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YEAR TERM WEEK SUBJECT SCORE

5 1 / 2011 7/ Test 6

6
I Write the plural form of the following nouns. 1. wolf 2. stuff 4. scarf 6. knife 8. giraffe 10. cliff
Each answer is worth 1 point.

3. dwarf 5. roof 7. beef 9. wife II Grammar

Funny plural form song


We'll begin with a box, and the plural is ______________, But the plural of ox becomes ______________, not oxes. One fowl* is a goose, but two are called ______________, Yet the plural of moose should never be meese. You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of ______________, Yet the plural of house is ______________, not hice. If the plural of man is always called ______________, Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen? If I speak of my foot and show you my ______________, And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet? If one is a tooth and a whole set are ______________, Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?

Score

10

Each answer is worth 2 points. Score 16

Fowl means bird.

YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

III Read the article about growing up in Greece and then sort out the cards into the table below, showing the differences between Athens and Sparta. Children in Athens Greek families in Athens were very large but parents preferred to have boy children. A father had a right to decide whether or not the family would keep a new baby. Unwanted or weak babies were sometimes left to die outdoors. Anyone finding an abandoned baby could adopt it and take it home, perhaps to raise it as a slave. If a couple were rich, they might hire a poor neighbour or a slave to nurse a new baby. At 3, children were given small jugs - a sign that babyhood was over. Until age 6 or so, boys were taught at home by their mother or by a male slave. Children in Sparta When babies were born in ancient Sparta, Spartan soldiers would come by the house and check the baby. If the baby did not appear healthy and strong, the infant was taken away, and left to die on a hillside, or taken away to be trained as a slave (a helot). Babies who passed this examination were assigned membership in a brotherhood or sisterhood, usually the same one to which their father or mother belonged. Education in Athens In ancient Athens, the purpose of education was not only to produce citizens trained in the arts but also to prepare citizens for both peace and war. Boys went to school at age 7. One of the most popular schools was Academy, founded by a famous philosopher Plato. Only children from rich families went to school because the teachers were paid by their parents. A wealthy family sent a slave to walk to school with the boys. The slave stayed at school to keep an eye on them during lessons. Most Greeks schools had fewer than 20 boys, and classes were often held outdoors. Boys at school learned reading, writing, arithmetic, music and poetry. Books were very expensive and rare, so subjects were read out-loud, and the boys had to memorize everything. They wrote on wooden tablets covered with soft wax, using a pointed stick called a stylus. The wax was melted and reapplied from time to time. They used an abacus, with beads strung on wires or wooden rods, to help with maths. Part of their lessons included learning stories and poems by heart. Boys did also athletics, to keep fit and prepare them for war as soldiers. They ran, jumped, wrestled and practised throwing a spear and a discus. They trained on a sports ground called a gymnasium. At the age of 14, children of tradesmen began to learn a trade. Most boys had to work hard as farmers, sailors, fishermen and craftworkers (potters, builders, metalworkers and stone-carvers). The children of rich Athenians went to the Assembly, the market place and the gymnasium to watch, listen to and learn from the older men. When they turned 18, they entered military school for two additional years. At age 20, they graduated. Athenian girls were not allowed to go to school and were often educated at home by their mothers. A few girls learned to read and write, but many did not. Girls learned housework, cooking and skills such as weaving at home. Most girls were only 13-16 years old when they married. Often their fathers chose husbands for them. A girl's husband was often older, in his thirties. The day before she married, a girl sacrificed her toys to the goddess Artemis, to show she was grown-up. In most of the other Greek city-states, women were required to stay inside their homes most of their lives. They could not go anywhere or do anything without their husband's permission, not even visit a woman who lived next door. They had no freedom.
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YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

Education in Sparta In ancient Sparta, the purpose of education was to produce a well-drilled, well-disciplined marching army. Spartans believed in a life of discipline, self-denial, and simplicity. They were very loyal to the state of Sparta. Every Spartan, male or female, was required to have a perfect body. All fit and healthy Spartan boys were sent to military school at age 6 or 7. In Spartan schools, science or math were not considered important subjects, students could hardly read even after they were out of school. Only warfare mattered. Teachers mostly cared about raising good soldiers, taught to obey all orders, and to be ready to endure all kind of hardship. They lived, trained and slept in the barracks of their brotherhood where they had to sleep on the ground, shave their heads, and march barefoot. They were taught survival skills and other skills necessary to be a great soldier. School courses were very hard and often painful. The boys were not fed well, and were told that it was fine to steal food as long as they did not get caught stealing. If they were caught, they were beaten. It was a disgrace to show any sign of fear or pain. The boys marched without shoes to make them stronger. It was a brutal training period. Somewhere between the age of 18-20, Spartan males had to pass a difficult test of fitness, military ability, and leadership skills. Any Spartan male who did not pass these examinations became degraded to a middle class. They were allowed to own property, have business dealings, but had no political rights and were not citizens. If they passed, they became a full citizen and a Spartan soldier. Spartan citizens were not allowed to touch money. That was the job of the middle class. Spartan soldiers spent most of their lives with their fellow soldiers. They ate, slept, and continued to train in their brotherhood barracks. Even if they were married, they did not live with their wives and families. They lived in the barracks. Military service did not end until a Spartan male reached the age of 60. At age 60, a Spartan soldier could retire and live in their home with their family. In Sparta, girls also went to school at age 6 or 7. They lived, slept and trained in their sisterhood's barracks. No one knows if their school was as cruel or as rugged as the boys school, but the girls were taught wrestling, gymnastics, and combat skills. Some historians believe the two schools were very similar, and that an attempt was made to train the girls as thoroughly as they trained the boys. In any case, the Spartans believed that strong young women would produce strong babies. At age 18, if a Sparta girl passed her skills and fitness test, she would be assigned a husband and allowed to return home. If she failed, she would lose her rights as a citizen, and became a member of the middle class. Women in Sparta were free to move around, and visit neighbors without permission.

NOW ASK YOUR TEACHER TO GIVE YOU THE CARDS. Look at the cards and sort them out according to the input from the text, then glue them. Be careful, some might be tricky!

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YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

ATHENS

SPARTA

Each answer is worth 2 points. Score


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36

YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

IV Circle ONLY the characteristics of rainforests. 1A The climate is dry but very hot. 1B The climate is mild but very humid. 2A Rainforests cover 6% of the worlds land area. 2B Rainforests cover 80% of the worlds land area. 3A Rainforests are located around the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. 3B Rainforests are located around the equator. 4A There are hardly any animals because of hard conditions. 4B There are thousands of species of animals. 5A The vegetation is lush and tall. 5B The vegetation is scarce and short. 6A People live in tents and travel around like nomads. 6B People live in tribes and build houses of twigs and mud. 7A It rains every day. 7B It rains once in 100 years. 8 This is the map of rainforests:

Each answer is worth 1 point. Score 8

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YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

V Read the text and answer the questions below - T if they are true or F if they are false. Sunbathing Most of us love being outside in the summertime. Sunshine not only makes everything look better, it makes us feel good too. But ultraviolet (UV) rays in the sunlight can damage the cells in your body. You should do everything you can to avoid getting burnt by the sun. This is because over time small amounts of sunburn damage can build up, which may lead to the development of skin cancer. Tanning and your skin Tanning is a natural process. Your skin creates the brown-coloured pigment called melanin to protect it against the harmful UV rays in sunlight. This means even the lightest suntan is evidence of skin damage. While a tan is your body's way of protecting itself against UV rays, if the damaged skin cells can't repair themselves, they can become cancerous. You should be particularly careful in spring when your skin is pale. A tan doesn't guarantee that you will avoid skin cancer later on in life. Sun exposure is a key factor in skin cancer, and the number of cases has doubled over the last few decades. How can you avoid sun damage? Small children usually love the sun and want to stay outside far longer than adults. But they are very sensitive to the sun's rays. Keep kids out of the sun for the hottest parts of the day and protect them with a high SPF (30+). You can protect your skin by following a few basic rules for your skin type. For example, if your skin always burns and never tans, avoid sunbathing and make sure you cover arms and legs with long shirts etc when out in the summer sun. If your skin gets tanned easily, it does not mean that you are safe from getting skin cancer. Therefore use SPF of 15 or more. All skin types should stay out of the sun at the hottest times of the day (11am to 3pm).

T or F
1. Ultraviolet rays in the sunlight can not damage the cells in your body.

2. You should do everything you can to avoid getting burnt by the sun. 3. Over time, small amounts of sunburn damage can build up and cause skin cancer. 4. Your skin creates the coloured pigment called browning. 5. A tan is your body's way of protecting itself against UV rays. 6. Dark tan guarantees that you will avoid skin cancer later on in life. 7. The damaged skin cells can't repair themselves and can become cancerous. 8. All skin types should stay out of the sun in the morning.
Each answer is worth 1 point. Score
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YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

VI What is the value of the fraction? Shade the pieces of the pie to help you compute.

1.

3 4

of 28=

4.

5 6

of 48=

2.

2 3

of 12=

5.

4 10

of 50=

3.

5 8

of 72=

6.

3 5

of 30=

Each answer is worth 3 points. Score 18

VII Solve the problem. Sarah wants to go on a trip which costs 72 Euros. She has of the money. How much is that? Her mother is going to add 10 more Euros. How much more money does she need?

The trip costs 72 Euros. Sara has ____________ Euros. Her mum is going to give her 10 more Euros so she needs ____________ more Euros to pay for the trip. This answer is worth 4 points. Score 4

TOTAL SCORE
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100

YEAR 5 TERM 1 / 2011 Test 6

A father had a right to decide whether or not the family would keep a new baby.

When babies were born, soldiers would come by the house and check the baby.

Anyone finding an abandoned baby could adopt it and take it home, perhaps to raise it as a slave.

If the baby did not appear healthy and strong, the infant was taken away, and left to die on a hillside, or taken away to be trained as a slave.

Only children from rich families went to school because the teachers were paid by their parents.

All fit and healthy Spartan boys were sent to military school.

Boys at school learned reading, writing, arithmetic, music and poetry.

Science or math were not considered important subjects, students could hardly read even after they were out of school. Boys lived, trained and slept in the barracks of their brotherhood where they had to sleep on the ground, shave their heads, and march barefoot. Somewhere between the age of 18-20, young men had to pass a difficult test of fitness, military ability, and leadership skills. The purpose of education was to produce a well-drilled, well-disciplined marching army.

Boys ran, jumped, wrestled and practised throwing a spear and a discus on a sports ground called a gymnasium.

When they turned 18, they entered military school for two additional years.

The purpose of education was not only to produce citizens trained in the arts but also to prepare citizens for both peace and war. Girls were not allowed to go to school and were often educated at home by their mothers. Women could not go anywhere or do anything without their husband's permission, not even visit a woman who lived next door.

Girls went to school at age 6 or 7, where they lived, slept and trained in their sisterhood's barracks.

Women were free to move around, and visit neighbors without permission.

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