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Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/mini show

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Mini Sh ow

A Minor Maze
Boiling Ice
Cold Chill

Friction Bottle

Food Chain
Picture from sound Tea Bag Rocket Water Magnifier

Introduction This activity is to help students identify the characteristics of image on a plane mirror. Besides that, it will also help the students understand the concept of lateral inversion.

What do we need?

What do we do?

1. Place the maze at on the table while the mirror is vertically positioned perpendicular to the maze. 1

2. Look at the image of the maze in the mirror.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

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A-Maze-Ing Mirror
Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

A plane mirror

A copy of a maze

3. Do not look at the maze itself - only at its image in the mirror! Use a pencil to follow the maze without crossing the lines. If you don't trust yourself, have a friend hold a piece of card to obstruct your direct view of the maze.

4. Using the image you see in the mirror, can you complete the maze without crossing the line . . 4 Whats happening? You will nd that it is quite di cult to follow the maze without crossing the lines. This is due to the lateral inversion i.e. the sideways reversal of images that you see when you look at yourself in a mirror e.g. you raise your right hand and the mirror shows as if youre raising your left hand! Daily-life application: The sign on an ambulance written as is for the driver in front of the vehicle to easily read the word "AMBULANCE" from his/her rear view mirror. Curriculum Speci cations Link Physics Form 4: Light and images of a plane mirror.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

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AMBULANCE

ECNALUBMA

Introduction Teachers should try to instill a sense of wonder in pupils, and to make them think about the scienti c explanation for the seemingly puzzling boiling ice phenomenon. What do we need?

What do we do?

1. Crush the ice cubes in a little bag to get smaller pieces. 1

2. Fill a boiling tube till it is 1/3 full of crushed ice.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Rohaizad Mohamed Akhir

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Boiling I c e
Prepared by: Rohaizad Mohamed Akhir

A boiling tube

Steel wool

Ice cubes

Water

A Bunsen burner

A pair of metal tongs or a test tube holder

3. Place a small piece of steel wool of about 1.5 cm thickness on top of the crushed ice. 4. Pour water on the wool, until it lls up of the boiling tube. 5. Carefully light up the Bunsen burner. 6. Hold the test tube over the ame using metal tongs. 7. What is your observation? 3

Whats happening? Water on the steel wool will boil, but ice at the bottom of the boiling tube will not melt! In a convection process, hot water rises and cold water sinks due to their density dierences. Ice is less dense and will oat in water. When water is heated, hot water will rise and should melt the ice. But the steel wool has kept the ice rmly beneath the water, and is not aected by the convection current. Therefore, the ice remains in a solid state.

WATCH OUT! The boiling tube remains hot for several minutes after the demonstration is done. Give some time for it to cool down before touching it. Curriculum Speci cations Link Science Year 5: Investigating the Physical World - Energy (heat) Science Year 5: Investigating the Material World - States of matter

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Rohaizad Mohamed Akhir

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Introduction How does a cold environment a ect our body system? What do we need?

Tap water What do we do?

1. Ask someone to take your pulse rate at the neck /or at the wrist. Record it.

2. Half ll a basin with water.

3. Add about 10-12 ice cubes into the basin of water.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

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Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

Cold Chill

10-12 Ice cubes

A stopwatch

A big basin

4. Immerse your face in the ice water for 30 seconds. 5. After 30 seconds, immediately take your pulse rate at the neck and/or at the wrist again. 6. Record your data. Do you notice a dierence in the pulse rate taken before and after your action?

Whats happening? Our body tries to conserve energy at cold temperatures. The heart pumps slower and with less strength in order to reduce blood (which carries heat) owing to the surface of our body. Hence, the pulse rate will be lower. This response is known as the mammalian diving re ex. When the body is in cold water, it redirects the ow of blood from the hands, feet, and intestines to the heart and brain to help preserve these vital organs. Curriculum Speci cations Link Science Form 2: Response & Stimuli Biology Form 5: Homeostasis

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

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Introduction This activity is to provide a better understanding of friction in moving objects. At the end of the activity, students should be able to identify the applications and importance of friction in daily life. What do we need?

A plastic bottle with its cap

1 metre of string

What do we do? 1. Using a knife/blade, carefully make a hole at the centre of the plastic bottle cap and one hole at the centre of the base of the bottle.

2. Insert a string through the hole at the base.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahya

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Friction Bott e
Prepared by: Aziah Yahya

1 Knife/blade

One 3cmx3cm polystyrene

3. Cut the polystyrene to a circular shape making sure that it is 2/3 the size of the cap. 4. Fix the polystyrene into the bottle's neck as shown in the picture below 5. Insert the other end of the string that comes out from the bottle's neck through the bottle cap. 6. Hold the string vertically. 7. What happens to the bottle if the string is taut? 8. Can you observe the di erence when the string is taut and when it is loose? 4

Whats happening? When the string is taut, there will be friction between the string and the polystyrene. Friction will nally stop the bottle from moving downwards i.e. the frictional force of the polystyrene and the string is greater than the weight of the bottle. When the string is loose, there is less friction of the string and polystyrene. Therefore, the bottle will move downwards. Curriculum Speci cations Link Physics Form 4: Frictional force

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahya

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Introduction This activity shows the interaction of organisms in a food chain. What do we need?

Felt-tip pens

What do we do? 1. Draw and colour a butter y, a spider and a bird on the styrofoam. 2. Carefully cut out the animal pictures. 3. Draw a garden scene on a mounting board and colour it. 4. Stick a paper clip behind each animal cut-out with a masking tape. 5. Place the animal cut-outs on the board and attach them with magnets behind the board. 6. Move the animals by moving the magnets. 7. Start by moving the butter y onto a ower, followed by moving the other animals to make a food chain. Example of a food chain: (Flower nectar butter y spider bird) *The arrows are drawn from food source to its consumer. 8. Ask questions about other organisms that can form a food chain.
Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Bebe Zarjan bt Mirbas Khan

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Food Chain

A mounting board

Some magnets (as many as the number of paper clips)

Some paper clips

Masking tape

A piece of styrofoam

Whats happening? A food chain shows the interaction between organisms in a habitat. By using a paper clip which can be attracted to a magnet, we can vary the positions of the animals. The magnetic force from the magnet passes through the mounting board and moves the animals around their habitat. Curriculum Speci cations Link Science Year 2: Animals (Herbivore, Carnivore, Omnivore) Science Year 3: Investigating Materials (Magnets) Science Year5: Investigating Living Things (Food Chain)

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Bebe Zarjan bt Mirbas Khan

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Introduction Can we use sounds to form mental pictures? What do we need?

4 marbles/ping-pong balls

1 hard board (50cm x 50cm)

What do we do? 1. Cut four strips of hard board to make partitions that can t inside the shoe box as shown. 2. Arrange those strips to get four di erent partitions within each shoe box. 3. Place a marble or a ball randomly in each box. 4. Close the lid of the box and secure it with adhesive tape. 5. Rotate the box in any direction and ask someone to hear the sound produced from the moving marble. 6. Let that person sketch down how he thinks the partitioning in each box might be. 7. Open up the box to check and con rm the sketches.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

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PICTURES FROM SOUND


Prepared by: Chin Chee Keong

4 Shoes boxes

Scissors

HUHU
Any kind of adhesive tape

Introduction This activity demonstrates the movement of heat energy by convection currents (moving uid). The currents are generated when dense air (cool air) replaces less dense air (warm air). What do we need?

What do we do? 1. Remove the staple and string from the tea bag without tearing the bag. 2. Carefully empty the tea bag and discard the tea leaves. 3. Open up the tea bag and roll it to form a tube. 4. Place the tube on the foil so that it is sitting on one of its open ends. 5. Strike the match and light the top of the tube and allow it to burn down to the base. 6. Predict what you think will happen. 7. Observe the tea bag from a distance. Explain what you think is going on.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

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Tea Bag Rocket


Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

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A box of matches

A tea bag with its string

Aluminium foil (50cm 50cm)

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Tea bag

Aluminium foil

Whats happening? As the ame moves down through the tea bag, all that remains is very light ash. The ame heats up the air in and around the tube; this draws in cooler air from the base of the rocket creating convection current. This hot air current rises and the burning tea bag rocket will slowly oat above the aluminium foil. Curriculum Speci cations Link Lower Secondary Science: Energy transfer through convection

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Aziah Yahaya

Introduction A tiny drop of water can become a magni er. What do we need?

A small wire (without insulator)

What do we do?

1. Take the wire and make a small loop by coiling it once around a nail.

2. Insert the loop into a glass of water.

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Bebe Zarjan bt Mirbas Khan

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Water Magnifier
Prepared by: Bebe Zarjan bt Mirbas Khan

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A glass of water

A newspaper article

Nail

The loop

3. Hold the loop above an alphabet on a newspaper article. 4. Are you able to see the through the drop of water in the loop?
The Ne ABC
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Whats happening? Light will be refracted as it enters the water loop. This will transform the drop of water into a magni er and make the letter seem larger than usual. Curriculum Speci cations Link Science Year 5: Refraction of Light

Teacher fellowship program 2006/COL/Mini Show Prepared by: Bebe Zarjan bt Mirbas Khan

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