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The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

Aflatoun

Child Social & Financial Education

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Non - Formal Education Manual

A manual for Facilitators on Child Social & Financial Education

All the editions have been through a process of creation, testing and revision based on work and feedback from the Aflatoun partner organisations, academics, teachers, pedagogues, Ministries of Education and children, as part of an ongoing bottom-up consultation process.

A special thank you to all the people who have made the creation of these workbooks possible: the children, teachers, parents, trainers, our dedicated partners, government ministries, donors, translators, designers, illustrators, the Aflatoun staff, volunteers, friends and family.

Aflatoun TM 2005 Jeroo Billimoria

This work may be reproduced and redistributed, in whole or in part, without alteration and without prior written permission, solely by educational institutions for non-profit administrative or educational purposes providing all copies contain the following statement:

Copyright 2008. Aflatoun Child Savings International. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of Aflatoun Child Savings International. No other use is permitted without the express prior written permission of Aflatoun Child Savings International. For permission, contact info@aflatoun.org

Printing versions

First edition February 2010

PREFACE

Welcome to the World of Aflatoun! As a facilitator, you will play an important role in teaching social and financial education in the non- formal education (NFE) settings.

Child social and financial education are aimed to help children learn about critical thinking, rights and responsibilities, as well as financial knowledge and skills that enable them to make the best use of recourses. Social education teaches children responsible citizenship and the need to know and be involved in social issues that affect them while financial education involves teaching children the important skills of saving, budgeting, and engaging in financial enterprise while.

This manual is designed for the learning facilitators and can be used for two general target groups:

children in need of special protection or non-formal learners (out of school youth, street children, abused children in institutions, children in conflict with the law, children in drop-in centers, among others) and children in non-formal settings (micro-finance institution clubs, after school clubs).

The manual is designed to address different issues that can make learning challenging for both groups. Children in need of special protection may have literacy and numeracy challenges as well as personal traumas which have affected their level of self-confidence and capacity to learn. Both groups may find it difficult to have a rigid schedule due to their different lifestyles. Hence, the manual aims to be as child-friendly and experiential as possible and to make learning a fun activity- based process.

This is also designed to be flexible enough for facilitators to mix and match the activities depending on the schedule that is available to them. We have annexed a suggested curriculum plan at the end of this manual, depending on whether you work with children in special need of protection or children in non-formal settings, or whether you have only one 4 hour session or about 40 hours in a year.

In the end, feel free to mix and match as you feel is appropriate. Activities can be delivered to both young and older children, unless specified. Young children refer to children 7 - 11 years old, while older children refer to children 12 - 17 years old. Please be sensitive to the competence of your participants and the appropriateness of the activities based on their competence given the varying experiences of these children.

Here is to a fruitful learning with the children!

on their competence given the varying experiences of these children. Here is to a fruitful learning

Acknowledgements

NFE Manual developed by:

Psychosocial Support and Children’s Rights Resource Center

Non-formal Contextualisation Workshop Participants:

Manizeh Bano, Sahil Sirsa Qursha, Jordan River Foundation Nazan Mustafa, SOS Kosovo Nanre Mfizger, Lynx Nigeria Luis Claudio Celma, Vincularte CDIA Roberto Urbieta, Fundacion Paraguaya Raymond Wever, FMO Doreen Lobeek, FMO Mirjam Nagel, Alice O Gerlad Kinuthia Ana Correia Rodrigues Carolina Tamayo Lila Vega Aflatoun Secretariat

Curriculum Development Task Force:

Nanre Mfizger, Lynx Nigeria Sumitra Ashtikar, MelJol Lucas Barberis, Ejercicio Ciudadano Lucia Anna Stasselova, Children of Slovakia

Writers and Module Developers:

Arnie C. Trinidad and Faye Alma G. Balanon Activity Consultant: Marichu Belarmino

Copyright 2009

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Contents

Introduction

05

The Aflatoun Approach

05

The Resilience Paradigm

06

A Simplified Framework

07

The Contents of the Manual

10

How to Use the Manual

11

Section 1: Aflatoun and I

13

Module 1: Hello, pleased to meet you!

15

Activity 1: Action!

15

Activity 2: Great Expectations

16

Module 2: This is me

18

Activity 1: Mini Me

18

Alternate activity: I am here!

20

Activity 2: What is Aflatoun

22

The Sounding Board

27

Section 2: Personal Understanding and Exploration

28

Module 1: My community, nation and world

30

Activity 1: My Own Community

31

Activity 2: Move in Space

33

Activity 3: The Groups We Belong To

34

Activity 4: A Piece of History

35

Activity 5: I Believe In

37

Activity 6: My World My Country My Aflatoun

39

Module 2: Learning more about myself

42

Activity 1: Things that I Love and Hate

43

Activity 2: A River of Hearts

44

Activity 3: A Time of Gift Giving

47

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Module 3: I am a good person

48

Activity 1: Are You Alive?

48

Activity 2: The Things I Do

49

Activity 3: Build Me a Tower

51

Activity 4: We can Solve This!

52

Module 4: My Dreams

53

Activity 1: I Will Become…

53

Activity 2: Water Ceremony

54

The Sounding Board

55

Section 3: Rights and Responsibilities

57

Module 1: My Rights and My Responsibilities

59

Activity 1: Child, House, Storm

59

Activity 2: A College of Needs

60

Activity 3: And the Rights were Born

61

Activity 4: Guess the Next Scene

64

Activity 5: What Would Happen?

65

Module 2: Things my “Family” and I Own and Have

70

Activity 1: Heart Strings

70

Activity 2: What we Have

72

Module 3: Institutions I can Count on

73

Activity 1: Battle of the Bands

73

Activity 2: Dreams for the Future

74

Alternate Activity: Wheb I Grow Up

75

Activity 3: To the Future!

76

The Sounding Board

77

Section 4: Saving, Spending, Planning, and Budgeting

78

Module 1: The Things We Want and Need

80

Activity 1: The Questioning Ball

81

Activity 2: A Snapshot of our Needs and Wants (for younger children) Activity 4: Is it True or False?

82

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Activity 3: Collage of Needs and Wants (for older children)

85

Activity 4: Is it True or False?

86

Activity 5: What if…

?

86

Module 2: Saving for a Rainy Day

(For younger children)

88

Activity 1: The Itchy Scalp Game

88

Activity 2: What Do I Need to Do?

90

Activity 3: The Happiness Bank

93

Activity 4: Word Relay Game

94

Activity 5: Helping Save the Environment 95 Activity 5.1: Aflatoun’s Journey to Planet

Waste-eria (for younger children)

96

Activity 5.2: Wind Mobile from Recyclable Materials

100

Activity 6: I Can Save, I Have Saved!

102

Activity 6.1: Problem Solving (for older children)

102

Activity 6.2: What will I do? (for younger children)

105

Activity 6.3: Yes, I can Save! (for younger children)

107

Activity 7: Places to Save Money

109

Module 3: Where Should I Keep It?

110

Activity 1: The Aflatoun Box

110

Activity 2: The Aflatoun Wallet

112

Activity 3: The Savings Book

114

Activity 4: The Book of Good Deeds

116

Activity 5: Poster Making

118

Module 4: All About Spending and Budgeting

119

Activity 1: Introducing Budgeting to Children

119

Activity 1.1: Buying the Things We Want and

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Activity 1.2: Planning a Party

120

Activity 2: Monthly Budget

122

The Sounding Board

124

Section 5: Financial and Social Enterprise 101

125

Module 1 My Personal Goal

127

Activity 1: The Trust Maze

127

Activity 2: Burning Our Past Hurts, Rekindling Our Spirit!

128

Activity 3: High Flying Goals

129

Module 2 Setting-up a Financial Enterprise

132

Activity 1: Deciding on an Apt Financial Enterprise (for older children)

132

Activity 2: All About Pricing (for older children)

135

Activity 3: Selling in the Community (for younger children)

137

Module 3: All About Social Enterprise

139

Activity 1: The Longest Line

139

Activity 2: The Goal Ladder

140

Activity 3: Our Goals within Our Reach

143

Activity 4: The Web of Life

144

The Sounding Board

144

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

Introduction

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual is a guide for facilitators of the Aflatoun Program for non-formal education learners (e.g. children in need of special protection who are in child care homes) and children learning in non-formal settings in social and financial enterprise. The Manual contains various Activities that will help the children attain the objectives of the Aflatoun program and develop the core competencies Aflatoun seeks to inculcate among children.

The Training Program aims for the children to:

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to: Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 5 1. Appreciate and respect their own uniqueness and

1. Appreciate and respect their own uniqueness and special characteristics as well as the uniqueness and special characteristics of others;

2. Appreciate and defend their rights and those of others, while fulfilling their responsibilities as good citizens;

3. Know and value the appropriate use of natural material and financial resources and prioritize their use in a responsible manner;

4. Value the importance of planning and budgeting resources;

5. Set goals, plan and coordinate resources, and implement plans accordingly;

6. Design and manage social and financial enterprises that contribute to self- improvement, the school and community, and

7. Demonstrate perseverance, responsibility, critical thinking and creativity.

The Aflatoun Approach

The Manual is anchored on the following principles that served as the framework in designing and crafting the Activities for this Training Program: The Five Core Elements of the Aflatoun Program and the Resilience Paradigm.

The Five Core Elements The Five Core Elements of the Aflatoun Program have been developed to help children become positive changemakers within their communities. Each Core Element is seen as equally important.

Core Element One: Personal Understanding and Exploration Self-confidence is essential for children who want to become change makers within their communities. Children are encouraged towards greater self-knowledge. Children are given the space to explore values, both individually and through interaction with peers. As part of that process they are encouraged to express themselves creatively. Aflatoun promotes child-centred learning. Planting the seeds of independence and self-reliance at an early age helps children develop into resourceful, self-motivated individuals. Aflatoun promotes values such as compassion and empathy. It emphasizes the child’s position within a wider community, where all members are mutually dependent. Financial ethics are explored and children learn the importance of balancing financial skills with the judgment to use these skills responsibly.

Core Element Two: Rights and Responsibilities Aflatoun is grounded in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1990), which identifies four sets of interdependent rights (survival, development, protection and participation). Whilst all the rights of the CRC are accorded equal importance, it is widely accepted that the ‘participation rights’ (Articles 12 – 17) are of particular importance because they enable children to realize other key rights. Children who are confident at expressing themselves and ensuring their opinions are heard, especially in adult company, are their own best line of defence. The same is true of children who are

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well-informed and organized, who know how to access and share information. Furthermore, learning about rights helps children understand the plight of others whose rights are denied. Participation is a right, not a reward. That is why Aflatoun encourages child-centred learning where children are free to offer opinions and express themselves.

Children should also learn about their responsibilities towards themselves, their family, their community and the environment and not just demand for their rights. This sense of responsibility will later help guide the decisions they make when they come to set up their own financial enterprises.

Core Element Three: Savings and Spending In keeping with Aflatoun’s holistic approach to development, a broad definition of savings is promoted. It entails saving both material and non-material resources. Saving water and using natural resources responsibly is deemed as important as saving money. Saving is seen as a tool that helps children realize their rights. Children learn how to save and how to spend in a responsible manner. The amounts saved are of little importance. The benefit derives from introducing children to the concept and discipline of regular saving.

Core Element Four: Planning and Budgeting Planning and budgeting are wonderful tools for boosting a child’s self-confidence. Boys and girls come to see that they can make hopes and dreams come true. They are financially empowered when they can use their saving and spending skills to improve their lives. For example, a consistent savings habit can enable a child to start her own micro-enterprise. A consistent savings habit can enable a group of children to launch a social justice campaign. Core Element Four leads to beneficial outcomes beyond the purely financial. Through planning and budgeting, children learn to see the future as something that they themselves can manage.

Core Element Five: Child Social and Financial Enterprise Children are encouraged to view themselves as active participants in, and shapers of their community. There is an emphasis on teamwork. Children are encouraged to organize and deliver their own social justice campaigns. They are helped in experimenting with generating revenue and gain experience of working financial enterprise models. Through managing community activities or entrepreneurial enterprises children begin to see how they can have a positive impact on their community.

The Resilience Paradigm

Aside from the previous paradigms, we also add another paradigm to enrich our framework: the resilience framework. We need to use the paradigm because most of the participants in the NFE programme are Children in Need of Special Protection 1 (CNSP).

CNSP are children whose rights have been violated and who need special protective interventions such as education, health, social welfare, rescue, recovery, reintegration, legal assistance, and protection. They may belong to any of the following categories:

• child laborers

• victims of commercial sexual exploitation

• victims of physical and sexual abuse or those who experienced violence at home, in the community, and under authorities

• suffered discriminatory, inappropriate, and deficient laws and judicial processes and practices for CICL

• other-abled individuals

• street children

• are involved in armed conflict

• belong to indigenous communities

These children’s negative experiences in life have left some of them with self-esteem problems. Their capacity to see a brighter future and to empathize with others may have also been compromised by their experience. We need to help these children regain their sense of self and sense of compassion

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for others by tapping into their strengths. Resilience helps children cope with their experiences and to have a healthier sense of self and more positive outlook in life.

Resilience is the:

1. Inner capacity of human beings to surmount difficulties or

to recover from loss 2 ;

2. Competence and inner strength to work well, play well, love

well, and expect well despite the presence of considerable adversities 3 ;

3. The latent capacity to resist distraction and the capacity or

positive construction in spite of difficult circumstances 4 ;

4. Capacity to withstand and recover and grow from negative

experiences 5 .

This program aims to nurture children’s resilience at the same time that the Five Core Competencies are developed.

A Simplified Framework

To simplify and bring together all the frameworks we have just discussed, we adopt the four qualitative categories by Chok Hiew in the Integrating Child-Centered Approaches in Children’s Work. The four qualitative categories capture the principles being put forward by the various frameworks of the Aflatoun Program. It presents in an easy to understand manner what we want the children to accomplish in this training (see list below), which is for the children to realize “what and who they are,” “what they have,” and “what they can,” to give them the confidence to say, “we

will” become effective changemakers in society.

1. We are (internal resources and being a person)—good self esteem, filled with faith and hope, autonomous and responsible

2. We have (external resources)—positive community life, agency intervention, family support, supportive school or community

3. We can (competence and skills)—leadership, problem solving skills, communication skills, ability to manage one’s feelings

4. We will (resolutions)—change and transformation

The Table below shows how we have used the principles of the various frameworks and fitted them with the knowledge, attitudes, and skills we want the children to learn from this Program:

1. Protacio-de Castro, Elizabeth et al. 2004. Handbook for Social Workers on Basic Bio-Psychosocial Help for Children in Need of Special

Protection. Quezon City: UP CIDS.

2. Rossi, R. 1995. Resilience and the Catholic Theological Tradition. Geneva: ICCB Series.

3. Garmerzy, N. 1985. “Stress resilient children: the search for protective factors.” In JE Stevenson (ed). Recent Research in Development

Psychopathology, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry Book Supplement. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

4. Vanistendael, S. 1995. Growth in the Muddle of Life, Resilience: Building on People’s Strengths. Geneva: ICCB Series.

5. Banaag, C. 1997. “Exploring resiliency among Filipino Street Children. In Resiliency: Stories Found in Philippine Streets. Manila:

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Core Activities

 

Knowledge

 

Attitudes

 

Skills

We are

I

am unique and

believe in myself and can achieve

I

I

can share things

special despite my

 

Activitieswillrevolve around knowing the child’s capacities and weaknesses, understanding the

experiences

many things

about myself and express how I feel

experiences of the child, and facilitating the processing of the children’s experiences to help them recover their

self-esteem/self-

I

am part of the

I

value diversity

I

can interact

world, which is diverse in gender,

and equity

with everybody

respectfully

age…etc

worth and to help

I

understand

I

like to be a

I

can come up with

that there are situations around me that need to, and can be,

improved

change maker

meaningful ways to address social issues around me.

them gain a better perspective of their

life and make them more hopeful about the future.

We have

I

am aware of

I

want rights to be

I

can claim my

The activities will

my rights and

realized for every

rights from whoever is responsible and I can help others

revolve around helping the children realize that there are persons and institutions that could offer them various forms of support. This will also involve helping the children assess their resources,

responsibilities

child in the world

I

know some of

I

value an

I

am able to

my resources are scarce and need to be valued

appropriate use of natural and financial resources

creatively use, reuse, save, and protect resources

material

otherwise that are available in their community that could help them achieve their goals.

or

I know my needs

I am proud of

I

am able to

and wants may be

making careful,

prioritize and

different

well-thought

distinguish

through spending

between my wants and needs

decisions

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We Can

I

understand

 

I

want to plan

I

am able to set

the importance

(before I spend/do

goals and plan steps to achieve them, using available resources

The activities in this part will ensure that the children have the requisite skills to engage in saving and industry. This will also be related to the activities in the “I have” portion. This is important because the resources children have will help them achieve their goals. This will also look into their capacities and capabilities that they can use in the program

of

planning and

things)

recognize the

different elements

involved

   

I

understand

the

I

appreciate the

I am able to create

use

of

and

the

use of budgets in my planning

a budget, and

different elements

balance it against

of budgeting

   

expenses

We Will

I

understand the

I

am eager to take

I

am able to

basic principles of

the initiative to

research and decide what enterprise I want to start and am able to run it

The activities here will help the children think about their social & financial goals, help guide them to find ways of achieving these goals, and

help them plan how they could achieve

enterprises

 

achieve something

I

know the

 

I

value working

We are able to make decisions and carry out tasks together and achieve our goals

importance of

with my friends

cooperation

 

I

have strengths,

I

can achieve my

I

am able to

these goals (i.e. financial stability).

which will help me achieve my goals. I may have weaknesses but I can do something about my weaknesses to

goals

achieve a certain level of financial independence

help me with my

goals

 
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Contents of the Manual

The Manual is divided into five sections:

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

Section 1: Aflatoun and I (Introduction) Section 2: Personal Understanding and Exploration (We are) Section 3: Rights & Responsibilities (We have) Section 4: Saving, Spending, Planning, and Budgeting (We can) Section 5: Child Financial and Social Enterprise (We will)

Each Section provides Activities that will help the children learn the competencies outlined in the Table above.

Section 1 provides introduction activities to help the participants get to know each other and to lend you a hand in presenting the Aflatoun Program to the children. It also contains Expectations Setting Exercises to help you learn more about the programme needs of your participants.

Section 2, Personal Understanding and Exploration, walks the children through the path of self-exploration to help them understand and know themselves better including their competencies, strengths, and their capacity to take charge of their lives. More importantly, it allows children to draw strength from and feel empathy towards fellow participants as they find resonances in their life stories and experiences.

Section 3 takes the social preparation of the children a step further by teaching children their rights. This is balanced by the emphasis on good citizenship or responsibility not only towards the self but towards others and the community as well. The Section also assists children in listing the material, institutional, and personal resources they can tap to help them achieve their goals.

Section 4 merges the Core Elements 3 and 4 of the Aflatoun Program Saving and Spending and Planning and Budgeting. As the section title implies, the section teaches financial management to children to help the children improve not only their financial status but their whole lives as well. One of the skills the children will learn from the section is saving, albeit in a broader sense as it teaches saving financial and non- financial resources as well.

Section 5 teaches children about financial and social enterprise. This section emphasizes the inextricable relationship between personal and social responsibility. While financial enterprise can help the children achieve their personal goals, the children are encouraged to go beyond thinking about their own welfare. The Section encourages children to think beyond their own personal welfare to engage in activities that are beneficial to the community. The skills they learned from financial education should not end in self- beneficial activities; instead, it can be used as a potent tool for social enterprise and social change

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

How to Use the Manual

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This manual is designed to be flexible to your needs. We understand that when working in the non- formal setting, you may encounter challenges:

- Varying levels of literacy and numeracy skills

- Finding a regular meeting time

- Varying ages in a mixed group

- Varying levels of psycho-social needs

- Changing participants due to their migratory lifestyles or due to being unable to require attendance

An effective Aflatoun programme requires conducting lessons from all the sections with the children. Depending on who you are working with, what you would need to focus on, how many hours you have, we suggest that you feel free to mix and match the activities, ensuring that there is one activity from each section. For recommendations, please refer to the annex at the end of this manual.

Some general notes on this manual:

- The sections are designed to be used sequentially. The children have to undergo personal and social preparations (sections 2 & 3) before they can engage in the activities in Sections 4 and 5.

- Each Section has a general objective with an overview of what the Section intends to accomplish.

- Sections are further divided into Modules that contain related activities that will help us achieve the objectives of the Section.

- Activities have objectives that need to be accomplished for that particular session. A suggested time limit and a list of materials for the activity are also provided. Procedures for the activities are carefully laid down.

- Unless stated, the activities can be used for multi-age group. Some activities are

specific for younger and older children. Some activities come with worksheets children that can be reproduced for distribution to the children.

- You will have to deliver the modules in your own language to make the activities more accessible to the children.

Activities that are culturally inappropriate will also have to be adjusted to suit the cultural practices of your participants. Although the activities are contextual, the messages that will be delivered to the participants are universal.

Look out for the following icons that signify an important part of the module:

to go through them.icons that signify an important part of the module: - “Bright Ideas!” suggest additional activities your

-

“Bright Ideas!” suggest additional activities your participants

can do. These are not required activities, though you may encourage your participants

Activities. They also give you alternative ways of doing the Activities and help you avoid potentially sticky situations and discussions.activities, though you may encourage your participants - - “ Notes to the Facilitator” give tips

-

-

“ Notes to the Facilitator” give tips on how to better run the

“Key messages” at the end are those which you have to deliver. These are found at

the end of each Activity. The messages usually contain the learning points we want the children to grasp after every Activity.end are those which you have to deliver. These are found at - “ Sounding Board”

-

“ Sounding Board” is where you ask your participants to give their feedback on the

activities they have just done. This will come in handy in making useful and relevant changes to the Activities. It will also help gauge whether the Program is meeting its objectives. Take time to listen to what the children have to say. Accept all their comments and be open to the changes they suggest. Feel free to give them your feedback as well.to grasp after every Activity. - “ Sounding Board” is where you ask your participants to

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The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 13 SECTION 1: Aflatoun and

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SECTION 1:

Aflatoun and I

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Aflatoun

Child Social & Financial Education

Hello Facilitator!

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

The First Section contains activities meant to introduce your participants to each other and also to introduce Aflatoun to them. We encourage you to conduct the activities because they are fun and they serve as good icebreakers! If you have been working with the children for sometime, you may skip some of the activities.

We start by having the children talk about themselves to get them out of their shells and to make them more comfortable about themselves! They will probably be shy at first, but with a healthy dose of encouragement , they will soon open up and share things about themselves.

This Section will also get the children to know their fellow participants. This will be very useful because they will be together in the Training for quite sometime. They will need to establish rapport, friendship, and trust. You will also get to know them and they will get to know you too. This will benefit you because you can adjust the training based on the profile of your participants.

The Section also helps them situate themselves in the context of the program we want to introduce, which brings us to another important feature of this module: the introduction of Aflatoun and its programs. The section aims to motivate children to make the crucial decision of becoming part of Aflatoun. It will help them realize that other children from all over the world have become Aflatouns. The lives of these children are now being changed for the better by that decision.

The section will also help you find out the expectations of the participants and for you to lay down your own expectations from them. This will help you share a transparent and trusting relationship

with them.

Section Objectives For this section, we will:

1. Facilitate introductions

among the participants and foster trust and camaraderie;

2. Help children

learn about Aflatoun and its programs;

3. Help children realize there are

children all over the world who have joined the program and are now

benefiting from it;

4. Encourage the children

to make a commitment to become an

Aflatoun.

joined the program and are now benefiting from it; 4. Encourage the children to make a

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Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 15 Module 1: Hello, pleased to meet you! As

Module 1:

Hello, pleased to meet you!

As the Module title suggests, the activities are getting-to-know activities, which hopefully will facilitate camaraderie and friendship among and inspire greater

cooperation and participation from the children.

Activity 1: Action!

Rather than going through the usual introduction, the Activity adds a new twist to make the name introduction activity lively and entertaining. It aims to break the proverbial ice. When done correctly, everyone will have a hearty laugh and will be energized by the activity.

Activity Objective

To have the children introduce themselves. To help break the ice among the participants.

Time

15 minutes

Procedures

1. Ask the children to form a circle. Each participant will shout

his or her name as a way of introducing him or herself. Start from the participant on your right then work your way till everyone has had his or her turn.

2. After everyone has finished, tell the children to shout their name again. This time

they have to perform an action or body movement that they think best describes their personality. For example, Joey will jump up and down as he calls out his name because he is energetic.

3. After the participant shouts his/her name, the rest of the group should also call out

the participant’s name and mimic the action s/he performed. Do this until everyone has had his or her turn.

Activity Objective To know the expectations of the participants from the facilitator and the Training Program. To share your own expectations from the participants.

Time

30-45 minutes

Procedures

1.

Retain the circle from the previous activity. Ask the children what they expect from

the training program, what they think will be discussed in the next few days, and the type of activities that will be conducted.

2. Instead of reporting verbally, ask them to act their answer out or use body

movement. Encourage them to express themselves fully and to shed their inhibitions. Give them a minute or less to do this.

3. The children should continue acting out their expectations, but this time, they have

to look for participants that seem to be acting out the same expectation. When they

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findsomeone with a seemingly similar answer, they should group together. In case they do not find anyone performing a similar action, they should continue their movement on their own.

4. When the children have finished grouping themselves, ask each group to act out

their expectation while the other groups guess what the action is. All the groups will have their turn. Probable answers include: listening to the lecture, playing games, sharing their ideas and things about themselves, etc.

5. After everyone is done, the groups should continue to discuss their other

expectations. Assign a question per group such as the following:

●What can you share as a participant to these activities? ●What do you expect from your trainer/facilitator? ●What do you expect from the other participants?

6. Give the groups 10 to 15 minutes to discuss their answers.

They can come up with as many answers as they can. When their discussion is over, ask the groups to present their answers through actions. The other groups will again guess the answers of the presenting groups.

7. Write down their answers on a white/black board or flipchart to make it easier for

you to summarize.

8. Discuss the answers after all the groups have presented.

9. Share what the training will cover and what won’t be covered. Relate your discussion

with their expectations. Encourage them to participate and to speak their minds out. Tell them they will learn together. 10. Start to introduce Aflatoun at this point. Introduce Aflatoun as their new friend. Tell them they will learn more about Aflatoun as they progress through the activities.

Introduce Aflatoun better later on as they progress through the activities.

Activity 2: Great Expectations

“Great Expectations” is an Expectations-Setting Activity. This will help you gauge how much the participants know about the Training and the Aflatoun Program. It will give you the opportunity to correct the wrong notions they may have. You can also use this activity to find out how much the children are willing to participate and how much commitment you can expect from them. Likewise, the participants can also express their expectations from you and their fellow participants. This activity lays the groundwork for a fruitful training program.

lays the groundwork for a fruitful training program. Activity Objectives To know the expectations of the

Activity Objectives To know the expectations of the participants from the facilitator and the Training Program. To share your own expectations from the participants.

Time 30 to 45 minutes

Procedures:

1. Retain the circle from the previous activity. Ask the children what

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they expect from the training program, what they think will be discussed in the next few days, and the type of activities that will be conducted.

2. Instead of reporting verbally, ask them to act their answer out or use body movement.

Encourage them to express themselves fully and to shed their inhibitions. Give them a minute or less to do this.

3. The children should continue acting out their expectations, but this time, they have to

look for participants that seem to be acting out the same expectation. When they find someone with

a

seemingly similar answer, they should group together. In case they do not find anyone performing

a

similar action, they should continue their movement on their own.

4.

When the children have finished grouping themselves, ask each group to act out their

expectation while the other groups guess what the action is. All the groups will have their turn.

Probable answers include: listening to the lecture, playing games, sharing their ideas and things about themselves, etc.

5. After everyone is done, the groups should continue to discuss their other expectations.

Assign a question per group such as the following:

• What can you share as a participant to these activities?

• What do you expect from your trainer/facilitator?

• What do you expect from the other participants?

6. Give the groups 10 to 15 minutes to discuss their answers. They can come up with as

many answers as they can. When their discussion is over, ask the groups to present their answers through actions. The other groups will again guess the answers of the presenting groups.

7. Write down their answers on a white/black board or flipchart to make it easier for you to

summarize.

8. Discuss the answers after all the groups have presented.

9. Share what the training will cover and what won’t be covered. Relate your discussion with

their expectations. Encourage them to participate and to speak their minds out. Tell them they will

learn together.

10. Start to introduce Aflatoun at this point. Introduce Aflatoun as their new friend. Tell them

they will learn more about Aflatoun as they progress through the activities.

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Module 2:

This is me

Module 2 still deals with self-introduction. However, it will go a step further. This time, participants will share some personal information such as where they come from and other personal stuff about them. These essential pieces of information will help us find appropriate approaches and refine our techniques in dealing with them.

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dealing with them. The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Activity 1: Mini Me It is often difficult

Activity 1: Mini Me

It is often difficult for children in need of special protection to share information about themselves for various reasons: having low self-esteem, feeling embarrassed about their experiences, or the unwillingness to open up to people. This Activity makes use of puppets to make children more comfortable and less intimidated in sharing personal information. Using a “Mini Me” gives them a feeling of security, of being less vulnerable given they are introducing “someone else”—that is, a smaller version of themselves.

Activity Objectives To help facilitate introduction and sharing of personal information and context. To initiate bonding between and among the participants and the facilitator.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Paper, tape, Popsicle sticks (or plain sticks), crayons or other coloring implements, yarn, other art materials, scissors and pastes, and pre-cut outlines of paper dolls (4-inches tall)

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Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 19 1. In this activity, the children will be making

1. In this activity, the children will be making paper versions of

themselves.

2. Give each participant a pre-cut outline of a paper doll. Tell

them that the paper doll is a little version of themselves.

3. Draw faces on the doll using crayons or other writing or

coloring implements. Create clothes, shoes/slippers, and hair using paper, yarn (for the doll’s hair), or other art materials.

4. Afterwards, prop up the paper dolls using (popsicle) stick to

make the doll into a puppet.

5. Divide the children into small groups of three or four members. Sharing with a small

group will help lessen anxiety and pressure. Have the children gather in a circle. Instruct them to introduce their “mini me” to their group.

6. The children will answer the following questions with optional follow up questions

depending on your assessment of the children’s capacity to answer follow-up questions:

a.Name (Optional: Do you know the origin or meaning of your name?)

b. Surname (Optional: Is the surname common?

Where are your forebears from [region or province]?)

c. Birthday (Optional: Tell us about a memorable birthday

you have had. Ask about the birthdays of his or her siblings)

d. Where do you live? (Optional: How long have you

lived there? Tell us about the community where you live.)

e. Do you go to school? If yes, where? What level are

you in? f. Person who is close to your heart? Why?

g. Do you work? If yes, what do you do? (Optional: How much do you earn?

How many hours do you work? )

7. When everyone has finished sharing in the small group and they have already loosened up, you

can have the children share in a plenary session.

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Alternate activity: I am here!

This is an alternate activity to the previous one. Instead of sharing in a group, the children will share information about themselves with a partner. Consult the participants if they are comfortable in sharing information about themselves in a one-on-one setting.

If every thing is fine, proceed with the Activity. This serves as a powerful introductory tool as in- depth personal information about the children is provided. It encourages trust between the dyads.

Time

30 minutes

It encourages trust between the dyads. Time 30 minutes Materials Paper, crayons or pens Procedure 1.

Materials Paper, crayons or pens

Procedure

1. Give each child a piece of paper and a pen/crayon. Group them into pairs. Ask them to place the paper on the floor or table.

2. Have the children place their hand on the paper with their

fingers

spread. They will trace their hand on the paper.

3. Ask the children to write their name and birthday on the palm of the outline of their hand. If the hand is too small, they

may write outside the outline. On the fingers, they will write down the following information:

a. Thumb – the names of the members of their family

b. Forefinger - Where do you live?

c. Middle finger – What do you like to do? (Examples:

dance, play, watching TV, tell stories)

d. Ring finger – Person/s you feel is close to your heart

e. Little finger – (choose which is appropriate) Do you go to school? If yes, where?

What level are you in? / Do you work? If yes, what is your work? / Organization that I belong to

4. Afterwards, each child chooses another child she/he is comfortable to share his/her drawing. The pairs will share with each other what they drew and wrote. Give them a few minutes for this.

5. Gather everyone in a circle. Each pair will talk about the hand print of his/her partner. While one is reporting, the other one should stand behind. The one behind will stick his arms out to make it look as if his arms were the arms of the reporter. He will also provide hand gestures while the reporter talks

to make it look as if his arms were the arms of the reporter. He will

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Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 21 Note to the Facilitator You might find yourself

Note to the Facilitator

You might find yourself in a sticky situation if the pairs are composed of male and female participants especially in more conservative settings. To avoid such situation, create same sex pairs. Another alternative is to have one perform a pantomime while the other one is reporting.

6. After reporting, ask the following:

a. Do you know the origin or meaning of your name?

b. Is the surname common in your community? From which region or province

did your forebears come from?

c. How long have you lived in your community?

d. Are you close to anyone? Why are you close to that person?

e. Etc.

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Activity 2: What is Aflatoun?

This Activity will be most useful for neophytes. It provides a good opportunity to introduce newcomers to the objectives and thrusts of the Aflatoun Program. On the other hand, seasoned participants will still benefit from this as the Activity deepens their understanding of the goals, objectives, and thrusts of the Program. It pays to issue useful reminders from time to time about the organization’s Program thrusts.

Activity Objective To introduce the Aflatoun objectives.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Paper, crayons or pens, scissors, tape, the children’s output from the previous activity (the paper doll or the hand) and a picture of the Aflatoun flame (Illustration of the Aflatoun mascot) or its stuffed toy version.

Procedures

1. Give each participant a piece of paper and pen/crayon. Ask them to place the paper on the floor or table.

2. Tell the children to place their hand on the paper, this time, with their fingers together. Have them trace their hand on the paper.

3. Ask the children to cut out their handprint and color the hand yellow and orange.

4. Ask the children what the yellow and orange hand reminds them of. Lead them to realize that it looks like a flame.

5. Ask the children what a flame symbolizes. Possible answers: it is a symbol for warmth and light, it serves as a beacon, it could be a symbol for faith, etc.

6. Some will point out the negative aspects of flames. For instance, fire can get us burned, put us in danger, or cause us pain. Acknowledge these as valid answers. However, stress that we will be focusing on the more beneficial aspects of flames in this Activity.

7. Introduce Aflatoun. Underscore that Aflatoun has the beneficial characteristics of flames. He is bright, warm, and friendly. Show the children the Aflatoun mascot or a picture of Aflatoun. Tell them that the mascot’s name is “Aflatoun” and he is named after a program of the same name.

8. Share that Aflatoun and the Aflatoun Program helps children all over the world by teaching them how to be resourceful, enterprising, and inventive. It also teaches children to be changemakers! As an example, Aflatoun teaches children to save funds and other resources. It works with children to help them act together on issues that are important to children. Tell the children that “Aflatoun also NEEDS YOUR HELP!”

9. Ask the children what they usually do to make a flame bigger. Probable answers: you have to kindle it, stoke the fire with firewood, or blow on it. Tell them that Aflatoun – the mascot– needs their help to be bigger and brighter. They can do this by joining the Aflatoun Program and by attending and participating in the various Activities.

10. Tell the children that by joining Aflatoun, all of us will be going through an exciting journey of exploring, thinking, investigating, and acting. By becoming Aflatouns, we are like little flames that light other people’s ways and serve as an inspiration to adults and other children.

11. Ask them: “Are you willing to become an Aflatoun?”

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activities). Ask the children: “As we put these two together, what message does it tell you?”

13. Summarize their answers and stress that the next activities will help make Aflatoun lessons part of their lives.

14. As a final activity, teach them the Aflatoun song. It will be better if you have the recording of the Aflatoun song or if you have translated the song in your language.

It will be better if you have the recording of the Aflatoun song or if you
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Aflatoun Song

24 Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Aflatoun Song

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The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 25
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Another Bright Idea! Help older children form an Aflatoun Club, if possible. The participants of the training can be the club’s initial members. Organizing them will make it easier to mobilize them to perform group activities.

The Club can initially be adhoc, meaning temporary. It can exist while the training is ongoing. Give the children the option to dissolve or retain the group once the program is over. However, encourage the children to retain the Club even after the Training is over. Explain to them the benefits of doing this.

Provide them with ample guidance to ensure the club’s sustainability. You can help them:

• Come up with goals and objectives of the Club.

• Suggest activities they can do as a group.

• Elicit ideas what Activities they want to do.

• Encourage them to meet every after training to discuss their plans for the group.

• Search funding for their projects or provide fund raising ideas

• Suggest ways to save as a group and make their savings grow.

The more occupied they are in the Club, the more reason they will get the Club going.

Encourage the group to conduct an election of Club Overseers (or Officers. We prefer the term overseers to highlight the fact that the “officers” are accountable to the members of the group). Election gives them a taste of the democratic exercise and gives them the opportunity to learn the basics of democracy.

Here are things you should stress to the children:

a. Elected overseers represent the interests of the whole group. It is not a position

of power, but a position of responsibility and accountability. The “power” rests on the

majority.

b. Everyone is entitled to take part in ALL decisions pertaining to club activities.

Decisions will have to be agreed upon by everyone.

c. The general body or the whole group can decide to hold fresh

elections should the overseers or officers not perform their tasks.

d. There are three main elective posts:

• Representative (equivalent to a Club President) who

coordinates the activities of the Club. While decisions are done by the general body, the representative is tasked to oversee that decisions are carried out as decided upon by the members of the group.

• Assistant Representative (equivalent to a Vice President) carries out the function of the representative in the absence of the representative. S/he assists in all administrative tasks of the group.

• Note Taker (equivalent to a Secretary) takes detailed

notes of all decisions taken at meetings and attends to other administrative tasks of the Club.

• Custodian of Resources (equivalent to a Treasurer) is in charge of the finances of the Club.

e. The election should be done through a secret ballot.

f. The positions are not permanent positions. The Club should hold regular elections (either once a year or every six months) to give all members the opportunity to lead the Club. Everyone should have the chance to lead to learn responsibility and to develop their leadership potentials.

g. Club members should take the Aflatoun’s Promise before the first club meeting. A

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copy is provided below. You can distribute this to the children (Have this translated in your own language).

Ask the children if they want to add their own promises. They should be free to do this. If you are working with a non-literate group, read the promise and have them repeat after you.the children (Have this translated in your own language). Note to the Facilitator h. Distribute copies

Note to the Facilitator

h. Distribute copies of the Suggestions to Help Run the Club Smoothly to the children. This is provided below. Like the Aflatoun’s Promise, you can have it photocopied.

Note to the Facilitator Explain each line of the Aflatoun Promise. Ask the children to provide what they think Explain each line of the Aflatoun Promise. Ask the children to provide what they think the promises mean. Help them understand the importance of the Aflatoun promise.

For those who are not literate, make them place their thumbmark on the document instead of asking them to sign it.

thumbmark on the document instead of asking them to sign it. The Sounding Board The Sounding

The Sounding Board

The Sounding Board allows you to find out how your participants evaluate the Activities you have conducted. It helps you to be in touch with your participants and to get suggestions how you can further improve the Activities and the Training. Accept all their comments, even negative ones. Their negative comments about the Program, how you have handled it, and the Activities you have conducted will help you refine the Training further. Do not be afraid to receive criticism. Acknowledge their positive comments too. The comments mean that you are on the right track and you can continue this in future trainings. The first Sound Board will be about mining the children for their feelings about the Training Program. This will help you gauge how you can raise their enthusiasm further in continuing with it.

Procedures

Gather the participants in a circle. Have them think of one word or phrase to describe what they feel about what they have just gone through. Give everyone the opportunity to speak. Ask follow up questions. For instance, when a participant says I was happy. Ask, “What made you happy? What will make you happier in this Training Program?” List down their answers.

Note from Aflatoun Introduce the Aflatoun website (www.aflatoun.org) as a place where they can visit if they have access to internet to learn about other Aflatoun members and clubs.

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& Financial Education The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual SECTION 2: Personal Understanding and Exploration

SECTION 2:

Personal Understanding and Exploration

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Everyday, we meet new people whom we want to get to know better. Getting to know new friends helps us to adjust our behavior and to deal with them better. We need this for smooth interpersonal relationships. In this Section, we aim to get to know the children more and to have them get to know each other as well.

This Section will help you deepen your understanding of the participants more than just knowing their name and other basic information about them.

The Section aims to facilitate the exploration and sharing of the children’s personal experiences, likes and dislikes, and their dreams. These pieces of information will set in motion the helping process because it will help us identify their individual needs and assess their psychosocial well being.

The Activities will allow participants to gain greater self-knowledge and confidence and realize their unique and special traits. The Activities also promote understanding and empathy towards others as they share their stories with each other. These are all part of the first core element of the Aflatoun Concept.

In the course of the activities, the children will also learn things about you. Open up and share things about yourself because the mutual exchange of information will cultivate trust between you and the participants.

Section Objectives

1. To help the children identify their personal strengths and social networks.

2. To help the children learn from the experiences of other children who share similar

from the experiences of other children who share similar circumstances, and from the adults in their

circumstances, and from the adults in their lives.

3. To help children recognize the value and appreciation of uniqueness and diversity.

4. To facilitate the sharing of dreams and plans for the future.

Note to the Facilitator Remind the children that all discussions and sharing in the Training shall remain confidential.

Note to the Facilitator Remind the children that all discussions and sharing in the Training shall
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Module 1:

My community, nation and world

Education Manual Module 1: My community, nation and world The focus of the introduction will be

The focus of the introduction will be more on the contexts where they come from rather than the basic information we asked in the past Section. We start by situating the children in their own community in Activity 1. Where are they from? What can be found in their communities? What is special about their communities? These are just some of the questions we will ask the children. In the next Activity, we situate them in the larger community - the Nation - to help them realize they share their traits, practices, and history with a larger group of people. These shared characteristics give them their identity as a distinct group of people. Lastly, we situate them in yet a larger group - the world. Although national identity and a sense of nationalism are not bad in themselves, too much of nationalism can have their negative consequences. It can lead to parochialism and discrimination. We must help the children realize that they also draw their identity from their shared humanity with citizens from the rest of the world. This shared humanity will help them realize that although others may seem different, these differences are immaterial and inconsequential because all of us are human beings who should be responsible for each other.

are immaterial and inconsequential because all of us are human beings who should be responsible for

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The activity encourages the children to share information about their community and place of origin. This will help us situate the child in the context of his or her community.

Activity Objective To share about one’s community.

Time

60 minutes

Materials Craft Paper (Standard size: 31”X43”), crayons or pens, adhesive tape, the children’s output from the previous activity (the paper doll, the hand, or the Aflatoun flame)

Procedures

1. Form small groups. Give the groups craft paper and pens/crayons. Tell them to draw a detailed map of the community where they live.

2. Afterwards, ask the children to stick the paper doll and the Aflatoun Flame on the community map using adhesive tape. Give them the freedom to choose where they will put it.

3. Using the map, ask them to place a symbol on a) where they play b) where they work (if it is located in their community) c) significant places for them (places they will not forget or are very memorable to them). Let them identify safe and unsafe places for children in their community. Tell the children to investigate or find out why these places are safe or unsafe. These may be categorized as based on their personal experiences, experiences of others whom they know, and based on hearsays. Tell them to differentiate the items based on the three categories. They can place markers to identify safe or unsafe places such as () for safe places and (X) for unsafe places.

Note: If the children can write, have them write Table Format. See example:

Based on their personal experiences

Experiences of others whom they know

Based on hearsays

4. Ask the children to gather and sit in circle. Each group will share what they have drawn and the result of their investigation.

5. Ensure that the places they frequent (where they live, work, play, etc. and the safe and unsafe places for children in the community) are shared and discussed.

Processing

1. Ask the children what they have learned from the sharing.

2. Summarize their answers and share these Key Messages to the children:

a. Our communities are alive and vibrant. It is where we live

– where we learn, play, laugh cry, work, and grow.

b. Our families live with us in the community. Our “family”

could be our biological family, friends, and other significant people in our

lives. They are important because they protect us, provide our needs, and love us.

c. There are places where we feel safe because there are people who protect

and help us and ensure we cannot be harmed by the elements. We also feel

safe because we feel loved in that place, etc.

d. There are unsafe places which we must avoid, if possible,

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in order to remain secure and well. When we need to pass

through these places we must be with adults or friends who can protect us.

e. There are places that are rumored to be safe or unsafe. We must carefully

separate fact from fiction. Ask trusted adults and friends about things that

you are not sure about. Do not be afraid or ashamed to ask questions.

Investigate.

f. We must search for new safe places. This Training is a new safe place. We

will be sharing our thoughts and experiences free from judgment. We will be learning together. We will be depending on each other to reach our goals. We

will act like a community or a family.

3. End the session with the Aflatoun Song to remind the children that they are part of the larger Aflatoun community.

that they are part of the larger Aflatoun community. Note to the Facilitator Go back to
that they are part of the larger Aflatoun community. Note to the Facilitator Go back to

Note to the Facilitator

Go back to page

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for the Aflatoun Song.

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Activity 2: Move in Space

Activity 2 is an enjoyable game that prepares the participants for the next Activity by helping them loosen up, shed their inhibitions, and be more comfortable being themselves. This is a good energizing Activity as well. It also prepares them for the next Activity, which will involve some

acting.

Activity Objective

To provide the children an energizing activity. To prepare the children for Activity 4 by going through a simple acting exercise.

Time

15 min

Procedure

1. Tell the children to move in space by performing actions such as

jumping, crawling, skipping, dancing, wiggling, etc. They are free to do any action of their choice.

2. When you shout, “FREEZE!” they should stop and maintain whatever position they are in and wait for the next instructions.

3. Give the following instructions:

a. You will all pretend that you are giants! Stand tall! Walk with big strides!

Speak in a huge giant voice! FREEZE!

b. Now you are dwarves. You are small. Shout like a dwarf with a small voice!

Run with small steps! FREEZE!

c. Relax. Stand still. Close your eyes. Think about a market. What do you

see in a market? Who are the people that you see there? What are they doing? What are they saying? Now choose a character and ACT it out! FREEZE!

d. Listen carefully, I will tap the shoulder of a participant and when I do,

you must UNFREEZE and continue to act the scene. All the others are free to move their heads and watch the participant who got “unfrozen.”

e. This time I will tap the shoulders of three participants.

When I do, interact and act out a scene from the market. All the others are free to move their heads and look at the one who got “unfrozen.”

4. Repeat c, d, and e again with the following scenarios:

a.

At home

b.

In the street

c.

In school

4. Repeat c, d, and e again with the following scenarios: a. At home b. In
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Activity 3: The Groups We Belong To

Activity 3 will introduce the children to the idea of sharing similar traits with other people. This similarity serves as a mark of belonging and gives us identity. While we share similar traits with others, there are others who are different from us. The more important lesson to derive from this is the need and significance of accepting the difference of others and of respecting people’s diversity.

This Activity also serves as fitting preparatory activity to succeeding Activities.

Activity Objective To introduce the idea of similarity and differences among people. To teach children to respect people who are different from them.

Time

45 min

Procedures

1. The activity is a grouping game. Let the children spread themselves around the room.

When you say: “Group yourselves according to

possible groups they belong to such as gender, place of origin [e.g. town, city, province],their birth month, religion, color of hair, color of clothes, etc), they must gather together with other participants who belong to the same category .

(different forms of

2. Ask them: “What did you think of the game? Was it fun? How did it feel to know that you belong to a group? How did you feel about the others who do not belong to your group?” For those who did not find others who share their category, ask them: “How did you feel about not belonging to any group? Did you feel left out and alone? How do you think others think about you because of your difference?”

3. Based on your past experiences, how do other people react to people different from them? How do they treat them? What do you think people who are different feel when people treat them in a certain way (especially in a negative way)? How would you feel if you are treated negatively because of your difference?

Processing

1. People share similarities and differences in terms of practices, customs, traditions, and rituals. Their similarities help them have a sense of belonging.

2. Differences in practices, customs, traditions, and rituals could be sources of tension among different groups of people. This is especially true when a particular group is stigmatized for their customs, traditions, and rituals.

3. Stress to the children that differences are a fact of life. When someone is different, it does not mean that this person is inferior. It simply means they come from a different background and have unique traits. We should respect and appreciate people’s difference from us.

4. The world has become a smaller world, although we are different in some ways from others, we also share a lot of things in common. The most important thing we share with others is our humanity—our being human beings.

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Activity 4: A Piece of History

Activity 3 helped the children realize they belong to various groups some of which are small like the family, school, church, etc. This Activity helps the children realize they belong yet to a larger community. While they belong to a local community, they come from a larger community called the Nation. Being a citizen of a Nation means we share a common culture, ancestry, and story with a larger group of people. This Activity helps the children rise above fixation with the self and feel at one with their compatriots. It will also inspire them to know the great things their people have accomplished.

Session Objective To share and learn about one’s country and culture. To help them have an appreciation of their history as a people.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Picture of the National Flag

Procedures

1. Ask the children to form three groups.

2. Each group will choose a significant event in their country’s history, which they will present in tableau. Give them five minutes to plan.

3. When the children are ready, have them present the tableaus one group at a time. The children who are watching will be asked to guess what the scene is about.

4. After the children have guessed, tell the presenting group that you will be tapping the shoulders of some of their members. When they feel the tap, they will deliver a line consistent with the scene. If more than one child is tapped, their characters should interact.

5. When all groups have presented, ask the children to sit down in a circle. Ask them about the activity, what they did, and the scenes they saw. Show the children the national flag and ask them the following questions:

a. What do the colors and symbols on your flag stand for?

b. What local language/s do you speak? (Share how many

languages are spoken in your country.)

c. What is your religion? What other religions are practiced

in your country?

d. Are you part of an indigenous tribe? If yes, what? If no,

what indigenous culture are you aware of?

e. What are the positive characteristics of your people?

f. What are the negative characteristics of your people?

f. What are the negative characteristics of your people? Note to the Facilitator Be prepared to

Note to the Facilitator Be prepared to provide information about the flag and a bit of your country’s background as the children might not know the answer to some of the questions.

children might not know the answer to some of the questions. Discuss events in your nation’s

Discuss events in your nation’s history with participants who have little or no idea about historical events in the country. Choose the most prominent and significant events. After the discussion, you can have them act the scenes out complete with dialogue.

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Processing

1. Ask the children about what they learned from the session. From their answers stress the following Key Messages:

a. Our country is rich in history and resources.

b. Our people are diverse and different but we share similar

and unique history, strengths, and traits. (Give examples of these.)

c. We have weaknesses too. Some we have in common,

others are unique to our lives. But cooperation with others will help us overcome weaknesses that we feel are too overwhelming. (Tell an example of a time when great obstacles were overcome in their country when the people united.)

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Activity 5: I Believe in …

This activity focuses on exploring the children’s experiences and awareness of cultural and religious beliefs and practices of different people. In this activity, it is likely that the biases of children will appear. Accept them as they surface; however, stress that differences in practices and beliefs need not be sources of conflict. Instead, they should learn to mutually respect each other’s varying beliefs and practices. It is hoped that this activity helps them separate facts from fiction especially when dealing with these differences.

Activity Objective To evoke the children’s awareness of different religious and cultural practices. To help the children appreciate differences in beliefs and practices of people.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Craft paper, pens, markers/crayons

Procedures

1. Tell the children to form three groups. Give them craft papers, pens,

children to form three groups. Give them craft papers, pens, markers, and crayons. 2. Instruct them

markers, and crayons.

2. Instruct them to think of people from different religious and cultural backgrounds. What practices or behaviors have they seen among these people? Ask them to think of the things they have heard about the people who practice these religions or who belong to cultural groups.

Note to the Facilitator Begin with people who belong to religious or cultural groups within your participants’ communities. If the community is more or less homogenous, have them think of religious or cultural groups in other localities (towns, cities, or countries).

Tell the children to feel free to include positive or negative answers. Assure them that all ideas will be accepted and discussed.

3. Tell the children to write or draw their answers in the craft paper categorizing them into the following:

 

What I have seen

What I have heard

Religious Beliefs/

   

Practices

Cultural Beliefs/

   

Practices

4. Have them share their findings to all the participants.

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Processing What have they learned from the session? From their answers stress the following Key Messages:

1. There are various religions and cultural groups in a community. Aside from differences in beliefs, they may have different clothes, skin colors, language, food preference, etc.

2. We may be different but in the end all the different beliefs aim to promote goodness, love, unity, cooperation, etc. We just express ourselves differently.

3. We may have biases against others who are different. (The facilitator will lead the children in discussing the differences between rumors and facts especially the practices of the people in different religions because words can hurt and cause people to discriminate and hate. This goes against the core message of peace and love that all religions espouse.)

4. Although we may have different beliefs we are all human beings. This makes us all alike regardless of what we believe in or where we come from.

regardless of what we believe in or where we come from. Note to the Facilitator The
regardless of what we believe in or where we come from. Note to the Facilitator The

Note to the Facilitator

The item on cultural beliefs and practices might not be appropriate if you live in a culturally homogenous community. Extend beyond the borders of the community if this is so.

Feel free to provide input or facts on practices of various religions and cultural groups.

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Activity 6: My Country, My World, and Aflatoun

The series of activities started out with the local community the children came from. The community grew bigger as the children explored the Nation. In this Activity, we take off from the last key message in the previous activity—we are all human beings and we have a shared humanity to uphold.

In this Activity, we help children realize that there is yet a larger world out there that we are all part of. As Aflatouns, they are also part of the growing number of children who are being helped by Aflatoun and whose lives are being changed for the better.

Session Objective To show that Aflatoun is present in other countries

Time

45 minutes

Materials Prepare small Aflatoun flames, which you will use to mark places in the map wherever Aflatoun Programs exist.

1. Present the world map to the children. Tell them what the map is for and what it represents, in case they do not know what it is.

2. Ask them to locate their country in the map. Flag it with an Aflatoun flame.

3. Tell the children to look at the world map and to look at their country vis-à-vis the other countries. How do they think their country compares with the others in terms of size? Tell them your country is just a small part of the larger world.

4. To make the activity more challenging, ask the children to name as many countries on the map as they can. Every time they mention a country where Aflatoun exists, flag the country with an Aflatoun flame. Make sure you know the countries where there are Aflatoun Programs. If the children can’t name any country, do it for them.

Processing

1. Tell them that billions of people now live in the planet Earth. These billions of people are different in terms of cultural practices, socioeconomic standing, political beliefs, etc. However, they share similarities as well. Remind them of your discussion in the previous Activities about the shared humanity of people. Tell them that all people basically want the same things too: to have stable lives, to be able to eat, to have access to healthcare and education, to have a conflict free world, to have a piece of land where they can build their home, etc. But reality tells us that not all people get what they want because some are more deprived than others. But this does not mean we cannot do anything about it. Aflatoun is one of the programs that are helping to make the world a better place.

2. Tell the participants that children from other countries are learning with Aflatoun and that Aflatoun is trying to make a difference in the lives of these children. Like them, these children face similar problems as they do. These kids work individually and with others to overcome the problems they encounter in life.

3. People should all do their share to make the world a better place.

4. The Aflatoun Program is active in 75 countries. There will be about one million members by the end of 2010.

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Financial Education The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Note to the Facilitator Go to www.aflatoun.org for an
Financial Education The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual Note to the Facilitator Go to www.aflatoun.org for an

Note to the Facilitator Go to www.aflatoun.org for an updated list of countries with Aflatoun Programs.

Enlarge the map and show to the participants the extent and status of the Aflatoun Programs.

To make the Activity more meaningful, let the children listen to the song “Heal the World” by Michael Jackson. Translate the lyrics if the children cannot speak English. Ask them what they think the song means. Discuss with them the meaning of the song. Stress the importance of people working together and transcending their differences to make the world a better place.

5. Ask the children if they are willing to work together to face problems. Encourage them to

shout a resounding “YES clap” (BEAT: clap, clap, clap YES! [fist punches the air])

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Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 41 Bright Idea! Show pictures of children from other

Bright Idea!

Show pictures of children from other parts of the world who have joined the Aflatoun Program. Show them sample letters from these children. This will help them see that they are part of a large network of children who are benefitting from the Aflatoun Program. Talk about some of the projects these children have done and the activities they do in their own communities. Inspire them to be

like these children!

these children have done and the activities they do in their own communities. Inspire them to
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Module 2:

Learning more about myself

In this Module, we will get to know some intimate information about the children. The information may be more difficult for some to share given the traumatic experiences they may have had as CNSP. They may feel embarrassed or ashamed of their experiences. Some will definitely have self- esteem issues that will make them less willing to talk about themselves.

However, because the children have been with you for sometime, some will be better prepared to reveal their personal experiences. At this point, they have hopefully learned to trust you and their fellow participants.

This Module is all about mining the experiences of children so we can help them move on from their negative experiences in the past. Moving on often requires confronting the sad experiences but also acknowledging the happy moments in their lives. It is also making them see the people who love and care for them. We should also highlight their special abilities to help them feel good about themselves.

Module Objectives

1. To be able to share one’s happy and sad experiences.

2. To identify one’s resources and strengths and their limitations and weaknesses.

3. To identify the people that care for them and those who could help them

strengths and their limitations and weaknesses. 3. To identify the people that care for them and

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Activity 1: Things that I Love and Hate

In this Activity, the children will explore the things they love and hate. This will help them understand themselves a little better. We help them realize that they share likes and dislikes with others but at the same time, they have unique likes and dislikes. But despite the differences, people still love them for who they are.

Activity Objective To be able to share about things that the children love and hate/like and dislike.

Time

30 min

Materials Pre-cut paper shaped like a heart (as big as a short bond paper), pre-cut paper shaped like a broken heart (with a tear in the middle), crayons or pens

Procedures 1. Give the children a heart, a broken heart, and writing materials. 2. Tell
Procedures
1.
Give the children a heart, a broken heart, and writing
materials.
2.
Tell them to draw symbols of the things they love on the
heart, for example, food, clothes, toy, and events like a birthday or holiday.
3.
Tell them to draw symbols of the things that they hate
on the broken heart, for example, food, clothes, toy, and
events or holidays.
4.
Ask the children to sit down and to share what they have
drawn to the rest of the group.
Processing
1.
Ask the children what was common among the things they

shared. Ask what they thought was unique and different.

2. Ask the children what do they have in common with their

friends – what they commonly like and don’t like.

3.From their answers, stress the following key messages:

a. What we like and don’t like are important parts that

make up who we are.

b. We all have things that we feel are unique to us and

those that we have in common with others.

c. Our commonalities and differences bind us to the

people in our lives like our friends and family. They love us and we love them despite the differences.

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Activity 2: A River of Hearts

Knowing the happy and sad experiences of children will give us a general idea of their emotional state. We can be more effective facilitators and helpers of children when we know and understand their emotional state. It allows us to determine whether they need to refer them to specialists incase they are suffering from depression or we need to give the psychosocial intervention. This Activity makes use of creative means to evoke the sad and happy experiences of the children.

Activity Objective To have children share their happy and sad experiences.

To have children share their happy and sad experiences. Time 45 minutes Materials Paper (16” x

Time

45 minutes

Materials Paper (16” x 22” or two short bond paper pasted together), Pre-cut paper shaped like a heart (small ones about an inch in height), pre-cut paper shaped like a broken heart, crayons or pens

Note to the Facilitator

Go back to the community map in the previous activity. The community map can serve as a deepening activity for this activity.

Prepare as many hearts and broken hearts as you can to allow the participants to use as many as they need.

can to allow the participants to use as many as they need. Procedures 1. Distribute the

Procedures

1. Distribute the paper and drawing materials. Show them the picture of the a river.

and drawing materials. Show them the picture of the a river. 2. Ask them the characteristics

2. Ask them the characteristics of a river. Possible answers could be: It has twists and

turns; it moves forward; the water can be high or low; it can be wide or narrow; the water moves

rapidly in some areas and slow in others, there are quiet portions but there raging portions as well; it can be deep or shallow, etc.

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ups and downs. We have moments of deep sorrow and intense happiness, sometimes life seems

fast other times slow. Sometimes we have money and sometimes we don’t or what we have is not enough. There are times when we have friends and sometimes we argue with our friends, etc. Like the river, life also has its ups and downs.

4. Ask them to draw happy and sad moments in their lives using the river as a metaphor for

their journey. On the paper, make them draw a river with bends, rocks, trees, etc. Along the river,

tell them to draw symbols of happy and sad moments in their lives. They will paste a heart if they were happy or a broken heart if they were unhappy during the particular event in their life. They can also paste both if the event brought both happiness and sadness at the same time.

event brought both happiness and sadness at the same time. 5. low point of their lives,
event brought both happiness and sadness at the same time. 5. low point of their lives,

5.

low point of their lives, ask the children who they shared their happiness and sadness with. They

could be family members, individuals, or organizations.

6. Ask the children what they learned from the stories they heard. Ask them who were there

to support them during sad moments who were there to share their happiness.

The children will then show their drawings to everyone. Whenever they share a high or

Note to the Facilitator

If the group is too big for individual reporting, form smaller groups. Ask the children to share what they did with the members of the small group. Afterwards, they will discuss what was in common among all their reports (for example, three important happy or sad experiences). They will choose a reporter for this or they can choose to do it as a group.

Processing Use their answers to stress the following Key Messages to the participants:

1. It is important to move on from sad events in our lives. Sad memories will always come

to haunt us. The important thing is to not allow it to affect us. We should also learn to get back on our feet and get on with our lives. Dwelling on the low points in our lives will stop us from reaching our goals.

2. Happy moments in our lives make life more bearable; hence, it will be more helpful to

remember these.

3. People have been behind us in times of happiness, successes, and triumphs .They have

been around to share these moments with us. Some of these people are from NGOs or from other organizations who help us.

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4. Sometimes we also ask help from God/Allah/Deity/Universe and we thank Him/Her for

helping us.

5. In times of sadness or failures, we should not be afraid to share our sadness and

frustrations with friends, families, God/Allah/Deity/Universe, counselors, and staff from NGOs. These people can help us through the rough patches of life. We have our own strengths and skills but we become stronger with the help of others.

6. We find strength and fortitude from people around us – those who share both our joys

and sorrows.

7. Through it all we are never alone. We have our “family.” A family is a group of persons

who support each other and love each other no matter what. We may have more than one family – the one where we are born to and the one that we make with our friends and adults whom we look up to. Stress to the children we can go beyond the usual notion of the family made up of blood relations. Friends and other significant people can be considered family as well.

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Activity 3: A Time of Gift Giving

The past two activities unearthed both the positive and negative experiences of the children. The unearthing of the negative experiences of the children may have left some children feeling emotional and emotionally drained. With this, we will try to end the Section on a lighter note, an Activity that will affirm what is good in them to help them regain their equilibrium.

In this Activity, we ask the participants to “give gifts” to each other to recognize a special trait the gift recipient has. By this time, they can easily identify special traits of fellow participants because they have been in the Training for a few days.

This activity affirms that each child is a special person who deserves to receive attention, care, and love. It also helps children realize they can depend on their fellow participants for support.

This serves as a good prelude for the activities lined up in the next Module.

Activity Objective To help the participants appreciate each other’s uniqueness and their special traits.

Time

30 minutes

Procedures

1. For this activity, group the children into dyads. Have the pair think of a special trait that

their partner has.

2. They will recognize this special trait by giving their partner a “gift.” The gift does not involve an actual exchange of material gifts. The gift giver will think of a gift, portray this through action, while saying “I am giving you this gift because (mention the special trait the receiver of the gift has; e.g. you have the cutest smile in this room, you are very caring and understanding, etc).

3. The receiver should then guess what that gift is by acting out how s/he will use the gift.

4. Each partner will have their turn to be the giver and receiver of the gift.

Processing

1. Ask the children: “Did you like the gift you received? Why or why not? How did you feel

that you received a gift and a compliment from your partner? Why did you choose to give that gift? What did you see in the person that makes you think she deserved the gift?”

2. The Activity helps the participants learn more about themselves through the eyes of others. It also teaches them to be more mindful of and to value the special traits of others.

3. It encourages children to be supportive of and to develop stronger bonds with each

other.

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Module 3:

I am a good person

The Aflatoun Non-Formal Education Manual

We will help the participants appreciate their talents and what is basically good in them in this Module. Knowing their abilities and what is good in them can help address self-esteem and self- confidence issues they may have. I am a Good Person stresses that they are special in their own right because they have talents, skills, and abilities they can use to make their lives better. We also aim to strengthen the children’s decision-making and problem solving skills because children who can handle problems in life will have a healthier self-concept.

Module Objective

1. To identify important values that translates to good behavior towards others.

2. To further improve decision-making and problem solving skills

Activity 1: Are You Alive?

This is a preparatory activity that involves chanting and body movements. It will help the children to loosen up and feel relaxed. The different body movements that they will do will also keep them energized, and as the title of the Activity suggests, alive.

Activity Objective To prepare the children for the next activity.

To engage children in a physical activity that would keep them awake and active for the succeeding activities.

Time

10 minutes

Procedures

1. Ask the children to form a circle. Lead the children to march in place.

2. Tell the children that they will responding to the chant you will lead:

a. Facilitator: Are we all alive?

b. Children: YEAH, YEAH!

c. Facilitator: Let us show that we’re alive!

d. Children: OH YEAH!

e. Facilitator: Let us show it with our

facilitator will name a body part, for example, head, arms, hips, legs, etc. f. The participants will move the body part while continuing to march in place and while they are chanting “uhm-ah-uhm-ah-

ah.”

The

3. Repeat the whole process and end by saying, “Let us show it

with our whole body!”

4. End the activity with this chant: “I am good! I am strong! We can do things on our own!” Tell the children

to add action to the chant.

this chant: “ I am good! I am strong! We can do things on our own!

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Activity 2: The Things I Do

In this Activity, we focus on the children’s abilities, skills, capacities, and traits. Making them realize the good things they can do will help the children believe in themselves more. We can also convince them that they can do things they set their minds to so long as they used their abilities. We also need to ground them in reality by pointing out their weaknesses as well. However, we will do this from the vantage point of an optimist—we will help them recognize their weaknesses and transform these into strengths.

Activity Objective To facilitate sharing of the strengths and weaknesses of the children.

Time:

1 hour

Materials Paper (big and tall enough to accommodate a whole person), crayons or pens

Procedures

1. Distribute the writing and drawing materials. Group the children into pairs. Tell them to choose a partner that they are most comfortable with. They will reflect on their “good” and “bad” side. Help them by giving them the following questions: What are the things I am good at doing? What are the things I am not so good at? What are

my good and bad characteristics and attitudes?

2. The partners will take turns tracing each other’s bodies on the paper. Afterwards, the participants will individually work on their own body trace.

3. They will draw a line in the middle of their body trace. On one half of the body trace, they will draw what they look like when they are doing good things. Tell them to add a face, clothes, accessories, etc. Beside the drawing, on certain body parts, they will write down the following or draw symbols for it (ask the appropriate questions based on the participants’ background) :

a. Head –Are you good in any of your subjects at school?

Do you have a special talent? Are you good at solving your problems? Etc.

b. Mouth – Are you good in singing? Talking? Telling stories?

c. Heart – Do you have a generous and forgiving heart?

How do you show that you love someone?

d. Hands – What are you good at doing with your hands?

(writing, drawing, cooking, washing clothes, cleaning, working, etc?)

e. Feet – What are you good at doing with your feet?

(dancing, walking, running, etc.)

4. On the other half of the body trace they will be drawing what they look like when they are not doing good things. As with the earlier instruction, they should add a face, clothes, accessories, etc. to their body trace. Beside the body parts, have them write the following or draw symbols for the following (ask the appropriate questions based on the participants’ background) :

a. Head – What are the bad things that you think of sometimes? Are you

stubborn? Do you worry too much? Are you to passive about things?

b. Mouth – What are the bad things that you say that hurt others? Do you

find yourself fibbing or lying?

c. Heart – What do you do when you are angry? Are you very sensitive about

what others think and say about you? Do you get affected easily by other people’s criticism?

d. Hands – What do you do with your hands that hurt

people or yourself?

e. Feet – What do you do when confronted with problems or hurtful words?

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5. Ask the children whether people usually notice their good or bad side. Tell them that sometimes we get frustrated because people around us only see the bad side and never acknowledge the right things we do. Tell them that is okay, because not all people know who we really are. Only we know ourselves best or sometimes, significant others can tell us who and what we really are.

6. Ask them what goes unnoticed among their good behaviors.

7. As a capping activity, have them affirm each other: “You are a good person. There are lots of things you can do well. If there are bad things about you, you can change them for the better on your own, with my help, and with other people’s help.”

Processing

From their answers stress these Key Messages:

1. There are times when they might believe that everybody is against them because of mistakes that they may have made. Remember that what could have been wrong was what you did – the action itself. Not you! You are an innately good person. People can always change for the better.

2. It is important to have a balanced view of ourselves. We should both be able to recognize our strengths as well as our weaknesses.

3. We also have to acknowledge that we are bad at doing things or we have attitudes or characteristics that are not good. This will help us improve ourselves. We must constantly work to make ourselves better individuals.

4. We all need to strive to be good persons although we know that it is not always easy. We also need to hold on to important values. (Ask the children to give examples of important values and how these values can be translated into good deeds.)

values. (Ask the children to give examples of important values and how these values can be
values. (Ask the children to give examples of important values and how these values can be

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Activity 3: Build me a Tower!

This is a preparatory activity to “Activity 4: We can Solve This!,” an activity that helps children acquire important decision-making skills. The ability to make decisions and solve problems is an important skill to learn for children. Knowing that they can get past their problems will help them gain better confidence in and appreciation of themselves. However, before going through this activity, we must prepare them properly by helping them grasp the concept of decision-making and by pointing out that decision making almost always involves problem solving.

that decision making almost always involves problem solving. This group activity will help the children understand

This group activity will help the children understand that crucial to decision-making is understanding and carefully analyzing the problem.

Activity Objectives To go through a simple activity that will help introduce to them the concept of problem solving and decision-making.

To teach participants the value of cooperation in problem solving.

Time

30-45 minutes

Materials Old newspapers, masking tape, and other found materials

Procedures

1. Group the children into groups of four or five members each.

2. In this activity, the children will be tasked to build the tallest tower they can using newspapers, found materials, and masking tape. The objective is not only to build the tallest tower but to build one that would stand on its own.

3. Give them 30-35 minutes to work on their towers. Have them display their creations. Choose the tallest tower. Acknowledge the members of the group that built the tallest tower. Compliment the groups that tried their best too.

Processing

1. Ask the participants, “Did you enjoy the game? What did you like about it? What didn’t you like about it? Was it difficult to build the tower?”

2. Ask the winning group the following questions: “How did you manage to build the tallest tower? What difficulties did you encounter while you were building it? How did you try to solve the problem? Did you have problems working with your team mates? How did you solve this dilemma?”

3. Ask the other groups, “Why were you not able to build the tallest tower? What were the hurdles or problems that you faced? How did you try to solve these problems? Was there another thing that you could have tried to solve the problem? How else could you have tried to solve the problem?”

4. Stress to the children the importance of teamwork and cooperation in trying to solve a problem.

5. All problems have a solution. In decision making, one should

consider various options and weigh the consequences involved.

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Activity 4: We can Solve This!

This Activity helps children to acquire good decision-making and problem solving skills. This is one of the more vital skills they need as children and later on as adults. The skills they will learn here will also come in handy in the Financial Education Section where the children will be made to make crucial decisions as regards their finances.

Activity Objective To learn decision-making skills.

Time

45 minutes

Procedures

1. Group the participants into two or three groups. Tell them that they will be creating a skit/drama about a problem that they encountered and how they were able to solve this.

2. Have them apply the skills outlined in the Processing Section, namely: being clear about what the problem is, identifying people they can listen to for advice, thinking about various solutions and possible consequences, choosing a path or a plan, and acting out that plan. All these information must appear in their skit.

that plan. All these information must appear in their skit. 3. Each group will take turns

3. Each group will take turns presenting.

Note to the Facilitator

Provide situations for younger children to make things easier. Sample situations include there is no money for tuition fee or medicines, what should they do? What can they do if they flunk in class. For instance, how would they break the news to their parents? What will they do to ensure they will no longer flunk in class? What will they do if someone takes advantage of them?

Processing

Ask the children about how the problems in the stories were solved. Take note of their answers and use these as examples in presenting the following guide for solving problems and making decisions:

1. Be clear about what the problem is.

2. Listen to the advice of people who are important to you. Be sure about what they are suggesting. Do not be ashamed to ask for clarifications.

3. Think about various solutions and their consequences. What will happen if you take a certain course of action? Who will be affected positively and negatively? How will this affect you? Remember that whatever you decide you must do no harm to yourself or to others.

4. Choose a path and plan. If you need to talk to family, friends, or other significant adults do so.

5. Act. If you need help, ask for help.

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Module 4:

My Dreams

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This is the last Module for this Section. After reflecting and sharing about their present life, it is time to look towards the future. In this Module, we help the children continue dreaming, an ability that may have been compromised by their negative experiences. By going through the Activities here, we stress to the children that it is all right to dream again. We also encourage them to believe they can make their dreams into reality. Despite the negative experiences, they must never quit hoping for a brighter future.

Module Objectives

1. To share their dreams for the future.

2. To help children identify the kind of support they need to fulfill their dreams.

3. To help the children identify what they can do for themselves to achieve their dreams.

what they can do for themselves to achieve their dreams. Activity 1: I Will Become… The

Activity 1: I Will Become…

The Activity helps the children realize what they want to become in the future. It will make the children realize that they need to take concrete steps to realize their dreams and that there are individuals and organizations who can and are willing to help them achieve their dreams or goals.

Activity Objectives

To help the children articulate their dreams for the future. To help them take concrete he steps to achieve their dream.

Time

45 minutes

Materials Pre-cut paper shaped like a star (as big as a short bond paper), pre-cut paper shaped like feet or footsteps, string or a ball of yarn, crayons or pens, tape

Procedure

1. Distribute the stars and art materials. The star symbolizes their dream. The children will write (or draw a symbol) their dream on the backside of the star. Tell them to attach a string at the end of the star.

2. Distribute paper cut outs of right and left feet to the children. On the right foot, the participants will write the support they need from others in order to reach their dreams. On the left, they should write what they should do in order to make their dreams come true.

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4. Each one will share their dreams.

Processing

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1. Ask them to recall the previous Activities. What lessons did you learn from these? What things did you learn about yourselves and the people around you? How have these activities made you feel? Take note of the answers and use these as examples to stress the following key messages:

a. Each of them is unique;

b. They have family, friends, and other people who care and

who are willing to help them;

c. They have strengths and resources but they also

have limitations and weaknesses but things can be done to address their weaknesses;

d. They can help themselves and other

people because they have skills they can use;

e. Remember that it is hard to walk with only

“one foot.” If we work together we can overcome greater odds.

foot.” If we work together we can overcome greater odds. Activity 2: Water Ceremony We end

Activity 2: Water Ceremony

We end the activities in this section with a meaningful exercise. The Water Ceremony will help children realize that the things they have learned so far and the things they will learn in the next few days or weeks will all contribute to making them better individuals. They will also be meeting a lot of friends, some of whom will become their lifelong friends whom they can depend on for emotional and perhaps even material support in the future. The ceremony also helps them realize that they need to contribute to making the succeeding Activities successful. In the same way, each of them has a role to play in helping each other achieve their dreams.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Water, plastic glasses, a container of water/jar

Procedures

1. Tell the children to fill their glasses with water then come back and form a circle. Place the water container in the middle of the circle.

2. Ask the children about the uses of water.

3. Now ask the children (keeping in mind the uses of water) what does water symbolize? Acknowledge all answers. Ask the children to close their eyes and reflect, be thankful for the friendship and support from those who participated in the activities.

4. Now one by one, the children will go to the water container in the middle. Before pouring the water in, they will say what they feel about the activities they went through.

Processing

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of water?” The most probable answer would be one person. Ask them again “who will benefit from a container of water?” Many.

“who will benefit from a container of water?” Many. 2. Add that for this activity water

2. Add that for this activity water symbolizes all the lessons that they have learned and the new friends that they met and have known over the past activities with Aflatoun.

The Sounding Board

Because the Activities have been about personal exploration, we will still focus on looking into the feelings of the participants. You will need paper and poster paint for this Activity. Distribute these to the participants. Ask them to create a painting, using their fingers as their brush. The colors of their choice should express their feelings right now about the Activities they have gone through. Give everyone the opportunity to present their paintings and to talk about their feelings. Ask follow-up questions and jot down their answers.

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their feelings. Ask follow-up questions and jot down their answers. Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education
their feelings. Ask follow-up questions and jot down their answers. Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education
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Note from Aflatoun

Other Aflatoun clubs in Uganda had made cards where they celebrate their identities. They made inspirational cards that said “Proud to be Ugandan”, or “You can make it”. What kind of messages would you like to share to other Aflatoun clubs around the world?

If you would like to share it with us, please send it to us at info@aflatoun.org

to other Aflatoun clubs around the world? If you would like to share it with us,

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Non-Formal Education Manual Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 57 SECTION 3: Rights and Responsibilities

SECTION 3:

Rights and Responsibilities

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Every one of us is born with rights regardless of who we are or where we are from. Our rights are enshrined in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Children, as an especially younger group in society, have special rights aimed to help them in their development. These rights are written in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Children (UN CRC), which a great majority of Nation States have already ratified.

This Section gives life to the third Core Element of the Aflatoun Concept, which promotes the four sets of interdependent rights (survival, development, protection, and participation) and teaches children their various responsibilities to the self and others.

This Section will be most beneficial for children who have not had any education on children’s rights

as it introduces the children’s rights enshrined in the UN CRC. For participants who are already

familiar with the UN CRC, this Section will give occasion to the review of their rights. Rights need

to be discussed as often as possible to help children better understand and remember them. The

children must also be reminded of the challenges of fighting for what is due them.

A key learning we have to stress to the kids is that regardless of whether we perform our

responsibilities or not, we must be able to enjoy our rights.

However, children must also learn responsibility and good citizenship. In this Section, guide them not only in claiming their rights but also performing their responsibilities towards themselves, their family, their community, and the environment.

their family, their community, and the environment. Section Objectives 1. To learn about children’s rights 2.

Section Objectives

1. To learn about children’s rights

2. To learn about responsibilities and good

3. To identify the people and institutions that support and help the children in everyday life

and in times of trouble.

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Module 1:

My Rights and My Responsibilities

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Aflatoun Child Social & Financial Education 59 Some adults fear that teaching children their rights make

Some adults fear that teaching children their rights make them stubborn thinking that children who are aware of their rights demand for their rights while altogether avoiding their responsibilities. There must be a healthy balance between rights and responsibilities. Responsibilities go hand in hand with their rights as the second core element of the Aflatoun Programs states.

In this Module, we help them learn the history of human rights and children’s rights to help them have a better appreciation of this. We also help them learn both their rights and responsibilities and the need to balance both. We also lead the children to find out people who can assist them in fulfilling their rights.

Activity 1: Child, House, Storm The Activity introduces the idea of needs through a game. Participants will pretend that a storm is coming. The objective is for the child to find shelter to protect himself from inclement weather. This lively game will help evoke from the children their basic needs. The concept of needs will be used to introduce the concept of rights in the later Activities.

Time

30 minutes

concept of rights in the later Activities. Time 30 minutes Procedures 1. Form groups of three

Procedures

1. Form groups of three members

each. One person will be assigned as the “it” of the game.

2. Two participants of each group will

hold their hands together and stretch their arms to resemble the roof of a house. The third group member will play the role of the child and will seek shelter in the house when the storm comes. Spread the participants around the room, to give them space when they run and switch places.

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3. The “it” of the game will chant “child-house-storm,” “child-house-storm” thrice. At the

end of the chant, the “it” must choose one of the three words. If the “it” calls out the word “child,” the participants who are playing the role of the child must seek shelter in a different house. If the word “house” is chosen, the participants playing the role of the child stays put while those playing the role of the house will have to find a child to shelter. If the “it” chooses “storm,” everyone should switch places. The person who is left out after each round becomes the “it.”

4. Run the game several rounds. Afterwards, process the activity with the children.

Processing

1. What happened to the child and the house while the storm was raging?

2. If we look at the storm as a symbol, what do you think it symbolizes (possible answers:

issues and problems that children face)?

3. What are some of the issues and problems children face? What are some of the

problems and issues that you face?

4. What do children need to address these issues and problems?

5. Jot down all their answers then point out that some of the needs that they raised are

actually rights of children.

Activity 2: A Collage of Needs

This Activity takes off from the previous discussions on needs. However, the discussion will be taken a step further by relating the concept of basic needs to the concept of “rights.” The provision of basic needs is important not only to the survival of a child but also to live with dignity, to achieve development, to allow participation, and to be protected from harm. This is a pre-exercise where the output will be carried over to the next activity.

where the output will be carried over to the next activity. Activity Objective To discuss and

Activity Objective To discuss and learn about children’s rights

Time

1.5 hours

Materials Old newspapers and magazines, poster-sized paper, scissors and paste

Procedures

1.

Form two or three groups. Distribute old newspapers, magazines, and art materials.

2.

Tell the children that they will make a collage of the things they NEED to live well and with

dignity.

3.

Afterwards, ask the groups to present their collage while the

facilitator takes note of their answers. Proceed to the next activity.

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Activity 3: And the Rights were Born

It is never enough to simply inform children that they have rights. It is also important to make them understand where their rights came from or how they came to be. This will allow not only the understanding of one’s rights but a deeper appreciation of them – of why these rights need to be protected and upheld.

Activity Objective To teach the children about the concept of rights.

Time

30 minutes

the children about the concept of rights. Time 30 minutes Procedures 1. Summarize the reports from

Procedures

1. Summarize the reports from the previous activities and introduce the concept of “rights.”

Tell the children that rights are standards that must be followed to live with dignity. Proceed to tell the story of the founding of the UN CRC. Use the visual aids. Be as animated as you can be while you are telling the story:

a. 1944, World War II broke out. (Ask the children if they have heard about

WWII before.) In this War, millions of people died and lost their homes all over the world. People

were kept in huge prisons because of who they were not because of what they had done. (Clarify this by asking the children about why people are put into prison in the first place. A possible answer is because they have done bad things). During WW II, millions of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, and other discriminated groups were incarcerated in concentration camps and killed. (Based on the facilitator’s assessment of the participant’s capacities, more or less information could be shared.)

b. When the war ended in 1948, the nations banded together to vow that

the atrocities of WWII will never happen again. They agreed that all human beings have rights whoever they are, regardless of their skin color, sex, religion, language, economic status. Under this framework, these differences will NOT MATTER anymore. We all have the same rights. We all have the right to be alive and to live with dignity. (Remind them of your discussion regarding diversity in the previous Section).

c.(Ask the participants the difference between adults and children. Possible answers could be adults are bigger and stronger, children are smaller and weaker, adults are wiser than children, etc. Tell the children that the differences mean that children are not necessarily inferior). Children are special because they are still in the process of growth and development. Because they are still growing and learning the ways of adults, they have needs that must be provided to them. These needs contribute to their survival, development, participation, and protection. They need all these to help them become productive adults later on. So in 1989, the

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nations united once again and committed to uphold CHILDREN’S RIGHTS. Ask the children if they have heard about children’s rights before. Acknowledge their answers but tell them that the next

activity will help them gain more understanding of their rights.

Acknowledge their answers but tell them that the next activity will help them gain more understanding

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Processes

1. There are a number of children’s rights but these can grouped into four big parts (use

visual aids):

Right to Survival This set of rights includes the right to life, an attainable standard of health, nutrition and an adequate standard of living. It also includes the right to a name and nationality.

Right to Protection This right includes “freedom from all forms of exploitation, abuse, inhuman or degrading treatment, and neglect including, the right to special protection in situations of emergency and armed conflict.” These rights seek to ensure that no one takes advantage of children and that their minds and bodies are protected.

Right to Development This set of rights includes the “right to education, support for early childhood development and care, social security and the right to leisure, recreation and cultural activities.” Development includes children’s right to study, play, practice their own religion and culture and to respect the uniqueness of other cultures, religions, opinions and views of others in their environment. The right to have one’s own identity and registration of one’s birth are also an important component of this set.

Right to Participation This set of rights includes “respect for the views of the child, freedoms of expression, access to appropriate information, and freedom of thought, conscience and religion.” These rights seek to ensure that children are allowed to responsibly express their opinions and feelings, and respect those of others. It also refers to children working towards ensuring that their peers enjoy the same rights. The Right to Participation is often the most misunderstood of all child rights. Adults may feel threatened by children who are capable of articulating their opinions and taking action to meet their needs. Questions are raised whether children can be trusted to be responsible or whether they are mature enough to make decisions. It has been observed that the biggest resistance from teachers arose when the issue of child participation was discussed. Some teachers feared it would result in behavioural issues in the classroom. Aflatoun’s experience in facilitating child participation demonstrates that if child rights are explained in the context of the larger community and as complementary to their responsibilities, children rarely abuse opportunities for discussion and action.

2. Remind the children that values guide our behavior and actions. If you have good values

then your actions towards others are good. In fulfilling children’s rights, we need to hold on the several values as a guide to all our actions. These are:

•Non-discrimination – EVERY CHILD has rights no matter where they come from, what their color is; whether they are girls or boys; rich or poor; Muslim, Christian, Hindi or Buddhist; able bodied or disabled.

•Best Interest – the child’s best interest is the MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION in all actions

•Participation – Children must be given support and opportunity to share their views, opinions, and thoughts on any matter concerning their best interest.

support and opportunity to share their views, opinions, and thoughts on any matter concerning their best
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Activity 4: Guess the Next Scene

The object of the Activity is for the children to predict the scene that will come next by performing mime, supplying dialogue, or acting out what they think the following scene is. The scenes they will give will serve as your jump off point when you discuss children’s rights with them. Lead them to a thorough discussion of their rights and make sure to cover things that you have not covered in the previous discussions.

Activity Objective To discuss the rights of children.

Time

One hour

Objective To discuss the rights of children. Time One hour Procedures: 1. Give the children a

Procedures:

1. Give the children a particular scene. The scene must evoke

discussions on children’s rights. Their task is to think of the following scene. They must act, supply dialogue, or perform a mime.

2. For example you can give them the following scene: “A father and child are together

the father is holding a belt, what do you think the next scene will be? Act it out, supply a short dialogue, or perform a mime.”

3. Call out several volunteers or if you do not have a lot of participants, give everyone a turn

to act out the next scene.

4. Write down their answers on a white board or a manila paper.

5. Classify their answers either as upholding the rights of children or violating their rights.

6. Relate their answers to the rights of children, particularly the four clusters of rights.

Note to the Facilitator Give them other scenes and repeat the process in case you do not have enough Give them other scenes and repeat the process in case you do not have enough materials to thoroughly discuss the rights of children. Other scenes could be a mother carrying a baby, a woman dragging a child, a child speaking to a man, etc.

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Activity 5: What Would Happen?

A possible cause for children becoming stubborn when they start to know their rights is our failure to teach them their responsibilities. We should always stress the balance between the two. As some people say, rights should go hand in hand with responsibilities. While children must realize rights are inherent whether or not we do our responsibilities, they must realize that they must perform their responsibilities. It is not enough that people enjoy their rights. We should promote the idea of responsible citizenship to children. We must also stress that rights are not enjoyed just for one’s own good, it should also be used for the good of others as well. Not performing these responsibilities could have negative consequences to oneself and others.

Activity Objective To teach children about their rights and responsibilities.

Time

30 minutes

Materials Pictures of children going to school, selling on a street full of cars, eating well, refusing to eat, laughing with friends, speaking to adults with adults listening to them, not listening to what adults are saying, refusing to study, children playing in a park, children leaving their toys on the floor, a child hurting another child intentionally while playing, littering in the streets, performing house chores, sitting around while mother works very hard, etc.

chores, sitting around while mother works very hard, etc. Procedures 1. Distribute the pictures randomly to

Procedures

1. Distribute the pictures randomly to the children.

2. The children will take turns describing what is happening in the picture. After they have described the scene, ask each of them “What will result to the actions being portrayed in the pictures?”

Processing

1. Every action has consequences. Consequences could be good or bad.

2. For every good that we do, someone will smile and approve what we’ve done. It may also contribute to our success. Although generally true, not all our good actions are rewarded. Despite this, it still good to be responsible and to do good.

3. For every mistake or bad thing that we do, someone might get hurt. It may also result to our failure. Some bad things we do go unpunished, but this does not mean this did not have any negative effects on anyone including us.

4. We must put to good use all our rights by performing our responsibilities to ourselves and others. When we fail to perform our responsibilities, this could have negative consequences to us and people around us.

5. We all have a responsibility towards ourselves. For instance, we have to know ourselves well including our strengths and limitations. We have to make responsible choices. We must anticipate consequences of our actions and own up to the effects of what we have done. We should be responsible enough to keep ourselves healthy and clean, among others.

6. We have a responsibility towards our family. One of this is performing household chores, expressing appreciation to family members or caregivers, respecting our elders, helping our young brothers or sisters, etc.

7. We have a responsibility towards the community. This may involve an awareness of mutual interdependence, appreciating and respecting contributions made by people, being sensitive towards the needs of the marginalized, respecting the diversity of people, etc.

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cleanliness in the environment, putting to practice environmental principles, etc.

9. Rights go hand-in-hand with each other. For instance, if a child has the right to be fed, s/he has the responsibility not to waste food. If the child has a right to education, s/he has the responsibility to ensure that s/he takes school work seriously.

to ensure that s/he takes school work seriously. Responsibilities of the Child Rights go hand-in-hand with

Responsibilities of the Child Rights go hand-in-hand with duties and responsibilities. A simple example: if a child has a right to food, she also has a responsibility to not waste food. If a child has a right to education, she also has a responsibility to ensure that she takes schoolwork seriously. Responsibilities of the child include:

Responsibilities towards self Before children can understand the other basic elements of responsible citizenship, they need to first understand themselves. This involves the issues of their identity, their selfhood, their choices, and so on.

Responsibilities towards the family/ care giving environment These responsibilities include doing small tasks at home such as laying the table, cleaning dishes etc. and in doing so, expressing appreciation to family members and/or caregivers.

Responsibilities towards the community These responsibilities involve an awareness of mutual interdependence, appreciating and respecting contributions made by people and things in their environment, being sensitive towards gender or people with different abilities.

Responsibilities towards the environment These responsibilities include maintaining the cleanliness of the neighbourhood, discussing

environmental issues and putting into practice conservation strategies.

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