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THE TIMES LEADER

WILKES-BARRE, PA

timesleader.com

WEdnESdAy, MAy 22, 2013

50¢

2013 ELECTION
2013
ELECTION

LUZERNE COUNTY CONTROLLER

DEMOCRATIC

50¢ 2013 ELECTION LUZERNE CO UNTY CO NTROLLER DEMOCRAT IC MICHELLE BEDNAR 12,093 STE- PHEN URBAN

MICHELLE

BEDNAR

12,093

CO UNTY CO NTROLLER DEMOCRAT IC MICHELLE BEDNAR 12,093 STE- PHEN URBAN REPUBLICAN WALTER GRIFFITH 5,843

STE-

PHEN

URBAN

REPUBLICAN

IC MICHELLE BEDNAR 12,093 STE- PHEN URBAN REPUBLICAN WALTER GRIFFITH 5,843 KAREN CEPPA-HIRKO 4,378 Griffith

WALTER

GRIFFITH

5,843

STE- PHEN URBAN REPUBLICAN WALTER GRIFFITH 5,843 KAREN CEPPA-HIRKO 4,378 Griffith survives primary CLArk VA

KAREN

CEPPA-HIRKO

4,378

Griffith survives primary

5,843 KAREN CEPPA-HIRKO 4,378 Griffith survives primary CLArk VA N OrdEN/THE TIMES LEAdEr Walter Griffith, the

CLArk VAN OrdEN/THE TIMES LEAdEr

Walter Griffith, the incumbent Luzerne County controller, votes early Tuesday morning in Kingston Township. He advanced to the fall general elec- tion despite felony wiretap charges recently filed against him.

Bednar bests Urban in Democrat’s contest

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Luzerne County Controller Walter Griffith’s pending felony wiretap charge didn’t stop Re- publicans from choosing him as their nominee for another term, according to unofficial election results. Democrats picked Conyngham Township resi- dent Michelle Bednar over Stephen A. Urban, a county councilman and former 12-year county commissioner who had the advantage of wide- spread name recognition, unofficial results show.

INSIDE: kokura, Mecadon move on in Pittston district judge race, PAGE 6A

Griffith, who

monitored the

results from

his Kingston Township home, said the outcome makes him believe peo- ple valued his watchdog style. “Obviously, they appreciate what I’ve done for them,” said Griffith. “I am grateful for that.” He did not know if the charges would turn away supporters. “In light of what just happened, the people put their faith in me, and I appreciate that,” Griffith

said, adding that he will continue to “put the fi- nancial state of Luzerne County above all else.” Griffith, 58, received 5,843 votes, compared to 4,378 for his Republican opponent, Wilkes-Barre tax accountant Karen Ceppa-Hirko. On the Democratic side, the votes were 12,093 for Bednar and 8,357 for Urban. Bednar, a private-sector corporate trust super- visor and township tax collector since 2009, said she believes voters are ready for change. “I’m grateful and humbled by the confidence

See CONTROLLER, Page 7A

LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL

Milanes odd man out for GOP; Sorokas tops among 5 Dems

Race will heat up because Tuesday’s 10 winners will compete in fall for five slots.

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

Wilkes-Barre Township resi- dent Alex Milanes did not se- cure enough votes Tuesday to land a Republican nomination for five Luzerne County Coun-

cil seats, according to unofficial results. County Republicans chose the following to advance to the November general election:

Paul DeFabo, Wilkes-Barre; Kathy Dobash, Hazleton; Sue Rossi, Butler Township, and two incumbents — Harry Haas, Kingston, and Eugene Kelleher,

See COUNTY, Page 6A

Turnout low; a wait for write-ins

See COUNTY, Page 6A Turnout low; a wait for write-ins AIMEE dILGEr /THE TIMES LEAdEr There

AIMEE dILGEr /THE TIMES LEAdEr

There was low voter turnout in Wilkes-Barre during primaries on Tuesday.

Ttimes Leader Staff

Fewer than one in five registered Luzerne County voters went to the polls Tuesday for the Democratic and Republican primaries in which many ballots were uncontested and there were few countywide races to drive turnout. Unofficial results showed turnout was only 19.8 per- cent, with 24,753 Democrats and 12,756 Republicans go-

See TURNOUT, Page 7A

OKLAHOMA TORNADO

12,756 Republicans go- See TURNOUT, Page 7A OKLAHOMA TORNADO AP PHOTO Jim St ubblefield, of Norman,

AP PHOTO

Jim Stubblefield, of Norman, Okla., raises a tattered flag he found while helping his sister salvage items from her home.

Rescuers’ job nearly complete

Search through the rubble of Moore, Okla., yielding no new victims. death toll lowered to 24, including nine children.

By CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN and SEAN MURPHY Associated Press

MOORE, Okla. — Helmeted rescue workers

raced Tuesday to complete the search for survi- vors and the dead in the Oklahoma City suburb where a mammoth tornado destroyed countless homes, cleared lots down to bare red earth and claimed 24 lives. Scientists concluded the storm was a rare and extraordinarily powerful type of twister known as an EF5, which is capable of

lifting reinforced buildings off the ground, hurling cars like missiles and stripping trees completely free of bark. Meanwhile, residents of Moore began returning to their homes a day after the tornado smashed some neigh- borhoods into jagged wood scraps and gnarled pieces of metal. In place of their hous- es, many families found only empty lots. The fire chief said he was confident there are no more bodies or survivors in the rubble. “I’m 98 percent sure we’re good,” Gary Bird said Tues- day at a news conference with

Storm survivor

McCumber

Chelsie

“I was kind of holding my breath thinking this isn’t the worst of it … When I got out, it was worse than I thought.”

the governor, who had just completed an aerial tour of the disaster zone. Authorities were so focused on the search ef- fort that they had yet to establish the full scope of damage along the storm’s long, ruinous path. The death toll was revised downward from 51 after the state medical examiner said some victims may have been counted twice in the confusion. By Tuesday afternoon, every damaged home had been searched at least once, Bird said.

See TORNADO, Page 14A

INSIDE A NEWS: Loca l 3A Nation & World: 5A Obituaries: 8A, 9A Ed itorials:

INSIDE

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WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013

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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER

police blotter

HAZLETON — City police reported the following:

• Police said a 16-year-old

girl from Hazleton will be cited with several traffic violations after a chain-reaction crash involving parked cars on Dia- mond Avenue on Monday. Police said the girl, operating a 2001 Isuzu Rodeo, struck the rear of a 2011 Chevrolet Cama- ro at about 8:20 p.m. The force of the impact caused the Chev- rolet to strike a parked 2005 Chevrolet Trailblazer, which then struck a parked 2005 Acu- ra TL. The girl then backed up and struck the front of a parked 2010 Nissan Altima, police said.

• Police said city firefight-

ers extinguished a vehicle fire in the area of East Birch and South Wyoming streets early Tuesday morning. A Mercedes SUV owned by Glenis Perez was totaled after the fire that was reported just before 12:30 a.m. Police said the vehicle was parked and unattended. The fire appears to have been caused by an electrical mal- function, police said.

• Police said graffiti was

spray painted on a wall in the

area of 24 E. Broad St. on Sun- day or Monday.

• Jo hn Ko ldesko, of We st

Magnolia Street, reported Tuesday mail had been stolen from his mailbox. • Daniel Vache, of Alter

Street , reported Tuesday an unknown person damaged his mailbox.

• Luzerne County Board of

Elections Marisa Crispell re- ported Tuesday that an election box was stolen from the front door of a building in the 300 block of East Broad Street.

WILKES-BARRE — City police reported the following:

• The outer glass of a double pane basement window was

smashed at a house on South Meade Street on Monday.

• A woman reported Mon-

day she discovered her apart- ment on Scott Street had been

ransacked and her dog was

missing. A rear door was forced open, police said.

• Police late Monday re-

leased the name of the man shot in the leg in the area of Hughes and Wall streets on Sunday. Junior Alberto Diaz-Reyes and several friends were leav- ing a party on Hughes Street when they encountered a man and a woman arguing just after 3 a.m. Diaz-Reyes asked the woman if she was OK when the man told him to mind his own business. An argument began when the man brandished a pistol and

fired several shots striking Di-

az-Reyes in the leg, police said.

HAZLE TWP. — A man was charged Saturday after he alleg- edly threatened township em- ployees with a compound bow and arrows. Anthony Francis Kasarda, 48, of Evervale Road, was charged with simple assault, terroristic threats and obstructing justice. He was jailed at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility

for lack of $30,000 bail.

According to the criminal complaint, Kasarda called the state police Hazleton barracks

complaining that township em-

ployees were removing vehicles parked in front of his house Saturday morning. Kasarda told state police he was going

to “use deadly and lethal force” and was in possession of a com- pound bow.

A trooper spotted Kasarda

leaving his house carrying a compound bow and arrows telling a township employee to “get the hell out of here,” the complaint says. State police searched Kasar- da’s residence and seized a compound bow and arrows, ac- cording to the search warrant receipt.

compost plan scuttled at lehman township building

Recycling will not be impacted by Dallas Area Municipal Authority’s decision.

By CAmILLE FIOTI Times Leader Correspondent

LEHMAN TWP. — The Dal- las Area Municipal Authority backed out of a proposed plan to set up a composting site at the township’s municipal building lot, the Board of Su- pervisors announced Monday. Chairman Dave Sutton said the site isn’t large enough to accommodate the setbacks re- quired by the state Department of Environmental Protection. As a result of the decision, Monday’s zoning hearing, which was for the purpose of making changes to the zon- ing ordinance to allow for the composting site, had been can- celed. The zoning hearing was to take place just before the su- pervisors meeting. Sutton said he heard DAMA is considering another site on state Route 118. “It’s probably a better parcel,” said Sutton. “Its level and a Phase I environmen- tal assessment has been done.” Sutton pointed out that the DAMA situation will not af- fect the township’s recycling

program, which is held at the municipal building. In other business, the board approved a resolution to take out a loan from Landmark Bank in the amount of $125,000 for the purchase of a backhoe and dump truck. The equipment al- ready had been purchased with money from the general fund, Chairman Dave Sutton said, adding that the loan proceeds will “reimburse” the general fund for that expenditure. The interest rate on the loan is 1.99 percent, which Sut- ton said is a better deal than leasing the equipment, and will save the township about $5,000 over a five-year period. The board also voted to switch insurance companies for the borough’s general insur- ance policy. Treasurer Alvin Cragle said the switch from Se- lected Risks Insurance Compa- ny to EMC Insurance will save the township roughly $12,000 per year. Sutton commended Cragle for shopping around for the best price. “Once again, if Al- vin hadn’t asked the questions, we wouldn’t have saved the money,” he said. “He’s a real asset to Lehman Township and always has been.”

MUNicipAl brieF

ASHLEY — Ashley Bor- ough Council reminds resi- dents the second half of the 2013 trash and recycling fee will be collected in the secre- tary ’s office beginning June 4. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and 4 to 7 p.m. Thurs- day. The mandatory fee is $115. After July 31, a $10 late fee will

be added. Citations will be is- sued for non-payment. Stickers can also be obtained by send- ing a check or money order payable to Ashley Borough to 10 N. Main St., Ashley, PA 18706, or by depositing pay- ment in the drop-off box in the vestibule of the Municipal Building. When using either of these methods, add $1.80 for post- age and allow for sufficient mailing time.

$1.80 for post- age and allow for sufficient mailing time. AP PHOTOS Dr. Urmen Desai, right

AP PHOTOS

Dr. Urmen Desai, right and Dr. Wrood M. Kassira, both plastic surgeons, held a news conference Tuesday in Miami about the progress being made by a man whose face was mostly chewed off by an attacker last year. The photos on the left are of Ronald Poppo, the homeless man who was attacked.

Face-chewing victim recovering

Ronald Poppo lost left eye, nose, most of surrounding skin when naked man attacked him.

nose, most of surrounding skin when naked man attacked him. Ronald Po ppo, a homele ss

Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami, plays the guitar in his room at Jackson Memorial Perdue Medical Center in Cutler Bay, Fla.

ported seeing a naked Eugene swinging from a light pole min- utes before the attack. Lab tests found only marijuana in his sys- tem. Ruth Charles, Eugene’s moth- er, declined comment. “To tell you the truth, I don’t feel like going back to this thing again,” she said. “I’m just try- ing to recover from what hap- pened.” Poppo doesn’t blame Eugene for what happened, said Ad- olfa Sigue, nurse manager at the Jackson Memorial Perdue Medical Center, where he lives. “The only thing that he al- ways tells me is that, ‘I’m sure that that man had a bad day that day,’” Sigue said.

Poppo, 66, still requires daily

and he’s working with occupa- tional therapists and specialists from the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind to learn how to adjust to his blindness. He can dress himself and is learning again to play the guitar, an instrument

he had not picked up for 40

like to see him exercise more, he so far refuses to leave the facility unless he’s going to the hospital to see his doctors, said Patricia Copalko, a certified nursing assistant at the medical center. He also hasn’t allowed any visitors to see him, other than his doctors, nurses and thera- pists. Sigue said Poppo doesn’t answer the telephone in his room and hasn’t wanted to talk with relatives other than a sis- ter, who calls the nurse’s cell- phone to get through. “He doesn’t wander out of his room very often,” Copalko said, adding, “He needs to get out and he has refused. But also, I get it. He says, ‘My face.’” Poppo’s caretakers describe

patient who enjoys listening to Miami Heat basketball games on the radio. He can stay at the medical center indefinitely. His care is covered by Medicaid, and a Jackson Memorial Foundation fund has raised $100,000 for his medical expenses.

By JENNIFER KAY Associated Press

MIAMI — A homeless man whose face was mostly chewed

off in a bizarre attack last year appeared Tuesday to be mostly at peace with his disfigure- ment, strumming a guitar, mak- ing jokes and thanking people for their donations to help pay for his care. Ronald Poppo doesn’t like to leave his hospital room, though, and he won’t allow any- one to visit him, other than his doctors and nurses. “My face,” he says. Poppo lost his left eye, his nose and most of the surround- ing skin when a naked man at- tacked him for no reason along- side a Miami highway a year ago.

In a video posted online Tues-

day by the hospital caring for him, his left eye socket is a hol- low shadow, his blinded right eye is covered by a skin graft and his nose is reduced to just the nostrils. Still, Poppo joked with his nurses and, though he wears a baseball cap, leaves his face uncovered to address the camera. “People in my predicament need to be helped out, and I’m sure there’s other people also that have the same type of pre- dicament. I thank the outpour- ing of people in the community, I’ll always be grateful for that,” Poppo said in the brief video, which was shot recently. He spent nearly a month in the hospital after the attack, be- fore moving to a long-term care facility. His doctors at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the Uni-

versity of Miami Miller School of Medicine praised Poppo for his resilience and said he’s sat- isfied with the surgeries and skin grafts that have closed his wounds. Poppo could still use his own

tissues or prosthetics to replace his nose or eye, but he is not interested in more facial recon- struction. “There’s still work that can be done, but he’s more than happy with how he is now, and he’s quite grateful,” said Dr. Wrood Kassira, a plastic surgeon.

A facial transplant wouldn’t

be necessary, since Poppo medical care for his wounds, him as a charming, cooperative

didn’t lose any functions other than his vision. “To put him through a life- time of immunosuppression is not something he nor us think

He’s gained 50 pounds, and

provoked Eugene. Callers re- though his caretakers would

Rudy Eugene. It’s still not clear

is in his best interest,” Kassira said.

A Miami police officer shot

and killed Poppo’s attacker, years.

THE TIMES LEADER

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Regional Business Development Director & General Manager (570) 970-7158

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OBITUARIES

Aston, Lenore Bone, Elizabeth Covert, David Doughton, Bessie Ely, Christopher Ferree, Debra Fletcher, Ann Gibbons, Sister Mary Luke Hulsizer, Shirley Lamoreaux, Elaine Manning, Richard McGuire, William Jr. Moyer, Dorothy Nestorick, Michael Olenginski, Alma Scorey, Robert Sr.

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TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om timesleader . com WEDNESD AY , MAY 22 , 20

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TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om timesleader . com WEDNESD AY , MAY 22 , 20

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013

PAGE 3A

LOCAL

IN BRIEF

WILKES-BARRE

Activities set for EMS week

Mayor Tom Leighton on Tuesday declared the week of May 19-25 as Emergency Medical Service We ek in the city, a celebration that will end Saturday with an open house at two city fire stations.

The declaration calls attention to the service and sacrifice

declaration calls attention to the service and sa crifice Le igh ton that the city ’s

Leighton

that the city ’s and the region’s emergency responders exhibit daily. An open house will be held at the fire department head- quarters at 20-22 E. Ross St. and the Hol-

lenback Fire Station, 1020 N. Washington St . The open houses will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free blood pressure screenings, fire safety presentations and fire and EMS equipment demonstrations will be offered. Luzerne County 911 personnel will

brief visitors on a new program, Smart 911, which allows residents to create

a household medical profile that will

be delivered to sponsoring 911 centers and first responders in the event of a medical incident. For more information, visit www.wil- kes-barre.pa.us or call the Wilkes-Barre Fire Chief ’s office at 570-208-4261.

HARRISBURG

4 locals earn certification

About 150 attorneys have been selected as the first group of Penn- sylvania lawyers certified by the PBA Workers’ Compensation Law Section

as specialists in workers’ compensation law. Four Luzerne County attorneys were certified. Those lawyers are Bart E. Ecker, Hazleton; Jeffrey C. Majikas, Hazleton; Timothy Belt, Kingston, and Donald Cosmo Ligorio, Kingston.

A lawyer who has successfully

completed the exam is certified for five years.

WILKES-BARRE

Sentence reduction opposed

Prosecutors say a Butler Township

man serving a life sentence for a 1992 homicide should not be considered for

a reduced sentence because he didn’t

file court papers in a timely fashion.

To dd Hyung-Rae Ta rs el li, no w 39,

said in papers filed late last year that because he was born in South Korea and was a juvenile at the time of the alleged crime, he should be considered

for a reduced sentence, despite a birth date that says he was an adult at the time.

Ta rs el li argu ed that because Ko re a

calculates ages differently than the United States, he was only 17 at the time he was charged with shooting and robbing his friend, 17-year-old Mark

Bunchalk, and new state laws prohibit life sentences for juveniles.

Ta rs el li wa s charge d in Ja nuary 1992

with shooting and killing Bunchalk inside the Kentucky Fried Chicken in Hazleton where Bunchalk had been working. Prosecutors said in a filing Tues- day that Ta rs el li’s re quest should be thrown out because he didn’t file it

in a timely fashion according to state

law and that Ta rs el li knew about the information a number of years ago.

A judge has not yet made a ruling.

WILKES-BARRE TWP.

‘Fight for Air Walk’ set

The American Lung Association of Pennsylvania will host the 11th annual Wilkes-Barre Fight for Air Walk on June 8 at Betzler Field, 221 Highland Park Blvd. The presenting sponsor of this year ’s walk is Kindred Hospital. Registration and other events, including a bonsai display by the NEPA Bonsai Society and an Ameri- can Lung Association informational table, begin at 9 a.m. The walk starts at 10 a.m. Proceeds will support the Lung Association’s advocacy and research programs. This year ’s walk is in memory of Sandi Mancuso and takes place on her

birthday. Her daughter, Sarah Fox, will speak about losing her mother to lung cancer.

A member of the Better Breathers

Support Group, Butch Modzelewski, will lead the walk, playing bagpipes. For more information, or to register for the walk, visit www.lunginfo.org/ wbwalk or call (570) 823-2212.

Hoggarth OK’d for division head

Some balk at initial salary proposal of $75,000 for ex-acting recorder of deeds.

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

A Luzerne County Council majority voted Tuesday to confirm Joan Hoggarth as ju- dicial services and records di- vision head at $70,000, which is $5,000 less than the salary originally proposed by county Manager Robert Lawton. Several council members had indicated before the meet- ing that they would not support the nomination at $75,000. Lawton’s first nominee, Colorado resident Linda A. Coxen, did not receive the

Colorado resident Linda A. Coxen, did not receive the required six votes last week. Law- ton

required six votes last week. Law- ton had pro- posed a sala-

ry of $67,500 for Coxen.

Council-

Hoggarth

man Stephen A. Urban criticized Lawton’s original $75,000 proposed sal- ary during Tuesday’s meeting, asking Lawton, “Is this a pay- back to us for not voting for the first nominee?” Lawton told council Tues- day he believes a $2,500 increase above Coxen’s pro- posed pay is warranted for Hoggarth because she has a decade of experience working in county government and has been performing as interim

division head without a pay increase since September. Hoggarth also will have a “very short learning curve,” and the county will save $33,000 an- nually eliminating Hoggarth’s prior position as acting record- er of deeds, Lawton said. Appreciates opportunity

paid $41,200, said she appre- ciates the opportunity. “I look forward to continuing with the foundation I’ve already laid for the division,” she said. Lawton congratulated Hog- garth after the meeting. “You’re going to do great,” he said. In addition to Urban, coun- cil members Elaine Mad- don Curry, Linda McClosky Houck, Eugene Kelleher, Rick Williams, Jim Bobeck and

lection panel. Brominski questioned Law- ton’s decision to submit a sec- ond nominee. The manager previously indicated he must restart the selection process “anew” if the initial nominee is rejected by council. Lawton said his nomination

Hoggarth, who is currently he had received from selec- of Hoggarth complies with

the charter. Some council members pre- viously raised concerns about the hiring of an out-of-state resident when area residents are qualified. Lawton told council two of the six division heads hired to date were not county residents. The county

Hoggarth, 49, of Hanover residents who are nominat-

ed can have “a great deal of pride” they were selected af- ter a national search, he said.

Tim McGinley voted to con- firm Hoggarth’s nomination. Council members Edward Brominski and Stephen J. Ur- ban opposed it. Councilman Rick Morelli was absent, and Councilman Harry Haas abstained, citing a $100 campaign contribution

tion committee member Jim Haggerty. The home rule charter cre- ated the judicial services and records division to oversee the deeds, wills, sheriff, coro- ner and civil and criminal court records departments. One of four finalists

Township, was among four finalists forwarded to Lawton for his consideration by a se-

THE HEAT IS ON – FOR NOW

for his consideration by a se- THE HEAT IS ON – FOR NOW CLARK VA N

CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER

A .J. Barbaria and Lexi Soifer of Wyoming Seminary watch a touch football game on the campus green Tuesday afternoon as they relax under a shade tree — an ideal spot to enjoy temperatures that climbed

into the upper 80s in Kingston and other parts of Luzerne County. The summer-like weather is forecast to remain with us today and Thursday, with thunderstorms possible as highs continue in the mid- to upper 80s. Things will cool down a bit for the weekend, with highs in the mid- to high 60s, but the threat of show- ers disappears and sweet sunshine is in store for us. For the forecast, see Page 14A.

Concerns surround flood closure gates on bridges

Rubber gaskets blew out on panels on Market and Pierce street bridges during September 2011 flooding.

By EDWARD LEWIS elewis@timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE — Flood closure panels that nearly failed when rubber gaskets blew out during the historic September 2011 flood will continue to be used until they are repaired, officials said Tuesday during the Luzerne Coun- ty Flood Protection Authority meeting. With the six-month hurricane season about to begin on June 1, concerns were raised about the integrity of the closure panels that are erected on both sides of the Market and Pierce street bridges in

Wilkes-Barre and Kingston. During the flood when the Susque- hanna River crested at 42.66 feet, the

panels using more tarps and sandbags. Road department crews in Kingston and Wilkes-Barre trucked in tons of rock

water pressure blew out the rubber that were dumped against the closure

gaskets that seal the closure panels to the pavement, causing an enormous amount of leakage that flooded North and South River Streets in Wilkes- Barre. At one point during the flood, Kings- ton Mayor James Haggerty said the river was three feet below the top of the closure panels. County Assistant Engineer Chris Bel- leman said the closure panels worked as designed, noting repairs have not been made to the gaskets. “We have to go with what we have originally,” Belleman said. Belleman said the 2011 flood taught a lesson to better prepare the closure

panels during the height of the flood. In other business, Authority Board Chairman Stephen Urban said the deadline to accept resumes for the posi- tion of executive director for the flood authority will be extended. The posi- tion opened earlier this year when Jim Brozena retired after more than three decades of employment with the county. The West Pittston resident served as county engineer from 1982 through May 2007, when he accepted a posi- tion as executive director of the Flood Protection Authority, which handles management of the Wyoming Valley Levee System and other flood-control projects.

10 charged with drug trafficking, firearm offenses

Most of people indicted by federal grand jury Tuesday were arrested last week.

By Times Leader staff

SCRANTON — Te n peo - ple were indicted by a fed- eral grand jury Tuesday on cocaine trafficking and fire- arm charges. Federal agents and state police with assistance from Wilkes-Barre police arrested most of the people last week based on a complaint that

was filed in U.S. District York City, N.Y., Michael Lowe and Patterson engaged

Court. Evidence was presented before a federal grand jury that returned an indict- ment that was unsealed on Tu esda y, charging Te re sa Bradigan, 30, of Pittston; Alejandro Delrosario, of Wil- kes-Barre; Christopher Gay- ton, also known as Hov, of Long Island, N.Y.; Zackarae Lowe, also known as SP, 31, of Scranton; Justin Murphy, also known as Bracks; Rich- ard Murphy, also known as

Mega, Rich and Christian; in Luzerne County.

Damon Murray, 34, of New

The indictment alleges Cobra .22-caliber Derrin-

in the use of firearms while conducting drug sales, ac- cording to the indictment. Gayton allegedly had a

Murray, also known as Dan- ger; William Patterson, also known as Pretty, and Ashlee Tayl or.

from May 2012 through May 14, the 10 people charged were involved in the distribu- tion of more than 100 grams

ger pistol and a Springfield Model XD 9-mm pistol; Lowe possessed a Smith & Wesson Model 639 pistol, a

of heroin, more than 500 Bursa .380-caliber pistol and

grams of cocaine, more than 28 grams of crack cocaine and the peddling of metham- phetamine and marijuana in Wilkes-Barre and other areas

Gayton, Michael Murray,

a Smith & Wesson Model 6906 9-mm pistol; and Lowe had an SCCY 9-mm pistol and a Sigsauer 9-mm pistol, according to the indictment. Details of Murray ’s gun charges were not specified.

Plymouth man faces charge of burglary

By EDWARD LEWIS elewis@timesleader.com

LARKSVILLE — A man free

on bail on charges he was target- ing vacant houses to burglarize was caught by Larksville police Tuesday morning allegedly using

a corkscrew to break into a de-

serted house on Garfield Street. Daniel Edward Eddy, 35, of Willow Street, Plymouth, was found wearing gloves and a headband flashlight while at- tempting to force open a rear door at the Garfield Street house just after 7 a.m., police said. Police allege Eddy possessed

a pipe cutter, tin snip pliers and

a piece of copper pipe when he

was arrested. Eddy was arraigned by District Judge David Barilla in Swoyers- ville on charges of burglary, pos- sessing instruments of crime and

criminal trespass. He was jailed at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility for lack of $3,000 bail. Eddy told police he was look- ing for scrap metal and planned to steal a metal shed in the rear

of

the Garfield Street house that

is

up for sheriff ’s sale. He said he

found a corkscrew near the shed that he used in an attempt to force open the rear door, accord- ing to the criminal complaint. Court records say Eddy has targeted at least five empty

houses or properties for sale in Forty Fort, Swoyersville and Wilkes-Barre in recent weeks. He was free on $20,000 bail on two cases, no bail on two cases and $30,000 unsecured bail on

one case, court records indicate. According to arrest and court

records:

• Wilkes-Barre police allege

Eddy was found inside a vacant Carey Avenue house on Feb. 26.

He told police he is unemployed and looking for copper pipe. A backpack he had contained cop- per pipe, city police said.

• Forty Fort police allege

Eddy entered a house for sale on Rose Street by climbing through

a window on March 18. He told

neighbors he was buying the house. Police said copper pipe

was missing from the basement.

• Swoyersville police allege

Eddy stole power tools from a

house that is being renovated on Brown Street on March 25.

• Forty Fort police allege

Eddy stole copper pipes from a

house for sale on Murray Street on March 27.

• Forty Fort police allege

Eddy stole copper pipes from

a house for sale on Arlington Road on April 4.

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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com NATION & WORLD WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013 PAGE 5A

NATION

&

WORLD

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com NATION & WORLD WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013 PAGE 5A

WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013

PAGE 5A

IN BRIEF

WORLD WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013 PAGE 5A IN BRIEF AP PHOTO He av y with meaning?

AP PHOTO

Heavy with meaning?

A more than 15-foot-tall sculpture,

“Pentateuque,” created by contem-

porary French artist Fabien Merelle,

is seen on display Tuesday in the

central business district of Hong Kong. The elephant is modeled on one at the Singapore Zoo and the man on the artist himself.

JOHANNESBURG

Pistorius’ brother off hook

O ne Pistorius brother is free of charges — acquitted Tuesday of

culpable homicide in the death of a woman in a road accident. The famous younger brother, Olympian double- amputee Oscar Pistorius, still must face his day in court for shooting and killing his girlfriend. The magistrate ruled that Carl Pistorius, 28, was not negligent and that Maria Barnard, 32, was driving her motorcycle excessively fast when she crashed into the back of his vehicle in March 2008. The case attracted international interest because both Pistorius brothers had faced court cases for the deaths of two women. Carl Pistorius’ case was brought to court shortly after athlete Oscar Pistorius shot dead his model girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day.

WASHINGTON

Immigration bill advances

The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved far-reaching immigration legislation that gives a chance at citi- zenship to millions living in the country illegally. The 13-5 vote clears the bill for a Senate debate expected to begin early next month. Committee approval came after the panel’s chairman sidestepped a showdown on the rights of gay spouses, heeding appeals from the White House and others who feared such a vote could lead to the bill’s demise in the Senate. On a final day of drafting, the panel also agreed to a last-minute com- promise covering an increase in the visa program for high-tech workers.

VATICAN CITY

Pope Francis in exorcism?

Pope Francis’ obsession with the devil took on remarkable new twists Tuesday, with a well-known exorcist insisting Francis helped “liberate” a Mexican man possessed by four dif- ferent demons despite the Vatican’s insistence that no such papal exorcism took place. The case concerns a 43-year-old hus- band and father who traveled to Rome from Mexico to attend Francis’ Mass on Sunday in St. Peter’s Square. At the end of the Mass, Francis blessed several wheelchair-bound faithful as he always does, including a man possessed by the devil, according to the priest who brought him, the Rev. Juan Rivas. Francis laid his hands on the man’s head and recited a prayer. The man heaved deeply a half-dozen times, shook, then slumped in his wheelchair.

HERSHEY

Hershey goes sweet on China

The Hershey Company says it’s launching a new “milk candy” bar in three Chinese cities next month, fol- lowed by a wider distribution next year. The central Pennsylvania-based com- pany says it will mark the first brand- new brand it has launched outside the United States in its nearly 120-year history. The new candy brand will be called “Lancaster” and be launched in the cit- ies of Wuhan, Hangzhou and Chengdu in June. Hershey says China is a priority mar- ket and that it will play a big role in the company ’s goal of reaching $10 billion in worldwide net sales by 2017.

Protesters rally over IRS’ tea party scrutiny

Demonstrators around the nation try to draw attention to tax agency scandal.

By DAN SEWELL Associated Press

CINCINNATI — Tea party activists waving flags and signs, singing patriotic songs and chanting anti-IRS slogans held rallies outside federal buildings across the country Tuesday to

protest the agency ’s extra scru- tiny of conservative groups.

A crowd packed the side-

walks in front of and across the street from a Cincinnati federal building housing the Internal Revenue Service offices that handled tax-exempt status ap- plications.

“It’s going to be up to the grass-roots movement to do something,” said Paul Wheeler, dressed in Colonial-era attire with tri-cornered hat and hold- ing a sign saying: “Internal ‘Re- venge’ Service Stop.” He said he came from Indianapolis, some 100 miles way, because Cincinnati is “the epicenter of some of the complaints.” IRS officials have acknowl- edged that some conservative groups received inappropriate attention. There were also rallies out-

side IRS offices in Philadelphia; Atlanta; Louisville; Chicago; Cherry Hill, N.J.; Denver; Kan- sas City, Mo.; Helena, Mont.; Phoenix, and Providence, R.I., among others. After a short march, activists

R.I., among others. After a short march, activists AP PHO TO Keith Pe acock part icipat

AP PHOTO

Keith Peacock participates in a tea party rally Tuesday in Cherry Hill, N.J., protesting the IRS.

in Cleveland filled sidewalks in front of the federal building for about 30 minutes. Some had

has got to go!” and “Stop the IRS!” Demonstrators also sang “The Star Spangled Banner,” ”God Bless America” and other songs.

A handful of activists gave a

Federal Protective Service offi-

cer a petition calling for the IRS

to “cease and desist” and asked

him to deliver it to the IRS. The officer later handed it to a man

in street clothes farther inside

the building.

“I don’t know if we made a

difference, but I’m sure proud that we all came out,” the Cin- cinnati tea party president, Ann Becker, told fellow demonstra- tors. Several IRS employees in Cincinnati declined to com- ment or didn’t return phone

Revolutionary War- style “Don’t Tread on Me” and 13-star U.S.

flags, as they chanted “IRS messages.

Many boardwalks, beaches ready to receive vacation crowd

Many boardwalks, beaches ready to receive vacation crowd AP PHOTOS Pe ople walk along the newly

AP PHOTOS

People walk along the newly rebuilt boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J., on Saturday. Visitors to the Jersey shore this weekend will find many of their favorite beaches and boardwalks ready for summer.

Jersey shore opens post-Sandy

By WAYNE PARRY Associated Press

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. — The boardwalks are back, and so are most of the beaches, even if some are a little thinner this year. The smell of funnel cakes, french fries and pizza will mingle with the salt air, and the screech of seagulls will be heard, but so will the thwack of hammers repairing what can be fixed and the roar of bulldozers and back- hoes tearing down what can’t. Welcome to Summer 2013 at the Jersey shore, the first since Super- storm Sandy pummeled the coast and upended hundreds of thousands of lives in October. “The Jersey shore is open for the summer and ready to receive our

customers,” Gov. Chris Christie said Monday at a ceremony reopening the

lier this month. To their right was a wood-shingled home that had been

newly rebuilt Lavallette boardwalk, destroyed by the Sandy ’s storm surge. ready for rental,” he said. “We are

three-quarters of which was destroyed by the storm. “This is going to be a really good week.” Christie cautioned that parts of the shore won’t look as they did last sum- mer, but predicted by next summer they should be back to normal. Even in many of the places that suf- fered the most from Sandy, remark- able recovery and rebuilding efforts have been made to get them ready fo r the summer tourist season. Ye t re - minders of the storm’s devastation are visible all around. Denise Gottilla and her husband Daryl stuck their beach umbrella into the sand in Point Pleasant Beach ear-

many shore rentals, there are still was quickly repaired. Those areas

plenty to be had, said Randy Sinor, past president of the Ocean County Board of Realtors, who works in Ship Bottom on Long Beach island.

“On LBI, we all have 95 percent or better of our pre-Sandy inventory

To their left was concrete rubble from a pool and patio from homes that also were badly damaged. And in front of them were large piles of sand that still needed to be smoothed down before beachgoers could arrive. But she was encouraged by what she saw. “The houses took a beating, but I’m pleased with how the beach looks,” she said. “It’s not as bad as I thought it would be.” While Sandy damaged or destroyed

open, we are ready, and we have prime weeks still available. It is not too late.” Countywide, rental stock ranges from about 65 percent of what was there before Sandy to 90 percent, depending on the town, he said. De- mand has been about 75 percent of what it was at this time last year. Not all of the Jersey shore was hurt by Sandy. Famous resort towns including Ocean City and the Wild- woods suffered minimal damage that

are girding for a potential spike in visitors this summer as vacationers seeking thrill rides look elsewhere this year.

Arias asks to serve life in prison

Convicted killer reverses earlier statement in which she said she wished to die.

The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Jodi Arias begged jurors Tuesday to give her life in prison, say- ing she “lacked perspec- tive” when she told a local reporter in an interview that she preferred execu- tion to spending the rest of her days in jail. Standing confidently but at times her voice breaking, Arias told the same eight men and four women who found her guilty of first- degree murder that she planned to use her time in prison to bring about positive changes, includ- ing donating her hair to be made into wigs for cancer victims, helping establish prison recycling programs and designing T-shirts that would raise money for vic-

and designing T-shirts that would raise money for vic- AP PHOTO Jodi Arias on Tuesday poin

AP PHOTO

Jodi Arias on Tuesday points to her family as a reason for the jury to give her a life-in-prison sentence.

tims of domestic abuse. She also said she could run book clubs and teach classes to prisoners to “stimulate conversations of a higher nature.” Arias became emotional as she played a slideshow of pictures from her photo album for the jury. The im- ages included family por- traits, pictures of her and

friends and boyfriends and young relatives she has met only from behind bars. Arias concluded her statement by pleading that jurors not give her the death penalty for the sake of her family. Arias admitted killing boyfriend Travis Alexander and said it was the “worst thing” she had ever done.

FBI ID’s 5 Benghazi suspects — but no arrests yet imminent

By KIMBERLY DOZIER AP Intelligence Writer

WASHINGTON — The U.S. has identified five men who might be responsible for the attack on the diplomatic mis- sion in Benghazi, Libya, last year, and has enough evidence to justify seizing them by mili- tary force as suspected terror- ists, officials say. But there isn’t enough proof to try them in a U.S. civilian court as the Obama administration prefers. The men remain at large while the FBI gathers evidence. But the investigation has been slowed by the reduced U.S. in- telligence presence in the region since the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks, and by the limited ability to as- sist by Libya’s post-revolution- ary law enforcement and intel- ligence agencies, which are still in their infancy since the over- throw of dictator Col. Moam- mar Gadhafi. The decision not to seize the men militarily underscores the

White House aim to move away from hunting terrorists as en- emy combatants and holding them at the military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The preference is toward a process in which most are apprehended and tried by the countries where

they are living or arrested by the U.S. with the host country ’s co - operation and tried in the U.S. criminal justice system. Us- ing military force to detain the men might also harm fledgling relations with Libya and other post-Arab-Spring governments with whom the U.S. is trying to build partnerships to hunt al-Qa- ida as the organization expands throughout the region.

A senior administration offi-

cial said the FBI has identified a number of individuals that it believes have information or might have been involved, and is considering options to bring those responsible to justice. But taking action in remote eastern Libya would be difficult.

PAGE 6A

WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013

PAGE 6A WEDnESD Ay, MAy 22 , 2013 NEWS TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om

NEWS

PAGE 6A WEDnESD Ay, MAy 22 , 2013 NEWS TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

PITTSTON AREA DISTRICT JUSTICE

Kokura, Mecadon capture nods

Eight candidates ran for spot in expanded magisterial district, all but two cross-filed.

By JOE HEALEY jhealey@psdispatch.com

Lawyers Alexandra Kokura

and Jerry Mecadon will square

off in the Nov. 5 General Elec-

tion for the district judge seat vacated when Fred Pierantoni became a Luzerne County judge, according to unofficial results late Tuesday night . Kokura, 30, of Dupont, gath- ered with a group of about 30 red-shirted supporters at the Dupont VFW. She was reluc- tant to acknowledge her win until she had a final number from Luzerne County. “I tried to knock on every door and meet as many people

as possible to get our message

out,” she said. “And that mes- sage was I’m going to work hard, 100 percent, every day for this community.” Mecadon, 48, of Jenkins Township, and his supporters gathered at the Knights of Co- lumbus Hall on Main Street in

Pittston. “It would have been nice to win on both sides, but we’re happy to be in the dance,” he said. “It was a hard-fought, well-run campaign by every- one. I thank my supporters and now I’m looking toward the fall campaign.” With all of the magisterial

district’s 21 precincts reporting

on the Democratic side, Kokura

received 1,365 votes to former Luzerne County Recorder of Deeds James “Red” O’Brien’s 1,357. Mecadon came in third with 1,283. On the Republican side, Mecadon received 286

votes to Kokura’s 260. O’Brien received 132. Eight candidates ran, and

all but two cross-filed on both

tickets.

Other candidates who cross- filed are Arthur Bobbouine

of

Pittston, Len Sanguedolce

of

Pittston and Mark Singer

of

Pittston. Jeffrey C. Kulick

of Hughestown and Quiana Murphy Lehman of Dupont ap-

peared on the Democratic bal-

lot only.

The magisterial district re- cently became significantly

larger. Earlier this year, the state Supreme Court approved

a plan by Luzerne County

Court that added Jenkins and Pittston townships and Yatesville Boro ugh to the dis- trict that currently includes Pittston, Dupont, Duryea and Hughestown. Realignment of the district takes effect on June 1. The Pittston seat is currently occupied on an interim basis

The Pittston seat is currently occupied on an interim basis PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/ THE TIMES

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER

Candidates for district judge Mark Singer, left, and Girard ‘Jerry’ Mecadon spend time outside the polls located at the Germania Hose Company in Duryea on Tuesday.

at the Germania Hose Co mpany in Dur ye a on Tuesday. Candidate for district judge

Candidate for district judge Alexandra Kokura, center, talks with voters at the polls located at the Germania Hose Co. in Duryea on Tuesday.

riod ending on May 6, Kokura was the biggest money raiser

by Senior District Judge An-

drew Barilla Jr., formerly the

longtime Swoyersville district and the biggest spender, fol-

lowed by Mecadon and Singer. Money collected come from candidates themselves, their families and personal campaign

paid on a per diem basis.

judge. He was appointed to the seat after Fred Pierantoni became a county judge and is

One early favorite for the donations.

Kokura is a special court

Luzerne County District At- master in the Lackawanna

County Court of Common Pleas, and, after the Luzerne County corruption scandal,

According to campaign fi- she volunteered to work on

the Youth Aid Panel Program through the District Attorney ’s Office. She does not operate a

district judge’s seat was former

torney Jackie Musto Carroll of Yatesville, but she decided not to run.

nance reports filed with the Luzerne County Election Of- fice for the latest reporting pe-

private practice. Born and raised in Dupont, she graduated from Scranton Prep in 2000. She received a bachelor’s degree at Lehigh University and, after several years off, she received her law degree from Widner University School of Law in 2009. After college, she served as an assis- tant to former U.S. Rep. Paul Kanjorski in Washington, D.C. After law school, she served as law clerk to Lackawanna Coun- ty Court of Common Please Judge Thomas J. Munley. She is married to Nick Kravitz, formerly of Pittston. Her family has resided in Du- pont for many generations. Mecadon is a private practice lawyer. Born in Pittston Town- ship, he graduated from Seton Catholic High School in 1983. He earned a bachelor of sci- ence degree in business man- agement from the University of Scranton in 1987 and his law degree from Widner University School of Law in Wilmington, Del., in 1990. His first legal job was a clerk in the U.S. Attorney ’s Office in Scranton. He worked for a year in Philadelphia and returned home to private-practice work. He teamed with current Coun- ty Court of Common Pleas Judge Mike Vough and subse - quently has been in practice on his own. He is also an as- sistant public defender for the county and serves on the board of directors of Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce. He is married to the former Christa DeVizia and they reside in Jenkins Township.

Scranton mayor race pits Courtright, Lewis

Times Leader staff

Financial analyst Garett Lew- is is expected to face Scranton tax collector Bill Courtright in the race for Scranton mayor in the November general election, according to unofficial results from the primary election Tues-

day. The seat was left open after in- cumbent Mayor Chris Doherty decided not to seek re-election after three terms in office. Lewis received 573 votes to Republican opponent Marcel

Lisi’s 384, according to early community development direc- 14,530.

results — with 158 of 163 pre-

tor Joseph Cardamone (458)

cincts reporting. About 714 and truck driver Lee Morgan

write-in votes were cast. Cour- tright received 5,495, ahead of former Lackawanna County commissioner candidate Liz Randol (4,559 votes), former

(287).

Voters in Lackawanna County also supported a referendum to create a government study com- mission by a vote of 22,805 to

COUNTY

Continued from Page 1A

Dallas Township. The five Democratic con- tenders were guaranteed pri- mary nominations because they faced no competition from others in the party. They

are: Re nee Ciaruffoli-Ta ffera, Larksville; Michael Giamber, Fairmount Township; Richard “Kick” Heffron, Dallas; incum- bent Linda McClosky Houck, Kingston, and Eileen Sorokas, Wilkes-Barre. The race will heat up as No- vember approaches because the 10 winners will compete for five council slots. Incumbent Rick Williams, an Independent, also is expected

to be added to the general elec-

tion roster. Independent and third-party candidates must

tion roster. Independent and third-party candidates must Haas Rossi Kelleher Dobash collect at least 633 signatures

Haas

roster. Independent and third-party candidates must Haas Rossi Kelleher Dobash collect at least 633 signatures from

Rossi

Independent and third-party candidates must Haas Rossi Kelleher Dobash collect at least 633 signatures from voters

Kelleher

and third-party candidates must Haas Rossi Kelleher Dobash collect at least 633 signatures from voters to

Dobash

collect at least 633 signatures from voters to get on the ballot in the council race. Voters are free to vote for any

five candidates, regardless of era, 11,082; Heffron, 10,909, their political registration, in and Giamber, 9,917.

Political observers have mixed opinions on whether ballot position provides an ad- vantage. The five council members elected in November will serve

That means Haas will be with six council members in

vote-getter on the Democratic ticket, with 13,352 votes. She was followed by: McClosky Houck, 12,206; Ciaruffoli-Ta ff-

the general election. The Re- publican nominees will appear first on the November ballot in the order of their primary vote count because the governor is a Republican.

listed first, with 6,554 votes, followed by Rossi, 6,509; Kelle- her, 6,413; Dobash, 6,293, and DeFabo, 4,404. Sorokas was the highest

seats that don’t expire until the end of 2015: Edward Bromin- ski, Jim Bobeck, Rick Morelli, Tim McGinley, Stephen J. Ur- ban and Stephen A. Urban.

Tim McGinley, Stephen J. Ur- ban and Stephen A. Urban. Council members re- ceive $8,000 annually.

Council members re- ceive $8,000 annually. Coun- cil approves the budget and larger contracts, appoints mem-

DeFabo

bers to outside county boards and revises the county ’s ethics, personnel and administrative codes in addition to hiring and evaluating the manager. Pointing to the low voter turnout Tuesday of 19 percent , Ciaruff oli-Ta ffera urge d vo ters to play an active role in Novem- ber. “I hope the citizens do their due diligence and research to find the best possible candi- dates so we can get home rule on track,” said the Larksville resident. Dobash, of Hazleton, thanked voters for “believing in me.”

LUZERNE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDS

Changes in the wind for Wilkes-Barre Area

By MARK GUYDISH mguydish@timesleader.com

With the largest number of contestants — 10 people seek- ing four seats — and only one incumbent in the running, Wilkes-Barre Area School Board not only had the most competitive race in Luzerne

County, it was all but assured of an infusion of new blood, according to Tuesday’s unof- ficial primary results. Veteran Christine Katsock teamed with newcomers Barry Matthews and Kathy Grinaway, promising to form

a new majority. Campaign

literature cited times Katsock was the lone “no” vote when hiring a solicitor for nearly $200,000 a year and placing one employee into a group of workers at nearly three times the salary of others under the same collective bargaining agreement. In the end, voters from both parties nominated Katsock and Grinaway, but not Mat- thews. On the Republican

ballot, it was Katsock, Caffrey, Denise Thomas and Grin- away. On the Democratic side

it was Caffrey, Denise Thom-

as, Katsock and Ned Evans.

Greater Nanticoke Area

Amid recent claims that two members were hiding the spending of taxpayer dollars

for a sign and a surveillance camera, voters in Greater Nanticoke Area were offered the choice of re-electing five incumbents for five seats or opting for the team of incum- bent Frank Shepanski Jr. and newc omers Megan Te nnesen and Wendy Wiaterowski. The three promised to ally with Ryan Verazin for a new major- ity. Voters opted for change, making Wi aterow ski, Te n- nesen and Shepanski the top three vote-getters on both tickets, unofficial results show. Donlin and Raineri got the two remaining slots on the Republican ticket while Raineri and Smith nabbed them on the Democratic ticket. Donlin and Koslofksi were accused last month of mis- leading the board on the source of $4,347 used to buy

a new sign, a charge Koslofski

angrily denied. Donlin and Koslofski were accused earlier of having a camera installed in a wrestling room without telling the rest of the board.

Pittston Area

Incumbents Bruce Knick and R. Kent Bratlee joined newcomer Rosanne Ricotta and former member Marty Quinn — who did not seek re-election two years ago — to form the Patriot First team, hoping to capture all four open seats with wins on both party ballots Tuesday. Voters gave them only a partial vic- tory, according to unofficial returns. Quinn topped both tickets. On the Republican ballot he was followed by Marilyn Star- na, Ricotta and Knick. On the Democratic side it was former member John Adonizio, Knick and Bratlee. That gives Pittston Area voters a November ticket with only two candidates on both ballots, leaving the other seats still up for grabs.

Wyoming Area

Two incumbents were among nine candidates vying

for four seats, with all appear- ing on both ballots. The four candidates nabbing the most Republican votes were Jerry Stofko, incum- bent John Bolin, Kimberly Yochem and incumbent John Marianacci. Stofko topped the Democratic ticket, followed by Bolin, Marianacci and Nick DeAngelo. That should set up

a showdown between Yochem

and DeAngelo in November.

Hazleton Area

Voters gave incumbent Clarence John another four

November Ballot. James Chapman topped the Democratic ballot for four available seats, followed by Bob Mehalick, Clarence John and Jared O’Donnell. Mehal- ick got the most Republican votes, followed by O’Donnell, Chapman and John. If the unofficial count holds, all four are virtually assured of vic- tory in November.

Crestwood

With only five people run- ning on both tickets for four available seats, Tuesday’s primary could, at best, create

one race in November, giving three other candidates clear sailing to seats on the board in December. Newcomer Maureen Mc- Govern was at the top of both tickets, followed by Randy Swank, Norb Dotzel and incumbent Eric Aigeldinger, leaving Peter Strecker in fifth. On the Democratic ticket, Aigeldinger came in fifth, setting up a likely showdown between him and Strecker in November.

Dallas

Dallas also had five cross- filed candidates vying for four seats. On the Republican tick- et, Newcomer Sherri Newell was top vote-getter, followed by Jeff Thomas, incumbent Charles Preece and incumbent Karen Kyle. On the Democratic ticket, Newell and Thomas were again on top, followed by Kyle and Preece. Patrick Musto came in fifth on both ballots, assuring the other four of wins in Novem- ber, barring a successful inde- pendent or write-in candidate, unofficial results show. Barring successful write- in campaigns, four Luzerne County school board races were decided before the first vote was cast Tuesday. In fact, in two of them, write-in candidates were needed just to fill the slates.

Hanover Area

Incumbents Evelyn Larson, Frank Ciavarella Jr. and Lor- raine Heydt were joined by newcomer Stacy McGovern in seeking four seats on both tickets with no competition.

Evans topped the Republican ballot while Ciavarella had the most Democratic votes.

Lake-Lehman

One of only two county districts to vote for school board members by region, Lake-Lehman also had three incumbents seeking re- election: Keven Carey had no competition for one seat in Region 1, and Andrew Salko and David Paulaskas were the only candidates for their two seats in region three. Newcomer Robin Wesley had no competition on the ballot for region two’s single open seat.

Wyoming Valley West

The only other county district that votes by region had an even less competi- tive race. Incumbents James Fender in region two, Gordon Dussinger in region five and Gary Evans in region six were each the only candidates for their seats. In region eight, no candidates were on the bal- lot, leaving the seat open to a write-in campaign, though incumbent Gary Richards did decide to run a write-in campaign.

Northwest Area

The county ’s smallest district by enrollment had four open seats but only three candidates, all incumbents who cross-filed: Alton Farver, Michael Kreidler and Peter Lanza. Lanza nabbed the most votes of listed candidates on

both ballots, though there

were more write-in votes on the Democratic ticket than he or any other candidate nabbed: 177. There were 219 Republican

years, but bumped incumbent write-ins, unofficial returns

Carmella Ye nkev ich off the

show.

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om NEWS WEDnESD Ay, MAy 22 , 2013 PAGE 7A

NEWS

TIMES LEADER www.t imesleader .c om NEWS WEDnESD Ay, MAy 22 , 2013 PAGE 7A

WEDnESDAy, MAy 22, 2013

PAGE 7A

MUNICIPAL RACES

ASHLEY

Of the seven Democrats vying for the three open seats on borough council, Frank Sorokach, Gerald Maldonado and Joseph A. McGlynn, Jr., won the nominations, unofficial results show. Democrat David J. Evans, who received 314 votes, was the only candidate to run for mayor on

either ticket, according to unofficial primary results. No Republicans ran for council. The Republican Party did not field a candidate for tax collector, and the only Democrat running was Robert

W. Shoemaker, who garnered 340

votes to secure the nomination. Following are Democratic council totals:

Frank Sorokach: 270 votes Joseph A. McGlynn Jr.: 224 votes Gerald Maldonado: 181 votes John Gibbons: 164 votes James J. Mullin: 159 votes Ann Nancy Hughes: 118 votes James J. Domyan Sr.: 43 votes

BLACK CREEK TWP.

In Bl ack Creek Township the only contested race was for the six-year supervisor post. Republican Don Tombasco received the most votes with 90. Joe Lescowitch received 87 votes and Larry Ulshafer received 37 votes, according to unofficial prima- ry results. To mbasco and Lescowitch will face each other in the November general election. Sandra K. Houseknecht, a Repub- lican, was the only candidate on the

ballot for tax collector. She received

150 votes.

BUTLER TWP.

In Bu tler Township, Re publican

Frank Polidora received 432 votes, more than Democrats James Caffray, with 190 votes and Brian

M. Maso, with 105 votes for one

empty supervisor post. Polidora and Caffray will face each other in the November general election. Republican Nancy J. Frederick secured a tax collector nomination,

with 366 votes against fellow Repub- lican Irene D. Healey, who received

136

votes.

CONYNGHAM

In Conyngham Borough, six Repub- licans were vying for three open four-year posts on borough council. Jim Susa, Ray Schneider and Jacob Carrelli secured nominations. Two Republicans vied for one open two- year post on borough council with Joe Gallagher securing a nomina- tion. Republican Joseph Carrelli was

the only candidate on the ballot for mayor, securing a nomination with

244 votes, according to unofficial

primary results. Republican Madelyn M. Lawson was the only candidate on the ballot for tax collector. She received 260 votes. The following are council vote totals:

Jim Susa: 151 votes Ronald Schadder: 133 votes Jacob Carrelli: 143 votes Ray Schneider: 158 votes Barry R. Jones: 116 votes Tom Fuccile: 123 votes Joe Gallagher: 149 votes Richard Sebring: 127 votes

DALLAS TWP.

In Dallas Township, two Re publicans vied for one six-year supervisor post, secured by Frank E. Wagner.

Jr. Craig Tupper received 152 votes

and Wagner received 379 votes. Re- publican William J. Grant secured an open two-year post as supervisor with 440 votes. No Democrats were on the ballot for either supervisor for tax collector. Leonard Kozick received 497votes for tax collector, according to unof- ficial primary results.

DUPONT

In Dupont, four Democrats were vying for three open four-year posts on council with Mark Kowalczyk, Bernard J. Zielinski and Stanley Knick Jr., securing nominations. One candidate, Democrat Pina

Hansen, secured an open two-year council post with 328 votes. Daniel A. Lello, a Democrat, was the only candidate on the ballot for mayor, receiving 471 votes, accord- ing to unofficial primary results. No Republicans were on the ballot for either council or tax collector. Joy Tetlak-Adelstein recieved 436 votes for tax collector. The following are council vote totals:

Mark Kowalczyk: 398 votes Paul Houdyshell: 229 votes Bernard J. Zielinski: 353 votes Stanley Knick Jr.: 377 votes Pina Hansen: 328 votes

DURYEA

In Duryea, eight Democrats were vying for four open four-year terms on borough council. Aubrey Col- lier Marcinko, Jimmy Balchune, Edward Ameika and Mike McGlynn won the nominations. Democrat Keith Alan Moss was the only candidate on the ballot for mayor, receiving 719 votes, accord- ing to unofficial primary results. No Republicans were on the ballot for either mayor, council auditor or tax collector. No Democrat ran for auditor. Martin Hanczyc received 791 votes for tax collector The following are council vote totals:

Valerie A. Olszewski: 342 votes Audrey Collier Marcinko: 385 votes Sean Shay: 370 votes Jimmy Balchune: 512 votes Joan M. Orloski: 302 votes Edward Ameika: 435 votes Frank Groblewski: 314 votes Mike McGlynn: 548 votes

EDWARDSVILLE

In Edwardsville, five Democrats vied for three open four-year council posts with David E. Warman Jr., Gary M. Mack and David J. Stochla win- ning nominations. Democrat Be rnar d “Ace” Dub askas

was the only candidate on the ballot for mayor, receiving 307 votes, ac- cording to unofficial primary results. No Republicans were on the ballot for mayor, council or tax collector. Carol Brawley received 277 votes for tax collector. The following are council vote totals:

David E. Warman Jr.: 260 votes Gary Moran: 243 votes Gary M. Mack: 261 votes Leonard W. Davies Sr.: 91 votes David J. Stochla: 268 votes

EXETER

In Exeter, five Democrats vying for three open four-year posts on council with Joseph Pizano, Thomas Shannon and Rick Turner winning nominations. Democrat Cassandra I. Coleman was the only candidate on the ballot for mayor, receiving 527 votes, ac- cording to unofficial primary results. No Republicans were on the ballot for mayor, council or tax collector. Thomas Polachek received 519 votes for tax collector. The following are council vote totals:

Joseph Pizano: 441 votes Thomas Shannon: 356 votes Mark Casper: 297 votes Betty Ann DeRoberto: 338 votes Rick Turner: 347 votes

EXETER TWP.

Two Republicans and one Democrat vied for one six-year term as super- visor, with John Coolbaugh securing a Republican nomination. He’ll face Democrat Neil S. Williams in the November general election. There was no candidate for auditor. Republican Wayman N. Smith Sr., received 219 votes for tax collec- tor, according to unofficial primary results. He was the only candidate on the ballot for that position. The following are supervisor vote totals:

Donald B. Kreseski: 108 votes John Coolbaugh: 137 votes Neil S. Williams: 88 votes

FORTY FORT

Two Republicans and one Democrat vied for a four-year term as mayor in Forty Fort, with Andy Tuzin- ski and Patrick Meade securing a nomination with 207 and 108 votes respectively, according to unofficial

primary results. Re publican Boyd T. Hoats Jr., received 159 votes under Tuzinski. Six Republicans vied for three open four-year terms on council, with Jeff McLaughlin, Rob Swaback and Dottie Craig winning nominations. Republican Ronald Jeffrey was the only candidate on the ballot for tax collector receiving 300 votes. The following are council totals:

Rebecca Zavada Hoats: 128 votes Jeff McLaughlin: 182 votes Cara R. Devine-Homza: 131 votes Rob Swaback: 155 votes Dottie Craig: 234 votes Dave Williams: 142 votes

FRANKLIN TWP.

Of the two Republicans vying for one open supervisor seat, Eric Williams collected the most votes, according to unofficial primary results. Williams won the GOP nod, edging out Michael J. Prokopchak by only

two votes, collecting 112 to Prokop- chak’s 110. No Democrats ran for supervisor or any other open seat in the township. Brett B. Slocum was the only can- didate for tax collector. He earned

184 votes.

FREELAND

Barring any successful write-in cam- paign, it appears that Ed Appleman will be the next mayor of Freeland. Appleman garnered 94 Republi- can votes to John W. Budda’s 86, according to unofficial primary results. Ta mi Mar tin did not run fo r re-election and no other Democrats ran for the post. Four Democrats and four Republi- cans ran for the four open seats on council. Democrat James J. Laputka was the only tax collector candidate. He scored 195 votes.

HARVEYS LAKE

The only contested seat in the bor- ough Tuesday was for tax collector, and Laurie Kehler apparently beat out Denise J. Sult for the Demo- cratic nomination. Kehler collected 87 votes to Sult’s 65, according to unofficial primary results.

Kehler will face Republican Jennifer Johnson in November. Johnson won

102 votes.

HAZLE TWP.

In the race for the sole open supervi- sor seat in the township, Democrat Francis Boyarski was top vote taker, with no Republicans running, accord- ing to unofficial primary results. Boyarski garnered 427 votes while Richard J. Wienches collected 217 and Richard Verbonitz snagged 215. Democrat Michael DeCosmo was the only candidate for tax collector, earning 772 votes.

HAZLETON

Of the four Democrats running for three city council seats, David Sosar, Kevin C. Schadder and Jack Mundie took the nominations, ac-

cording to unofficial primary results. They will face Republicans Jeff Cusat and Jim Perry, who garnered

521 and 421 votes respectively, in the

general election, along with whom- ever won the most of 407 write-in votes. Following are Democrat council totals:

David Sosar: 734 Jack Mundie: 675 Kevin C. Schadder: 480 Carlos R. Mejia: 298

JENKINS TWP.

In the contest for one township supervisor seat, Coreen A. Milazzo captured the most votes to win the Democratic nomination, according to unofficial primary results. Milazzo won 346 votes to Bob Lins- key’s 313. There were no Republican supervi- sor candidates. Republican Jean Mudlock, the only tax collector candidate, earned 178 votes.

NANTICOKE

William Brown and Kevin J. Cough- lin won the Democrat nominations for two city council seats on Tues- day, according to unofficial primary results. Coughlin garnered 724 votes while

Brown earned 612, edging out Cameron E. Cox, who collected 475 votes. No Republicans ran for council or mayor. Democrat Richie Wiaterows- ki earned 976 votes as the only mayoral candidate.

NEW COLUMBUS

Of the four Republicans vying for

three council seats, Kevin E. Sav- age, Keith L. Edwards and Tracey

L. Chonko won the nominations, ac-

cording to unofficial primary results. Only one Democrat — Stephanie Bogert Steinruck — ran for council. She garnered seven votes. Democrat Allen E. Chapin was the only mayoral candidate, also bring- ing in seven votes. Following are Republican council totals:

Kevin E. Savage: 17 Keith L. Edwards: 15 Tracey L. Chonko: 15 Veldra A. Kishbaugh: 5

NEWPORT TWP.

In the contest for two commis-

sioner seats, John Zyla and John

D. Vishnefski won the Democrat

nominations, according to unofficial primary results. Zyla earned 456 votes while Vish- nefski won 359 votes, edging out John Grabowski, who garnered 332. Democrat Ken Angradi, the only tax collector candidate, tallied up 584 votes.

NUANGOLA

Of the seven Republicans vying for four four-year borough coun- cil seats, Mark J. Gandzyk, Ted Vancosky, Michael J. Johnson, Anthony DeLuca and Michelle A. Zawoiski collected the most votes, according to unofficial primary results. But that race could still be anybody’s to win, given that 80 write-in votes were cast — more than any single candidate received. Only three Democrats — Regina Plodwick, Joseph Tucker and Joan Shirk — are running for the four-year seats. But given that Plodwick scored 51 votes and Tucker and Shirk both brought in 41 each, the 140 write-in votes leave that race a toss-up as well.

Of the two Republicans battling for a two-year council seat, Michael

J. Johnson secured the necessary

votes for the nomination. Ted Van-

cosky earned 11 votes to Johnson’s

45.

On the Democrat side, the only contested race was for the two-year council seat, with Plodwick besting Tucker, 42 votes to 35. Following are Republican totals for those four-year seats:

Mark J. Gandzyk: 55 Michael J. Johnson: 48 Michelle A. Zawoiski: 45 Ted Vancosky: 22 Anthony DeLuca: 22 Douglas D. Fawbush: 20 Elizabeth Graham: 14

PITTSTON

Barring a successful write-in campaign, it appears that Jason C. Klush will retain his seat as mayor of Pittston. According to unofficial primary results, Klush beat out Eugene M.

Rooney Jr. for the city’s top execu- tive spot, 842 votes to 312. And of the three candidates running for two council seats, Barb Zangre and Kenneth Bangs and Michael

A. Lombardo won the Democratic

nominations. No Republicans ran for any open city post. Following are the Democrat totals for council:

Michael A. Lombardo: 883 Kenneth Bangs: 548 Barb Zangre: 371 Democrat Chris Latona will appear on the ballot for city controller, garnering 880 votes.

PITTSTON TWP.

Of the five Democrats vying for one seat on the board of supervisors, Barbara Attardo won the nomina- tion. No Republicans appeared on the ballot. Rita Timonte earned the Democratic Party nomination for tax collector. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Democratic vote

results for supervisor:

Barbara Attardo: 320 David Kaminski: 215 Ron Bruno Marcellini: 137 Carmen Timonte: 95 Michael A. Savokinas: 63

PLAINS TWP.

Of the five Democrats running for two seats on the board of com- missioners, Robert Sax and Jerry Yozwiak earned the party’s nomina-

tions. No Republicans ran for the seats. In the race for tax collector, James E. Chiucchi earned the Democratic Party nomination. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Democratic vote results for commissioner:

Robert Sax: 742 Jerry Yozwiak: 657 Phillip S. Lukas: 314 Andrew Sabol: 192 Brian S. Hoch: 58

PLYMOUTH

In the race for four council seats, Republicans Mark A. Ktytor, Mary Morgan Jarrett and Matthew

Hornick earned nominations. On the Democratic side, the top four in a nine-person race for the four nominations were Frank Coughlin , Steve Gerko, Gary J. Kochinski Jr. and James Mahon. In the race for mayor, no Republi- cans ran and the lone Democrat was Dorothy Petrosky, who garnered 597 votes to secure her party’s nomination. In the race for tax col- lector, Gail Ruth Burdulis earned the Democratic Party nomination. No Republicans appeared on the bal- lot for this position. Following are Republican results for council:

Mary Morgan Jarrett: 131 Matthew Hornick: 77 Mark A. Ktytor: 72 Following are Democratic results for council:

Frank Coughlin: 360 Steve Gerko: 322 Gary J. Kochinski Jr.: 320 James Mahon: 306 George J. Mizzer: 256 Joseph A. Mazur: 244 Adam Morehart: 238 Stanley ‘Tubby’ Scibek: 231 Ronald Kobusky: 217

PRINGLE

Five Democrats were vying for their party’s nomination for four council seats. The top four finishers were Michael J. Berish, Joseph D. Baran, Mary F. Watkins and Rita Thomas. No Republicans ran for that party’s nomination. Nobody ran for their party’s nomination for mayor. Following are Democratic results for council:

Michael J. Berish: 66 Mary F. Watkins: 64 Joseph D. Baran: 59 Rita Thomas: 57 Joyce Evans: 43

RICE TWP.

Donald A. Armstrong drew eight more votes than Rich Evans to secure the Republican nomination for the one supervisor seat on the ballot. Democrat Mark Taney drew his par- ty’s nomination and will face Evans in November. He ran unopposed. In the race for tax collector, Joan Kogut earned the Democratic Party nomina- tion. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Republican results for

supervisor:

Donald A. Armstrong: 85 Rich Evans: 78

SHICKSHINNY

Four Republicans were vying for their party’s nomination for three council seats with Kathy Llewellyn, Kevin Morris and Cassandra Vil- lano capturing the nods. Barry Joe Noss finished fourth. On the Demo- cratic side, only one resident sought his party’s nomination and James Wido garnered it. In the race for borough mayor, Bev- erly Moore ran unopposed to garner the Democratic nomination. She will square off against Republican Clar- ence E. Lewis, who ran unopposed on his party’s ballot. In the race for tax collector, Rose Ann McLaughlin earned the Democratic Party nomi-

nation. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Republican results for council:

Kathy Llewellyn: 50 Kevin Morris: 44 Cassandra Villano: 39 Barry Joe Noss: 36

SUGAR NOTCH

Five Democrats were vying for four nominations for a chance to serve on council. Joseph M. Rutkoski Sr., Patrick Dalton, Yvonne M. Pelchar and Paul J. Casey earned the nomi- nations with incumbent councilman Mario J. Fiorucci on the outside looking in. On the Republican side, only William J. Hagenbaugh III was on the ballot and he earned a nomination. In the race for nominations for mayor, William A Davis secured the Republican nomination while Domi- nick A. Panetta held off Fiorucci for the Democratic nod. In the race for tax collector, Panetta also earned the Democratic Party nomination. No Republicans appeared on the bal- lot for this position. Following are Democratic results for council:

Yvonne M. Pelchar: 96 Patrick Dalton: 83 Joseph M. Rutkoski Sr: 77 Paul J. Casey: 69 Mario J. Fiorucci: 60 Following are Democratic results for mayor:

Dominick A. Panetta: 84 Mario J. Fiorucci: 53

SUGARLOAF TWP.

Four Republicans were vying for one nomination for the right to run for a supervisor position with Richard Yost coming out on top. He handily de fe at ed Ea rl T. Miller , Le s Sc hr am and Thomas Mundie. Only one Democrat, Shannon Larock, sought her party’s nomination, which she received. In the race for tax col- lector, Wilmer D. Good earned the Republican Party nomination for tax collector. No Democrats appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Republican results for supervisor:

Richard Yost: 190 Ea rl T. Miller : 114 Les Schram: 11 Thomas Mundie: 6

SWOYERSVILLE

In the race to secure the Democratic Party nomination for mayor, Vincent

T. Dennis de fe at ed Donald Ra ku s.

No Republicans ran for the seat. Nancy Bozinko Keating earned the Democratic Party nomination for tax collector. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Democratic results for mayor:

Vi nc en t T. Dennis: 224 Donald Rakus: 183

WEST WYOMING

The top three finishers in the five- way race to secure the Democratic nomination for one of three seats on council were Daniel Grescav- age, Ralph Confletti and Michael

J. Dolan II. Walter J. Stevens and

Gloria Bubblo came up short. No Re- publicans sought a seat. In the race for tax collector, Robert F. Connors earned the Democratic Party nomi- nation. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Democratic results for council:

Ralph Confletti: 246 Daniel Grescavage: 233 Michael J. Dolan II: 223 Gloria Bubblo: 186 Walter J. Stevens: 178

WRIGHT TWP.

Colleen A. Macko and Daniel N. Frascellar Sr. secured the Demo- cratic nominations in a three-way race for two seats on the township’s board of supervisors. They edged out Michael Stair. Only one Repub- lican ran for that party’s nomination with Donald Zampetti securing it. Barbara J. Macko earned the Democratic Party nomination for tax collector. No Republicans appeared on the ballot for this position. Following are Democratic vote results for supervisor:

Colleen A. Macko: 300 Daniel N. Frascellar Sr.: 169

CONTROLLER

Continued from Page 1A

and support of the voters,” said Bednar, 47, who celebrated at Happy Pizza in Plymouth. “I’m looking forward to getting back out on the campaign trail for November.”

Radio campaign

Hungry for the controller seat, Urban had loaned $6,000 of his own money to his cam- paign on May 7, largely to fund radio advertisements emphasiz- ing his military experience and willingness to speak out against wrongdoing as a county official. County Council seats pay $8,000 annually, compared to $64,999 for the controller elect- ed in November. Urban also hit the air waves and print media, blasting Griffith on his arrest, even though the two weren’t com- peting against each other in the primary. Urban, who attended Tues- day night’s council meeting but didn’t stick around the courthouse rotunda to monitor results, said he ran because he is qualified and believes voters

sa id he ran because he is qualified and believes voters AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER

Stephen A. Urban, an unsuccessful Democratic contender for Luzerne County controller, arrives at the Luzerne County Courthouse prior to the evening’s county council meeting.

should have options. Bednar’s campaign was bol- stered by $9,412 in contributions, including $5,000 from the IBEW PAC Voluntary Fund in Washing- ton, D.C., and hundreds of dol- lars from several union-related political action committees. She also was expected to re- ceive support from fellow mu-

nicipal tax collectors believed to have a strong political base of most-likely voters — an ad- vantage in municipal primaries with historically low voter turn- out. Urban had hoped for votes from tax collectors and unsuc- cessfully opposed the county ’s switch from elected collectors to in-house collection of county

taxes earlier this year. Ceppa-Hirko’s loss wasn’t a surprise to many political ob- servers, who say her campaign was too subdued to overcome the outspoken incumbent. Ceppa-Hirko said before the election that she believed many Griffith supporters would stand by him because he hasn’t been convicted or pleaded guilty.

Charges against Griffith

Griffith is accused of mak- ing three recordings without the knowledge or consent of the parties involved. He faces up to 21 years in prison be- cause each wiretap violation carries a maximum sentence of seven years. Griffith pointed to the tim- ing of the charges days before the primary. The county ’s home rule charter says county elected of- ficials must forfeit their office if they are convicted or plead no contest to any felony. It’s unlikely the charges against Griffith will be resolved in court before November unless he pleads guilty as part of a settlement agreement. The county Republican Par- ty would choose someone else

to run in the November general if Griffith withdraws from the race before the general because of a guilty plea. Griffith showed no indication of withdrawing, saying he looks forward to No-

vember. After Griffith’s arrest, Bednar issued a statement describing the charges as “another black eye in a long line of disservice to our residents.”

peared on Tuesday’s primary election ballot. The county elec- tion board will evaluate those ballots before certifying them. To receive a write-in nomina- tion, a candidate must obtain the same number of votes as sig- natures required on nominating petitions for that office. For ex- ample, most municipal supervi- sor and council candidates must obtain 10 signatures on their nominating petitions, so write-in contenders must obtain at least that many votes. Write-in votes will be tallied at the official count Friday, which begins at 9 a.m. in the second-

To complicate matters Tues- floor jury room at the court-

day evening, the county web house. The election board must

server was down for much of the evening, forcing the media and others to go to the courthouse rotunda to get results from a pro- jection screen. Some municipal ballot slots will be filled by write-in selec- tions because no candidates ap-

meet five days later to vote to certify the election results, which will likel y be We dnesday. The board also will vote at this meet- ing on any requests from candi- dates seeking credit for write-in votes cast under different spell- ing variations of their names.

ing to the polls. Voter turnout was much high- er in last municipal primary in May 2011, with one in three vot- ers — about 33 percent — going to the polls. At that time, there were judicial races and the first slate of home rule County Coun- cil candidates on the ballot. Turnout was 36 percent in the 2007 primary and 35 percent in the 2009 primary, county records show.

TURNOUT

Continued from Page 1A

PAGE 8A

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013

PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg
PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg
PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg

OBITUARIES

PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg
PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg
PAGE 8A WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013 OBITUARIES TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com ALMA OLENGINSKI , 86, of Lewisburg

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

ALMA OLENGINSKI, 86, of Lewisburg and formerly of Glen Lyon, died Tuesday morning at Geisinger Shamokin Area Com- munity Hospital, Coal Township. Funeral arrangements are pending from the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211 W. Main St., Glen Lyon.

ROBERT J. SCOREY SR., 74, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013, at Geis- inger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. Born Sept. 29, 1938 in Wilkes-Barre Township, son of the late Robert and Bertha Sonneburg Scorey, he was a member of the Oak Grove Club, Italian Club and American Legion. Preceding him was his brother, William Scorey. Surviv- ing are his wife, Joan (Gurick) Scorey; son Robert Scorey Jr.; daughter Deborah Weiser and her husband, Jerrold; son James Scorey and his wife, Jean; daugh- ter Rebecca Scorey; stepdaugh- ter, Molley Fogle; stepson, Ste- phen Gurick; six grandchildren; one great-grandson; sister, Irene Fristic. Private funeral services will be held at the convenience of the family.

SHIRLEY A. HULSIZER, 81, passed away Monday, May 20, 2013, in Manor Care. She was born June 28, 1929, in Hillsgrove, Pa., daughter of the late William Dieter. She was preceded by her sister, Bertie Hoover. Surviving are children, Susan Schlesing (Don), Pittston; Bruce Hulsizer, Virginia Beach, Va.; brothers, William Dieter, Williamsport; John Dieter, Muncy; grandchil- dren, Kelly Purcell, Kingston; Brian Hann, Kingston; four great- grandchildren; several nieces and nephews. Funeral service 11 a.m. to- day at Williams-Hagen Funeral Home, 114 W. Main St ., Plym- outh. Friends may call 10 a.m. until service. Interment in Me- morial Shrine, Carverton. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to a charity of the donor ’s choosing.

Bessie