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Title of Unit: The English Colonies Title of Lesson: The Middle Colonies Submitted By: Jessica Solomon

A. Summary of the Lesson Plan: This social studies lesson describes the ways that proprietors solved the problem governing their colonies. This lesson uses the 5th Grade Houghton Mifflin Social Studies Textbook United States History: Volume 1 (p. 188-193). B. Target Population: Grade Level: 5th Grade Skill Level: students at all learning levels Grouping: whole group reading and discussion, independent for activity and assessment C. Materials: Paper and pencils Reading Skill Strategy (Unit Resources p. 54) for each student- see last page of lesson plan for sample Vocabulary and Study Guide (Unit Resources p. 55) for each student- see last page of lesson plan for sample Houghton Mifflin 5th Grade Social Studies Book: United States History: Volume 1 (p. 188193) D. Objectives: o NV State Social Studies Standards o H1.5.5. Describe the social, political, and religions lives of people in the New England, Middle and Southern Colonies.

Student-Friendly Standards H1.5.5. I can describe the social and political lives of people in the Middle colonies.

E. Procedure: 1. Refer to notes on TE 188 Get Set to Read. Explain the Study Guide students will complete as we read. Call students attention to the map on p. 189. o Ask, What are the names of the Middle Colonies?

Complete the Reading Skill Strategy worksheet as a class as we read. Identify & discuss with students how people look after houses, businesses, and land they own. Ask what responsibilities owners have when other people live on their land, and what problems can arise. Explain that proprietors of colonies had to deal with some of these problems.
EDEL 453 - Spring 2013 Karen Powell- Instructor page 1

Nevada State College

Title of Unit: The English Colonies Title of Lesson: The Middle Colonies Submitted By: Jessica Solomon

Create a word web of students responses.

Introduce vocabulary (proprietor, representative, treaty).

2. As a class, read p. 188-191, stopping to ask questions as indicated in the margins of the TE. 3. Students should take notes and record information on their Study Guide while we are reading. They can continue working on it when we finish reading. 4. Ask questions listed in the margins of the TE as an ongoing check for understanding. Focus on these questions about the thirteen colonies: (TE 189) How did the Duke of York become proprietor of New Netherland? (TE 189) How did the Middle Colonies proprietor hope to make money? (TE 189) Why did Penn call his colony a holy experiment? (TE 190) In what way did Penn contribute to self-government? (TE 190) In what ways did geography contribute to the growth of Philadelphia as a center of trade? (TE 190) What was Poor Richards Almanack? (After paragraph 2 on p. 191) How did the government of Pennsylvania differ from those of New York and New Jersey? (Review question #3) What evens led to the founding of New York as an English colony?

5. CLOSURE: Discuss the two statements in the Review and Assess section of TE 191. F. Assessment: What will you use to measure student understanding? Art Activity (p. 191) Students will create a pamphlet to encourage people to move to Pennsylvania in the 1700s. Include drawings, maps, and persuasive reasons for moving. Explain how you will know students understand the concepts from the lesson. Students will be able to describe the social and political lives of people in the Middle colonies through their pamphlets about Pennsylvania. G. Reflection: 1. Which part of the lesson do you think will be the easiest for you to teach?

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

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Title of Unit: The English Colonies Title of Lesson: The Middle Colonies Submitted By: Jessica Solomon

I think the group discussion aspect will be the easiest part of the lesson. The group discussion would allow students to learn from each other and hear things from a different perspective. 2. Which part will be most challenging for you to teach? Once again, I think the most difficult part of the lesson will be to help students recognize the differences between the different colonies. I will need to ensure that they remember the different colonies as well and understand their different contributions. 3. How will you follow up or extend this lesson? In order to extend the lesson, we will as a class do the Extend Lesson 1 Benjamin Franklin: Inventor on p. 192-193. 4. What can you do for students who dont grasp the concepts? I would pull any students that did not grasp the concepts aside and we would work on the Reteach Mini Lesson described at the bottom of TE 191. We would work together to use a chart to compare and contrast the Middle Colonies. 5. Which part of the lesson, if any, do you think might need to change? If anything, I think I might need to teach about Benjamin Franklin as a completely different lesson. He can be such a huge topic that I might have to add a day in order to understand the contributions he made. 6. When you were writing this lesson plan, what was the most difficult part? Deciding on the assessment was definitely the most difficult part of this lesson. I felt there were many assessments that would fit in this lesson, but I wanted to choose an engaging assessment.

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 3

Title of Unit: The English Colonies Title of Lesson: The Middle Colonies Submitted By: Jessica Solomon

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 4

Title of Unit: The English Colonies Title of Lesson: The Middle Colonies Submitted By: Jessica Solomon

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2013

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 5