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Instructional Design Project

Name: Jennifer Gonzalez Date: April 30, 2013 Subject: Leadership WKU ID#: Age/Grade Level: Ages 12-14/Grade 8 # of Students: ~ 25 # of IEP Students: unknown

Major Content: Language Arts Unit Title: The Do Something Challenge

Authentic Topic: community service Lesson Title: Getting the Principal to Say Yes

Type your lesson plan in this template. Do not delete the questions or directions. Be sure to put all worksheets, assessments, and scoring rubrics in the Appendix. After you teach the lesson in LME 537, complete the IMPACT and REFINEMENT sections at the bottom of this file.

BE SURE TO REVIEW THE SCORING RUBRIC FOR EACH SECTION AS YOU ARE COMPLETING IT.

ACTIONS: Completed prior to teaching lesson. Your instructor must approve this section before you teach the lesson.
Goals and Objectives:
Clearly state your broad goals and specific objectives (each objective must have all four parts) that identify the content and technology skills/processes to be taught and formally assessed. The Content Objective must address the highest level thinking activity of content (curriculum) of the lesson. Give the Blooms level for each objective. Identify essential questions you want to address. You must have no more than one technology objective and no more than one content objective.

Essential Questions: 1. 2. 3. How can I personally solve a problem in my school in just a few months, for free? Will my solution actually work? How do I know? How can I use writing and technology to persuade my principal to let me implement my solution?

Content Goal: Pupils will understand how effective persuasive and informative writing are essential tools for active participation and influence in their communities. Content Objective:
Revised Blooms Level, Cognitive Process, and Justification:

Connections to Kentucky Core Academic Standards: CCR: Writing 8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (259) 8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (259) 8.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration (261)

1. After thoroughly researching a school problem, pupils will create a detailed written plan for solving that problem, including a timetable and progress checklist, scoring a 3 or higher on the content section of the rubric.

6.2: Create/Planning Planning the solution to a school problem. 6.3: Create/Producing Writing the text that will persuade administrators to permit the plan.

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Technology Goal: Pupils will understand the basic structure and management of a blog, and develop a greater appreciation for the importance of functionality, aesthetics, and organization in appealing to an audience. Technology Objective:
Revised Blooms Level, Cognitive Process, and Justification:

Connections to Technology Skills in Kentucky Core Academic Standards: KCAS: Technology Big Idea: Communication and Productivity Students will construct and publish information in printed and digital formats for authentic audiences (388) CCR: Writing 8.6 Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas effectively as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (260)

2. Using a free blogging website, pupils will produce a project blog to gain support for their solution from school administrators, scoring a 3 or higher on the technology section of the rubric.

6.3: Create/Producing Creation of blog site, including several separate pages of information.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards: Writing: (1) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. (2) Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. (6) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Strand: Writing Clusters: Text Types and Purposes, Production and Distribution of Writing Grade: 8 Standard #: 1, 2, 6

Common Core Standards for the Content Objective: (sub-standards in gray will not be addressed in this unit) 8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (259) a. b. c. d. e. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. Establish and maintain a formal style. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (259) a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Establish and maintain a formal style. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. Common Core Standards for the Technology Objective: 8.6 Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas effectively as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (260)

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Create Learning Targets for the primary Kentucky Core Academic Standard for your Content Objective and your Technology Objective: Learning Targets
Directions: What are the knowledge, reasoning, performance skills, and products that underpin the standard? Create student-friendly I Can Learning Target statements Use RED text to indicate which Learning Targets you will address in this lesson. Use the Learning Target number throughout the lesson to identify where you address this target. Be sure to identify how you assess each red LT in your scoring rubrics.

Knowledge Target 1. I can define blog, post, static page, link, and tag. 2. I can identify persuasive techniques. 3. I can clearly describe my community problem, including its causes and impact.

Reasoning Target 4. I can evaluate the effectiveness of different persuasive techniques. 5. I can evaluate the quality of a websites design, content, and functionality. 6. I can determine which evidence will be most convincing to my audience.

Performance Skill Target 7. I can compose, tag and publish a new blog post. 8. I can create a static page on my blog. 9. I can add graphics and links to my pages. 10. I can use explanations, definitions, details and facts to make my community problem clear. 11. I can use reasoning and evidence to convince others that my idea will work.

Product Target 12. I can create a detailed plan for solving a problem in my school. 13. I can create a blog that will persuade my principal to support my solution.

Context:
Directions: Clearly describe how these objectives and this lesson relate to your broad goals for teaching about the topic and how this lesson fits into your unit. Explain how this lesson addresses CReaTE, and diversity of students. Describe any collaboration with other professionals during this lesson. Address any personal, social, cultural, and global concerns that will be relevant to student learning. How does your lesson address the following? A. How your objectives relate to your broad goals and how this lesson fits into your overall unit including students prior learning in lessons before this lesson. In previous lessons, pupils explored whatkidscando.org to learn about ways young people are addressing problems in their communities. Forming task groups, pupils then identified a school problem, researched it online and through interviews, and submitted two written documents: a summary of the problem, which fully described the issue they planned to tackle (LT3, LT10), and a brief proposal of their solution. It is assumed that most plans will be very rough, simplistic and in need of more development. Another lesson reviewed various persuasive techniques (LT2) used in writing, advertising, and other promotional materials to give pupils a vocabulary for analyzing websites in todays lesson. Finally, pupils were introduced to the architecture of a blog (LT1) and introduced to key terms that they would need for doing the work of creating their own blogs. The next group of lessons (shown in this IDP) serve as the linchpin for the whole unit. They require pupils to take their general ideas and make them much more specific, considering such questions as: Is our solution sustainable? Will it build capacity in those affected? Have we partnered with those affected to come up with this solution? After these questions have been considered and pupils have developed their plans more fully (LT12), they will then consider how to get permission from their administration. The next lesson will show them how they can gain support with both their content (by effectively writing and organizing information in a way that is clear, appealing, and persuasive to the audience LT11) and their delivery system (by creating a blog that is informative, aesthetically pleasing, and functional LT13). The approach will be holistic demonstrating

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that websites achieve effectiveness from a number of different angles, and if any of these is lacking, their cause will suffer. After in-depth analysis of sample charity websites (LT4, LT5), pupils will be able to get their hands on their own blogs and get to work (LT13), both on the implementation of the technology (LT7, LT8, LT9) and development of the content (LT6, LT11). Although the problem has already been summarized and the solution proposed, they have yet to craft descriptions of either with an audience in mind. After this lesson, pupils will take several class sessions to prepare their blogs for launch. Once blogs are launched and pupils receive permission, they will begin implementing their solutions.

B. Cognitive Complexity

Provide the CReaTE levels and justify your ratings with examples of higher level thinking that are required of pupils with the content in your lesson. Be sure to give the Blooms level for student thinking with the Content (not technology). Also, use statements from the CReaTE Framework to justify the CReaTE levels.

C. Real World learning

C Level: 5 Justification with lesson examples: Pupils develop their own projects by identifying a problem, developing a solution, and carrying out that solution. Solutions can take many forms and can involve a variety of tasks, all generated by the pupils themselves. No two solutions will look the same. Creating the solution and the blog text are all at the Create level of Blooms. Finally, because pupils essentially create their own mini-charity and develop texts that build administrator confidence the same way a public relations department would, they are thinking like content experts. Justification with CReaTE Framework: Create level of Blooms; pupils develop own projects; pupils think like content experts.

Provide the CReaTE levels and justify your ratings with examples of authentic learning that are required of pupils with the content in your lesson. Also, use statements from the CReaTE Framework to justify the CReaTE levels.

D. Technology integration

R Level: 4 Justification with lesson examples: The pupils solutions ultimately impact the classroom, school or community by directly addressing and attempting to solve a local problem; their blogs effectiveness is a necessary step toward implementing those solutions . The lesson integrates learning across several subject areas: language arts, social studies (historical perspective, social change, economics), and technology. Justification with CReaTE Framework: impacts the classroom, school, or community; learning is integrated across subject areas.

Provide the CReaTE levels and justify your ratings with examples of technology integration that are required of pupils with the content in your lesson. Also, use statements from the CReaTE Framework to justify the CReaTE levels.

T Level: 3-4 Justification with lesson examples: The technology is embedded in the content pupils create text and combine it with images and other graphics on the blogs themselves, and their audience will view that text online. Project blogs are not necessarily essential to project completion and could be considered an add-on: Although the most effective way to reach the school administration and convey professionalism is with technology, and blogs provide a good platform for this kind of work, because they allow for some static pages for basic information, and fluid pages for regular updates, it could be argued that the same thing could be accomplished with posterboard, since the administration is in the same building. Still, blogs would be far more efficient and effective. Pupils will produce the blogs in small groups, which naturally builds in collaboration, and their teacher, advising and supporting that work during the writers workshop and before, modeling my own work, will serve as a partner. Finally, pupils will use the blogs to solve authentic problems at the Create level with their community problem solutions. Justification with CReaTE Framework: technology use embedded in content and (somewhat) essential to project completion; lesson promotes collaboration and partnership with teacher; technology helps them solve authentic problems at the Create level.

E. Engaged learning

Provide the CReaTE levels and justify your ratings with examples of engaged learning that are required of pupils with the content in your lesson. Also, use statements from the CReaTE Framework to justify the CReaTE levels.

E Level: 4-5 Justification with lesson examples: Pupils will partner with the teacher to define the content

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F. Describe pupil characteristics and diversity of your students; # of pupils, gender, ethnicity, academic levels, special needs, include the results of the learning styles survey of your pupils

(their problem and solution). The website study is an inquiry-based lesson: Rather than seek one correct answer, it asks pupils to consider and evaluate a real-world website and collectively offer critiques, which is a form of inquiry as we are all viewers of the site and therefore a potential target audience. Also, this lesson comes after each group has done its own inquiry-based research on the problem, which could take a variety of forms from online research to personal interviews. The blog work will be collaborative, as pupils will collaborate with each other in groups and between groups to evaluate each others blogs. In a larger context, pupils will also collaborate with community members to solve their problems, which will be initiated by pupils (level 5). Some groups may need more help and structure from the teacher, which would put them at a 4, while others may take more initiative themselves, which would be at a level 5. Justification with CReaTE Framework: pupils partner with the teacher to define content, pupil inquiry-based approach, pupils collaborate with other pupils.

You do not have to fill this out until LME 537.

G. How will you differentiate instruction for these diverse students? H. How will you collaborate with other professionals?

You do not have to fill this out until LME 537.

I will collaborate with the classroom teacher whose class I am co-teaching for this unit. She will have greater familiarity with her pupils interests and abilities than I will and will therefore have significant input on planning for pupil grouping and differentiation, making decisions during instruction, and assessing pupil work. I will also collaborate with the schools technology coordinator to arrange access to the biz.nf website and other sites that may be necessary for project completion. Collaboration will also be necessary to acquire video or audio recording equipment for pupils who would like to add extra multimedia to their blog sites. Finally, I will collaborate with the schools administration to get permissions and make arrangements for implementing pupil projects.

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Resources:
Use bullets to list all resources (i.e., all materials, software, files, websites, including specific technology applications) that will be used during the lesson. Include worksheets and scoring rubrics to be used with students in the Appendix of this lesson plan file. You must link to worksheets and rubrics that are in the Appendix of this file. Give one to two sentences for each resource telling how it will be used in the lesson. Pre-Assessment: Website Evaluation This will be given to pupils to complete individually, prior to any instruction on persuasion or web functionality. With a modified version of the rubric that will be used to assess their own blogs, pupils will examine the website of small charity (one that lacks some qualities of a good website) and evaluate its effectiveness on several criteria (design, timeliness, clarity, functionality). The pre-assessment will be given several days before this lesson to allow the teacher to make adjustments in the instruction and differentiate for pupils who demonstrate advanced knowledge on the subject. How Good Is Your Solution? This activity will help pupils determine whether they have come up with a solution possesses the necessary qualities of sustainability, capacity building, and partnership. By studying their definitions, then studying examples that lack some of these qualities, pupils will begin to understand where their own solutions may be lacking. Charity Website Study This activity guides pupils through several sample charity websites, asking them to examine their effectiveness using the same criteria from the pre-assessment. The study moves from whole-group, with the teachers assistance, to small-group, where pupils evaluate a different site with their project task force. Project Blog Prompt and Project Blog Scoring Rubric These will be given to pupils after the Website Study, to give them clear guidelines for their blogs before they begin working on them. [Setup instructions used with permission by Dr. Marge Maxwell.] Pupils will be instructed to refer back to these documents frequently to make sure they are meeting all of the requirements. The scoring rubric will be used to score blogs once they are completed. These two documents assess both objectives for this lesson. Biz.nf (www.biz.nf) This site offers free hosting of WordPress blogs. I will use the site to have pupils set up their blog accounts. Stock.xchng (www.sxc.hu) This site offers free stock photos for download. Pupils will use it to gather images to use in their blogs.

Charity Websites Used as Models for Study Educate2Envision International: www.educate2envision.org A California-based organization dedicated to improving educational opportunities in rural Honduras. HOTEL Inc: hotelincbg.com A local organization whose mission is to break the cycles of poverty in our community. International Center of Bowling Green: immigrationrefugeeservices.org This local organization resettles and fills the needs of international refugees and immigrants in Kentucky. My Charity for Kids: www.mycharity4kids.org Used as an example of a poorly constructed website New Beginnings Therapeutic Riding: www.nbtr-bg.org A local organization that offers therapeutic horse riding to improve the lives of people with disabilities. Potter Childrens Home: www.potterministries.org This local organization provides residential and counseling services to orphaned children and single-parent families.

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Assessment and Instruction Plan:


Give the objective number and text from your Goals and Objectives section above. Describe the pre-assessment strategies for each objective. Copy the assessment to the Appendix and link to the assessment from this table. Describe the instructional activities you will use to engage students toward mastery of your objectives including how you will trigger prior knowledge and adapt strategies to meet individual student needs and the diversity in your classroom. Be sure to describe higher level thinking requirements in your activities. All worksheets you use must be included in the Appendix of this lesson file (not a separate file). Bullets or numbered items preferred over lengthy paragraphs. If there were prior lessons providing background knowledge and skills, begin by briefly describing what pupils learned from those prior lessons. There is not need to give those lesson activities here. Clearly state how you will assess student progress in meeting each objective, including performance criteria you will use. Include all written assessment measures and rubrics in the Appendix of this lesson file (not a separate file). Link to your assessments/rubrics from this table. (Points will be deducted for not linking to worksheets and assessments.) Learning Targets: Indicate which Learning Targets (LT) are addressed in your instructional activities and assessments. Pre-assessment Website Evaluation: Pupils will evaluate a sample charity website, using a modified version of the rubric that will be used to evaluate their own blogs. The content score will apply to this objective. Describe Instruction and Activities In previous lessons, pupils formed task groups, identified and researched their community problem, and submitted a draft of a proposed solution. Prior knowledge will be triggered in these activities with the vocabulary used in instruction that refers to persuasive techniques (from a previous lesson). Individual needs will be met with grouping: When pupils work in pairs/groups, they will be placed with others of similar ability level, so that higher-level pupils will be challenged, and lower-level pupils will take on more responsibility. Discussion questions will be adjusted for ability level, wherein the more challenging questions are posed to the higher-level groups, and more manageable ones are given to the lower-level groups. During workshop time, teacher assistance will be adjusted according to need all pupils will be prompted at their level and slightly above, to maintain challenge. Higher level thinking is shown in bold text below. 1. How Good Is Your Solution? Discussion activity in which pupils first evaluate several sample solutions for sustainability, capacity building, and partnership, then evaluate their own, followed by a whole-class activity in which each group presents its self-evaluation and takes suggestions from other class members on how it can improve its solution. (LT12). 2. Charity Website Study: Whole-class and small-group close reading and evaluation of several sample charity websites, assessing them for their effectiveness in persuading their intended audience (LT4, LT6). 4. Writers Workshop: Pupils will be given the blog prompt and rubric, and will then begin drafting the text for their blogs (creating). They will spend the next several class sessions writing, revising and editing the text until the blogs are completed. (LT6, LT11, LT13) Post-assessment Website Evaluation: Pupils will be given this assessment again to measure growth. The content score will apply to this objective. Finished blogs will be evaluated using the content section of the scoring rubric.

Objective (# and text) Content Objective: 1. After thoroughly researching a school problem, pupils will create a detailed written plan for solving that problem, including a timetable and progress checklist, scoring a 3 or higher on the content section of the rubric.

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Technology Objective: 2. Using a free blogging website, pupils will produce a project blog to gain support for their solution from school administrators, scoring a 3 or higher on the technology section of the rubric.

Website Evaluation: Pupils will evaluate a sample blog, using a modified version of the rubric that will be used to evaluate their own blogs. The technology score will apply to this objective.

In a previous lesson, pupils set up their free blog account, but they did not do anything beyond establishing a domain name. Prior knowledge will be triggered in these activities with the vocabulary used in instruction that refers to blog components (from a previous lesson). Individual needs will be met with grouping: When pupils work in pairs/groups, they will be placed with others of similar ability level, so that higher-level pupils will be challenged, and lower-level pupils will take on more responsibility. Discussion questions will be adjusted for ability level, wherein the more challenging questions are posed to the higher-level groups, and more manageable ones are given to the lower-level groups. During workshop time, teacher assistance will be adjusted according to need all pupils will be prompted at their level and slightly above, to maintain challenge. Higher level thinking is shown in bold text below. 2. Charity Website Study: (same as above) Whole-class and small-group close reading and evaluation of several sample charity websites, assessing them for their effectiveness in persuading their intended audience through site design and functionality. (LT5) 3. Teacher Modeling: I will demonstrate how to navigate the blog dashboard, change the blog theme, compose, tag and publish a new blog post, create a static page, and add graphics and links. (LT7, LT8, LT9, LT12) 4. Workshop: Pupils will be given the blog prompt and rubric, and will then be given class time to compose and place blog text, create pages, add images, links and other features to improve the blogs appeal to its audience (creating). (LT7, LT8, LT9, LT12)

Website Evaluation: Pupils will be given this assessment again to measure growth. The technology score will apply to this objective. Finished blogs will be evaluated using the technology section of the scoring rubric.

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References:
Include five or more annotated APA references. Annotations should be complete sentences, describe source contents, and how the source was used in creating your lesson.

Cox, E. (2010, September 28) How to spot a bad charity website. Retrieved from Reason Digital: http://www.reasondigital.com/how-to-spot-a-bad-charity-website/ The author explains the various criteria for poor charity websites. The information contained in this article helped me to develop the rubric for the blog and gave me insight for the website study activity, to get pupils to deeply consider the qualities of an effective charity website. De Leon, N. & Strenecky, B. (2013, February 8). The $100 Solution faculty and staff training. Presented by the Western Kentucky University ALIVE Center for Community Partnerships from Bowling Green, KY. I attended this training because the premise of the $100 Solution is similar to what I hope to do with my own pupils. I learned that in order for a service project to be really effective, it needs to possess the qualities of partnership, capacity building, and sustainability, among other things. I adapted some of the training materials to create the How Good Is Your Solution? exercise. Do Something website: www.dosomething.org Do Something is the countrys largest not-for-profit for young people who want to create social change. Started in 1993, the organization funds charitable projects exclusively for projects initiated by those under age 25. Initially, I planned to use the site will to teach and inspire pupils early in the unit to determine their cause and their solution. However, because the site lists sex and relationships as one of its possible causes, I ultimately chose not to share it with pupils. Parents of 8th graders are likely not going to approve of this, and I also think kids at this age would all be drawn to and thereby distracted by this section of the site, and miss the point altogether. Still, the site was invaluable for helping me understand the process of youthled community service. I also used the foundations grant information to develop the required pages for pupil blogs. Franker, K. (2010-12). A rubric for evaluating pupil blogs. Retrieved from University of Wisconsin Stout: http://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/blogrubric.html

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This document is a sample rubric for evaluating pupil blogs. I used it to help me develop my own rubric for the pupil blogs in this unit. Kalkman, D. (2003). Website evaluation rubric. Retrieved from http://www.cedu.niu.edu/pt3/centter/ITC/Website_Evaluation_Rubric.pdf I used this document to help me develop the technology section of the project blog rubric. In particular, it helped me phrase the copyright and permissions section of my rubric. Maxwell, M. (2013). Blog set-up instructions. [Course materials]. Western Kentucky University. These instructions explain how to set up a free blogging account through biz.nf. I borrowed them with permission to create my own set of instructions on the blog prompt. Silver, H., Strong, R., & Perini, M. (2007). The strategic teacher: Selecting the right research-based strategy for every lesson. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. This book provides in-depth descriptions of 20 research-based instructional strategies that can be used in most subject areas and most grade levels. I used it to develop the Website Evaluation activity to compare qualities of different websites in this lesson. The text advises that any comparison activity will be more effective and memorable if pupils have a visual organizer to collect their findings. I used a version of the Side-by-Side Diagram on page 77. What Kids Can Do, Inc. website: www.whatkidscando.org Founded in 2001, What Kids Can Do, Inc., is an organization whose mission is to document the power of what young people can accomplish when given the opportunities and supports they need and what they can contribute when we take their voices and ideas seriously. This site is used earlier in the unit to give pupils inspirational stories for coming up with their own ideas for community improvement projects.

Appendix:
Include (copy and paste) all student worksheets, assessments, and rubrics in this section. Do not link to other files or refer to other files. You may link to online projects, rubrics, etc. that you created for the IDP.

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Website Evaluation 1. Go to this website: www.mycharity4kids.org 2. Using the chart below, give this website a score for each of the criteria listed (1 = Poor, 2 = OK, 3 = Good, 4 = Excellent). In the far-right column, write an explanation for each score, including a specific example for any problem you describe.

Criteria
Problem, cause of problem, and impact are clearly defined and described. Clear claim is made proposing a solution that is sustainable, builds capacity, and demonstrates partnership with those affected. Claim is supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources.

Score

Explanation

Solution is fully described.

Headings and transitions are used to organize ideas and aid reader comprehension. Minimal errors in grammar, usage, spelling or punctuation. Balanced, attractive layout with good quality visuals that add information and fit the message. All information is easy to locate. Purpose of each item is clear and relevant to overall purpose of site. All links work properly and connect user to something relevant and useful: no error pages or links to irrelevant material. All elements of the site function properly.

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Pre-Assessment Scoring Key


Pupils will be given two scores on the pre-assessment, one for content and one for technology. Both will be holistic, based on how closely their responses match of those written here. 4 = All scores are within one number of key scores; explanation includes nearly all issues identified in key; specific examples provided for nearly every issue described 3 = Most scores are within one number of key scores; explanation includes most issues identified in example; specific examples provided for most issues described 2 = Many scores are within one number of key scores; explanation includes some issues identified in example; some specific examples provided for issues described 1 = Many scores are not within one number of key scores; many issues identified in example are missing; few specific examples are provided for issues described

Criteria

Score

Explanation Not entirely clear the organization was started when its founders daughter, who is blind, was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome. On the Miracles in Life page, it is implied that there are some families with special-needs children who do not have the financial or emotional resources to adequately care for their children. This idea is not well-developed or substantiated, however. Because the solution itself is not fully described, it is also not clear whether it possesses these qualities. The only place where capacity-building seems to be visible is in Savannah Family Workshop, where families are given tools and education for working with their children. Sustainability and partnership are not evident. Since the solution is not clear, there is also no evidence to support it. The site does not include any evidence that their services are working or needed. The site does link to a number of other sites that provide more information to families with specialneeds children, but those are provided as a service, not to provide evidence to support the solution. It is not really clear what this charity does with its donations. Gas and car maintenance, rent and phones are mentioned on the charitable donations page, but there is not a clear picture of what the charity actually does. Some effort is made to create headings and organize

Problem, cause of problem, and impact are clearly defined and described.

Clear claim is made proposing a solution that is sustainable, builds capacity, and demonstrates partnership with those affected.

Claim is supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources.

Solution is fully described.

Headings and transitions are used to

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organize ideas and aid reader comprehension.

information, but it is inconsistent. For example, on the OnGoing Opportunities page, several ways to help are presented, but each one has a different kind of formatting to identify where its description starts the first one is Savannahs Kakes 4 Kids, which is a heading in black bold font. The next item, a Scratch and Help program, is given an orange heading, which initially makes it look like a link. Finally, theres a long string of blue links, each one followed by a town name. The links take you to a donation page. Several prominent errors appear right on the front page, showing a lack of proofreading: Volunteers should not have an apostrophe, OnGoing is an odd and unnecessary use of capitalization, Past-Events is incorrectly hyphenated, the Miracles in Life button has a period added for no reason. The layout isnt too hard on the eyes, but there are areas that need improvement to make the information clearer. Quite a few visuals seem to be fluff and create a cluttered feeling; still others are misleading, such as the Donate in Memory image on the Charitable Donations page, which looks like a link to take you to a donation page, when in fact it is just an image. Several pages on the site are unclear in their purpose. For example, the VOElectronix, section is confusing. It appears to be a separate charity, and after a little digging through the posted documents, that sort of becomes clear, but it is not presented clearly on the VOElectronix page itself. In fact, the information is hidden inside images that must be clicked on. Similarly, Savannahs Family Workshop seems to be some kind of workshop that this charity offers, but that it not clearly stated on the page it just goes straight into listing the contents of the workshop. No information is given about where these happen or how a person might request one. Although most items take you where you think they will, there are some errors and some illogical choices. For example, most images can be clicked on, which takes you to the image itself on a page

Minimal errors in grammar, usage, spelling or punctuation.

Balanced, attractive layout with good quality visuals that add information and fit the message.

All information is easy to locate. Purpose of each item is clear and relevant to overall purpose of site.

All links work properly and connect user to something relevant and useful: no error pages or links to irrelevant material. All elements of the site function properly.

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this serves no purpose for the overall mission of the site, as many of the images are stock photos, so linking them is a confusing choice. On many pages, some images contain text that implies that if you click on them, youll go to a page with information about volunteering, but they turn out to just be images. This is especially confusing on the home page, which appears to have several clickable links, but none of them actually do anything. In the Gallery of Past Events, there appears to have been an attempt to embed something, but only the coding appears, not the item itself.
Back to Resources Back to Assessment and Instruction Plan

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How Good Is Your Solution?


For a solution to be a good one, it should have these qualities: sustainability: long-lasting; the solution will be able to be maintained over a long period of time capacity building: helps recipients become self-sufficient, rather than dependent on you to solve the problem partnership: the solution comes from consulting with those affected to find out what they really need Part 1: Stations With your group, visit each of the Solution Scenario Stations posted around the room. Using this chart, record whether each solution has sufficient sustainability, capacity building, and partnership by circling Y for yes, or N for no. Then support your opinion with a brief explanation. Sustainability Capacity building Partnership

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

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Scenarios (printed on cards posted around the room):

i. BROKEN DOWN PLAYGROUND iii. LANGUAGE EMERGENCY! Problem: A local playground has a lot of broken and unsafe equipment, and the landscaping has deteriorated, leaving mostly bald patches in the ground that get muddy in wet weather. The two remaining benches are broken or missing parts. Although a lot of kids live in the neighborhood, the playground usually only attracts teenagers who use the playground as a place to hang out. Solution: A group of citizens from a few towns over plan a Repair Day, where they will come to the playground to paint and repair the broken equipment, install a new see-saw, plant a few bushes and add mulch, which will greatly improve the playgrounds appearance. ii. NO RIDE TO THE DOCTOR Problem: Many local elderly people are unable to see their doctors, because they have no reliable transportation. Solution: After identifying which neighborhoods had the greatest need, and determining which days and times were most preferred for doctors visits for this population (mornings on M-Th), a local charity worked with city officials to add a new route to the existing city bus schedules for M-Th mornings, to pick up people in these neighborhoods and drop off in four locations with a high concentration of physicians offices. Problem: It has been reported that many children who receive free or reduced lunch do not have enough food to eat over the weekend. Solution: the Backpacks for Kids program discreetly provides kids with backpacks full of nutritious, child-friendly, easy-toprepare food to take home over the weekend. Problem: A large number of people from Afghanistan have been immigrating into the area, and many of them only speak Farsi, their native language, and not English. This creates a problem when it comes to performing tasks such as setting up a bank account, buying groceries, or signing a lease to rent an apartment. Solution: A local woman who speaks Farsi has volunteered to serve as a volunteer interpreter whenever a new family arrives and needs assistance with these tasks.

iv. FEEDING THE HUNGRY

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Instructional Design Project

Part 2: Evaluate Your Solution With your group members, evaluate your own unit, using the chart below. If you decide that your solution needs work in one or more areas, write down what you will do to improve it in that area. When you are finished, your group will present your decision to the class, and they will give you other suggestions for improvement.
Sustainability Capacity building Partnership

How our solution is currently doing in this area

What we can do to improve in this area

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Instructional Design Project

Charity Website Study


Directions: We will take a look at several websites today and consider how well they meet the criteria in the chart below. For each of the criteria listed, we will score the website (1 = Poor 2 = OK 3 = Good 4 = Excellent) and write a brief comment defending our score. We will do website 1 as a whole group. Website 2 will be scored by you in pairs, then discussed as a whole group. Website 3 will be scored by you in different pairs, then discussed as a group. Criteria
1. New Beginnings Therapeutic Riding www.nbtr-bg.org
score comments score

2. Potter Childrens Home www.potterministries.org


comments

3. International Center of BG immigrationrefugeeservices.org


score comments

Problem, cause of problem, and impact are clearly defined and described. Clear claim is made proposing a solution that is sustainable, builds capacity, and demonstrates partnership with those affected. Claim is supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources.

Solution is fully described.

Headings and transitions are used to organize ideas and aid reader comprehension.

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Instructional Design Project

Criteria

1. New Beginnings Therapeutic Riding


score comments score

2. Potter Childrens Home


comments score

3. International Center of BG
comments

Minimal errors in grammar, usage, spelling or punctuation. Balanced, attractive layout with good quality visuals that add information and fit the message. All information is easy to locate. Purpose of each item is clear and relevant to overall purpose of site. All links work properly and connect user to something relevant and useful: no error pages or links to irrelevant material.

Final Discussion Questions (write down answer first, then share with a partner, then we will share as a group): Which of these websites does the best job of convincing you to support it? Why?

List 2-3 things you have learned in this exercise that you will apply to your own project website.

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Instructional Design Project

Project Blog

In order to get permission to implement your solution, you need to show your school administration that you have thoroughly researched the problem and have a solid plan in place. You will do this by creating a professional, well-designed blog full of clear information about your problem, your solution, and why you should be trusted to make it all happen. This page outlines the basic requirements. The Scoring Rubric on the next page provides specifics on how your blog will be graded when it is finished. Step 1: Create Your Blog Account Begin by setting up a free WordPress blog account through biz.nf. 1. Go to www.biz.nf 2. Click Sign Up Now. 3. Select Free Hosting Plan. Scroll to the bottom and click Continue. 4. Type in your account information (name, address, use your student email, use a password THAT YOU WILL REMEMBER), click Yes to agree to the terms of service, and click Continue. 5. You are mailed two emails. You need to click the link in the first email to confirm your account. (Be sure to keep these emails for future reference.) 6. On the Control Panel, you will now select your free domain name. Click Domain Names on the top blue menu. a. Near the middle of the screen click Create a Free Subdomain. b. Type in a subdomain that is similar to the name of your project. Have several alternatives ready, in case your choice is not available. Click Create. 7. Click Hosting Tools on the top blue menu. a. Under Website Manager, click Zacky Installer. b. Click Word Press on the right side. 8. Select a theme for your site. You can change it later. Then click Next on the bottom right. 9. No need to select any plugins now since you can do that later. Click Next on the bottom right. 10. Type a Title for your website, your Admin email (use your student email), your Admin username (I suggest using Admin), and an Admin password (Do Not Forget this password!!). Click Next. 11. Click Install Now. 12. You are sent another email that your website has been set up. It has a direct link to your site and another to sign in as the administrator. You can click either one but I suggest the link that takes you to the Admin login. Use your Admin name and password. Click Remember Me before you click Log In. 13. You have created your own WordPress Website!

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Instructional Design Project

Step 2: Create Your Required Pages You will need to create the following static pages for your blog. See rubric for specific requirements. 1. The Problem: In several well-developed paragraphs, fully describe the problem you are addressing. Optional: Multimedia presentation (using iMovie, Windows Movie Maker, or other platform approved by your teacher) embedded on this page, to increase viewer understanding of the problem and further persuade them to get involved. In order to earn a 4 for this page, the movie must only be done in addition to meeting the page requirements. 2. The Solution: Fully describe your proposed solution and explain why it will work. 3. Timetable: Using text and graphics (a chart or other visual), show your reader the exact steps you plan to take to implement your solution, from beginning to end, including approximate dates when you expect key events to happen. 4. Progress: Create a checklist that contains at least 5 criteria that will help you determine whether your solution has been a success. 5. About Us: 100+ word description of your team members (first names only!), with a brief description of how your group came to the decision to solve this problem and why you have a personal interest in it. Step 3: Personalize Your Blog Using online tutorials that you find yourself, learn how to change your theme, cover photo, and other options to personalize your blog site to better fit your groups message. Step 4: Create Your First Post Write an introductory post, welcoming visitors to the blog and providing a basic overview of what they will find there. As we move through the implementation phase of your solution, you will be asked to add other posts, updating your readers on how the project is going.

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Instructional Design Project

Scoring Rubric: Project Blog


1 Emerging
Goals Not Met

Page

2 Partial Mastery
Goals Partially Met

3 Mastery
Goals Met

4 Exemplary
Goals Surpassed

Problem, cause of problem, and impact are clearly defined and described. Topic is developed with well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, and quotations. The Problem The Solution Timetable C O N T E N T Lead establishes clear purpose; clear closing statement. 2-3 Relevant graphics/images added to aid comprehension. (Embedded multimedia presentation = Exemplary score.) 3 resources cited within the text and listed at the end in APA style. At least one of these is an interview with a real person. Links are provided to at least 2 credible sites for more information. Clear claim is made that proposes a solution that is sustainable, builds capacity, and demonstrates partnership with those affected. Claim is supported with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources. Solution is fully described. Opposing claims are addressed and refuted. Provides a clear, accurate picture of all project components; no obvious gaps or unanswered questions. Includes graphic to aid reader comprehension.

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Instructional Design Project

Progress About Us Style & Structure T E C H N O L O G Y

Identifies 5 clearly defined criteria that measure the projects success. Checklist is regularly updated as the project is implemented. Provides 100+ word description of your team members (first names only!), with a brief description of how your group came to the decision to solve this problem and why you have a personal interest in it. Headings and transitions are used to organize ideas and aid reader comprehension. All text is written in a professional tone that conveys reliability. Minimal errors in grammar, usage, spelling or punctuation. Balanced, attractive layout with 4-5 good quality visuals (whole site) that add information and fit the message. All information is easy to locate. Purpose of each item is clear and relevant to overall purpose of site. All design elements are consistent in color, size, and style. All links work properly and connect user to something relevant and useful: no error pages or links to irrelevant material. All elements of the site function properly. Clear, easy-to-locate and accurate citations for all borrowed material. No material is included from Web sites that state that permission is required unless permission has been obtained.

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Instructional Design Project

These sections must be completed in LME 537 AFTER you teach the lesson.

IMPACT: Reflection/Analysis of Teaching and Learning


1. INSTRUCTIONAL DECISIONS: Describe one occasion when pupil responses or other performance/ behavior required a change (adaptation) in your instruction from the original lesson plan. Do not describe administrative activities such as setting up equipment. Describe changes made in your instruction for pupils. Explain what was done, for which objective, and how the change improved pupil learning for that objective. Was it done for one pupil or for the whole group?

2.

ANALYSIS OF PUPIL LEARNING: a. Data and charts of five pupils Select five pupils of varying performance levels from the class. Using tables and/or charts, present their progress from the pre-assessment to post-assessment for each instructional content and technology objective. If you use charts or graphs, you must also give numerical data. It can be difficult to determine progress from graphs alone.

1. Results of pre/post-assessments

2. Results of assessment of pupil project for Content objective

3. Results of assessment of pupil project for Technology objective

b.

Narrative describing performance Describe pupils performance for the objectives in terms of the relationship between the pre and post -assessment results.

1. Discussion of pre/post assessments

2. Discussion of pupil performance on their project for Content objective

3. Discussion of pupil performance on their project for Technology objective

c.

Conclusions about overall pupil performance in unit From the data shown in the tables and/or charts, draw conclusions about the differences in their achievement. Draw conclusions about pupil mastery of all of your objectives. Did pupils meet your criteria?

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d.

Influence of factors in instruction and pupil performance Consider the contextual factors, learning styles, instructional design, assessment strategies used, etc. How did these factors influence pupil learning and your conclusions?

3.

LESSON REFLECTION: a. Select the instructional objective (either the Content or the Technology objective) for which pupils had the greatest success. Explain possible reasons for this success. What things under the control of the teacher were done well?

b.

Select the instructional objective (either the Content or the Technology objective) for which pupils had the least success. Explain possible reasons for this. What things under the control of the teacher could have been managed more effectively?

c.

Reflect on possibilities for your professional development based on the designing, implementing, and assessing instruction for this project. Discuss at least two areas of your professional competence that should be a focus for further training for you.

d.

Discuss how you considered the diversity of pupils in planning and teaching this lesson. Diversity can include special populations, ELL, different learning styles, ethnic differences, gender, economic differences, etc.

e.

Discuss your role in this lesson. Were you the classroom teacher, library media specialist, TRT (technology resource teacher), or other? Discuss how you collaborated with other professionals in creating and/or teaching this unit.

f.

Select three disposition statements for the course (page 2 of the syllabus) and discuss how you demonstrated those positive dispositions in teaching this unit. Copy each disposition statement and discuss it.

g.

List the original technology products you created for teaching this lesson. Give links to your products if they are online or upload the files to BB (along with the other files for this project).

REFINEMENT: Lesson Extension/Follow-up


1. Based on your reflection, discuss plans for subsequent lessons to reinforce and extend understanding particularly for students who did not make satisfactory progress.

2.

Include ways in which you would change this lesson if you were to teach it again.

3.

Give suggestions for increasing the CReaTE level of this lesson.

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Instructional Design Project

How to Submit: 1. 2. Submit this IDP to EPS. Submit the following to BlackBoard: a. Personal Reflection and Self-evaluation b. All work for at least one student: pre/post-assessments and your evaluation of these assessments; Student work and/or project for both the Content and Technology objectives and your evaluation of the student project using your Content Objective and Technology Objective scoring rubrics

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Instructional Design Project