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Adams, John. "The XYZ Affair." Congress, Philadelphia. 16 May 1797. Speech.

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This speech by President Adams was given in response to the French demanding payment to see an ambassador. He spoke about the outrage of the demand and the outrage of French ships coming to raid American shipping. He spoke about the entirety of the XYZ affair.

Bowman, Albert H. The Struggle for Neutrality: Franco-American Diplomacy during the ! Federalist Era. Knoxville: University of Tennessee, 1974. Print.

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The Struggle for Neutrality showed both sides of the conict. It showed how the Americans were split on party lines, and the French government was too occupied to wage war, but privateers were encouraged to hassle American shipping. Both nations were outraged at the other, but neither wanted a full war.

Brown, Michael E. Theories of War and Peace: An International Security Reader. ! Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1998. Print.

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This book gave me insight to the Republican view of the French. The Republicans viewed the French as a sister republic and was willing to forgive them for both the XYZ affair and for plundering their ships as they were still

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orienting themselves as a republic. They thought that while the French were forgivable for their actions, the British werent as they were still a monarchy.

"Bush's Final Approval Rating: 22 Percent." CBSNews. CBS Interactive, n.d. Web. 23 ! Apr. 2013.

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I found this website to nd evidence that President Bush was considered unpopular. On it I also found how the Iraq War and the Afghanistan War were undeclared. They were legal and were authorized by congress, but not considered War.

DeConde, Alexander. The Quasi-war: The Politics and Diplomacy of the Undeclared ! War with France 1797-1801. New York: Scribner, 1966. Print.

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This book laid out the political decisions for me from both France and the United States. It gave me a weak version of Frances view, but mostly the Americans view. The American view it presented was split. The Federalistsfor the most partwanted war, where most of the Republicans wanted peace and brotherhood. The French view it gave was a reluctant and distracted government.

France. Convention of 1800. Philadelphia: S.n., 1801. Print.

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Signed as the closure to the Quasi-War, the Convention of 1800 put into place an agreeable solution to war. It allowed the Americans not to join Frances war with Great Britain, and gave France a trade advantage over Great Britain. It acts as the end to the Quasi-War and the nal reason we didnt go to war.

"From Neutrality to War: The United States and Europe, 19211941 | EDSITEment." ! ! From Neutrality to War: The United States and Europe, 19211941 | EDSITEment. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 April 2013.

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This website I found when I was searching for a World War Two article. The Article showed me the step by step process about the American neutrality in World War Two, why it happened, and what put a stop to it. The Japanese bombing of Perl Harbor was the last straw, not the only one.

Holder, Jean S. The John Adams Presidency War Crisis Leadership in the Early ! Republic. Diss. American University, 1983. Print.

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This dissertation given by Holder gives a deeper perspective into the Adams side of the conict. It gave me details as to what he was doing and what he planned to

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do if the French declined his offer of peace. It gave me insight into how he though the Alien and Sedition acts were appropriate and necessary.

James, James Alton. "French Opinion as a Factor in Preventing War Between France ! ! and the United States, 1795-1800." The American Historical Review 30.1 (1924): 44-55. Print.

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French opinion. That pretty much sums up what this article is. It gave me their opinions of the Americans, and their opinions on war, but it also gave me a bit of how these opinions turned into political reality. How it affected them so that we didnt have to go to war.

"Missions." USCG: About Us. United States Coast Guard, n.d. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

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This is the ofcial site of the United States Coast Guard and this sub site gives me specically the purpose of the Coast Guard. The information on the site was hard to sort through, but I found what I was looking for, the mission of the United States Coast Guard.

United States. Continental Congress. Treaty of Alliance with France. York, PA: S.n., ! 1778. Print.

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The Treaty of Alliance with France brought France into the American War for Independence. America desperately needed allies at the time, so they saw no problem signing a treaty with France. It forced us into a tricky situation and into the Quasi-War with France when congress nullied it. This allows me to see how the Quasi-War was started.

United States. Congress. Proclamation of Neutrality. Philadelphia: n.p., 1793. Print.

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This was the act of Congress in 1793 to declare themselves neutral in the French -British conict. It enraged the French as we were supposedly allies, but the British didnt really react to it. It basically says America will not enter the French-British ght.

United States. Legislative. Congress. Act to Provide a Naval Armament. Philadelphia: ! Congress, 1794. Print.

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This was the act that reinstated the United States Navy. It allowed for purchase a total of six vessels either by direct purchase or building. It allowed for America to

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reenter the naval combat sphere after it got disbanded following the end of the American Revolutionary War.

United States. Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation between His Britannic ! ! Majesty and the United States of America. By George Hammond. Philadelphia: Printed by Neale and Kammerer, 1795. Print.

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This is the treaty that sparked the whole thing. It was a trade treaty between America and Britain. I learned from it the reason that France felt betrayed when America signed it. They felt betrayed because of the trade this meant between America and Britain. To add insult to injury, America stopped paying its debts to France and declared themselves neutral in the conict between France and Britain.

"The US Navy - Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments." Center for Strategic ! and Budgetary Assessments. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.

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This le that I found was a summary of the United States naval forces and how it compares to the rest of the world. It shows the cost, tonnage, and number of ships of the United States Navy compared to the rest of the world. The le

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contains much more, but I havent sifted through it after I found the desired information.

Washington, George. "Washington's Farewell Adress." Daily American Advertiser ! [Philadelphia] 19 Sept. 1796: n. pag. Print.

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Washingtons famous Farewell Address is famous because it lays out the rst vision of the American future. For me, the useful part is the part where he explains his vision for the American foreign policy. He envisioned a world where they could stay out of war, but not out of trade.

Wells, William R. "The Perception of Naval Protection: The Southern Galleys, ! ! 1798-1800." The Georgia Historical Quarterly Winter 1996, 80th ed.: 737-58. Print.

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Published by the Georgia Historical Society, The Georgia Historical Quarterly is a way for them to express their knowledge. This particular article describes the use of galleys in the south during the Quasi-War with France. It helps me understand how the war was fought, allowing me to better gure out why a full war was not fought.