Families .................................................................................................................................................................... 58 2

Self-Assessment Procedure, Part 1........................................................................................................................ 64 Assessment, Part 2 ....................................................................................................................................................... 66 Task Card ......................................................................................................................................................................... 67 Anecdotal Observations Sheet ................................................................................................................................ 68 Heat Energy Cycle ............................................................................................................................................................. 69 Rubric: Heat Energy Cycle ........................................................................................................................................ 72 Types of Energy ................................................................................................................................................................. 73 Patterns of Settlement Slideshow............................................................................................................................... 76 Slideshow Rubric .......................................................................................................................................................... 79 Community .......................................................................................................................................................................... 80 Student Challenge ........................................................................................................................................................ 86 Student Homework Challenge................................................................................................................................. 87 XO Task Cards ......................................................................................................................................................................... 89

The Belinda Stronach Foundation


OLPC Canada is a core program of The Belinda Stronach Foundation (TBSF), an organization committed to advancing human potential and achievement through individual empowerment and social change. The Foundation builds partnerships with individuals, non-governmental organizations, businesses large and small, as well as other foundations who work in Canada and around the world to confront global challenges with innovative solutions. For more information about TBSF please visit www.tbsf.ca.

OLPC Canada
Aboriginal youth are the fastest growing population in Canada, but many do not have access to the tools they need to realize their full potential and explore opportunities. Together with members of Aboriginal communities, corporate Canada and various governments, TBSF has brought the internationally-successful program, One Laptop per Child (OLPC), to Canada. TBSF has distributed 3,600 laptops to children aged six to twelve in Aboriginal communities across Canada. With support from Vale, BMO Financial Group and the Government of Ontario, OLPC Canada leverages leading-edge technology combined with culturally relevant programming to deliver a unique platform of learning tools to Aboriginal children. For more information about OLPC Canada, please visit www.olpccanada.com. The global OLPC initiative has roots at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab in Boston, where the XO laptop was designed. Branded A real world laptop for real world change, the XO laptop was designed considering everything from extreme environmental conditions to technological issues such as local language support. As a result, the XO laptop is an extremely durable, functional, energy-efficient, responsive, tool designed for joyful, selfempowered learning. For more information about OLPC, please visit www.laptop.org.

Partners
OLPC Canada is a testament to the strength of partnerships and the important role the private sector, government and NGOs can play in strengthening communities and strategically investing in Canadian children. The program has been generously supported by Vale, BMO and the Government of Ontario.

Various partners have also contributed significantly to the program through the development of Custom Content and Gifts in Kind.

Actor and Motivational Speaker Dakota House acts as an OLPC Canada Ambassador, as an extension of his work with the organization Going Miles.

Pilot Sites

British Columbia

Maaqtusiis School, Ahousaht First Nation, Ahousaht


Ahousaht is located in a small bay on Vancouver Island's west coast. With approximately half of the 2000 members reside on reserve, it is the most populated reserve in the area. It is also the largest of the Nuu-chah-nulth nations. The reserve sites are only accessible by boat or float plane. The school has a population of 130 students and 8 teachers.

Alberta

Gift Lake School, Mtis Settlement, Gift Lake


The Gift Lake Mtis Settlement is in Northern Alberta, approximately 200 km northeast of Grande Prairie within the municipal district of Big Lakes. The community consists of approximately 1000 members, and the school has a population of 179 students, 14 teachers, 15 Teaching assistants and 2 literacy workers. 6

Saskatchewan

Kakisiwew School Ochapowace First Nation, Whitewood


Ochapowace is one of four reserves that make up the Crooked Lakes reserve. There are 1380 band members, with 560 living on reserve. Band members are Muskego, of Northern Obijwe decent. The school has a population of 96 students, 10 teachers and 4 teaching assistants.

Manitoba

Otetiskiwin Kiskinwamahtowekamik (O.K. School) Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, Nelson House


The Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation has over 4,600 members, 60% of which are between 13 and 30 years old. The community success of their youth and this is reflected in the programs and development they work so hard on. The nation is also always working on maintaining their ageold traditions, spiritual beliefs and their language Cree- which is the most widely spoken aboriginal language across Canada. Of course, specifically in Nelson House, a separate dialect of Cree has evolved. Although growing and developing like most first nations territories in Canada, many Nisichawayasihk, especially older individuals, still follow traditional lifestyles by fishing, hunting, and gathering.

Northwest Territories

Weledeh Catholic School, Yellowknife


Weledeh Catholic School is situated in an urban area of Yellowknife, with a population of 386 students, 29 teachers and 12 assistants. The school is tri-lingual, with most students speaking English, French and Tlicho (formerly known as Dogrib). Many of Weledeh's students are of the Tlicho First Nation, a branch of the Dene Aboriginals in NWT.

Nunavut

Simon Alaittuq School, Rankin Inlet


Rankin Inlet is a fly in Inuit community on the Kudlulik Peninsula in Nunavut, Canada. Next to the Capital city, Iqaluit, Rankin Inlet is the next most populous community in Nunavut with approximately 3000 inhabitants. Simon Alattuq School is a middle school with a population of 107 students, 7 teachers and 4 teaching assistants.

Ontario
John C. Yesno Education Centre Eabametoong First Nation, Eabamet Lake
Eabametoong, also known as Fort Hope, is only accessible by airplane or by boat. However, during the winter months a winter/ice road is available. Just on the shore of the Eabamet Lake, Eabametoong is only about 300 Km North East of Thunder Bay, Ontario. The two major languages in Eabametoong are Ojibwe (mainly used by adults and in the home by families) and English (becoming predominant among youth and in schools). John C. Yesno Education Centre, runs from grades 1-9 and has a population of 199 students and 12 teachers. However, being a smaller community, there is no high school in Fort Hope, meaning students who wish to pursue further education must relocate to larger areas such as Thunder Bay.

J.R. Nakogee School Attawapiskat First Nation, Attawapiskat


Attawapiskat, in the local language Cree, means People of the Parting of the rocks as it is located at the mouth of the Attawapiskat River, at James Bay, Ontario. Attawapiskat has grown from initial basic community of tents and teepees in the 1950s to a thriving small town with permanent buildings, built in the late 1960s and 70s. Being a community that is quite isolated, many who moved onto the territory at that time are still living a traditional lifestyle following original ways of life and thinking. Goose hunts in the spring and fall are still a popular tradition, as is making a living out of the land outside of the community. The school has a population of 360 students, 18 teachers and 18 Teaching assistants.

Peetabeck Academy, Fort Albany


Also near James Bay, is Fort Albany: A community situated along the southern shore of the the Albany River. This region is the oldest, and was once one of the most import ant, of the Hudsons Bay Company posts. The only road into Fort Albany is the winter road, generally open from January- March. Otherwise, the only access into the community is by air or water. Transportation within the area includes small motor boats and canoes during the summer (for hunting, fishing and short-distance travelling) and during the winter people travel by skidoos. Within the region, the majority of the population speaks Mushkegowuk Cree, a dialect of Cree spoken by particular groups of Cree First Nation members. Many of the younger men and women are bilingual in both English and Cree, as children are taught both Cree and English at schools. The community as a whole speaks a variety of different languages including English, French, Cree, Ojibwe and Oji-Cree.

Shawanosowe School Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island


Whitefish River First Nation is an Ojibway nation located along both Lake Huron and Georgian Bay, just North of manitoulin Island, Ontario. The people in this region are collectively known as Anishinabek consisting of the Ojibwe, Odawa and Pottawatomi people. There are 1200 members of the WRFN, with 440 living in the community while the rest move to more urban locations to work and live. The school has a population of 58 students and 8 teachers.

Kawenni:io Elementary School Six Nations of the Grand River, Hagersville


Six Nations of the Grand River is the most populated reserve in Canada. It is a united group made up of six initially-separate nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca, Tuscarora and Onondaga, who have all joined together under the Great Tree of Peace. Our partner school Kawenni:io.Gaweni:yo is tri-lingual, speaking Mohawk, Cayuga and English. The school has a population of 90 students and 8 teachers.

Lloyd S. King Elementary Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, Hagersville
Lloyd S. King Elementary is located on the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation Territory. The community consists of about 1785 members with approximately half of its members living on the reserve. The community has is equipped with a school, social and health services, a children's centre, church, commercial plaza and recreation complex. Lloyd S. King has a population of 104 students, 11 teachers and 4 teaching assistants. Students at the school speak both English and Anishinaabe (an Ojibwe language).

Quebec

Ulluriaq School Inuit community of Kangiqsualujjuaq, Nunavik


Nunavik, is a vast area, making up about a third of all of Quebec (bigger than the state of California). In the local dialect of Inuktitut, Kangiqsualujjuaq" means "the very large bay" and Nunavik, being a large community, means "place to live". While the first language for the majority of the population is Inuktitut, many Inuit also speak English and French as second and third languages. The Inuit inhabitants of Nunavik call themselves Nunavimmiut. Ulluriaq school has a population of 140 students, 13 teachers and 5 resource assistants.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Jens Haven Memorial School Inuit community of Nain, Labrador


In 2005, Nain became the administrative capital of Nunatsiavut, an autonomous area claimed and named by the Inuit people of Labrador. Within this area there are five Inuit Community Governments: Hopedale, Postville, Makkovik, Rigolet and Nain. The Inuit people of these regions call themselves Nunatsiavummiut. The goal of this collective group is to protect and preserve the Inuit culture and language. In Inuttut, a Nunatsiavummiut dialect of the Inuit language, Nunatsiavut means: Our Beautiful Land. The school has a population of 125 students, 8 teachers and 4 assistants.

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Lesson Plans

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Classifying Instruments
Goals: Students will classify instruments according to instrument families and explore sounds. Students will use TamTam Mini to create a variety of sounds. Grade: 5,6,7 Subject: Music Lesson Plan Scope: Standard Teachers Role: Assessment Teacher Facilitates Students direction towards Self Evaluation goal. Resources: Activities: TamTam Mini Handout Laptop Keyboard/ Piano Keyboard Guide Introduction: Students will explore sounds using TamTam Mini and classify instruments according to instrument families. Set Up: The teacher will explain the 4 main classifications of instruments (wind, string, brass and percussion) as well as how sound is made for each. Students will work in pairs, either chosen by teacher or by students. Students Will: 1. From Homeview, choose TamTam Mini. 2. Students can explore the different sounds by clicking on each sound image and by using the keyboard. 3. Once they have explored, students will click on the first family of instruments: Strings. Using the handout as a guide, they will try to identify each instrument, and play its sound. Using a checkmark, they keep track of all the instruments they find. 4. They will work through each family of instruments, identifying each one. 5. Students will then return to the full view of instruments. One student will name an instrument from the handout at random and the other student will try to find it from the pictures. Students can take turns naming and identifying. Extensions 1) Students and teachers can play a game together. The teacher names an instrument, and the students have to find it in the main view and play a sound. Speed could be a factor in this game. 2) Students can play "Guess Who." One student will describe an instrument, such as: This is a string instrument. It has more than 3 strings. The sound is made with a bow. And students guess the answer: Violin. Or, This is a wind instrument. The sound is made by blowing air through it. There are air holes for the fingers. Answer: flute

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Example Activity: Connect each subcategory to the main category.

Example Activity 2: Add further descriptions to each category.

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Handout: Instrument Families


How sound is made: Brass Wind String Percussion Keyboards By By By By By hitting or shaking something buzzing the lips strumming or plucking the string hitting a key blowing air into it

Find each of these instruments: STRINGS Checkmark Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like. Acoustic Guitar Banjo Cello Distorted Guitar Electric Bass Guitar Electric Guitar Folk Guitar Grand Piano Guitar Harp Lute Sitar Chinese Guitar Super Electric Guitar Violin PERCUSSION Wind Chime African Finger Drum Bell Chinese Marimba Finger Cymbals Marimba Triangle KEYBOARDS Alien!! Electric Organ Flower? Organ 14 Checkmark Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like. Checkmark Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like.

Piano Synthesizer BRASS Tuba Flugelhorn WIND INSTRUMENTS Checkmark Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like. Checkmark Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like.

Ocarina Harmonica Didgeridoo Wooden Flute WIND INSTRUMENTS Checkmark (REEDS) Clarinet Soprano Saxophone Alto Saxophone Oboe

Extension: Describe what it looks like or sounds like.

Self-Evaluation
1 (correct very few times) ----------- 5 (correct all the time) Identifying how sound is made in each instrument family Identifying String Instruments Identifying Percussion Instruments Identifying Keyboard Instruments Identifying Brass Instruments Identifying Wind Instruments Classifying Instruments into their families OVERALL 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

_________/ 35

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Music Exploration and Creation


Goals: Students will perform a melody with accompaniment. Students will explore the various sounds and accompaniments in Tamtam Mini Grade: 6,7 or 8 Subject: Music Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher guides students discovery Marking Scheme included Resources: Activities:

Piano keyboard printouts Earphones or earbuds for each student, if possible

TamTamMini

Modifications and Adaptations: Students use all notes on the keyboard to create a composition. Teacher demonstrates and uses a playback technique to teach the musical tune. Introduction: Teacher performs a song on the XO using the accompaniment. Students can use their music sheets to sing and follow along. Set Up:

The teacher sings the melody and teaches the students through rote, using the words only. The teacher then introduces the piano keyboard printout and shows the students how to play the melody on their XO's. Students and teacher sing and play the melody together.
Students Will: 1. From Homeview, choose TamTamMini. 2. Students can click on the images to explore sounds. Each image corresponds to a different sound. 3. Students can perform the melodies from the sounds that they choose. 4. To add drumming to the background, click on one of the drum sets on the left of the screen. Set the beats per bar (suggestion: less than 8 bpb) 5. Set the complexity of the beat (suggestion: start with low complexity). 6. Set the Tempo (suggestion: slower tempo to start). 7. Set the volume accordingly. 8. Press the arrow to start the drumming accompaniment. Students can play along. Extension

Use a variety of different sounds in performing a melody. Create variations by changing the drumbeat, complexity, or tempo. Perform a piece with a friend by playing the tune together on two XO's, following the same drum beat. Find a way to make the two melodies work together using complimentary sounds.
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Screenshot: TamTamMini

Play a song with the XO laptop


MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB (with piano keys) Mary had a little lamb little lamb little lamb E D C D E E E D D D E E E Mary had a little lamb Its fleece was white as snow. E D C D E E E E D D E D C MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB (With XO keys) Mary had a little lamb little lamb little lamb E D C D E E E D D D E E E Mary had a little lamb Its fleece was white as snow E D C D E E E E D D E D C

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TWINKLE TWINKLE LITTLE STAR (With piano keys) Twinkle twinkle little star how I wonder what you are C C G G AA G F F E E D D C Up above the world so high, like a diamond in the sky G GF F E E D G G F F E E D Twinkle twinkle little star how I wonder what you are C C G G AA G F F E E D D C TWINKLE TWINKLE LITTLE STAR (with XO keys) Twinkle twinkle little star how I wonder what you are C C G G AA G F F E E D D C Up above the world so high, like a diamond in the sky G GF F E E D G G F F E E D Twinkle twinkle little star how I wonder what you are C C G G AA G F F E E D D C

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Marking Scheme: Musical Composition


Student Name: ______________________________ Melody Student performs the melody with correct notes Student performs the melody with correct timing ___ /5 ___ /5

Accompaniment Student uses an appropriate tempo, dynamic and ___ /5 Student uses appropriate drumming and complexity All elements come together to make a comprehensive performance. ___ /5

___ /5

TOTAL ___ /25

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Creating Geometrical Shapes


Goal: Students will explore geometrical shapes and learn about angles of shapes. Introduce Turtle Art and discover the uses of geometrical shapes using the XO program. Grade: 2-5 Subject: Mathematics Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher guides Students discovery Student Worksheet Teacher facilitates Students free exploration Resources:

Any lesson material on shapes.

Activities:

Turtle Art

Introduction: Teacher will guide students and introduce how to make geometrical shapes in the Turtle Art activity. Students will then self direct their learning to explore making different shapes. Set Up:

Students have XO laptops and a copy of the work sheet.

Teacher Will 1: Introduce activity with a brief classroom discussion on geometric shapes in everyday life. Some questions that can be raised to the students are: 1. What do you call a three-sided shape? 2. What are angles and how are they measured? 3. What do you call a four-sided shape? 4. What do you call a five-sided shape? Teacher Will 2: Guide students through the steps to create a triangle in Turtle Art. (See attached screen shots with steps for programming in Turtle at end of lesson plan.) Teacher may want to guide students to come up with the qualities for a particular shape by asking questions such as: -What number do you think we need to put in the repeat command? (for # of sides) - If a triangle was three, what do you think a square might be? Students Will 1:

Follow along with teacher in creating shapes on the XO and then explore Turtle Art by typing in different values (for angles, number of sides, number of corners, etc.) to create different shapes.
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Steps for drawing in Turtle Art:

Step One- Move pointer to Turtle Art and left click to open the activity.

Step Two- Clear screen if necessary. Click on the yellow double-arrow button to open commands on left side of screen.

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Step Three- Drag the repeat command from left side panel and place on blank screen.

Step Four- Drag forward command and attach to repeat command.

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StepFive- Drag right command and attach under forward command.

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Step Six- Change the numbers (degrees) attached to the right command to 120. (You may drag the turtle to anywhere on the screen to make more shapes.)

Step Seven- Click on the rabbit at top of screen to have turtle draw the commands.

*Repeat these steps using different numbers and turtle will draw different shapes!

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Worksheet- Creating Geometrical Shapes in Turtle Art


Name:______________________________ Date:_______________________

Fill in the blanks on the chart below by either drawing the shape you have created or the values (numbers) you have input on your XO.

Turtle Commands

Shape Created

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Answer Key - Creating Geometrical Shapes in Turtle Art


Name: ANSWER KEY Date:_______________________

Fill in the blanks on the chart below by either drawing the shape you have created or the values (numbers) you have input on your XO.

Turtle Commands

Shape Created

Answers will vary as students create their own.

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Equal Fractions
Goals: Students will demonstrate and represent the concept of equivalent fractions. Students will create their own matching game on their XO demonstrating knowledge and understanding of equivalent fractions in numbers and representations. When complete, students will exchange with partners to play the Matching Game they have created, practicing knowledge and recognition. Grade: 5 Subject: Math Lesson Plan Scope:

Comprehensive

Teachers Role: Teacher directs students actions Teacher facilitates students direction towards goal Resources:

Assessment: Rubric Task Completion Activities:

Fraction circles, Cuisenaire rods, number lines, and student created representations of fractions

Memorize

Paint

Record

Modifications and Adaptations: Modification: The content, equivalent fractions, may be modified to matching

representations of whole numbers. E.g. the number 6 matching a representation of six trees Adaptations: The Challenge of creating a memorize game may be adapted to whole class, small group, and individual work. The screenshots can be shared with students to provide support when needed.

Introduction: In whole class or group instruction, students will begin by following steps in creating their first 3 sets of matched pairs: 1 set of equivalent fractions entered with numbers 1 set of equivalent fraction representations by inserting images created in the Paint activity 1 set of equivalent fraction representations by inserting images created in the Record activity Students will begin to add matching pairs independently. Students will play, and share their created games Set Up: Give a brief lesson/activity/chalkboard talk reviewing equivalent fractions. Introduce Challenge: To make a Memorize game that matches equivalent fractions (or paint activity representation of fractions). Introduce Rubric, Review Criteria Stated and ask for student input into specify goals. Extension The process of creating a memorize game is an ideal performance task. As part of a larger unit, and paired with a rubric, this process can assess higher level thinking skills of application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. This lesson can be modified to any curriculum content such as: Matching pairs of Paint representations of landscape and geographical features with places and habitat terms. 27

Procedure: Students Will, Part 1: Create a Memorize game, and add text pairs
1. From Homeview, open Memorize activity by clicking on the Memorize icon

2. In Memorize click on Create. 3. Give your game a title by entering students name into the Game Name (Students should use a Unique Game Name for sharing their games, for example Fractions [STUDENT NAME]. (The game is named Fractions in the screen shot)

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4. We will now make our first set of Equivalent Fractions by entering 1/5 in the first text box.

5. In the second text box enter 5/25. 6. Click the Add icon. 7. Students who finish early can continue adding matched text pairs of equivalent fractions.

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Students Will, Part 2: Open Paint activity, create a picture of fraction

representations and return to Memorize to insert a picture.


1. Return to the Homeview by accessing the Frame and clicking the Home View icon, or pressing the Home key on the keyboard. 2. Once in Homeview, open Paint by hovering over or right-clicking the Paint activity icon, and then clicking Start in the drop down menu.

3. In Paint, click the Shapes tab

4. Right-click the Ellipse shape and select Fill, Size : 2, and Keep Aspect. Now click the Ellipse icon to select it.

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5. Right-click on the Fill Color icon and select yellow. Right click the Stroke Color and select black.

6. From the top, left corner of Paints workspace, hold down the left (x) track pad button and drag towards the bottom right corner until the desired circle size is created.

7. Right-click (o) on the Line icon. Select Size: 2 and Keep Aspect. Now click the Line icon to select it. 8. From just outside the circle, bring the cursor to the furthest left part of the circle (or the 9 oclock position, still on the circle). 9. Hold down the left (x) track pad button and drag it right until the line has exited the circle at the furthest right side (or the 3 oclock position). 31

10. Your screen should have a yellow circle with a black outline and a black horizontal line dividing the circle into two halves

11. Select the Tools tab and click the Bucket icon. 12. Right-click on the Stroke Color and select Blue. 13. Using your track pad, position the cursor (which is now a Bucket) over the top half of the yellow circle and click to fill that area with the color blue. You have now created a representation of 1/2. 14. Click on the Activity tab and name your image by erasing Paint Activity and typing 1/2. 15. Click the Keep icon to save it to your journal.

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16. Using Frame, click or hover on the Memorize icon and click Resume to return to your create Memorize game screen.

17. Time to add the first of our matching representations. 18. Click on the Insert Picture icon under the left text box.

19. A pop-up window of your Journal will appear, select the Paint activity titled 1/2.

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Students Will, Part 3: Return to Paint activity, edit and rename a picture of a

fraction representation, and return to Memorize to insert a picture:


1. Using Frame, click on the Paint icon to return to the Paint activity.

2. Select the Tools tab, and then select the Line tool. 3. From just outside the circle at the top (or the 12 oclock position), hold down the left (x) track pad button, and drag down until the line has exited the circle at the bottom (or the 6 oclock position). 4. You now have a representation of 2/4, we will alter this to create a representation of 4/8 by drawing our line from the centre outward to the edge of the circle. (By clicking Keep Aspect under the Line tool, we are only able to draw lines vertical, horizontal, or at a 45 degree angle).

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5. Place you cursor at the centre (where the lines intersect), hold down the left (x) track pad button, and drag toward the top right corner (Half way between the end points of the horizontal and vertical lines you have already drawn) until the line exits the circle, let go of the (x) key.

6. Repeat this process drawing a line from centre to outside the circle in order to split each quarter of the circle in have, creating eighths.

7. Select the Tools tab and click the Bucket icon again. 35

8. Right-click the Stroke Color icon and select Red. 9. Using your track pad, position the cursor, which is now a Bucket over the one of the four Blue eighths parts of the top half of the circle and click to fill it with red. Repeat for the remaining eighths unitl you have 4 of the 8 (the top half) filled in with red. 10.You have now created a representation of 4/8. 11. Click on the Activity tab, and name your image by erasing Paint Activity and typing 4/8. 12. Click the Keep icon, in the top right corner, to save it to your journal.

13.Using Frame, click on the Memorize icon, or hover and click Resume to return to your create Memorize game screen.

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14.

Time to add the second of our matching Representations. Click on the Insert Picture icon

under the right text box.

15. A pop-up window of your Journal will appear, select the Paint activity titled 4/8.

16.

Click the Add icon. You have now made 2 matching pairs of Equivalent Fractions. This is

a good time to save your work. Click on the Save Game icon. 17. Students may now continue to add matching pairs of Equivalent Fractions on their own by using the steps above. Remind students to Save Game after changes are made. 37

Students Will, Part 4: Open Record activity, capture two pictures of a fraction

representation and return to Memorize to insert a picture.


1. Have a matching set of fraction representations created and ready to be photographed. 2. Return to the Home View by accessing the Frame and clicking the Home View icon, or pressing the Home key on the keyboard.

3. Once in Home View, open Record by hovering over or right-clicking the Record activity icon and then clicking Start in the drop down menu. 4. Select the Photo tab and adjust camera to capture first representation of fraction on the screen. Click the shutter icon to capture the image. The shutter icon is directly beneath

the cameras displayed image and is a white outlined circle with a small white circle inside.
The circle or button above the Power button located outside the lower right corner of the screen is also a shutter button. The photo will be displayed underneath the cameras display.

5. Adjust camera to capture second representation of fraction on the screen. Click the shutter icon to capture the image. 38

6. Click on the first representation. The image will replace the cameras display on the screen. Rename the Title. In this example, the image has been renamed 6/8 .

7. Click on the second representation. The image will replace the cameras display on the screen. Rename the Title. In this example, the image has been renamed 12/16. 8. Using Frame, click or hover on the Memorize icon and click Resume to return to your create Memorize game screen.

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9. Time to add the first of our matching Representations created in Record. Click on the Insert Picture icon under the left text box. 10. A pop-up window of your Journal will appear, select the Record activity with the title you want. In this example, it is 6/9. 11. Time to add the second of our matching Representations created in Record. Click on the Insert Picture icon under the right text box.

12. A pop-up window of your Journal will appear, select the Record activity with the title you want. In this example, it is 12/16.

13. Click the Add icon. 14. You have now made 3 matching pairs of Equivalent Fractions. This is a good time to save your work. Click on the Save Game icon. 15. Students may now continue to add matching pairs of Equivalent Fractions on their own. Remind students to Save Game after changes are made. 40

Students Will: Share the Memorize game with the XO Neighborhood.


1. Go to Play in Memorize.

2. Click the Load Game icon. 3. Choose the Fraction Memorize activity from drop-down menu. The game will be loaded.

4. Go to Activity in Memorize and change the Share with setting from Private to My Neighborhood. 5. Click on the Keep icon to save changes. 6. From the Frame view click the Neighborhood icon.

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7. Ensure all students are connected to the same network, for example: Ad-hoc Network 1.

8. Have students join a game by clicking on the icon of the game they want to join. For example: Fraction [Student name].

Congrats! Youve completed the Equal Fractions Activity

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Assessment: Rubric
Student Name: ___________________________ Date: ___________________________ Self Assessment 1 Needs more work Student needs to continue working to complete this challenge Cooperation ~ I need to ask for, and give help as needed Engagement ~ I need to focus on what is to be done I need a total of ____ matched equivalent fraction pairs I need ____ matched representations of equivalent fraction pairs created in Paint 2 Complete Student has met the requirements of this challenge Cooperation ~ I asked for and gave help readily Engagement ~ I focused on the tasks to complete them in a timely manner My Memorize game has 9 or more total matched equivalent fraction pairs My Memorize game has 3 or more matched representations of equivalent fraction pairs created in Paint 3 Excellence Student has completed the requirements of this challenge and enriched the challenge by going above expectations. Cooperation ~ I helped others complete the challenge and/or reach excellence Engagement ~ I focused on the tasks to complete them in a timely manner, and found ways to enrich my work My Memorize game has 13 or more total matched equivalent fraction pairs My Memorize game has 1 or more matched equivalent fraction pair, which matches numeric fractions to fraction representations created in Paint My Memorize game has 1 or more matched equivalent fraction pairs, which matches representations created in Paint with representations created in Record My Memorize game has 1 or more matched equivalent fraction pair, which matches numeric fractions to fraction representations created in Record My Memorize game has 1 or more matched equivalent fraction pairs, which matches representations created in Paint with representations created in Record

Memorize Activity

Paint Activity

Record Activity

I need ____ matched representations of equivalent fraction pairs created in Record

My Memorize game has 3 or more matched representations of equivalent fraction pairs created in Record

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Monthly Budget
Goals: Create a monthly budget, to be used to prepare a weekly grocery list. Use charts and graphs to manage data. Understand and utilize 'debits' and 'credits' in the Finance program. Grade: 7 Subject: Math Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher guides Students discovery Checklist Task Completion Reflection Questions Resources: Activities: Finance

Budget list Grocery flyer (online or in paper), grocery list

Introduction: Teacher completes a lesson or review of graphs and tables in mathematics. Set Up: Teacher will discuss the concept of a budget, and how it can be used to manage finances. Students will use the Monthly Budget worksheet to determine their own monthly budget. Students Will Part 1: Create a budget. 8. From Homeview, choose Finance. 9. Click on Period and on the right side of the screen set the period to Month. 10. Click on Transaction. 11. Choose New credit and under the Description write monthly salary. Under Amount, type in $2500. 12. Under Category, write salary. 13. Click on Add a new debit. Students now choose from the 10 available items to balance their budget. For each item chosen, type in its' description/amount and assign it to a category. 14. Click on View. Choose Chart (the circle icon on the top of the frame). You will view the debits in a circle chart form. Students Will Part 2: Create a weekly grocery list. 9. In View, click on Register. Then click on Period. Click on the top right-pointing arrow and choose the following week. Now click on Transaction. 10. Click on Credit and add the amount spent on food from the monthly budget. For 44

category, write food budget. 11. From an online flyer or store flyer students will choose items to add to their grocery list. For each item, include the category from the Canada Food Guide: milk/dairy, meat & alternatives, fruits & vegetables, grains & starches, condiments, drinks, or snacks. 12. Once all the items have been chosen and entered, note whether the total amount was under budget, on budget, or over budget. Adjust accordingly by adding or removing items. 13. In View, click on the circle to see the graph. Take note of which food categories are the least and most expensive in one month. 14. Click on the triangle to see the budget. 15. At the top of the screen, click Stop to save your work. Students Will Part 3: Reflect on budgeting. 1. From Homeview, click on Words. 'Copy' the 4 Reflection questions (on pg. 39) and 'paste' them into a Words document. Answer the questions to reflect on the process of budgeting. Extension

2.

Students can create shopping lists for other aspects of life, such as clothing, entertainment, house hold items, etc.

**See screenshots on the following pages.

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Screenshot 1: Enter each amount in Transaction view.

Screenshot 2: Create a budget by entering each category and division, as well as the amount.

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Screenshot 3: In View, choose Budget view to see the specifics for each category.

Screenshot 4: Use Chart view to see the relative values of each category.

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Example: Monthly Budget


TYPE OF EXPENSE Rent Hydro Phone and internet TV Clothing Food Gas or transportation Entertainment Savings Other Range House $900-$1200 Apartment $700-$890 $150- $200 $50- $75 $50 $0-$250 $0-$400 $0-$100 $0-$250 $0-$400 any TOTAL YOUR CHOICE

Salary $2500

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Assessment
Reflection Questions

Student Name: ______________________________

1. Were there items that you couldn't include in your list because they cost too much? 2. What types of food were the most expensive? Least Expensive? 3. After making your grocery list, how would you change the monthly budget list? 4. In your monthly budget, which items took up the largest amount of money? The smallest? 5. Are there any benefits to budgeting? What are they and why?

Checklist
Monthly Budget Worksheet Complete Balances with the Salary ___ /5 ___ /5

Monthly Budget Transaction Overview Correct Entries Correct Categories ___ /5 ___ /5

Grocery List Includes items from all 4 Food Categories All entries include categories and prices ___ /5 ___ /5

Reflection Answers all questions with complete sentences Answers are complete ___ /5 ___ /5

TOTAL ___ /40

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P.o.e.t.r.y.
Goals: Students will be able to discuss a sample poem to identify its parts. Students will record the poem in their own voice and capture an image associated with the poem. Use these as stimulus to begin to add their own lines to an existing poem. Grade: Junior Subject: Language Arts

(speaking, writing, reading)

Lesson Plan Scope:

Comprehensive

Teachers Role: Teacher directs students actions Teacher facilitates students direction towards goal Resources:

Assessment: Teachers discretion Activities:

- Short Poem selected to interest of students and their school environment (so a relevant photo can be taken).

Record

Story Builder

Speak

Lesson One: Teacher finds a short poem (approx. 4 lines), makes paper copies or shares with students via XO Neighbourhood Students discuss - What makes it a poem? What are the parts of a poem? What is it describing? Does the title match the subject? How does the poem sound out loud? Lesson Two: Students open Record and use the audio tab to record themselves reading the poem.

They then use Image in Record to capture an image that matches what they decided the poem was describing.
Adaptations and Extensions: The capabilities of XO-type devices means that introducing poetry to students can become a much more interactive and connected activity, thus offering constructivist and collaborative opportunities for student learning that are not otherwise possible. Teachers can extend this activity for many types of artistic expression, introducing longer poems, typing out the poems in creative ways, using song lyrics and making music videos, telling stories and acting them out (creating movie clips). Be creative!

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Dramatic Reading
Goals: Students will work in pairs to perform a dramatic reading of a short childrens book, poem, or chapter from a novel. Students will explore the various sounds and accompaniment in Tamtam Mini. Grade: 6,7 or 8 Subject: Language Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher guides Students discovery Rubric Resources:

Piano keyboard printouts Earphones or earbuds for each student, if possible

Activities:

TamTamMini

Modifications and Adaptations: Students will choose a short paragraph rather than a whole story. Students will work with teacher, performing the sounds as the teacher reads the story. Introduction: Teacher performs a dramatic reading of a short story, poem or chapter from a novel. Set Up: Students work in pairs to choose their reading piece (about 5 minutes in reading length). Students will read their chosen paragraph/story/poem and identify spots where possible

sound effects could be added. Consider adding 'voice' sounds as well as environmental sounds. Students Will: Create and then perform a dramatic reading using sound effects from the XO laptops.
16. From Homeview choose TamTamMini program. 17. In 'TamTamMini' students can click on the images to explore the range of sounds

available. Each image corresponds to a different sound (see screenshot below). Use the full keyboard to see the full range of sounds for each image. 18. Read through the story and explore by adding different sound effects to your reading. 19. Once the sounds are determined, practice reading through the story, with one person reading and the other performing the sound effects on the XO. 20. Perform completed project for a friend, teacher or the class. Extension

Students perform their works for the class, another class, or in a performance. Mix up student groups to see how one group's sound effects sound on another group's story
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Screenshot: TamTamMini Sound Effect Images

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Dramatic Reading Rubric


Student Name:___________________ Name of Story/Book/Poem:__________________ Level 1 Uses a limited amount of sounds Sounds are not in coordination with ideas in the story Shows a limited understanding of ideas in the story Uses a limited amount of creativity in the performance Level 2 Uses some sounds Uses sounds in coordination with ideas in the story Shows a basic understanding of ideas in the story Uses some creativity in the performance Level 3 Uses many sounds Uses sounds in coordination with ideas in the story, adding good dramatic effect Shows a strong understanding of ideas in the story Uses creativity in the performance Level 4 Uses a great variety of sounds Uses sounds in coordination with ideas in the story with excellent dramatization Shows an excellent understanding of ideas in the story Uses outstanding creativity in the performance

Variety of Sounds Usage of Sounds

Story Comprehension Creativity

OVERALL LEVEL

53

Story Prediction
Goals: Students will predict what will come next in a chapter or section of a book, poem or short story. Students will use Scratch to create characters and have them act out a scene or interaction. Grade: 7,8 Subject: Language Teachers Role: Teacher guides Students discovery. Resources: Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Assessment Rubric Activities:

Chosen book, poem or short story.

Scratch
Modifications and Adaptations: Students can create a Sprite, changing costumes and sounds. Teacher can model the creation of a Sprite, adding actions. Introduction: Teacher or students finish reading a section of a book, poem or short story. Brainstorm different ideas of what could happen next. Students should have an understanding of how to plot points on a coordinate grid. Set Up:

Introduce the XO activity by presenting an example of a scene using Scratch.


Students Will a). 6. From Homeview, choose Scratch.

7. On the bottom right-hand corner of the screen, press "Get surprise sprite" to choose one or two characters. 8. Click on one Sprite to start adding actions. In the middle section on the screen, add in commands from the menus (on the left) to control the movements and interactions of the Sprite. *See menu details below. 9. In the middle column, you have three submenus- Scripts to control movements and actions, Costumes to determine and create costumes, and Sounds to add sounds. 10. When project is complete students will share their scenes with teacher and classmates. Extension

Students can create future Scenes, continuing the actions and interactions from their initial scene. Students can create more dialogue using the Write program. Students can create a written script of the scene they created.

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*MENUS: Motion Menu: Your sprite can: move forward, turn, point in a direction, or glide. Use "go to x,y (filling in coordinates) to have the sprite move to a specific position. Looks Menu: You can have your Sprite: Say or think words (which will appear in speech bubbles). Sound Menu: You can add Drum sounds, chosen sounds, specific notes, and adjust the volume and tempo. Pen Menu You can use the pen to draw in objects and backgrounds. Control Menu Contains more controls for overall actions. Example: Enter the commands in the script view.

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Example 2: Use the costume and sound tabs to adjust and add sound and images.

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Story Prediction Rubric


Student Name:_____________________ Name of Story/Book/Poem:__________________ Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Integrates Ideas Integrates a Integrates some Integrates many Integrates limited amount of ideas from the ideas from the ideas from the ideas from the story story story perfectly. story Understanding of Demonstrates a Demonstrates a Demonstrates a Demonstrates an Characters limited satisfactory strong extensive understanding of understanding of understanding of understanding of characters from characters from characters from characters from the story the story the story the story Use of elements Uses few Uses some Uses many Integrates for costume, elements of elements of elements of elements of sound & costume, sound costume, sound costume, sound costume, sound movement to & movement to & movement to & movement to & movement to express express express express fully express characters/ideas characters/ideas characters/ideas characters/ideas characters/ ideas OVERALL LEVEL

57

Word Families
Goals: Students will use graphophonic and phonic knowledge to differentiate between real and nonsense words and write their own sentences Students will use Speak activity to write, listen, evaluate, and share their work

Grade: 1-3

Subject: Language Arts

Scope: Standard

Teachers Role: Teacher Facilitating Students direction towards goal Teacher guides Students discovery Resources:

Assessment: Task Card, Teacher and Self assessment Teacher Observation Checklist Activities: Speak

- Stopwatch (or any timer), headphones (optional), and Word Family Words (e.g. look, book, cook, nook, brook). Words can be written on board, or in card format.

Modifications and Adaptations: Provide students with 'Word Family Words' at their level. Use of punctuation, grammar,

and writing elements (word choice) may be incorporated into checklist or task card. In a station situation. Word Family Words can be sets of cards and words used for this lesson can be selected from a set of previously introduced words

Introduction: With whole class, at stations, or in small groups: 1. Students will use the Speak activity on their XOs to write, read, and listen to the Word Family Words, and to add as many other words, real or nonsense, which belong to that word family. 2. Students will create a list of 5 real words, and a list of 5 nonsense words (of same family). 3. Students will write 5 sentences, one for each word on their real words list. 4. Students will assess and revise their work. 5. Students will share in the teachers assessment and feedback of their work. Set Up:

This lesson can be used after first introducing Word Family Words or as a literacy station. Students should have opportunity to decode words, with support, for the word family before beginning this lesson. Students' challenge: To use the Speak activity to make 3 different lists, and 5 sentences for the word family. The speak activity will use a task card with 8 tasks to complete. *See Procedure and screenshots below for How to run this lesson.

Extension Use Speak as an independent reading tool to assist reading unfamiliar words Use Speak as a writing tool to assist with determining and correcting spelling Use the sharing of teacher assessment to make student directed reading development goals Discuss and share in the planning of timeframe, strategies, experiences, and activities to meet those goals Add criteria for sentence writing to the Task Chart from your writing programs (6+1 traits, blended structure and style) or which provide developmental writing experiences (requiring and identifying grammar elements such as verbs, adjectives, and adverbs; practicing writing strategies such as word choice) 58

Procedure:
Students Will, Part 1: 1. Create a list of Word Family Words at their desks (or together on the board). 2. Students will be given a copy of the Task Card (included below) and will write in their name, the date, and the word family. The Word Family Words (look, book, cook, nook, brook) will be presented on board or through cue cards. 3. From Homeview, open Speak activity.

4. Select the ABC tab at the top left of the screen.

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5. Students type first word from the word family into the text box, followed by a comma. *Note: Commas are not necessary, though, their use will slow down the Speak output to enhance differentiation between words. Use of commas is strongly recommended for this lesson.

6. * Students can press the enter key at any time to check that their word is spoken smoothly. Students may adjust the pitch, rate, mouth, and eyes from the drop down menus.

60

Students continue to add the remaining words, separated by commas.

7. When the all words have been put into the text box, press the enter key and listen to the Speak program for words that need corrections. 8. Students start timer and begin to add more real and nonsense words to their lists, as many as possible, until time runs out.

9. Students can share their lists with neighbours or other students at their station by pressing the enter key and listening. Students can help each other by suggesting and correcting any words that are misspelled, do not conform to the Word Family, or are not the proper spelling for that word. Encourage discussion about what new words are real or nonsense, and what words sound like real words but are spelled differently.

61

E.g.

Students Will, Part 2: Create a list of nonsense words and a list of real words.

1. Student will clear the text box by pressing the up arrow key (pg up) to select the text (the
text will become highlighted), and then pressing the erase key.

2. Students will enter a list of their 5 favourite or funniest nonsense words from the Word Family into the text box, separated by commas.

3. Students can share their lists with neighbours or other students at their station by
pressing on the enter key and listening. Students can help each other to ensure all words conform to the Word Family. 4. Student will clear the text box by pressing the up arrow key (pg up) to select the text, and then pressing the erase key 5. Students will enter a list of their 5 favourite real words, from the Word Family, into the 62

text box, separated by commas. 6. Students can share their lists with neighbours or other students at their station by pressing on the enter key and listening. Students can help each other by suggesting and correcting any words that are misspelled, do not conform to the Word Family, or are not the proper spelling for that word. E.g.

Students Will, Part 3: 1. Write 5 sentences, one for each word from their list of 5 real words. 2. Students will clear the text box again and enter their first sentence. 3. Students can share their sentence with neighbours or other students at their station by pressing the enter key and listening. Students can help each other suggest and correct any misspelled words 4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 of this section until all 5 words have been used in sentences.

63

E.g.

Self-Assessment Procedure, Part 1


1. Complete a self-assessment by checking their work to make sure they have all tasks complete and filling out the task card (below). *Note: Once introduced to this practice, Students may choose to assess and revise their work throughout the activity. 2. Students will click the down-arrow to the right of the text box to review past inputs into Speak activity. 3. A pop up list of the past entries will appear above the text box. Once an entry is selected, students may add, erase, or change all or parts of the entry. 4. With task card, students will locate an entry from the speak activity, which meets a task on the task card, and select it by clicking on the entry. Students will read the entry to see if it Looks Right and listen to the entry to hear if it Sounds Right.

64

E.g.

5. Locate and revise any parts of the entry which do not look or sound correct, if needed.
Checkmark the student side of the box on the task card for that task.

6. Repeat steps 1 through 5 until the student side of the task card is complete. 7. Students will click the Speak icon on the top left corner of their screen and rename the
activity (for example to ook family) and click the Keep icon.

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E.g.

Assessment, Part 2
Students will have their work assessed, and feedback provided by their teacher. 1. Student will present their XO and task card to the teacher. 2. The teacher will press the down-arrow to the right of the text box to review past inputs into Speak activity.

3. Teacher will locate the entry for the first task and checkmark the box for Needs Work, Word Family words spelled correctly, or All words spelled correctly (see below). 4. Teacher will show and explain the assessment of work to the student and point out how it matches up with the looks right and sounds right self-assessment. 5. Record any misconceptions, miscues, or any other speech to print relationship issues onto the Teacher Observation Checklist, especially persistent ones. Point these out to student.

6. Repeat steps 1 through 5 until the student side of the task card is complete.
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Task Card Name:


Word Family:

Date:

___________________________________________ Looks Sounds _ Right Right Word Family Word List Nonsense Word List Real Word List Sentence 1:_______________ Sentence 2:_______________ Sentence 3:_______________ Sentence 4:_______________ Sentence 5:_______________

Needs Work ___/8

WFW spelled correctly ___/8

All words spelled correctly ___/8

Name: Example

Date: Oct.

3 2012

Word Family:

ook
Word Family Word List Nonsense Word List Real Word List Sentence 1: brook Sentence 2: nook Sentence 3: cook Sentence 4: look Sentence 5: book

Looks Right

Sounds Right

Needs Work

WFW spelled correctly

All words spelled correctly

___/8

___/8

___/8
67

Anecdotal Observations Sheet Teacher Anecdotal Observations Sheet: Word Family Words
Student:
Example
Word Family

Date:

Totals
WFW: 2/8 AW: 6/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8 WFW: __/8 AW: __/8

Notes
Misspelled with - wif

10/10/12 ook

68

Heat Energy Cycle


Goals: Describe the heat energy cycle using words and pictures. Use Paint to create an image. Grade: 7 Subject: Science, Geography Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher facilitates students direction Rubric Resources: Activities: Paint

Geography textbook or notes


Introduction: Students will create diagrams to show the cycle of heat energy between the Sun and the Earth. Set Up:

Teacher completes a lesson, describing the cycle of heat energy.


Students Will:

Part 1. Create an image about the daytime heat cycle.


21. Select Paint from Homeview. 22. Use the pencil and brushfrom the Tools menu, as well as various shapes from the Shapes menu, to create a diagram of land, sea and sun. 23. Use red (for hot) and blue (for cool) arrows to show the heat cycle. 24. From the Text menu, click Type to add text. Click on the screen to add a description of your picture. 25. From the activity menu, add a name to your image, and clickkeep. 26. To clear the screen, click on the Edit menu and press clear. Part 2. Create an image about the heat cycle in the night. Repeat instructions 1 through 6 from above, drawing the moon in place of the sun. Extension

Students can make a slideshow in Scratch to display the images they create. Students can create diagrams of other heat energy cycles.

69

Example Part 1: Daytime Heat Energy Cycle

70

Example Part 2: Nighttime Heat Energy Cycle

71

Rubric: Heat Energy Cycle


Student Name:________________________________ Level 1 Diagram explains the heat energy cycle in a limited way Uses a limited amount of text and images Uses a limited amount of creativity Level 2 Diagram explains some of the heat energy cycle Uses a small variety of text and images Uses some creativity Level 3 Diagram explains the heat energy cycle Uses a variety of text and images Uses creativity Level 4 Diagram fully explains the heat energy cycle Uses a wide variety of text and images Uses outstanding creativity

Ideas

Images and text Creativity

OVERALL LEVEL

72

Types of Energy
Goals: Students will identify and describe the types of energy. Students will use Browse to find pictures and Labyrinth to create a mind-map. Grade: 7 Subject: Science Lesson Plan Scope: Standard, Comprehensive Teacher's Role: Assessment: Teacher facilitates students direction towards Rubric goal. Checklist Task Completion Resources: Activities:

Textbook or resource with list of types of energy.

Browse

Record

Labyrinth

Modifications and Adaptations: Students create a mind-map with pictures rather than words. Provide a blank mind-map, to be filled in. Introduction: Students will explore the types of energy by creating a mind-map. Set Up:

Give a lesson describing the types of energy and what they are used for. Show students how make a mind-map that describes each type of energy in images. Introduce Rubric, Review Criteria Stated and ask for student input into specifying goals.
Students Will 1: Create the initial mind-map. 3. From Homeview, open Labyrinth. 4. In Labyrinth click on Edit. 5. Select text mode from the top menu. Click in the middle of the page, then drag cursor to draw a rectangle. Click in the middle of the rectangle to type the title Energy. 6. Add 7 other labels surrounding the word Energy: sound, light, heat, mechanical, electrical, chemical, nuclear. 7. Click on Activity on the top menu. Write a title in the textbook. Click on keep (the green book icon) to save the project with its title.

73

Students Will 2: Find images using Browse. 1. Click on the Homeview button on the keyboard to return to Homeview. 2. Select Browse. 3. Students can search for images using the browser. 4. To save an image, first select the image using the Left click; then choose download

image. It is now saved in your journal. When all pictures have been selected and saved, click stop from the top menu to close the browser.
Students Will 3: Add pictures to their Labyrinth. 27. From Homeview, open Labyrinth. 28. Select image add mode from the top menu. Click on the screen where you want to put the first image. The journal of images will appear. Click on the image you want. Adjust the size of the image by dragging the contours of the picture. 29. After all pictures have been added, connect a picture to its corresponding type of energy by holding down shift while clicking on both selections. Select link two selected thoughts and a line will be drawn between the two. Repeat for each image. 30. If more space is needed, click view and zoom in or out as needed. To return to the edit screen, select edit. Students Will 4: Share the Labyrinth mind-map with their neighborhood. 15. Go to Activity in Labyrinth, and change the Share with setting from Private to My Neighborhood. 16. Click on the Keep icon to save changes. 17. From the Frame view click the Neighborhood icon. 18. Ensure all XOs are connected to the same network, for example: Ad-hoc Network 1. 19. Have students click on the icon of the game they want to join. For example: Energy [Student Name].

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Extension

Students can add descriptions for each picture, showing how it relates to the specific type of energy. Use the label mode.
The process of creating a mind-map is a useful way to apply ones knowledge of how topics can be described with images. This lesson can be modified to any curriculum content such as: o Sources of heat energy. o Types of mixtures o Types of bridges

75

Patterns of Settlement Slideshow


Goals: Apply knowledge of patterns of settlement Use scratch to create a slideshow Grade: 8 Subject: Geography Lesson Plan Scope: Comprehensive Teachers Role: Assessment: Teacher facilitates students direction towards Rubric goal. Resources: Activities:

Handouts or textbooks with diagrams and explanations of human settlement patterns

Paint and Scratch Modifications and Adaptations: Students can create the pictures or drawings only. Teacher presents the slideshow process step by step, on an overhead projector.
Introduction: Students will create drawings to represent different patterns of human settlement and then present them in a slideshow for their peers. Set Up: Students Will A: 11. From Homeview click on Paint. 12. Using the tools, create a sketch of the first pattern of settlement. 13. Click on activity to name and save the file. 14. Continue creating sketches of patterns of settlement, saving under different names. Students Will B: 1. From Homeview click on Scratch. 2. In the Scripts menu, drag the codes (provided below) into the scripts area. 3. Click on the Costumes tab and import each image from Paint that you created. Delete any that you dont want to include. 4. Click on the Sounds tab and either import a sound from the library or record one. 5. Back in the Scripts menu, the first block indicates that when the Green Flag is pressed, the Script starts switching to the first costume (the first image you imported). This is expressed in the example below. 6. The second block indicates that when it receives the next object, it should repeat 10 times and change pixelate effect by 10 (maximizing by 10, making it a bigger block size). 7. The script should move on to the next costume (your second chosen image). 76

Teacher reviews patterns of human settlement. Teacher provides an example of a slideshow, then showing the appropriate code in Scratch.

8. Repeat 10 times, changing pixelate effect by -10, playing the pop sound simultaneously. 9. Finally, it clears the graphic effect. 10. Click on Save As and type in a file name. Extra: You can add a new object, by clicking on the paintbrush icon. Paint Editor will appear and you will proceed to create your new object. Then click on OK. Change the Sprite Name to NEXT. Add the following code: when NEXT clicked and broadcast next. Extension

Students can add in descriptions to the images that they create in Paint. Students can add new sounds, new pictures, and adjust the pixelate and/or other effects.

CODE

In the Scripts menu, drag the following codes into the scripts area.

77

You can add a new object by clicking on the paintbrush icon. Paint Editor will appear and you will proceed to create your new object. Then click on OK. Change the Sprite Name to NEXT.

Add the following code: `when NEXT clicked`and ``broadcast next.`


78

Slideshow Rubric
Student Name:________________________________ Level 1 Diagrams show few details of the patterns of settlement The slideshow includes few images, sounds and transitions Uses a limited amount of creativity in the slideshow Level 2 Diagrams show some details of the patterns of settlement The slideshow includes some images, sounds and transitions Uses some creativity in the slideshow Level 3 Diagrams show sufficient details of the patterns of settlement The slideshow includes sufficient images, sounds and transitions Uses creativity in the slideshow Level 4 Diagrams show extensive details of the patterns of settlement The slideshow includes all images, sounds and transitions Uses outstanding creativity in the slideshow

Diagrams or Drawings Slideshow

Creativity

OVERALL LEVEL

79

Community
Goals: Students will identify members of our community and the role they are partaking in. Students will us the Record activity to capture images and video of community members engaging in jobs, chores, or participating in community events. Grade: k-3 Subject: Social Studies, Lesson Plan Scope: Standard

Health

Teachers Role: Teacher directs students actions Teacher facilitating students direction towards goal Resources:

Assessment: Rubric Activities:

XO

Record

Modifications and Adaptations: Modification: o The challenge in this lesson was prepared for grade 2/3, however, with small

adjustments to the rubric, students at kindergarten and grade 1 levels can be accommodated. o The procedures learned in this lesson can be modified for any number of subjects and contents (such as recording a student talking through a math operation, or recording a song while practicing for a concert). out the scene, or write and take notes about the activity in the community.

Adaptations: o Students who do not have access to an XO may: Draw and label pictures, act it

Introduction: This lesson will take place in 3 parts: Guided discovery: Students will be introduced to the Record activity and given an opportunity to record pictures, video, and audio of themselves and classmates. Direct instruction: Teacher will lead students in capturing and titling a picture, an audio clip, and a video of a community member doing a job, chore, or activity using the title and tagging functions of the Record activity (e.g. Title: a teacher teaching; Tags: school, teacher, jobs, careers). Students Challenge: Students will take their XOs home (or around the school) to capture and title 5 videos, pictures, or audio clips of community members doing a job, chore, or activity.

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Set Up:

This lesson can be used immediately after the above steps, or as a way to reinforce understanding about roles, relationships, community, and jobs. The task in this lesson is open ended introducing, recalling, and brainstorming as many possible recordable and namable types of people, roles, jobs, activities, and chores will be ideal.
Guided discovery challenge: Students will open Record, and be asked: What can you

do with this activity? Teacher will guide students actions with prompts, suggestions, and troubleshooting It is recommended that teachers complete the Direct Instruction portion of the lesson independently first, and use skills and understandings presented in it to inform their guiding of students actions Direct instruction: Students are directed to follow step-by-step instructions for recording, titling, and tagging a video. Students will then work independently, with teacher support, in capturing, titling, and tagging a picture and an audio clip. Students Challenge: Students will take their XOs home (or around the school) to capture, title, and tag 5 videos, pictures, or audio clips of community members doing a job, chore, or activity.
Guided Discovery Students Will: Open the Record activity and experiment with different ways to record pictures,

video, and audio.


1. In Homeview, open the Record activity by clicking on the Record icon.

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Record will look like this:

2. Students will be asked: What can you do with this activity? 3. Allow time for students to experiment with making videos, taking pictures, and recording audio clips (Audio recordings are accompanied by pictures). 4. After students have had a chance to experiment, have students take one video, one picture, and one audio clip that represents something they like. 5. Use this time to discuss with students individually, in small groups, or as a class the importance of recording something with meaning. Some questions to start the discussion: a. Do some pictures, videos, or audio clips show more than others? b. Can a picture, video, or audio clip help explain something, or remember it? c. How can we take a picture, video, or audio clip that show, remember, or explain more? d. What makes a picture, video, or audio clip good? 6. Wrap up the lesson by sharing and recording students answers, and some of the questions, to these questions.

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Notes:

1.

This is the shutter icon, as seen beneath the record capture display

2. The button, above the power button, is manual shutter button for the camera.

3. This icon is used to enter full screen mode. 4. In each of the Record tabs (Photo, Video, and Audio), there are options and settings specific to the operation of that tab:

a) In Photo, a timer may be set:

b) In Audio, the addition of setting the duration of an audio clip may be set (the audio clip will play while displaying a picture captured at the moment the shutter button or icon was activated):

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Direct Instruction
Students Will: Open Record activity and follow steps to record, title, and tag a video of their

teacher. Students will work independently to record, title, and tag a picture and an audio clip.
1. In Homeview, open the Record activity by clicking on the Record icon. 2. Click on the video tab.

3. Students will direct their XO camera at their teacher. 4. When all students have their XOs ready, teacher will give the signal for students to click

the shutter icon

or click the shutter button

. The teacher will then begin a

short explanation about the different people who make up a community.

5. When the teacher is finished speaking, or gives a signal, the students stop the recording
by clicking the shutter icon or button again.

c) In Video, quality is added to the settings that can be adjusted. 84

6. Students click the video file along the bottom of the screen to select it, and the video will begin to play (it wont be a cartoon like above, it will be the video of their teacher). 7. Click the i icon information screen. 8. Students will enter a title in the title text space, for example Teacher Teaching. 9. In the text box under Tag: students will enter tags which relate to the content of the video, for example teacher, school, work, job, career, lesson about community. in the bottom right of the video playback field to access the

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10. Students are now asked to create a picture and an audio clip, following steps 5 through 9 to title and tag their recordings.

Student Challenge
Students Will: Use their XOs to capture, title, and tag 5 videos, pictures, or audio clips of community members doing a job, chore, or activity. 1. Introduce Challenge and Rubric (Challenge sheet and Rubric found at end of lesson plan). 2. Review the recorded answers and questions from the discussion portion of the first lesson, to remind students of what they can do to make their recording more meaningful. Some terms to bring up and explain to students: o Subject: What you are recording the person, their voice, the activity they are doing o Title: What you name your recording possibly in person activity format, for example, Brother Doing Dishes o Tag: A note about what is recorded key words or catch phrases that relate to the recording

3. Take their XOs and challenge sheet (On next page) home to complete individually or with
their parents.

4. Bring back challenge sheets and present work to the class.

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Student Homework Challenge


Student challenge: Using your XO Record 5 pictures, videos, or audio clips of people in our community doing jobs, chores, or participating in community events Title your recordings in person activity format, for example: Brother Doing Dishes Tag your recordings with words that tell something about what you recorded Parents Can Help: Your child has practiced this at school, let them show you how to record something You may help with suggestions for titling or tagging the recording

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Assessment Sheet
Student Name: ___________________________ 1 2 Complete Student has met the requirements of this challenge 3 Excellence Student has completed the requirements of this challenge and enriched the challenge by going above expectations Effort ~ I added more to my homework I have more than 5 pictures, videos, or audio clips All of my pictures, videos, or audio clips are recorded with the subject clearly visible or heard and understood My pictures, videos, or audio clips are titled and tagged clearly and in a thoughtful or creative way

Needs more work Date: Student needs to continue working ___________________________ to complete this challenge

Self Assessment

Effort ~ I need to be responsible for doing my homework

Effort ~ I worked hard and finished my work

Quantity

I need a total of I have 5 ____ more pictures, pictures, videos, or videos, or audio audio clips clips My pictures, videos, or audio clips need to be recorded with the subject more visible My pictures, videos, or audio clips need to be titled or tagged All of my pictures, videos, or audio clips are recorded with the subject visible or heard My pictures, videos, or audio clips are titled and tagged

Record Quality

Titling and Tagging

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XO Task Cards
Photocopy these pages and use them at stations or at students desk to provide optional XO activities during open learning time. Suggestion: Cards can be cut, shuffled and handed out at random, or laminate a full page for students to choose activities either based on interest or by rolling a die and completing the activity it lands on.

Measure distances in class with a friend in DISTANCE.

Explore PIPPY.

Find and download a new book in GET BOOKS.

Download some songs onto the laptop.

Play IMPLODE and beat your last score.

Explore TAMTAMJAM.

Use STOPWATCH to time how long it takes someone to sing a song, write a sentence, or say a difficult poem.

Make a mind-map with images in LABYRINTH.

Read a book in READ.

Take pictures of the classroom with RECORD.

Translate some of your favourite words into Spanish or French in WORDS.

Record different animal sounds in RECORD.

Draw an outdoor scene in COLOURS.

Find out new things about the moon in MOON.

Use PAINT to draw something.

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Use CALCULATE to answer math questions.

Try out some algebra and trigonometry functions in CALCULATE.

Make motors in PHYSICS and create a catapult for objects.

CHAT with a friend.

Ask the computer questions in SPEAK.

Copy sentences from a poem in SPEAK and listen to how they are pronounced.

BROWSE about a topic that was covered in science, geography or history.

Explore ETOYS. See if you can create one!

In TURTLE ART, create geometric shapes, like square, rectangle, etc.

Read more about some activities in the HELP section.

Try to recreate the shapes in TURTLE ART that are described in the Help section.

In SCRATCH, create a scene between two characters or sprites.

In MEMORIZE, create a matching game about a topic covered in class.

In DRUMBEAT, learn about the nature of sound.

In DRUMBEAT, learn about native instruments, create a quiz for friends.

In SWIFT FEET, practice new steps.

In MEETING PLACE ADVENTURE, In SWIFT FEET, put new visit all the places in the town to steps together to create prepare for the feast. Play a routine. hockey, snowball, and other games.
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In OWL VISION, play and activity to improve and strengthen your reading.

In HEALTHY HEART, prepare meals for people in the restaurant and create menus.

Complete the challenge in EKOMINIVILLE.

In CALM WATERS, listen as they read you a story.

Organize your music in JUKEBOX.

In TYPING TURTLE, work on the next level of typing skills.

In MAZE, complete the next level of mazes.

In COLORS, choose the LEARN tab to learn how to add animations.

Explore SCRATCH.

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