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Wonderware FactorySuite

IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

Revision E Last Revision: 7/13/05

Invensys Systems, Inc.

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Contents

Contents
Before You Begin ...............................................9
About this Guide .................................................................................... 9 IndustrialSQL Server Documentation Set.............................................. 9 Document Conventions ........................................................................ 10

CHAPTER 1: Getting Started with Administrative Tools ......................................... 11


About the System Management Console ............................................. 12 Starting the System Management Console........................................... 12 Using the Console Tree ........................................................................ 14 Creating Server Groups .................................................................... 15 Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians ................................... 16 Using the Management Console .......................................................... 19 Starting and Stopping an IndustrialSQL Server Historian................ 20 Starting and Stopping Modules ........................................................ 20 Configuring General Startup Options............................................... 21 Shutting Down the Entire IndustrialSQL Server Historian .............. 22 Configuring the IndustrialSQL Server Historian to AutoStart ......... 23 Viewing Status Information .............................................................. 25 Status Bar Information...................................................................... 26 Using the Configuration Editor ............................................................ 27 Connecting to the SQL Server.......................................................... 28 Configuration Editor Toolbar Buttons .............................................. 29 Accessing Properties for an Item...................................................... 29 Deleting an Item ............................................................................... 30 Creating a New Item......................................................................... 30 Filtering Tags in the Details Pane..................................................... 30 Determining the Configuration Editor Version ................................ 32 System Management Console Menu Commands................................. 32 Closing the System Management Console........................................... 33 IndustrialSQL Server Historian Utilities.............................................. 33 Microsoft SQL Server Administrative Tools ....................................... 34 SQL Server Enterprise Manager....................................................... 34 SQL Service Manager ...................................................................... 35 Administrative Tools for the Windows Operating System................... 35

CHAPTER 2: Configuring Tags .......................37


Accessing Tag Information .................................................................. 38 Configuring Analog Tags ..................................................................... 38 Editing General Information for an Analog Tag............................... 38 Editing Acquisition Information for a Tag ....................................... 40

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Editing Storage Information for an Analog Tag................................42 Editing Limit Information for an Analog Tag ...................................44 Editing Summary Information for an Analog Tag ............................48 Adding an Analog Tag.......................................................................49 Configuring Engineering Units .........................................................50 Configuring Discrete Tags ....................................................................53 Editing General Information for a Discrete Tag................................53 Editing Storage Information for a Discrete Tag ................................54 Adding a Discrete Tag .......................................................................56 Configuring Message Pairs................................................................57 Configuring String Tags........................................................................59 Editing General Information for a String Tag ...................................59 Editing Storage Information for a String Tag ....................................60 Adding a String Tag...........................................................................62 Configuring Event Tags ........................................................................63 Copying Tag Definitions .......................................................................64 Deleting a Tag .......................................................................................64 Organizing Tags into Groups ................................................................65 Adding a Group .................................................................................65 Renaming a Group.............................................................................66 Adding a Tag to a Group ...................................................................66 Deleting a Group or Tag Reference...................................................67 Pre-allocating Memory for Future Tags................................................67

CHAPTER 3: Importing and Exporting Configuration Information ................................69


Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary .................................................69 Before You Import.............................................................................70 Performing a Dictionary Import or Re-Import ..................................73 Viewing Tags Associated with an InTouch Node..............................85 Exporting or Importing Configuration Via a Text File .........................86 Encoding Formats for Configuration Exports ...................................87 Configuration Exporter Error Log.....................................................87 Performing a Configuration Export...................................................88 Performing a Configuration Import...................................................94 Editing the Configuration Text File...................................................97

CHAPTER 4: Configuring Data Acquisition .101


Accessing Data Acquisition Information ............................................101 Configuring IDASs .............................................................................102 Editing General Information for an IDAS.......................................102 Editing Advanced Information for an IDAS ...................................103 Adding an IDAS ..............................................................................105 Deleting an IDAS ............................................................................106 Configuring I/O Server Types.............................................................106

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Editing I/O Server Type Properties................................................. 107 Adding an I/O Server Type............................................................. 107 Deleting an I/O Server Type ........................................................... 108 Configuring I/O Servers ..................................................................... 109 Editing General Information for an I/O Server .............................. 109 Editing Storage Rule Information for an I/O Server .......................111 Adding an I/O Server.......................................................................113 Deleting an I/O Server .....................................................................114 Configuring Topics..............................................................................114 Editing General Information for a Topic .........................................114 Editing Storage Rules for a Topic....................................................116 Adding a Topic ................................................................................118 Deleting a Topic...............................................................................119 Reinitializing I/O Topics..................................................................119

CHAPTER 5: Managing Data Storage ...........121


Managing the IndustrialSQL Server Historian Runtime Database .... 121 Changing the Properties for the Runtime Database........................ 122 Managing the Runtime Database.................................................... 124 Backing Up the Runtime Database................................................. 124 Managing a Runtime Database Object ........................................... 127 Space Management for Event and Summary History .................... 128 Managing IndustrialSQL Server Historian History Blocks ............... 128 Viewing History Blocks.................................................................. 129 Starting a New History Block......................................................... 130 Editing History Block Storage Locations ....................................... 130 Backing Up History Blocks ............................................................ 132 Adding History Blocks from Prior Versions to the System............ 133

CHAPTER 6: Importing, Inserting, or Updating History Data .....................................................135


Importing Data from an InTouch History File ................................... 135 Performing the InTouch Data Import ............................................. 136 Importing Data from CSV Files ......................................................... 141 Configuring CSV File Import Folders............................................ 142 About Normal CSV File Imports.................................................... 143 About Fast Load CSV File Imports ................................................ 143 General File Format for a CSV Import........................................... 144 Formatting the CSV File for a Normal Import ............................... 144 Example CSV Files for a Normal Import ....................................... 146 Formatting the CSV File for a Fast Load Import ........................... 147 Example CSV Files for a Fast Load Import ................................... 148 Handling of NULL Values in CSV Files ........................................ 149 Copying a CSV File into an Import Folder .................................... 150 Inserting or Updating Data via Transact-SQL Statements ................. 150 INSERT ... VALUES Syntax .......................................................... 150

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Using the wwVersion Parameter for INSERTs................................152 UPDATE Syntax..............................................................................154 Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data .......156

CHAPTER 7: Managing Security...................159


Verifying the Authentication Mode for a SQL Server ........................159 Managing Logins ................................................................................161 Viewing Login Properties................................................................161 Adding a Login................................................................................162 Managing Users and Roles .................................................................165 Viewing All Users and Roles for a Database ..................................165 Adding a New Database User..........................................................165 Adding a New Database Role..........................................................166 Adding a User to a Role ..................................................................167 Managing Permissions ........................................................................168 Setting Object Permissions..............................................................168 Setting Statement Permissions ........................................................170 Managing Passwords...........................................................................171 Adding a User to a Windows Operating System Group .....................173 Changing the Windows Login for IndustrialSQL Server Historian Services ...............................................................................................175

CHAPTER 8: Viewing or Changing SystemWide Properties ...............................................177


Viewing License Information..............................................................177 Refreshing the License Information ................................................180 Editing System Parameters .................................................................180 Adding a System Parameter ............................................................181 Committing Configuration Changes ...................................................181 Turning Modification Tracking On/Off ..............................................183 Viewing Database Modifications ........................................................183 Viewing the Runtime Database Report...............................................186 Changing the Default Network Protocol.............................................187

CHAPTER 9: Monitoring the System ............189


Monitoring the General Status of an IndustrialSQL Server Historian 189 Viewing the Current System Status .................................................190 Viewing the Status of System Modules...........................................192 Viewing System Status Messages ...................................................193 Monitoring Data Acquisition ..............................................................193 Monitoring Client Connections...........................................................194 Monitoring System Messages .............................................................195 Viewing Errors in the Windows Event Viewer ...................................195 IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

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Monitoring System Tags from within InTouch HMI Software.......... 197 Using Windows Performance Logs and Alerts .................................. 198 Viewing Message Logs from Previous Versions................................ 198 Viewing Message Logs in the System Management Console ........ 199 Changing the Default Language for the System Messages ............ 201 Changing the Log Path ................................................................... 202 Copying or Saving the Contents of the Log ................................... 202

CHAPTER 10: Configuring Events................205


Accessing Event Information ............................................................. 206 Adding an Event Tag.......................................................................... 206 Editing General Information for an Event Tag................................... 209 Configuring Detectors .........................................................................211 Configuring a Specific Value Detector ............................................211 Configuring a Schedule Detector ................................................... 213 Configuring a Generic SQL Detector ............................................. 213 Configuring an External Detector................................................... 214 Configuring Actions........................................................................... 214 Configuring a Deadband Action..................................................... 215 Configuring a Snapshot Action ...................................................... 216 Configuring a Generic SQL Action................................................ 217 Configuring an E-mail Action ........................................................ 218 Configuring a Summary Action ..................................................... 222 Using the Tag Finder .......................................................................... 225 Using the Form Query Tab ............................................................. 226 Using the SQL Query Tab .............................................................. 227 Retrieving Logged Event Data........................................................... 228 Viewing Summary Information.......................................................... 229 Viewing Summary Tag Properties .................................................. 229 Viewing Data for a Summary Tag .................................................. 230 Viewing History for a Summary Operation.................................... 231 Using ActiveEvent ............................................................................. 231 Configuring Security Attributes for ActiveEvent........................... 232 ActiveEvent Methods ..................................................................... 235 Scripting Example: Triggering Events within the InTouch HMI Software.......................................................................................... 239 Scripting Example: Triggering Multiple Events within Visual Basic..... .......................................................................................... 240

CHAPTER 11: Browsing the ArchestrA Model View using Historian Clients ..........................241
Model View Representation in the Historian Namespace.................. 241 Model View Replication to the Historian........................................... 242 Replication Configuration using the IDE........................................... 244 Configuring Replication for a WinPlatform ................................... 244

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Configuring Replication for an AppEngine ....................................245 Enabling Replication at Runtime ........................................................246 Viewing Historized Attributes in the IndustrialSQL Server Configuration Editor ...........................................................................246 Browsing the Model Hierarchy in a Historian Client .........................247

Index ................................................................251

IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

Before You Begin

Before You Begin

About this Guide


This IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide provides information on how to administer and maintain an installed IndustrialSQL Server historian. This guide describes the tools you will use to administer the historian, as well as how to configure the system to start storing plant data. This guide also describes administration tasks such as changing the default security, configuring system-wide parameters, and monitoring the system. The IndustrialSQL Server historian is tightly integrated with Microsoft products, and working knowledge of both Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Windows operating systems is required. It is assumed that you are familiar with administering a Microsoft SQL Server and using the administrative tools provided with Microsoft Windows operating systems. For more information on Microsoft SQL Server or the Microsoft Windows operating system, see your Microsoft documentation.

IndustrialSQL Server Documentation Set


The IndustrialSQL Server historian documentation set includes the following guides:

IndustrialSQL Server Historian Installation Guide. This guide provides information on installing the IndustrialSQL Server historian, including hardware and software requirements and migration instructions. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. This guide provides an overview of the entire IndustrialSQL Server system and describes each of the subsystems in detail. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide. This guide describes how to administer and maintain an installed IndustrialSQL Server historian, such as configuring data acquisition and storage, managing security, and monitoring the system. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Database Reference. This guide provides documentation for all of the IndustrialSQL Server database entities, such as tables, views, and stored procedures. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Enterprise Edition Users Guide. This guide describes IndustrialSQL Server failover clustering and provides details on how to plan, configure, implement, and manage the IndustrialSQL Server Enterprise historian. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Glossary. This guide provides definitions for terms used throughout the documentation set.

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Before You Begin

A PDF file for each of these guides is available on the IndustrialSQL Server historian installation CD. You can easily print information from the PDF files. The IndustrialSQL Server historian documentation is also provided as an online Help file, which can be accessed from the System Management Console management tool.

Document Conventions
This documentation uses the following conventions: Convention Initial Capitals Bold
Monospace

Used for Paths and filenames. Menus, commands, dialog box names, and dialog box options. Code samples and display text.

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C H A P T E R

Getting Started with Administrative Tools

Administering the IndustrialSQL Server historian includes controlling system startup and shutdown, database configuration management, security, performance monitoring, error log control, and disk administration. Administrative tools that you can use with the historian are:

System Management Console InSQL Database Export/Import Utility InTouch History Importer Microsoft SQL Server administrative tools Windows administrative tools

Contents About the System Management Console Starting the System Management Console Using the Console Tree Using the Management Console Using the Configuration Editor System Management Console Menu Commands Closing the System Management Console IndustrialSQL Server Historian Utilities Microsoft SQL Server Administrative Tools Administrative Tools for the Windows Operating System

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Chapter 1

About the System Management Console


Use the System Management Console to start and stop IndustrialSQL Server historians, as well as monitor the system and make any configuration changes. The System Management Console is a saved Microsoft Management Console (MMC) file, which has an .msc extension. Microsoft Management Console is a container application that can host one or more third-party applications, called "snap-ins." The snap-in for the historian includes a main console tree, on which to add one or more servers to administer. The console tree functions much like Windows Explorer or the folder view in Internet Explorer. The snap-in also includes areas for monitoring and controlling each historian in the console tree, as well as for configuring each server. The System Management Console can be installed on a different computer than that of the historian(s) you want to administer. This allows you to perform all monitoring and administrative tasks from a single computer anywhere on your network. Some of the general functionality of the System Management Console is provided by the MMC container. See the Microsoft Management Console documentation for information such as:

An overview of MMC. Opening, closing, and saving console files (.msc). Using the MMC menu bars and toolbars. Navigating in the console tree. Changing how columns appear in the details pane. Note The System Management Console is different from regular consoles in that you can alter the position of the first column. Also, when you shut down the console and restart it, any changes to the column layout are not persistent.

Adding additional snap-ins to a console file.

Starting the System Management Console


To start the System Management Console

On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, Wonderware, IndustrialSQL Server, and then click the System Management Console icon . The System Management Console starts.

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The System Management Console window consists of two main areas: the console tree and the details pane.

Console tree

Status bar

Details pane

The console tree (also called the scope pane) contains all of the items available within the console. For the IndustrialSQL Server historian, this includes the registered servers, the Management Console, and the Configuration Editor. Additional ArchestrA consoles, such as the Log Viewer, may appear in the ArchestrA System Management Console. If the System Management Console is installed on the same computer as the historian, the server is automatically registered and appears under the default IndustrialSQL Server Group item in the console tree. However, if the System Management Console is installed on a remote computer, you must register a historian. For more information, see "Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians" on page 16.

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The details pane (also called the results pane) shows the relevant data pertaining to the item currently selected in the console tree.

If you double-click on an item in the details pane, a Properties dialog box appears, if applicable. For some of the tree items, you can export all of the associated information shown in the details pane to a text file. These include History Blocks and anything under the Configuration Editor item. You can save a particular subrange of rows by first highlighting them with the mouse. To export, right-click the parent item in the console tree pane and then click Export List. You can open the file using any text editor and then print the data.

Using the Console Tree


Before you can use the System Management Console to administer an IndustrialSQL Server historian, the historian server must be registered within the application. You can add and register any server that you can connect to on the network. Also, if you are administering many servers, you can organize them into groups in the console tree.

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Creating Server Groups


In the System Management Console, you can organize multiple IndustrialSQL Server historians into groups. A default group, called "IndustrialSQL Server Group," is created for you. You can add servers to this existing group, delete or rename the group, and add other groups.

Adding a Server Group


To add a server group 1. In the System Management Console tree, right-click on IndustrialSQL Server and then click New InSQL Server Group. The Add Server Group dialog box appears.

2. 3.

In the New InSQL Server Group Name box, type the name of the group. The group name must contain no more than 40 characters. Click OK.

Renaming a Server Group


To rename a server group 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, right-click on the server group and then click Rename. In the box that appears, type a new name for the server group. The group name must contain no more than 40 characters.

Deleting a Server Group


WARNING! When you delete a server group, you delete all of the server registrations within that group. To delete a server group

In the System Management Console tree, right-click on the server group and then click Delete.

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Chapter 1

Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians


Before you can administer an IndustrialSQL Server historian using the System Management Console, you must first register it within the console. When you register a server, you are giving the System Management Console a logical name and login IDs to connect to both:

The IndustrialSQL Server Configuration Manager. The Microsoft SQL Server database.

You can register and administer multiple historians from within a single instance of the console. When registering a server, a list of your previously registered servers is available for selection. To be able to administer the historian (for example, start and stop the server), you must provide a Windows security login that has administrative rights on the historian computer. If you do not supply the login when you register the server, you are prompted to supply it when you attempt to execute an administrative command. If the login you supply does not have administrative permissions, the Management Console is set to read-only mode. You must have SQL Server database administrative permissions to make changes to the historian system configuration, as it is stored in the Runtime database. Examples of administrative permissions include being the database owner or a member of the "aaAdministrators" group. If you do not log in with the SQL Server administrative permissions, functionality is restricted. All registration information associated with a particular server name is stored in the Windows registry on the computer running the System Management Console, not in the console file (.MSC). In addition, all registration information is stored according to the current user. This has the following implications:

If you register the same historian in multiple console files (.MSC), and you then edit the status or configuration for the historian in one .MSC file, the status and configuration is reflected in the other .MSC files in which that historian appears. If you copy a saved .MSC file from one computer to another, the registration properties for a particular historian are not copied with the .MSC file. The same historian can have different registration properties for each user who logs onto the System Management Console computer, even though all users may be using the same .MSC file.

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Registering an IndustrialSQL Server Historian


To register a server 1. In the System Management Console tree, right-click on the server (or group) and then click New InSQL Server Registration. The Registered InSQL Server Properties dialog box appears.

2.

In the InSQL Server box, either type the name of a new server to register or select a previously registered server from the list. If you select a previously registered server, all of the options saved for that server appear in the dialog box. If you edit these options and click OK, the new settings are saved. In the Management Console - Windows Login Information area, enter the Windows login information that the Management Console uses to connect to the Configuration Manager. The Configuration Manager runs as a Windows service on the historian computer. Domain Name of the domain in which the login is validated. A domain is a group of computers that share a central database for security authentication. Login Name Valid login name for Windows.

3.

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Password Valid login password for Windows. Always prompt for login information If selected, stored login information is not used and, instead, a login prompt appears each time access is required. 4. In the Configuration Editor - SQL Server Login Information area, configure the login that the Configuration Editor uses to authenticate to the associated Microsoft SQL Server. Note Use the correct case for login IDs and passwords if your database is case-sensitive. To use a valid Windows login, click Use Windows authentication. The login that you specified in Step 3 is used. Also, make sure that the current Windows user is a valid user on the IndustriaSQL Server computer, and that the user account has been added to the proper Runtime database role(s). To use a valid SQL Server login, click Use SQL Server authentication. The following options become available: Login Name Valid login ID for the SQL Server. Password Valid login password for the SQL Server. Always prompt for login information If selected, stored login information is not used and, instead, a login prompt appears each time access is required. 5. Click Display InSQL Server state in console to show IndustrialSQL Server historian information in the status window of the System Management Console. In the Refresh Rate box, type the rate at which the status, client connections, and data acquisition information are refreshed in the details pane. You can specify a value of 0 or between 500 ms and 86,400,000 ms. If you set this rate to 0, the server status is checked one time when the console opens. After that, you need to manually refresh the details pane. Click OK.

6.

7.

Editing Registration Properties


To edit registration properties for a server 1. In the System Management Console tree, right-click on the server and then click Edit InSQL Server Registration Properties. The Registered InSQL Server Properties dialog box appears. For information on the options in this dialog box, see "Registering an IndustrialSQL Server Historian" on page 17. 2. Edit the properties and then click OK.

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Deleting a Registered Server


Deleting a registered server simply removes it from the System Management Console list. All of the registration options are stored along with the server name in case you want to register it again later. To delete a registered server 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, right-click on the server and then click Delete. You are prompted to confirm the deletion. Click Yes.

Moving a Registered Server to a Different Group


Moving a server to a different group within the console requires deleting it and then registering it again under the target group. To move a registered server to a different server group 1. 2. In the console tree, delete the server you want to move. For more information, see "Deleting a Registered Server" on page 19. Right-click on the group to which you want to move the server, and then click New InSQL Server Registration. The Registered InSQL Server Properties dialog box appears. In the InSQL Server box, select the server you just deleted from the list. Click OK.

3. 4.

Using the Management Console


The Management Console portion of the main console tree is used to start and stop the IndustrialSQL Server historian, as well as perform some system-level tasks, such as monitoring the status of the server, creating new history blocks, and resetting error counts.

If you have multiple historian servers registered in the console, make sure that you select the server you want to manage before you right-click in the tree to select a short-cut menu command.

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Chapter 1

Starting and Stopping an IndustrialSQL Server Historian


Some of the functions performed during the startup sequence are:

Start the associated Microsoft SQL Server, if not already running. Verify startup information stored in the SQL Server and the registry. Start each historian process. Create a new history block on the hard disk drive for data storage. Initiate communication with the data sources (IDASs). Begin storing data.

You cannot start up the system if there is not enough space in the circular storage location (less than 50 percent of the minimum threshold). To start or stop the historian 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console and then click Start InSQL/Stop InSQL. If you are stopping the historian, you can select to not stop IDASs configured for store-and-forward. Click OK.

Starting and Stopping Modules


Some of the components that make up the IndustrialSQL Server historian can be stopped and started individually without affecting data acquisition, storage, and retrieval. These modules include the event subsystem and the IndustrialSQL Server historian I/O Server (InSQLIOS). To start/stop a module 1. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server.

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2.

Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Start Module/Stop Module. The Select Modules to Start/Stop dialog box appears.

The Server box shows the name of the IndustrialSQL Server historian to which the options apply. 3. In the Modules window, click to select the optional modules to start/stop. If you are starting modules, only those modules that are currently not started appear in the Modules window. If you are stopping modules, only those modules that are currently not stopped appear in the Modules list. For more information about the event system, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. For more information about the IndustrialSQL Server historian I/O Server (InSQLIOS), see "InSQL I/O Server" in Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. To select all of the modules at once, click Select All. To cancel the selection of all of the modules, click Select None. 4. Click OK.

Configuring General Startup Options


You can configure the IndustrialSQL Server historian to automatically start up (or not) when the computer starts up. In addition, you can configure the optional modules to automatically start up when the main historian subsystems start up. These modules can be stopped and started individually without affecting data acquisition, storage, and retrieval.

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To configure general startup options 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Server Startup Options. The Set InSQL Startup Options dialog box appears.

The Server box shows the name of the IndustrialSQL Server historian to which the options apply. 3. To automatically start an optional module(s) when the Industrial SQL Server historian starts up, click to select the module(s) in the Startup Modules window. To select all of the modules at once, click Select All. To cancel the selection of all of the modules, click Select None. For more information about the event system, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. For more information about the IndustrialSQL Server historian I/O Server (InSQLIOS), see "InSQL I/O Server" in Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 4. Click OK.

Shutting Down the Entire IndustrialSQL Server Historian


During a normal start and stop of the IndustrialSQL Server historian, the Configuration Manager service, the retrieval service, and the OLE DB provider are not shut down; they continue to run. A complete shutdown stops the entire system, including these services. Also, the Configuration Manager service is disabled so that it cannot be restarted. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

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Note The Configuration Manager service is different than the Configuration Editor portion of the System Management Console management tool. To shut down the entire system 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Shutdown (and disable) InSQL. You are prompted to verify the shutdown. Click OK.

3.

When the shutdown is complete, "Disconnected" appears for the system status.

To start up the system again, you first need to start up the Configuration Manager service and then restart the historian. To start up the entire system 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Enable (allow to run) InSQL. A confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Start InSQL. A confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK.

Configuring the IndustrialSQL Server Historian to AutoStart


You can configure the IndustrialSQL Server historian to automatically start up when the computer on which it is running boots up. Basically, you need to configure the InSQLConfiguration Service to autostart and then configure a system parameter to allow the InSQLConfiguration Service to autostart the rest of the historian system.

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To configure the historian to autostart 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Services. The Services console appears.

2.

In the console tree, click Services.

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3.

In the details pane, right-click on the InSQLConfiguration service and click Properties. The InSQLConfiguration Properties dialog box appears.

4. 5. 6. 7.

In the Startup type list, click Automatic. Click OK. Close the Services console. The InSQLConfiguration service will now start up automatically when the computer starts. Using the System Management Console, set value of the AutoStart system parameter to 1. For information on setting the value of a system parameter, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. For more information on system parameters, see "System Parameters" on page 26 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Viewing Status Information


Using the Management Console, you can monitor four main areas of the system: general system status, data acquisition, client connections, history blocks, and legacy error messages. These items appear in the console tree.

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If you click on Status, the details pane shows the overall status for the IndustrialSQL Server historian, such as whether the server is running, the number of system errors, and the time since the last startup. If you click on Data Acquisition, the details pane shows each data source (IOServer\topic or MDAS client) that is supplying the historian with data. If you click on Clients, the details pane shows the status of all clients that are currently connected to the historian. If you click on History Blocks, the details pane shows a list of all of the history blocks stored on the historian computer. For more information on administering history blocks, see Chapter 5, "Managing Data Storage."

If you click on Log, the details pane shows a list of all system message log files stored on the historian computer. Prior to the IndustrialSQL Server 9.0 historian, error messages were logged to disk in .ier files and shown in the Management Console. If you upgraded from the IndustrialSQL Server 8.0 SP3 historian or earlier to the IndustrialSQL Server 9.0 historian, an additional Log folder appears that contains the existing system message logs. For more information on monitoring the general status, data acquisition, client connections, and the system message log, see Chapter 9, "Monitoring the System."

If you have multiple historian servers registered in the console, make sure that you select the server you want to manage before you right-click in the tree to select a short-cut menu command.

Status Bar Information


The status bar appears at the bottom of the console window. The status bar shows the total number of objects for selected items in the console tree. Tree Item Data Acquisition Clients History Blocks Log Count Number of data sources. Number of IndustrialSQL Server historian clients. Number of history blocks. Number of log files.

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The status bar also shows any errors pertaining to the state of the connection to the Configuration Manager on the historian computer. These errors only appear if you select the historian in the tree or any item below it. If you upgraded from an IndustrialSQL Server 8.0 SP3 or earlier historian to the IndustrialSQL Server 9.0 historian, the existing log files (.ier) appear in the Management Console. If you click on a log file in the console tree, the status bar shows the path and filename of the log file, the number of displayed lines, and the total number of lines. For more information on monitoring log files, see "Monitoring System Messages" on page 195. For example:

Using the Configuration Editor


Use the Configuration Editor portion of the console tree to configure the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

For example, the Configuration Editor allows you to:

Import a tagname data dictionary from InTouch HMI software. For more information, see "Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary" on page 69.

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Add, edit, and delete tags. For more information, see Chapter 2, "Configuring Tags." Configure data acquisition, such as I/O Servers, topics, and tags. For more information, see Chapter 4, "Configuring Data Acquisition." Add, edit, and delete event definitions. For more information, see Chapter 10, "Configuring Events." Configure paths to storage locations. For more information, see Chapter 5, "Managing Data Storage." Administer system-wide properties, such as modification tracking. For more information, see Chapter 8, "Viewing or Changing System-Wide Properties." Create groups in the public and private folders. For more information, see "Creating Server Groups" on page 15.

Connecting to the SQL Server


The Configuration Editor requires a valid Windows or SQL Server login to connect to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. You can specify this login ID when you register a server. If you did not configure the login ID upon registration, or if you selected to display a login prompt, you will need to provide a login as soon as you click the Configuration Editor item in the console tree.

For more information on SQL Server logins, see "SQL Server Security" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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When a connection is established, the Configuration Editor must evaluate the user permissions. If SQL Server authentication is used, the user is a member of the aaAdministrators or aaPowerUsers group, and full permissions are available. In all other cases, read-only permissions are applied.

Configuration Editor Toolbar Buttons


Toolbar buttons specific to the Configuration Editor are: Button Description Add a new item under the currently selected item in the console tree. Open a Properties dialog box for the currently selected item in the details pane. Delete the currently selected item. Start the wizard for adding an analog tag. Start the wizard for adding a discrete tag. Start the wizard for adding an event tag. Start the wizard for adding a string tag. Commit database changes to the system. For more information, see "Dynamic Configuration" in Chapter 3, "Configuration Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Start the Tag Importer wizard. For more information, see Chapter 3, "Importing and Exporting Configuration Information." Open a dialog box in which you can search for database modifications. For more information, see "Modification Tracking" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Open the Tag Finder dialog box, in which you can search for tags to add to a tag grouping in the console tree. For more information, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225. MMC toolbars are not moveable or re-dockable.

Accessing Properties for an Item


To open the Properties dialog box for an item in the details pane, do any of the following:

Double-click the item. Right-click on the item and then click Properties. Select the item and then click the button.

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Select the item and then click Properties on the Action menu.

Deleting an Item
To delete an item in the details pane, select the item and then perform any of the following:

Click the

button.

On the Action menu, click Delete. Press the Delete key on your keyboard. Right-click on the item and then click Delete.

Note The delete option is not always available. For example, you cannot delete a topic if it still has tags associated with it.

Creating a New Item


To create a new item, select the console tree item under which you want to create the new item (for example, Analog Tags), and then perform any of the following:

Right-click the console tree item and then click New <Item Name>. Click the button.

Note Some of the items have special "New" toolbar buttons. For more information, see "Configuration Editor Toolbar Buttons" on page 29.

On the Action menu, click New <Item Name>.

Note Not all console tree items support the addition of new sub-items.

Filtering Tags in the Details Pane


When you select certain items in the console tree, a list of associated tags appears in the details pane. For example, if you click the All Analog Tags item in the Public Groups folder, a list of all analog tags in the system appears. If you click a specific message pair in the Messages folder, a list of tags that use that message pair appears. You can apply simple filtering to any list of tags that appears in the details pane. Also, you can configure a different filter for each tag list. A particular filter will remain associated with a list until you remove the filter.

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Applying a Filter
To apply a filter 1. Right-click in the tag list in the details pane and click Filter. The <item name> - Filter dialog box appears.

2. 3.

Click the Enable Filter check box. In the Tagname Like box, type the filter string. The maximum length of the filter string is 100 alphanumeric characters. When filtering tags, use the percentage sign (%) as a wildcard character for any portion of the filter. For example, "SysDate%" or "SysPerf%ThreadCount." Case senstivity for the filter depends on the SQL Server settings. If the SQL Server is case-sensitive, then the filter is case-sensitive; if the SQL Server is case-insensitive, then the filter is caseinsensitive. Also, the string you use is not validated.

4.

Click OK.

The details pane will be refreshed automatically. The word "Filtered" appears in the bottom right corner of the details pane, along with the number of tags that matched the filter string. The filter remains in effect until you disable it or remove it, even if you close the System Management Console without saving your changes to the .msc file.

Disabling or Removing a Filter


Disabling the filter allows you to turn the filtering off without completely removing the last filter string you applied. To disable the current filter 1. 2. 3. Right-click in the tag list in the details pane and click Filter. The <item name> - Filter dialog box appears. Click to clear the Enable Filter check box. Click OK. Notice that the filter string remains in the Tagname Like box.

To remove a filter 1. 2. Right-click in the tag list in the details pane and click Filter. The <item name> - Filter dialog box appears. Click Remove.

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Determining the Configuration Editor Version


The version of the Configuration Editor that you are using must be the same version as the IndustrialSQL Server historian that you want to manage. To determine the Configuration Editor version 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Click Configuration Editor. On the Help menu, click About InSQL Configuration Editor. The About InSQL Configuration Editor dialog box appears, showing the current version. Click OK.

4.

System Management Console Menu Commands


The following commands appear on both the Action menu and on the shortcut menu that can be accessed by right-clicking an item in the console tree. The appearance of certain menu commands depends on which item is selected in the tree. Also, the same menu command may appear for multiple tree items. This table does not describe standard menu commands, such as Copy and Delete. Command New InSQL Server Group New InSQL Server Registration Edit InSQL Server Registration Properties Start InSQL/Stop InSQL Start Module/Stop Module Server Startup Options Reset Error Counts Start New History Block Rescan History Blocks View License Information Refresh License Information Reinitialize Topic/All Topics Load Messages Description Add a new server group to the console tree. Register an IndustrialSQL Server historian for use with the console. Change the registration properties for the selected historian. Start/stop the historian. Start/stop individual modules that are a part of the historian. Configure optional modules to be started when the historian starts up. Reset the number of errors and warnings back to 0. Start a new set of files on disk in which to store history data. Perform a full refresh of history block information. View licensing details for the historian. Update the licensing information. Disconnect and then reconnect to a topic(s). Change the language in which system messages appear. This command only appears if you have existing error logs from versions prior to the IndustrialSQL Server 9.0 historian. Show a list of modifications to the system.

Track Modifications

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Command Commit Pending Changes Import Tags New IDAS New I/O Server Type New I/O Server New Topic New Analog Tag New Discrete Tag New String Tag New Event Tag New Message New Engineering Unit New Tag New Group Add Tags to Group Filter

Description Commit changes to the system configuration. Import an tag definitions from InTouch HMI software into the historian. Add a new IDAS. Add a new I/O Server type. Add a new I/O Server. Add a new topic. Add a new analog tag. Add a new discrete tag. Adding a new string tag. Add a new event tag. Add a new message. Add a new engineering unit. Add a new tag for the type you select in the console tree. Add a new tag grouping in the Public Groups or Private Groups area of the console tree. Access the Tag Finder dialog box, in which you can search for tags to add to a tag group. Apply a filter to the list of tags in the details pane.

Closing the System Management Console


If you made any changes to the System Management Console, such as making server registration changes or adding tag groups, you are prompted to save those changes when you close the console.

IndustrialSQL Server Historian Utilities


The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility (InSQLDBDump.exe) is a standalone utility that allows you to export or import IndustrialSQL Server configuration information using a text file. For more information, see Chapter 3, "Importing and Exporting Configuration Information." The InTouch History Importer (InSQLITHist.exe) is a stand-alone utility that allows you to import existing InTouch history data into the historian history blocks. For more information, see Chapter 6, "Importing, Inserting, or Updating History Data."

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Microsoft SQL Server Administrative Tools


The Microsoft SQL Server administrative tools, such as SQL Server Enterprise Manager, are installed along with the server. Use these tools to start and stop the embedded Microsoft SQL Server and administer the Runtime database, including configuring security and performing database backups. For more information on using these tools, see your Microsoft SQL Server documentation.

SQL Server Enterprise Manager


As an administrator, you will probably spend the majority of your time interacting with Microsoft SQL Server through the SQL Server Enterprise Manager, in which you can manage the Microsoft SQL Server areas of the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Using SQL Server Enterprise Manager, you can perform the following functions for databases (including the Runtime database):

Register servers Manage backups Manage databases Manage devices Manage logins and permissions Manage replication Manage objects, such as tables, views, stored procedures, triggers, indexes, rules, defaults, and user-defined data types Schedule tasks Drag-and-drop objects from one server to another or within a server Generate SQL scripts

To start SQL Server Enterprise Manager, on the Start menu of the Windows Taskbar, point to the Microsoft SQL Server program group and then click SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

Registering a Server in SQL Server Enterprise Manager


The first time the SQL Server Enterprise Manager is started, the Local server node is added by default. To manage a remote server using SQL Server Enterprise Manager, you must first register it. When you register a server, you are giving the SQL Server Enterprise Manager a logical name and user login to connect the Microsoft SQL Server database. To register a server 1. 2. Start SQL Server Enterprise Manager. On the Action menu, click New SQL Server Registration.

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3. 4.

The Register SQL Server Wizard appears. Follow the instructions in the wizard to complete the registration.

For more information, see your Microsoft documentation.

Navigating in SQL Server Enterprise Manager


You must be connected to a server to manage it in SQL Enterprise Manager. After you connect to the server, you can view the entire console tree associated with the server, including all of the devices and databases. You can expand folders just as you do in Windows Explorer.

SQL Service Manager


One of the ways to start the Microsoft SQL Server is to use the SQL Server Service Manager. This application is loaded as part of the Microsoft SQL Server installation. The System Management Console, used to start the IndustrialSQL Server historian, also starts the Microsoft SQL Server. To start the Microsoft SQL Server 1. 2. 3. On the Start menu, point to the Microsoft SQL Server program group and click SQL Service Manager. The SQL Service Manager window appears. In the Server list, click the default server name for Microsoft SQL Server. Click Start/Continue to start the service. The status of the service appears at the bottom of the window.

Administrative Tools for the Windows Operating System


The Windows operating system includes a number of administrative tools that you can use to manage files on disk, monitor system events, and monitor system performance. For more information, see your Windows documentation.

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C H A P T E R

Configuring Tags

A tag is a variable in the IndustrialSQL Server historian which represents a parameter or plant data point. For a tag, real-time or historical data is stored by the historian storage subsystem, and then retrieved, or read back, by the retrieval subsystem. Each tag in the system is identified by a unique name. You can configure the following types of tags:

Analog Discrete String Event

Configuration information for each type of tag is stored in the historian, as well as the history for tags over time. Event tags do not store values, but rather definitions for events to be detected by the system and the subsequent actions to be triggered. By using the Configuration Editor, you can view or edit information for existing tag definitions, create definitions for new tags, or delete existing tags. For more information about tags, see "About Tags" in Chapter 2, "SystemLevel Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Note If you already have tags defined in InTouch HMI software, you can import the definitions using the Tag Importer. For more information, see Chapter 3, "Importing and Exporting Configuration Information."

Contents Accessing Tag Information Configuring Analog Tags Configuring Discrete Tags Configuring String Tags Configuring Event Tags Copying Tag Definitions Deleting a Tag
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Organizing Tags into Groups Pre-allocating Memory for Future Tags

Accessing Tag Information


To access tag information 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration.

Configuring Analog Tags


You can configure general information, acquisition details, storage details, limit information, and summary setup information for a selected analog tag, as well as add new analog tags to the system.

Editing General Information for an Analog Tag


To edit general information for an analog tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Analog Tags.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the analog tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6.

In the Description box, type a description of the tag. In the Engineering Unit list, select the unit of measure. Examples are mph, grams, and pounds. For information on adding an engineering unit to the system, see "Configuring Engineering Units" on page 50.

7. 8.

In the Min Value box, type the minimum value of the tag, measured in engineering units. In the Max Value box, type the maximum value of the tag, measured in engineering units.

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9.

In the Current Editor group, specify which application or editing environment controls the tag definition. Tags imported from the InTouch HMI software use InTouch as the current editor. If modifications are made to an imported tag in the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. If a re-import is performed, any modifications made using the Configuration Editor are preserved. You can manually maintain InTouch as the current editor for re-importing; however, all changes made to the tag using the Configuration Editor are lost during the re-import. Tags (attributes) that are initially configured using Industrial Application Server (IAS) use IAS as the current editor. If you modify an IAS tag using the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. However, the next time you redeploy the engine, the changes are not preserved.

10. In the Interpolation Type group, specify the analog value to use for the last point of the retrieval cycle. For more information, see "Interpolated Retrieval Mode" in Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Linear The system will calculate a new value at the given cycle time using linear interpolation. Stair Step The last known point is returned with the given cycle time. System Default The settings of both the InterpolationTypeReal and InterpolationTypeInteger system parameters are used. 11. In the Rollover Value box, type the rollover value if this tag is a countertype tag. The rollover value is the first value that causes the counter to "roll over." This rollover value is used for the "counter" retrieval mode. For example, for a counter that counts from 0 to 9999, the counter rolls over back to 0 for the 10,000th value it receives. Therefore, set the rollover value to 10,000. For more information, see "Counter Retrieval Mode" in Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 12. Click OK.

Editing Acquisition Information for a Tag


The Acquisition tab contains basically the same configuration information for analog, discrete, and string tags. However, the tabs for string and discrete tags do not include the Raw Type group or Scaling group. For information on data acquisition, see Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. If you change the configuration, then the changes are applied only to data with timestamps that are equal to or greater than the timestamp of the configuration change.

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To edit acquisition information for a tag 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select the type of tag for which you want to edit the acquisition properties. In the details pane, double-click on the tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6.

Click the Acquisition tab. In the Acquisition Type list, select the method by which the tag's value is acquired. If the tag value is acquired from an I/O Server, specify the name of the I/O Server, topic, and item. In the I/O Server list, select the application name of the I/O Server. This name is usually the same as the executable file name. The list includes all I/O Servers defined in the system. In the Topic Name list, select the name of the topic. The list includes all topics defined for the selected I/O Server. In the Item Name box, type the address string of the tag.

7.

8. 9.

10. If you are editing a discrete or string tag, click OK. Otherwise, continue with the next step.

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11. In the Raw Type group, select the numeric type for the raw value as it is acquired. Integer Integer value. If you select this option, a list appears in which you can select the integer size, in bits, and whether it is signed or unsigned. Real Floating (decimal) point tagname. The floating point value may be between -3.4e38 and +3.4e38. All floating point calculations are performed with 64-bit resolution, but the result is stored in 32-bit. 12. In the Scaling group, select the type of algorithm used when scaling from raw values to engineering units. For linear scaling, the result is calculated using linear interpolation between the end points. The following options are required for linear scaling. Min Raw The minimum value of the raw acquired value. Max Raw The maximum value of the raw acquired value. 13. Click OK.

Editing Storage Information for an Analog Tag


For more information on storage, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. If you change the configuration, then the changes are applied only to data with timestamps that are equal to or greater than the timestamp of the configuration change. To edit storage information for an analog tag 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Analog Tags. In the details pane, double-click on the analog tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

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5.

Click the Storage tab.

6.

In the Storage Method group, select the way in which values for the tag will be stored. Rate The rate at which the tag is stored if the storage type is cyclic.

7.

In the Active Image group, configure the options for the active image. Active Image contains all received/only stored values Used to specify the behavior of retrieval for data in active image. You can either retrieve from all acquired data values that are currently in the active image, or only the data values that are configured to be stored on disk. Data on disk may be a subset of that in the active image, depending on the storage rate for the tag. Samples In Active Image The number of samples that the active image holds for the tag. 0 indicates that the active image is using the default of 65 values. The higher the number of samples, the higher the load on memory resources. Calculated Active Image Samples The number of values required in the active image to hold data for 1 min (+15%), as calculated by the system. This value is updated only if the AIAutoResize system parameter is set to 1 and the number of required samples is greater than 65. This value is written to the SamplesInActiveImage column of the Tag table at system startup.

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8.

In the Deadband group, configure details for how the tag value is stored. The availability of options in this group depends on which storage method you selected. Time and Value A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes. In the Time box, type the time to use for this deadband. A value deadband is the percentage of the difference between the minimum and maximum engineering units for the tag. Any data values that change less than the specified deadband are not stored. The value deadband applies to delta storage only. A value of 0 indicates that a value deadband will not be applied. In the Value box, type the value to use for this deadband. Swinging Door A swinging door deadband is the percentage of deviation in the full-scale value range for an analog tag. The swinging door (rate) deadband applies to delta storage only. Time and/or value deadbands can be used in addition to the swinging door deadband. Any value greater than 0 can be used for the deadband. A value of 0 indicates that a swinging door deadband will not be applied. In the Rate box, type the rate to use for this deadband.

9.

Click OK.

Editing Limit Information for an Analog Tag


To edit limit information for an analog tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Analog Tags.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the analog tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

Click the Limit tab. The following information about limits for the tag appears: Context The description of the context. Limit Name The name for the limit. Value The value that is used as a specific limit for a tag. In theory, a tag can have an infinite number of limits defined. Type The type of limit; that is, whether it is a rising (up) or falling (down) limit. Checked Used to specify whether a tag imported from InTouch is configured for automatic limit checking. Only checked limits are imported. Priority The priority for the limit. Priorities can range from 1 to over 2 billion, with 1 being the highest priority. Description The description of the limit.

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6. 7.

To add a limit, click Add. The Limit Properties dialog box appears. For more information, see "Configuring Limits" on page 46. To view properties for a limit, click Properties. The Limit Properties dialog box appears. For more information, see "Configuring Limits" on page 46. To delete a limit, select the limit in the window and then click Delete. To view or add context definitions, click Contexts. For more information, see "Configuring Context Definitions" on page 47.

8. 9.

10. To view or add a limit names, click Limit Names. For more information, see "Configuring Limit Names" on page 48. 11. Click OK.

Configuring Limits
Before you add a new limit, you must first add a limit name and a context. For more information, see "Configuring Limit Names" on page 48 and "Configuring Context Definitions" on page 47. To add a limit or view properties for a limit 1. On the Limit tab of the analog tag Properties dialog box, click Add or Properties. The Limit Properties dialog box appears.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

In the Context list, select the description of the context. In the Limit Name list, select the name for the limit. In the Value box, type the value that is used as a specific limit for a tag. In theory, a tag can have an infinite number of limits defined. In the Type list, select the type of limit; that is, whether it is a rising (up) or falling (down) limit. In the Priority box, type the priority for the limit. Priorities can range from 1 to over 2 billion, with 1 being the highest priority. Click the Checked box to enable automatic limit checking.

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8. 9.

In the Description box, type the description of the limit. Click OK.

Configuring Context Definitions


To add or view context definitions 1. On the Limit tab of the analog tag Properties dialog box, click Contexts. The Context Definitions dialog box appears.

All defined contexts are listed in the window. 2. 3. 4. 5. To add a context, click Add and then type the name of the new context in the dialog box that appears. Click OK. To change the context name, select a context in the window and then click Properties. Type the new name in the dialog box that appears. Click OK. To delete a context, select the context in the window and then click Delete. Click OK.

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Configuring Limit Names


To add or view limit names 1. On the Limit tab of the analog tag Properties dialog box, click Limit Names. The Limit Name Definitions dialog box appears.

All defined limits are listed in the window. 2. 3. 4. 5. To add a limit name, click Add and then type the name of the new limit. Click OK. To change the limit name, click Properties and then type in a new name. Click OK. To delete a limit, select the limit in the window and then click Delete. Click OK.

Editing Summary Information for an Analog Tag


Summaries are aggregation operations that can be set up to be automatically performed for analog tags. To edit summary information for a tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Analog Tags.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the analog tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

Click the Summary tab. A check mark appears in the Frequency column of the summary operation in which the selected analog tag is included.

6. 7. 8.

To remove the selected analog tag from an operation, click to clear the checkbox in the Frequency column. To add the analog tag to any summary operation, select the check box in the Frequency column for the desired operation. Click OK.

Adding an Analog Tag


Be sure that you do not exceed your licensed tag count by adding another tag. To add an analog tag 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration.

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3.

Right-click Analog Tags, and then click New Tag. The New Analog Tag wizard appears.

4.

Type a unique name for the analog tag and click Next. For information on allowable tagnames, see "Naming Conventions for Tags" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. You are prompted to define general, acquisition, and storage information for the tag. For more information on configuring general properties, see "Editing General Information for an Analog Tag" on page 38. For more information on configuring acquisition, see "Editing Acquisition Information for a Tag" on page 40. For more information on configuring storage, see "Editing Storage Information for an Analog Tag" on page 42.

5.

When you are done defining the new analog tag, click Finish.

Configuring Engineering Units


An engineering unit is the unit of measure for an analog tag. Examples of engineering unit types are CPS, pounds, degrees, and so on.

Viewing Defined Engineering Units


Engineering units are configured for a single server. Any defined engineering unit can be used when adding or editing an analog tag.

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To view defined engineering units 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Expand Engineering Units to view all currently-defined engineering units. If you select an engineering unit in the tree, a list of tags that make use of that engineering unit appears in the details pane.

Editing an Engineering Unit


If you make changes to an engineering unit, that change is applied to all tags in the system that are currently using that engineering unit. To edit an engineering unit 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Engineering Units. In the details pane, double-click on the engineering unit to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

In the Unit Name box, type a name for the unit of measure. Examples are mph, grams, and pounds.

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6.

(Optional) In the Tag Rate box, type the default rate, in milliseconds, at which tags are cyclically stored, based on engineering units. Although the system does not make use of this engineering unit based tag rate, you can reference this value in custom SQL scripts. The value you enter for this tag rate does not affect the default storage rate set for the tag. In the Time Base of EU box, type the factor to be applied when integrating a rate with the units [EngUnits/TimeUnit] to a quantity with units [EngUnits]. This factor is called the integral divisor. The default value of 1 assumes a time unit of seconds and ensures that a rate of [Unit/ second] is correctly integrated to [Unit]. For a time unit of minutes, set the integral divisor value to 60; for a unit of hours, set the integral divisor value to 3600, and so on. The integral divisor is applied similarly to rates or quantities that are not expressed in terms of a time unit. For example, to convert watts to watt-hours, the integral divisor is 1/3600. To convert watts to kilowatt-hours, the integral divisor is 1/3600000. Click OK.

7.

8.

Adding an Engineering Unit


After you add an engineering unit, you can configure both existing and new analog tags to use the new engineering unit. To add an engineering unit 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Right-click Engineering Units, and then click New Engineering Unit. The New Engineering Unit wizard appears.

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4.

Type the name and optional cyclic storage rate for the engineering unit. For more information, see "Editing an Engineering Unit" on page 51.

5.

Click Finish.

Configuring Discrete Tags


You can configure general information and acquisition details for a selected discrete tag, as well as add new discrete tags to the system.

Editing General Information for a Discrete Tag


To edit general information for a discrete tag 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Discrete Tags. In the details pane, double-click on the discrete tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6.

Click the General tab. In the Description box, type a description of the tag.

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7.

In the Message Pair list, select the message pair to associate with the FALSE/TRUE states of the discrete tag. For information on adding a message pair to the system, see "Configuring Message Pairs" on page 57.

8.

In the Current Editor group, specify which application or editing environment controls the tag definition. Tags imported from the InTouch HMI software use InTouch as the current editor. If modifications are made to an imported tag in the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. If a re-import is performed, any modifications made using the Configuration Editor are preserved. You can manually maintain InTouch as the current editor for re-importing; however, all changes made to the tag using the Configuration Editor are lost during the re-import. Tags (attributes) that are initially configured using Industrial Application Server (IAS) use IAS as the current editor. If you modify an IAS tag using the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. However, the next time you redeploy the engine, the changes are not preserved. Click OK.

9.

Editing Storage Information for a Discrete Tag


For more information on storage, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. If you change the configuration, then the changes are applied only to data with timestamps that are equal to or greater than the timestamp of the configuration change. To edit storage information for a discrete tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Discrete Tags.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the discrete tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6. 7.

Click the Storage tab. In the Storage Method group, select the way in which values for the tag are stored. In the Active Image group, configure the options for the active image. Active Image contains all received/only stored values Used to specify the behavior of retrieval for data in active image. You can either retrieve from all acquired data values that are currently in the active image, or only the data values that are configured to be stored on disk. Data on disk may be a subset of that in the active image, depending on the storage rate for the tag. Samples In Active Image The number of samples that the active image holds for the tag. 0 indicates that the active image is using the default of 65 values. The higher the number of samples, the higher the load on memory resources. Calculated Active Image Samples The number of values required in the active image to hold data for 1 min (+15%), as calculated by the system. This value is updated only if the AIAutoResize system parameter is set to 1 and the number of required samples is greater than 65. This value is written to the SamplesInActiveImage column of the Tag table at system startup.

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8.

In the Deadband group, configure details for how the tag value are stored. The availability of this group depends on which storage method you select. Time Deadband A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes.

9.

Click OK.

Adding a Discrete Tag


Be sure that you do not exceed your licensed tag count by adding another tag. To add a discrete tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Right-click Discrete Tags, and then click New Tag. The New Discrete Tag wizard appears.

4.

Type a unique name for the discrete tag and click Next. For information on allowable tagnames, see "Naming Conventions for Tags" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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5.

You are then prompted to define general, acquisition, and storage information for the tag. For more information on configuring general properties, see "Editing General Information for a Discrete Tag" on page 53. For more information on configuring acquisition, see "Editing Acquisition Information for a Tag" on page 40. For more information on configuring storage, see "Editing Storage Information for a Discrete Tag" on page 54.

6.

When you are finished defining the new discrete tag, click Finish.

Configuring Message Pairs


A message pair consists of the messages associated with the FALSE or TRUE state of the discrete tag. A discrete tag set to 0 is in the FALSE, or OFF, state. A discrete tag set to 1 is in the TRUE, or ON, state.

Viewing the Current Message Pairs for a Server


Message pairs are configured for a single server. Any defined message pair can be used when defining or editing a discrete tag. To view all message pairs 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Messages to view all currently-defined message pairs in the details pane. If you expand Messages and then select a message in the console tree, a list of tags that make use of that message appears in the details pane.

Editing a Message Pair


If you make changes to a message pair, that change is applied to all tags in the system that are currently using that message pair. To edit a message pair 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select Messages.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the message to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

In the Message0 box, type the message associated with the FALSE state of the discrete tag. The maximum number of characters is 64. A discrete tag set to 0 is in the FALSE state. In the Message1 box, type the message associated with the TRUE state of the discrete tag. The maximum number of characters is 64. A discrete tag set to 1 is in the TRUE state. Click OK.

6.

7.

Adding a Message Pair


If you add a message pair, you can configure both existing and new discrete tags to use the new message pair. To add a message pair 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration.

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3.

Right-click Messages, and then click New Message. The New Message wizard appears.

4.

In the Message0 box, type the message associated with the FALSE state of the discrete tag. The maximum number of characters is 64. A discrete tag set to 0 is in the FALSE state. In the Message1 box, type the message associated with the TRUE state of the discrete tag. The maximum number of characters is 64. A discrete tag set to 1 is in the TRUE state. Click Finish.

5.

6.

Configuring String Tags


You can configure general information and acquisition details for a selected string tag, as well as add new string tags to the system.

Editing General Information for a String Tag


To edit general information for a string tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select String Tags.

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4.

In the details pane, double-click on the string tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6. 7.

In the Description box, type a description of the tag. In the Maximum Length list, select the maximum number of characters for the string. In the Current Editor group, specify which application or editing environment controls the tag definition. Tags imported from the InTouch HMI software use InTouch as the current editor. If modifications are made to an imported tag in the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. If a re-import is performed, any modifications made using the Configuration Editor are preserved. You can manually maintain InTouch as the current editor for re-importing; however, all changes made to the tag using the Configuration Editor are lost during the re-import. Tags (attributes) that are initially configured using Industrial Application Server (IAS) use IAS as the current editor. If you modify an IAS tag using the historian Configuration Editor, then the current editor for the tag is changed to InSQL. However, the next time you redeploy the engine, the changes are not preserved. Click OK.

8.

Editing Storage Information for a String Tag


For more information on storage, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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If you change the configuration, then the changes are applied only to data with timestamps that are equal to or greater than the timestamp of the configuration change. To edit storage information for a string tag 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select String Tags. In the details pane, double-click on the string tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6.

In the Storage Method group, select the way in which values for the tag are stored. In the Active Image group, configure the options for the active image. Active Image contains all received/only stored values Used to specify the behavior of retrieval for data in active image. You can either retrieve from all acquired data values that are currently in the active image, or only the data values that are configured to be stored on disk. Data on disk may be a subset of that in the active image, depending on the storage rate for the tag.

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Samples In Active Image The number of samples that the active image holds for the tag. 0 indicates that the active image is using the default of 65 values. The higher the number of samples, the higher the load on memory resources. Calculated Active Image Samples The number of values required in the active image to hold data for 1 min (+15%), as calculated by the system. This value is updated only if the AIAutoResize system parameter is set to 1 and the number of required samples is greater than 65. This value is written to the SamplesInActiveImage column of the Tag table at system startup. 7. In the Deadband group, configure details for how the tag value is stored. The availability of this group depends on which storage method you select. Time Deadband A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes. 8. 9. In the Double-Byte Storage check box, select to specify whether or not to store the string as a double-byte string. Click OK.

Adding a String Tag


Be sure that you do not exceed your licensed tag count by adding another tag. To add a string tag 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration.

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3.

Right-click String Tags, and then click New Tag. The New String Tag wizard appears.

4.

Type a unique name for the string tag and click Next. For information on allowable tagnames, see "Naming Conventions for Tags" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. You are then prompted to define general, acquisition, and storage information for the tag. For more information on configuring general properties, see "Editing General Information for a String Tag" on page 59. For more information on configuring acquisition, see "Editing Acquisition Information for a Tag" on page 40. For more information on configuring storage, see "Editing Storage Information for a String Tag" on page 60.

5.

6.

Click Finish.

Configuring Event Tags


Event tags are a special tag type and are configured differently than analog, discrete, and string tags. For information on configuring event tags, see Chapter 10, "Configuring Events."

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Copying Tag Definitions


You can use an existing tag definition as the basis for additional tag definitions. To copy a tag definition 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select the appropriate tag type folder (for example, Analog Tags) so that the list of available tags appears in the details pane. Perform any of the following:

Right-click on the tag to copy in the details pane and click Copy. Then, right-click on the tag type folder and click Paste. Select the tag to copy and then drag it onto the tag type folder.

The new tag wizard appears with the definition options of the copied tag set as defaults. The name of the new tag is the name of the copied tag, appended with a number. For example, "MyTag2." 5. Use the wizard to change any of the options for the new tag. For information on configuring analog tags, see "Adding an Analog Tag" on page 49. For information on configuring discrete tags, see "Adding a Discrete Tag" on page 56. For information on configuring string tags, see "Adding a String Tag" on page 62. For information on configuring event tags, see "Adding an Event Tag" on page 206.

Deleting a Tag
To delete a tag 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select the tag in the details pane and perform any of the following:

Click the

button on the toolbar.

On the Action menu, click Delete. Right-click on the tag and then click Delete.

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Organizing Tags into Groups


In the System Management Console, tags are organized into two main groups:

Public groups The Public Groups folder contains all objects that are visible to all clients. If you have administrative permissions, you can create, rename, and delete groups in the Public Groups folder. You cannot change the following default groups: All Analog Tags, All Discrete Tags, All String Tags, All Event Tags, InTouch Nodes, System Status Tags.

Private groups The Private Groups folder contains all objects that are visible to the user that is currently logged on. Users can create, rename, and delete groups in their Private Groups folder.

The console tree shortcut menu contains commands for adding groups in the hierarchy and adding tags to them. Open the shortcut menu by right-clicking on the item in the console tree. Add a group just as you add a new folder in the Windows Explorer. For example, create the "BoilerTags" group under the existing "Private Groups" group. When you add tags to a new group, the original reference still appears in the default system group under Tag Configuration in the console tree. Any tag can belong to any number of groups, and any group can contain any number of tags.

Adding a Group
To add a group 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, and then expand Public Groups. Select the folder under which you want to create a group. Perform any of the following:

On the Action menu, click New Group. Right-click and then click New Group.

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Click the

button on the toolbar.

The New Group dialog box appears.

5. 6.

In the Group Name box, type a name for the new group. The group name can be up to 255 characters and must be unique. Click Finish.

Renaming a Group
You can rename any group that you have created in the console tree, except for public folders or tag references. To rename a group 1. 2. Select the group in the console tree. Press F2 on your keyboard.

3.

Type a new name for the folder and press Enter.

Adding a Tag to a Group


If you are a member of the wwUsers group, you can only add tags to a private group. To add a tag to a group 1. Select the group to which you want to add a tag.

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2.

Do any of the following:

Drag the tag from the details pane into the folder. Right-click and then click Add Tags to Group. The Tag Finder dialog box appears, in which you can search for and select tags to add. Click the button on the toolbar to open the Tag Finder.

For more information on the Tag Finder, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225.

Deleting a Group or Tag Reference


To delete a tag from the IndustrialSQL Server historian, you must select the tag in the appropriate folder under Tag Configuration. After a tag is deleted, all references to it anywhere in the public or private folders are also deleted. For more information, see "Deleting a Tag" on page 64. When you delete a private group, the group folder and all references to tags are deleted. The tags themselves are not deleted, and the original reference still appears in the default system group. You cannot delete public folders or the tag references contained in them. To delete a group or tag reference 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, and then expand Public Groups or Private Groups. Select the group in the console tree. Delete the item by doing one of the following:

On the Action menu, click Delete. Right-click on the group or tag, and then click Delete. Click the toolbar button.

Pre-allocating Memory for Future Tags


To facilitate the addition of analog, discrete, and string tags to your system, you can pre-allocate memory before you actually add the tag definitions and start storing values. Pre-allocating memory allows you to dynamically add tags to the system at a later date with minimal performance impact. A good time to pre-allocate memory is when the system is not busy handling client requests. Memory is allocated using system parameters. For a list of these "headroom" system parameters, see "System Parameters" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. To pre-allocate memory for future tags 1. Edit the appropriate headroom system parameter(s) to specify the number of tags that you will later add. For more information, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

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2.

Commit the parameter changes to the system. For more information, see "Committing Configuration Changes" on page 181.

When you commit the headroom parameter changes to the system, a new history block is created. However, when you later add the tag definitions to the system, a history block is not created unless you add more tags than you preallocated. The system maintains the value of the headroom system parameters. For example, if you pre-allocate ten 2-byte analog tags, and then add five 2-byte analog tag definitions to the database, the system automatically decreases the internal value of the available HeadroomAnalog2 tags when the new tag definitions are committed to the system. The headroom counts are then reset to the system parameter values after a new block is triggered, either by the system or by you. Tag count validation for licensing purposes does not apply to pre-allocated tag memory; the tag count is verified only when the tag definitions are committed. Important! Headroom tags are a very powerful feature, allowing you to start acquiring values for new tags within seconds instead of a few minutes. However, use caution in allocating headroom tags, as they increase the memory allocation and demand on the system.

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C H A P T E R

Importing and Exporting Configuration Information

For the IndustrialSQL Server historian, configuration information includes all of the definitions for entities within the system, such as tags, I/O Servers, summary operations, and so on. You can import information from an InTouch data dictionary (Tagname.x) using the Tag Importer wizard available from within the System Management Console application. Also, you can export all of the configuration information from a historian to a text file. This allows for making bulk additions or modifications using thirdparty tools, such as Microsoft Excel. The modified text file can be imported into the same or a different historian.

Contents Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary Exporting or Importing Configuration Via a Text File

Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary


You can import an InTouch tagname database, also called the data dictionary, and use it to configure most of the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Importing a tagname database eliminates the need to manually configure I/O Server and tag definitions for both the InTouch HMI software and the historian. Information in the tagname database is automatically mapped to the appropriate tables within the historian Runtime database as part of the import process. You can import tagname databases from multiple InTouch nodes, but you can only import one application from each node. Tagname databases from InTouch HMI software 6.0 or later can be imported. To perform an import, you must have administrative permissions for the historian Runtime and Holding databases, (for example, be a member of the sysadmin or wwAdministrators roles or be in the Runtime and Holding db_owner roles).

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However, to perform a delta import, you must be importing from an InTouch 7.1 or later tagname database. For more information, see "Re-importing" on page 72. After you configure your system by importing I/O Server and tag definitions and then commit the changes, the historian acquires data for these tags. After the history data is being stored in the Runtime database, it can be manipulated using any SQL method for retrieving data supported by the historian. Functions specific to the historian, such as setting the resolution for a query, can be applied to the data, and the data can be retrieved from client applications, including InTouch HMI software. InTouch user-defined tags are supported in the public namespace. For more information on user-defined tags, see your InTouch Users Guide.

Before You Import


Using the tag importer functionality from within the System Management Console, you can import topic and other configuration data from one or more InTouch nodes. There are several factors that contribute to effectively importing tags from multiple InTouch nodes into the IndustrialSQL Server historian database.

Determining Import Order Duplicate Tagnames and/or Tag Addresses Import Limitations for Topic Names Editing Machine Names Re-importing Importing Information for DDE I/O Servers Holding Database

Although you can import from multiple InTouch nodes, only one application from each InTouch node may be imported. That is, you cannot import an InTouch node that has the same computer name as one you have already imported. However, you can import a Tagname.x from a repository and then edit the node name location. If you delete the application from the historian, you can import a different application from the same InTouch node. When you delete an application from the historian, all tag information, annotations, snapshots, and summaries are deleted. Although the stored history data is not deleted from the history blocks, it is no longer accessible. If you perform a re-import, the existing history data already in the historian is accessible again.

Determining Import Order


If you are importing from more than one InTouch node, the following scenarios can exist:

You have more than one InTouch node retrieving values from the same I/O tag, which is receiving values from the same point on a factory device.

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You have an InTouch node retrieving values from an I/O tag on another InTouch node, which is receiving its data value from a point on a factory device. All of your InTouch nodes are retrieving values from I/O tags on a dedicated InTouch node, which is receiving its data values from a point on a factory device. In this case, the dedicated InTouch node is set up to function as a "tag server."

When you import tagname dictionaries from multiple InTouch nodes, avoid importing duplicate I/O tags. To maximize the efficiency of importing data, first import the InTouch node that is functioning as the tag server or that contains the highest number of tags that have direct access to the data points from the factory floor devices. As you import multiple nodes, always import a node with more tags having direct access, before importing a node having fewer tags with direct access.

Duplicate Tagnames and/or Tag Addresses


If the Tag Importer encounters a tagname that already exists in the IndustrialSQL Server historian database, it can optionally add a string to the beginning or end of the tagname so that the tag is unique within the historian. During the import, you can select:

Whether or not you want a string to be added. The string to add. The placement of the string, either at the beginning or the end of the tagname. Whether to add a string to all tagnames from that node, regardless if they are duplicates or not, or to only add a string when a duplicate tagname is detected.

If, by adding a string, you create a duplicate tagname during the importing process, the Tag Importer does not import that tag. For example, you choose to prefix all tags from a particular node with the letter "B," and you are importing a tag named "TestTag." However, a tag named "BTestTag" already exists in the historian. The Tag Importer does not import potential duplicate tags. To solve the problem of potential duplicate tags, change the names of these tags in InTouch HMI software to avoid the duplication and then try importing a second time. If the Tag Importer encounters a duplicate address (consisting of the application, topic, and item) for one or more tags, the information is still imported. However, if you are using DDE and have duplicate addresses, only the first tag (per tagname order) actually receives data. This is a DDE limitation.

Import Limitations for Topic Names


If the InTouch application you are importing contains topic names that are longer than 50 characters, the application is not imported.

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Editing Machine Names


During an import, you are prompted to verify the InTouch machine name and the path to the InTouch application. Normally, you should not change these default values. However, you need to change the InTouch machine name if you are importing multiple applications from the same InTouch computer. For example, perhaps you have a dedicated "application repository" computer on which you develop all of your InTouch applications. You then publish these applications to the actual production computers on which they will run. In this case, you can import all of the InTouch applications from the repository computer, but during the import process you need to change the InTouch computer name to the corresponding production computer name. The import wizard checks for duplicate InTouch nodes, but not until after you have the opportunity to rename the InTouch computer. You cannot change the InTouch machine name and the path to the InTouch application during a re-import. However, you can manually edit this information in the InTouchNode table using SQL Server Query Analyzer (or any other query tool) before the re-import. When the re-import is performed, the new information will be used.

Re-importing
A re-import imports all of the tagname dictionary information, regardless of whether or not the information changed. No special configuration is required for re-importing an InTouch data dictionary. You may only perform a re-import for the same InTouch node. The steps for performing a re-import is basically the same as an initial import, with only a few differences. For instructions on importing, see "Performing a Dictionary Import or Re-Import" on page 73. Note Back up the Runtime database before you perform a re-import. If you are re-importing and you do not choose to re-import all topics, only the tags for the topics you select are updated in the IndustrialSQL Server historian. All other topics remain unchanged. You can also just re-import those tags that changed for a particular InTouch node since the last import. This is called "delta re-import," as opposed to the full re-import. A delta re-import is usually faster than a full re-import because only those tags that have changed since the last import are updated in the historian. However, the delta re-import procedure does not provide the flexibility of the full re-import procedure. You cannot import a subset of the changed tags, nor can you edit the cyclic storage rate. For these capabilities, perform a full reimport. For example, if you initially imported Topic A but not Topic B, a full re-import is required to add Topic B to the historian database. Any existing uniqueness settings and cyclic storage parameters (specified during the original import) will be retained for the delta re-import. Note Delta re-import is only supported for InTouch HMI software 7.1 and later.

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Importing Information for DDE I/O Servers


If you are importing configuration information for remote I/O Servers that use DDE, you must first configure shares for these I/O Servers and then import the tagname database into IndustrialSQL Server historian. You do not need to configure shares for local DDE Servers. When you import I/O Server configuration information from InTouch HMI software, the default protocol for all I/O Servers is set to SuiteLink. If you imported a DDE I/O Server(s), use the System Management Console to change the default protocol back to DDE for the server(s). Note If the historian is running on the Windows Server 2003 operating system, DDE is not supported.

Holding Database
The Holding database temporarily stores topic and configuration data that has been imported from an InTouch node. When you import data from InTouch HMI software, the data is first mapped to table structures in the Holding database. Then the data is moved into the Runtime database.

Performing a Dictionary Import or Re-Import


The Tag Importer allows you to select an InTouch tagname database (Tagname.x) and import all information from an InTouch application into the IndustrialSQL Server historian Runtime database. To import from a Tagname.x file 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Click Configuration Editor. Start the Tag Importer wizard by doing any of the following:

Right-click on Configuration Editor, and then click Import Tags. On the Action menu, click Import Tags. Select the button on the toolbar.

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4.

The Welcome dialog box appears. Click Next to start the import. The Imported InTouch Nodes dialog box appears. If there are no imported nodes currently in the IndustrialSQL Server historian, only the Add, Cancel, and Help buttons are available in the dialog box, and the dialog box only contains informational text.

5.

Do any of the following:

To import an InTouch node and its associated tags, click Add. In the Select Tagname.x dialog box that appears, browse for the Tagname.x file (InTouch HMI software version 6.0 or later) that you want to import and then click Open. If you are importing for the first time, you are prompted to verify the import. To re-import a node, select the desired node and click Full ReImport. For more information, see "Re-importing" on page 72. To re-import only those tags that changed for a node, select the desired node and click Delta ReImport.

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To delete a node and all its associated tags, select the desired node and click Delete. A warning box appears so that you can confirm the deletion.

After a script runs, the InTouch Node Information dialog box appears.

6.

Verify the InTouch machine name and the path to the InTouch application. Options in this dialog box are unavailable during a re-import. The current InTouch machine name and the path to the current InTouch application are shown as defaults. For more information on changing the default machine name, "Editing Machine Names" on page 72.

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7.

Click Next. The Tag Duplicates dialog box appears.

8.

Configure how the Tag Importer handles duplicate tagnames. Options in this dialog box are unavailable if you are re-importing. Bypass Uniqueness String Select to not append a uniqueness string to any duplicate tagnames. The Tag Importer does not import these duplicate tagnames. Uniqueness String The characters to add to the tagname to make it unique, if the Tag Importer determines that it is a duplicate. You can use up to 6 characters for the uniqueness string. You cannot leave the uniqueness string blank, and you cannot use a string that you used before. For information on allowable tagnames, see "Naming Conventions for Tags" in Chapter 2, "SystemLevel Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Strings already in use The strings that are already appended to tagnames in the system. Always affix uniqueness string Used to append the uniqueness string to all imported tagnames from the selected node, regardless of whether they are duplicates. However, if affixing a string creates a duplicate tagname, the Tag Importer will not import that tag. Prefix Uniqueness String Select to append the string to the beginning of the tagname. Suffix Uniqueness String Select to append the string to the end of the tagname.

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9.

Click Next. The Filter Tags dialog box appears.

10. Check the category or categories for the tags that you want to import: All Import all tag information from the data dictionary. If you select this option, all tag information from the other categories is automatically included. Plant I/O Import only tags receiving data from I/O Servers, including I/O discrete, I/ O integer, I/O real, and I/O message tags. Memory Import only InTouch memory tags, including memory discrete, memory integer, memory real, and memory message. System Import only InTouch system tags ($<name>). 11. In the Logged Only For Category group, select whether to include only those tags that were configured in the InTouch HMI software to be logged, or all the tags for that category. These options are available if you selected All, Plant I/O, or Memory tags.

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12. If you selected All tags or Plant I/O tags, you can individually specify which plant I/O topics you want to import. To do this, click Topics. The Select Topics dialog box appears.

13. Using the right and left arrow buttons, move the topics that you want to import into the To Be Imported window. Click OK. In the example above, no tags belonging to the ABPLC topic will be imported.

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14. Click Next. The Tag Storage dialog box appears.

For more information on storage, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 15. To use cyclic storage, select Use Cyclic Storage For All Topics. The Cyclic Storage For All Topics area becomes available. In the Storage Rate list, select the desired rate. The cyclic storage rate is the time interval between consecutive stored values. 16. To use delta storage, select Use Delta Storage For All Topics. The Delta Storage For All Topics area becomes available. Select from the following options: No Deadband All changed values for a tag are stored. InTouch Deadband The time interval for storing a tag, as it was defined in the InTouch HMI software.

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InSQL Specific Deadband Allows you to specify a time and value deadband or a swinging door deadband. A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes. A value deadband is the percentage of the difference between the minimum and maximum engineering units for the tag. Any data values that change less than the specified deadband are not stored. The value deadband applies to delta storage only. A value of 0 indicates that a value deadband will not be applied. A swinging door deadband is the percentage of deviation in the full-scale value range for an analog tag. The swinging door (rate) deadband applies to delta storage only. Time and/or value deadbands can be used in addition to the swinging door deadband. Any value greater than 0 can be used for the deadband. A value of 0 indicates that a swinging door deadband will not be applied. 17. To use forced storage, select Use Forced Storage For All Topics.

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18. To assign the storage paradigm on a per-topic basis, select Per Topic Storage Selection and then click the Topics button. The Topic Configuration dialog box appears.

19. Configure the storage method for a topic. These options are similar to that of the Tag Storage dialog box. Click Apply to apply the new storage method. Note If you do not click Apply, the storage rule options revert back to their previous settings. 20. Click OK to return to the Tag Storage dialog box.

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21. Click OK. If you have more than one IDAS on the computer from which you are importing, the IDAS dialog box appears.

22. Select the IDAS that supplies the data values for the InTouch node. For information on IDASs, including failover and store-and-forward options, see "About IDASs" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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23. Click Finish to start the import options. The Final Confirmation dialog box appears.

24. Click Finish. The Tag Importer Status dialog box appears.

25. If you click Hide, the dialog box closes, and the import process continues. The dialog box reappears when the import is complete.

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Note For a re-import, only the tags for the topics you select are updated in the historian. Topics from the previous import remain unchanged. 26. When the import is complete, click OK. 27. Commit the changes to the system.

Viewing Properties for an Imported InTouch Node


In the System Management Console, you can view details for all imported InTouch nodes, as well as a list of tags associated with each node. To view properties for an imported InTouch node 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Storage. Expand Imported Nodes. Right-click on an InTouch node, and then click Properties. The InTouch Node Properties dialog box appears.

5.

The read-only properties are as follows: Machine Name The name of the computer on which the InTouch application resides.

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Path The UNC path to the InTouch Tagname.X file. InTouch Node Key The unique numerical identifier for the named InTouch node. Duplicate Char. The string that was prefixed or suffixed to the tagname to make it unique. Prefix or Suffix Used to indicate whether unique tags were created by prefixing or suffixing the unique string for the node. 0 = Suffix; 1 = Prefix. 6. Click OK.

Viewing Tags Associated with an InTouch Node


In the Public Groups folder of the System Management Console tree, you can view a list of tags that have been imported from an InTouch node. You can also view the list of tags under the System Configuration folder, but with more details. To view a list of tags in the public group 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand Public Groups, and then expand InTouch Nodes. Select the InTouch node for which you want to view a list of tags. The tag list appears in the details pane. You can right-click on any tag to access the Properties dialog box for that tag.

To view a list of tags under the system configuration 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Storage. Expand Imported Nodes. Select the InTouch node for which you want to view a list of tags.

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5.

The tag list appears in the details pane.

The columns shown are: InSQL Tag Name The unique name of the tag within the IndustrialSQL Server system. InTouch Tag Name The original tagname in the InTouch HMI software. This may be different than the IndustrialSQL Server tagname if a new name was generated to ensure uniqueness. InTouch Tag Type The type of tag in the InTouch HMI software. For more information on InTouch tag types, see your InTouch documentation.

Exporting or Importing Configuration Via a Text File


The InSQL Database Configuration Export/Import Utility (aahDBDump.exe) is a stand-alone utility that allows you to export or import IndustrialSQL Server historian configuration information via a text file. Exporting and importing data are two independent operations. The InSQL Database Configuration Export/Import Utility is useful when you want to make bulk modifications to the configuration, instead of using the InSQL Configuration Editor to edit a single database entity at a time. You would simply export the text file, make the modifications, and then import the changes back to the historian. The utility is also useful for transferring configuration information from one historian to another. You can export/import the configuration information for one or more of the following entities. For some of the entities, the utility supports additional filtering.

IDASs IOServers Topics Engineering units Messages Analog tags

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Discrete tags String tags Event tags Snapshot tags Summary operations Summary tag lists

The InSQL Database Configuration Export/Import Utility does not export: InTouch node information. If you import tag definitions using the Tag Importer, and then export the database configuration, the node information is not included. If, after exporting, you rebuild the IndustrialSQL Server historian database, or want to import the database configuration into a different IndustrialSQL Server historian, you must first reimport the tag definitions for the InTouch application before you import the database configuration. Tags created using Industrial Application Server. Only tags created using the IndustrialSQL Server historian or imported from InTouch HMI software are exported by the utility. System parameters. After importing a previously-exported text file, make sure that the system parameters are set to be the same as they were on the IndustrialSQL Server historian that you exported the file from.

The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility requires a client connection to the SQL Server used by the historian to perform the export and import tasks. However, the historian does not need to be running.

Encoding Formats for Configuration Exports


When you export the configuration information, you can specify either Unicode or ASCII as the preferred encoding format for the text file. Select Unicode if you are exporting any information that uses double-byte characters (for example, Japanese tagnames). When importing a text file, the InSQL Database Export/Import Utility automatically detects the encoding of the file and converts all text to Unicode, if needed, before populating the IndustrialSQL Server historian database.

Configuration Exporter Error Log


The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility keeps track of errors that occur during an import, on a line by line basis. When an error is encountered, you are prompted to stop the import or continue and process as much of the import as possible. The utility logs progress and any errors encountered during the import to an error log file, named aahDBDumpLog.Txt. The error log file resides in the same folder as the utility executable and can be viewed with any program capable of reading text files, such as Notepad or Microsoft Excel. The error log file contains the:

Date and time.

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Name of the input file. Line number(s) of the input file where the error(s) occurred. SQL Server error message(s) reported when processing that line.

Each subsequent export or import appends to the log file, so it is recommended that you periodically delete older records to prevent the file from becoming too large.

Performing a Configuration Export


To export configuration information 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Wonderware, point to IndustrialSQL Server, and then click Database Configuration Export and Import. The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility Wizard appears.

2.

Click Export from InSQL to a text file.

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3.

Click Next. The Connect dialog box appears.

4. 5.

In the Server name box, type the name of the IndustrialSQL Server historian for which you want to export configuration information. Provide a login for the historian. Click Use Windows authentication to use your Windows login information to connect to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Click Use SQL Server authentication to use a SQL Server login. Type a valid SQL Server username and password.

6. 7.

In the File name box, type the path for the text file to export, or click to browse to the location. If you are exporting and want to encode the data as Unicode, select the Save file as Unicode check box. For more information, see "Encoding Formats for Configuration Exports" on page 87. To export configuration information for all database entities (for example, tags, engineering units, summary operations, and so on), click Export all objects. Skip to Step 17.

8.

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9.

Click Next. (If you are exporting a file, and the file already exists at the location, you will be prompted to overwrite it.) The Select Objects dialog box appears.

10. In the Data acquisition and miscellaneous group, select one or more groups of definitions to export. IDAS An IndustrialSQL Server Data Acquisition Service (IDAS) is a software application that accepts data values coming from one or more I/O Servers and forwards it to a historian. For more information, see "About IDASs" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. I/O Servers An I/O Server is an application that provides data to a client over a network via the DDE or SuiteLink protocol. For more information, see "Data Acquisition from I/O Servers" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Topics In the DDE or SuiteLink protocol, a topic is an application-specific subgroup of data elements. For more information, see "I/O Server Addressing" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Engineering units An engineering unit is the unit of measure for an analog tag. For example, RPMs, milliseconds, degrees. Messages Messages are the string values associated with the TRUE (ON) or FALSE (OFF) states of a discrete value.

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Snapshot tags Tags that are defined to have value snapshots saved by the event subsystem. For more information, see "Snapshot Actions" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Summary operations Aggregation calculations that are used by the event subsystem. For more information, see "Summary Actions" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Summary tags Tags that are defined to have aggregation calculations performed for their values by the event subsystem. For more information, see "Summary Actions" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 11. To export analog tag definitions, select Include Analog Tags. System tags are not included. 12. In the Where tagname like box, type a string value in order to filter the tags by name. To include all tagnames, leave this option blank or use the wildcard symbol (%). The exporter recognizes all SQL Server wildcard characters. For example, to select all analog tags that have names starting with "MyTag", type "MyTag%". 13. In the Acquisition type list, select the filter for the source of the tag values. All acquisition types No filter set. The export file includes all tag definitions (that is, I/O tags, MDAS tags, and tags for which values are not acquired). IOServer only Select to only include tag definitions that specify an I/O Server as the data source. Manual only Select to only include tag definitions that specify MDAS or manual data acquisition as the data source. For example, values from MDAS or Transact-SQL statements. For more information on acquistion, see Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 14. In the Storage type list, select the filter for the storage type. The storage type determines how often the value for an analog tag is stored. An analog value can be stored either by time interval (cyclic) or when the value changes (delta). All storage types Specifies no filter. Cyclic, delta, and unstored tags are selected for export. Cyclic only Only include tag definitions that specify cyclic storage. If you select this option, you can set an additional filter on the storage rate in the Storage rate list. Otherwise, click All storage rates.

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Delta only Only include tag definitions that specify delta storage. For more information on storage types and rates, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. 15. Click Next. The Select Objects dialog box appears.

16. Configure the filters for discrete, string, and event tag definitions. System tags are not included. These options are the same as for analog tags.

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17. Click Next. The Final Confirmation dialog box appears.

18. Click Next to start the export. The Status dialog box appears, showing the results of the export. The number of objects exported is reported.

19. Click Finish to exit the wizard.

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Performing a Configuration Import


Important! The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility offers considerable flexibility for modifying the contents of the Runtime database. However, after an import is complete, there is no rollback or "undo" capability. It is highly recommended that you make a backup of the Runtime database before performing an import. To import configuration information 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Wonderware, point to IndustrialSQL Server, and then click Database Configuration Export and Import. The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility Wizard appears.

2.

Click Import from a text file to InSQL.

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3.

Click Next. The Connect dialog box appears.

4. 5.

In the Server name box, type the name of the IndustrialSQL Server historian for which you want to import configuration information. Provide a login for the historian. Click Use Windows authentication to use your Windows login information to connect to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Click Use SQL Server authentication to use a SQL Server login. Type a valid SQL Server username and password.

6.

In the File name box, type the path for the text file to import, or click to browse to the location.

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7.

Click Next. The Confirm dialog box appears.

8.

Click Next to start the import. Note If you are importing a text file that includes one or more delete mode indicators, the utility prompts you to verify each entity to delete, unless you select to turn off subsequent delete warnings.

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9.

The Status dialog box appears, showing the results of the import. The number of objects imported is reported.

10. Click Finish to exit the wizard.

Editing the Configuration Text File


By editing a configuration text file, you can insert new objects into the database, modify existing objects, and delete existing objects. For example, you can add 10 new engineering units simply by adding 10 lines under the EngineeringUnit entity line and then importing the configuration file into the IndustrialSQL Server historian. You can also ignore any changes to existing objects by skipping portions of the text file when importing. Important! The order in which entities appear in the text file is important to ensure successful importing of the file. For example, if an analog tag is defined in the file, and the tag requires a new engineering unit, the new engineering unit should appear in the text file before the analog tag. The InSQL Database Export/Import Utility scans the file once from top to bottom and makes no attempt at resolving ordering conflicts. As a general rule, the following order of entities in the text file should be maintained: IDAS, IOServer, Topic, EngineeringUnit, Message, AnalogTag, DiscreteTag, StringTag, EventTag, SnapshotTag, SummaryOperation, SummaryTag.

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The following is an example of a configuration text file. All values must be separated by a tab stop. Mode Indicator Entity Name Attribute Fields

Mode Indicators The mode indicator determines whether the data is inserted, updated, deleted, or ignored. Valid values for the mode indicator are: Value update: Description If the line being imported corresponds to an existing entity in the database, the entity is updated with the contents of the line in the file. If the entity does not exist in the database, it is inserted. If the line being imported corresponds to an existing entity in the database, that entity is left unmodified in the database. Only non-existing database entities are added when this value is specified for the mode indicator. If the line being imported corresponds to an existing entity in the database, that entity is deleted; otherwise, nothing is done. The line in the text file is essentially ignored. This is useful for skipping portions of the text file when importing.

insert:

delete: ignore:

The very first line in the text file must be a valid mode indicator; otherwise, the importer reports an error and stops importing the file. Mode indicators can appear anywhere in the file and remain effective until the next mode indicator or the end of the file is encountered.

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Line Entries The text file contains header lines to indicate the type of database object referenced by the actual data lines following the header line. The header line consists of an entity name (shown within parentheses) followed by a series of attribute identifiers. The entity name loosely corresponds to a table (or tables) in the database, while the attribute identifiers resemble the column names in the tables. Note, however, that there is no strict correspondence between database tables and header lines. For example, a line in the text file related to an analog tag contains all the fields necessary to populate the Tag, AnalogTag, and other tables. In the text file, a header line is followed by one or more lines containing actual data for the entity shown in the header line. Any particular entity can be repeated in the text file as many times as needed. For example, you can have a set of new analog tags inserted at the beginning of the file, and another set of analog tags deleted later in the file. When you add lines to the end of the export file, make sure that the last line in the file is terminated by a carriage return/line feed. You can do this by pressing the Enter key on your keyboard at end of the line. The value of the DefaultTagRate for an engineering unit must be one of the valid cyclic rates for analog tags. For more information, see "Cyclic Storage" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Note The name "$local" appears in the export file, instead of the real computer name, for any object that has a computer name that refers to the local computer. When an import is performed, "$local" is translated into the name of the computer that is the target of the import.

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C H A P T E R

Configuring Data Acquisition

The purpose of the data acquisition subsystem is to accept and process incoming data that originates from data sources. One data source is a Wonderware-compatible I/O Server. An I/O Server is an application that provides factory data to a client via a specific protocol. An IDAS is a component of the IndustrialSQL Server historian that accepts data values from an I/O Server and forwards it on to the storage subsystem, which stores the data to disk. You can also batch import existing history data into the system via a .CSV file or by using the InTouch History Importer. For more information, see Chapter 6, "Importing, Inserting, or Updating History Data." For conceptual information about the data acquisition subsystem, see Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. For information about monitoring data acquisition, see "Monitoring Data Acquisition" on page 193.

Contents Accessing Data Acquisition Information Configuring IDASs Configuring I/O Server Types Configuring I/O Servers Configuring Topics Reinitializing I/O Topics

Accessing Data Acquisition Information


To access data acquisition information 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition.

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Configuring IDASs
Use the System Management Console to configure IDASs. At least one IDAS must exist.

Editing General Information for an IDAS


To edit general information 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Right-click on the name of the IDAS to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears. Click the General tab.

5.

To change the name of the computer on which the IDAS runs, click Modify and then type the new name in the IDAS Node box. If you are creating a new IDAS definition or modifying an existing one, make sure that the IDAS software is installed on the target computer. To disable failover or store-and-forward, select No Failover/Store Forward.

6.

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7.

To specify a backup IDAS, select Failover Node. In the adjacent box, type the name of the computer on which an optional, redundant IDAS runs. This should be set to an empty string if no redundant IDAS is specified. Make sure that the IDAS software is installed on the target failover computer. If the failure of the primary IDAS is detected by the system, the failover IDAS is automatically started. The failover IDAS is shut down after the primary IDAS is back online. To enable store-and-forward, select Store Forward Mode Enabled and then configure the options. Store Forward Path Used to specify the path for the IDAS data buffer on the local hard drive of the IDAS computer. The path should be absolute (for example, c:\IDASBuffer). Data is written to this path until the minimum threshold for the buffer is reached. Remote buffer paths are not supported. If a invalid path or no path is specified, data is stored to the default path, which is C:\Document and Settings\All Users\Application Data\ArchestrA\SF. Minimum MB Threshold The minimum amount of free disk space, in megabytes, at which IDAS stops collecting data in the store-and-forward buffer.

8.

9.

Click OK.

Editing Advanced Information for an IDAS


To edit advanced information 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Right-click on the name of the IDAS to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

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4.

Click the Advanced tab.

5. 6.

Select the Enable IDAS check box to allow the system to use the IDAS. Configure store-and-forward options. For more information on store-and-forward, see "IDAS Store-andForward Capability" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Min. Store Forward Duration The minimum duration, in seconds, for the IDAS to function in store-andforward mode. The IDAS functions in store-and-forward mode for this length of time even if the condition that caused IDAS to function in storeand-forward mode no longer exists. The maximum duration is 3600 seconds, and the minimum is 15 seconds. File Chunk Size The size, in bytes, of the data "chunks" that are sent to the historian when store-and-forward data is forwarded. The size of the chunks can be decreased to accommodate slower networks. Decrease this number only if the forwarding delay is greater than zero. Forwarding Delay The interval, in milliseconds, at which "chunks" of store-and-forward data are forwarded to the historian. The length of the interval may need to be increased to accommodate slower networks.

7.

Configure the IDAS for autonomous startup. For more information on autonomous startup, see "IDAS Autonomous Startup" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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Autonomous Startup Select to enable the IDAS to start itself, even if the historian is unavailable. Autonomous Startup Timeout The amount of time, in seconds, that the autonomous IDAS should wait for configuration commands when started by the Configuration service before going to the autonomous mode. This timeout may need to be increased only if you have a large number of IDASs configured as autonomous on a slow network. 8. Configure additional options. Connection Timeout The amount of time, in seconds, that the Configuration service attempts to communicate with an IDAS for configuration/reconfiguration. If this timeout elapses, the Configuration service assumes that the IDAS connection has been dropped. This number may need to be increased to accommodate slower networks. Buffer Count The number of 64 KB buffers pre-allocated for buffering data. This number may need to be increased to accommodate high data rates. 9. Click OK.

Adding an IDAS
If you are adding a remote IDAS, install the IDAS software on the remote computer before setting up the IDAS configuration in the System Management Console. During the installation, you are prompted to specify the network account that will be used by a remote IDAS and the historian for communication. This account must belong to the Windows Administrators group on both computers. To add an IDAS 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration.

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3.

Right-click on Data Acquisition and then click New IDAS.

4.

Enter the configuration information for the new IDAS. For more information on these options, see "Editing General Information for an IDAS" on page 102.

5. 6.

Click Next. Enter the advanced information for the new IDAS. For more information on these options, see "Editing Advanced Information for an IDAS" on page 103.

7.

Click Finish.

Deleting an IDAS
An IDAS cannot be deleted if topics and/or I/O Servers are still associated with it. Also, at least one IDAS must exist. It is recommended that you delete a remote IDAS when it is connected to the historian. This ensures that the temporary configuration files on the remote computer are deleted.

Configuring I/O Server Types


The System Management Console lists every supported Wonderware I/O Server type that is available at the time that IndustrialSQL Server historian is shipped. You can add new I/O Server types at any time. Before you add an I/O Server, make sure that its associated type is available in the system for selection.

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Editing I/O Server Type Properties


To edit properties for an I/O Server type 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Click I/O Server Types. A list of types appears in the details pane. Right-click on the I/O Server type and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

You can only edit the description, revision letter, and platform for an I/O Server type. For information on these options, see "Adding an I/O Server Type" on page 107. Click OK.

6.

Adding an I/O Server Type


1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition.

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3.

Right-click on I/OServer Types and then click New I/O Server Type.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

In the Application Name box, type the application name of the I/O Server. This name is usually the same as the executable file name. In the Exe Name box, type the name of the I/O Server's executable file. In the Description box, type the description of the I/O Server type. In the Revision box, type the revision number for the I/O Server. In the Platform list, select the operating system required by the I/O Server. Valid operating systems are: WINDOWS NT, WINDOWS 95, WINDOWS 98, WINDOWS XP, WINDOWS 2000, WINDOWS 2003. Note The values for the Description, Revision, and Platform options are not used by the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

9.

Click Finish.

Deleting an I/O Server Type


To delete an I/O Server type 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. In the Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Click I/O Server Types. A list of types appears in the details pane. Right-click on the I/O Server type and then click Delete.

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Configuring I/O Servers


I/O Servers and their associated topics can be imported from InTouch HMI software or added manually using the System Management Console. In the System Management Console tree, selecting the Data Acquisition item shows a list of the configured I/O Servers in the details pane. Using the System Management Console, you can view, edit, and delete existing I/O Servers and their associated topics. You can also add new I/O Servers and topics. You cannot create an I/O Server tag unless an I/O Server and an associated topic are available. If you edit I/O Server information and then re-import a tagname database using the Tag Importer wizard, the changes you made to the I/O Server will not be preserved. For more information on I/O Servers, see Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Editing General Information for an I/O Server


To edit general information 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. In the Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Expand the IDAS associated with the I/O Server.

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4.

Right-click on the name of the I/O Server to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6. 7. 8.

In the I/O Server Location box, type the name of the computer on which the I/O Server runs. In the I/O Server Type list, select the application name of the I/O Server. This name is usually the same as the executable file name. In the Description box, type a description of the I/O Server. In the Protocol Type group, select the protocol that the I/O Server uses to send data to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. For more information, see "Supported Protocols" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Note If the IndustrialSQL Server is running on the Windows Server 2003 operating system, DDE is not supported.

9.

In the Alt. Server Location box, type the name of the computer on which an optional, failover I/O Server runs. The failover I/O Server must be running in order for the switch to be made.

10. Click OK.

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Editing Storage Rule Information for an I/O Server


When you set storage rules for a particular I/O Server, the rules apply to all tag values originating from that I/O Server. To edit storage rules 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. In the Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Expand the IDAS associated with the I/O Server. Right-click on the name of the I/O Server to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

Click the Set Storage Rules tab.

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6.

To redirect the I/O Server to InTouch HMI software, click Redirect to InTouch. This button is only available if at least one I/O Server type is "VIEW." The Select InTouch Node dialog box appears.

In the Computer name of InTouch system list, select the name of the InTouch node from which you want to acquire tag values. If more than one InTouch nodes are imported, be sure to select the InTouch node that receives data from the I/O Server you are redirecting. For more information, see "Redirecting I/O Servers to InTouch HMI Software" in Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Important! After you redirect an I/O Server, you cannot undo. Click OK to redirect the I/O Server. 7. In the Storage Type group, configure the storage rule for all the tags associated with the I/O Server: Unchanged No storage rule is applied at the I/O Server level. Delta Tag values are stored only if they have changed. Cyclic Tag values are stored according to a fixed rate, which you can select from the Storage Rate list. None Tag values from this I/O Server are stored in the active image, but are not stored into history. Forced All values received from this I/O Server are stored. 8. In the Deadband group, configure the deadband. Options in this group are only available if delta storage is selected in the Storage Type group. For the deadband type you select, configure the appropriate options. Unchanged No storage rule is applied at the I/O Server level.

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Time and/or Value A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes. A value deadband is the percentage of the difference between the minimum and maximum engineering units for the tag. Any data values that change less than the specified deadband are not stored. The value deadband applies to delta storage only. A value of 0 indicates that a value deadband will not be applied. Swinging Door A swinging door deadband is the percentage of deviation in the full-scale value range for an analog tag. The swinging door (rate) deadband applies to delta storage only. Time and/or value deadbands can be used in addition to the swinging door deadband. Any value greater than 0 can be used for the deadband. A value of 0 indicates that a swinging door deadband will not be applied. 9. In the Set Acquisition box, select whether or not to turn data acquisition from the I/O Server either on or off. The Unchanged option allows you to leave current acquisition settings unchanged, which is useful if you have a mix of acquired and not acquired tags on the I/O Server and do not want to go through all of them.

10. Click OK.

Adding an I/O Server


To add an I/O Server 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition.

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3.

Right-click on the IDAS to which you want to add the I/O Server, and then click New I/O Server.

4.

Enter the configuration information for the new I/O Server. For more information on these options, see "Editing General Information for an I/O Server" on page 109.

5.

Click Finish.

Deleting an I/O Server


If you delete an I/O Server and then re-import the tagname database that contained the I/O Server definition using the Tag Importer wizard, the I/O Server is added again. An I/O Server cannot be deleted if there are still topics associated with it.

Configuring Topics
A topic is a logical block of data from an I/O Server. Both the DDE and SuiteLink protocols use topics to locate information coming from I/O Servers.

Editing General Information for a Topic


To edit general topic information 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition.

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3. 4.

Expand the IDAS and then the I/O Server that contains the topic to edit. Right-click on the topic, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

5. 6.

In the Topic Name list, type the name of the topic. In the Time Out box, enter the time span, in milliseconds, in which a data point must be received on the topic. If no data point is received in this time span, the topic is considered "dead." The historian disconnects and then attempts to reconnect to the topic. The default is 60000 milliseconds. Note You can also manually force a reconnect for one or all of the topics in the system. For more information, see "Reinitializing I/O Topics" on page 119.

7.

To disable the time out, select Set to No Time Out. You might want to disable the time out if the topic has data values that are not changing at all or changing very slowly. If you have a slow-changing tag for which a time out is occurring frequently, you will see periods of NULL data in history, as a result of the historian disconnecting and reconnecting. Disabling the time out prevents the historian from disconnecting, so that valid data is always being logged. The topic timeout is automatically set to 0 and disabled if you enable late data for the topic (configurable on the Set Storage Rules tab).

8.

Click OK.

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Editing Storage Rules for a Topic


To edit storage rules for a topic 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Expand the IDAS and then the I/O Server that contains the topic to edit. Right-click on the topic to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears. Click the Set Storage Rules tab.

6.

In the Set Time Stamp of list, select the whether the timestamp of the data source or the server should be used. Note If a fast-changing tag is configured to use server timestamping, the packet of data that is sent to the storage subsystem may contain multiple data values with the same timestamp, which may affect data calculations, such as for swinging door storage.

7.

In the Storage Type group, configure the storage rule for all the tags associated with the topic: Unchanged No storage rule is applied at the topic level.

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Delta Tag values are stored only if they have changed. Cyclic Tag values are stored according to a fixed rate, which you can select from the Storage Rate list. None Tag values from this topic are stored in the active image, but are not stored into history. Forced All values received from this topic are stored. 8. In the Deadband group, configure the deadband. Options in this group are only available if delta storage is selected in the Storage Type group. For the deadband type you select, configure the appropriate options. Unchanged No storage rule is applied at the topic level. Time and/or Value A time deadband is the minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes. A value deadband is the percentage of the difference between the minimum and maximum engineering units for the tag. Any data values that change less than the specified deadband are not stored. The value deadband applies to delta storage only. A value of 0 indicates that a value deadband will not be applied. Swinging Door A swinging door deadband is the percentage of deviation in the full-scale value range for an analog tag. The swinging door (rate) deadband applies to delta storage only. Time and/or value deadbands can be used in addition to the swinging door deadband. Any value greater than 0 can be used for the deadband. A value of 0 indicates that a swinging door deadband will not be applied. 9. In the Set Acquisition box, select whether or not to turn data acquisition from the topic either on or off. The Unchanged option allows you to leave current acquisition settings unchanged, which is useful if you have a mix of acquired and not acquired tags on the topic and do not want to go through all of them.

10. In the Deadband group, configure the deadband. Options in this group are only available if delta storage is selected in the Storage Type group. For the deadband type you select, configure the appropriate options. 11. In the Late Data group, configure options for transmission of late data from the topic. For more information, see "IDAS Late Data Handling" on page 59 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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Enable Late Data Select to allow late data to be processed. Note that if you enable late data, the topic timeout (as configured on the General tab) is set to 0. Idle Duration The amount of time, in seconds, before data is processed from the I/O Server. For example, if you set this value to 60 seconds, data from this I/O Server is cached and only processed by the storage engine after no more data has been received from the I/O Server for at least 60 seconds. Processing Interval The amount of time, in seconds, after which late data from the I/O Server is processed, regardless of the idle duration. If the nature of the data is such that the idle duration is never satisfied, the historian storage engine processes data from the topic at least one time every processing interval. The processing interval defaults to twice the idle duration and cannot be set to a value less than the idle duration. 12. Click OK.

Adding a Topic
When you add a new topic for an I/O Server, a new row is added to the Topic table in the Runtime database. Topic names must be unique for the I/O Server, not for the global system. You can have two topics with identical names, as long as they are on different I/O Servers. To add a topic 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Data Acquisition. Expand the IDAS that contains the I/O Server.

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4.

Right-click on the I/O Server, and then click New Topic. The New Topic wizard appears.

5.

Enter the configuration information for the new topic. For more information on these options, see "Editing General Information for a Topic" on page 114 and "Editing Storage Rules for a Topic" on page 116. You can set storage properties for a topic after you add it to the system.

6.

Click Finish.

Deleting a Topic
If you delete a topic and then re-import the tagname database that contained the I/O Server definition using the System Management Console, the topic definition is added again to the database. A topic cannot be deleted if tags are still associated with it.

Reinitializing I/O Topics


You can manually reinitialize I/O conversations for topics using the System Management Console. When you reinitialize a topic, the existing I/O converstation is closed and the entire process for setting up the I/O conversation restarts. All I/O points associated with that topic are affected when the reinitialization occurs. You can either reinitialize all of the topics or a single topic.

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Note You can also enable an automatic topic time out, in which the IndustrialSQL Server historian issues a disconnect and reconnect for a topic that has not provided data within a specified time span. For more information, see "Editing General Information for a Topic" on page 114. To reinitialize all topics 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, and then expand System Configuration. Right-click on Data Acquisition, point to All Tasks, and then click Reinitialize All Topics. The Reinitialize All Topics dialog box appears. Click OK.

To reinitialize a single topic 1. 2. Click Data Acquisition. In the details pane, right-click on the topic you want to reinitialize, and then click Reinitialize Topic. The Reinitialize One Topic dialog box appears. Click OK.

3.

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Managing Data Storage

IndustrialSQL Server historian stores data in the following places:

Configuration information is stored in a SQL Server database file (.mdf). When you install the historian, this database file is created for you and is named Runtime. The Runtime database file is named Run90Dat.Mdf and the transaction log is named Run90Log.Ldf. For general information on database files, see your Microsoft SQL Server Books Online. Note The Holding database is used internally by the historian if you import a tagname database from InTouch HMI software. The file names for the Holding database are Holding90Dat.Mdf and Holding90Log.Ldf.

Historical tag values from the plant floor are stored to hard disk in special sets of files, called history blocks. Copies of the current values for all defined plant tags in the system are temporarily held in a memory space as the actual values are being stored to disk. This memory space is called the active image.

You need to manage aspects of each of these storage places. For a detailed explanation of historical data storage, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Contents Managing the IndustrialSQL Server Historian Runtime Database Managing IndustrialSQL Server Historian History Blocks

Managing the IndustrialSQL Server Historian Runtime Database


The Runtime database is a normal SQL Server database and can be managed using SQL Server Enterprise Manager. The Runtime database stores relatively static information about how the IndustrialSQL Server historian is configured, such as tag definitions and I/O Server definitions.

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Although the Runtime database does not store historical plant data, it stores other types of system-generated data that impacts the size of the database file. For example, information is added to the database file if you:

Turned on modification tracking, because a record is stored for each modification made. For more information, see "Modification Tracking" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Defined any events. Each detected event is logged in the database. If you configured any summary actions, the summarized values are stored in the Runtime database. Also, if you set up event snapshot actions, the values for the snapshots are logged in the database. For more information, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Be sure that you have enough space on your hard disk to accommodate a growing Runtime database file. By default, the Runtime database is configured to expand automatically when required.

Changing the Properties for the Runtime Database


You can view or change the properties for the Runtime database, such as the paths to the database files and transactions logs and the permissions on the database. To view/change the Runtime database properties 1. In Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the IndustrialSQL Server historian, and then expand Databases.

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2.

Right-click on the Runtime database and then click Properties. The Database Properties dialog box appears.

3.

To view directory in which the database file resides, as well as view the current size of the file, click the Data Files tab. To view the same details for the transaction log, click the Transaction Log tab. Tip To see the database file in the Windows Explorer, look in the \DATA directory of the main Microsoft SQL Server directory.

4.

Using the options in the Runtime Properties dialog box, you can recalculate the space available in the database or the transaction log. You can also set database options and grant and revoke statement permissions for database users and groups. Important! Do not modify the default permissions for the default historian logins and users, as this negatively affects the system. For more information on managing databases, see your Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager documentation.

5.

Click OK.

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Managing the Runtime Database


Managing a database involves procedures such as performing backups or exporting data. Note You should not edit any of the pre-configured tables, stored procedures, or views that are shipped with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. To manage the Runtime database 1. 2. In Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the IndustrialSQL Server, and then expand Databases. Right-click on the Runtime database, point to All Tasks, and then select the menu command for the task you want to perform. Note Microsoft SQL Server includes several wizards that guide you through the most common tasks. To open these wizards, on the management console's Tools menu, click Wizards. For more information on managing databases, see your Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager documentation.

Backing Up the Runtime Database


It is highly recommended that you back up all of the IndustrialSQL Server and SQL databases:

Before you make any changes to the database, in case you want to return to the original configuration. On a regular schedule, to minimize data loss in the event of a disk failure. The best way to perform database backups is to set up automatic backups using SQL Server Enterprise Manager. You should back up your database at least once a week.

When you perform a database backup, all system tables, user-defined objects and data are copied to a separate file located on a backup device. Backup devices include disk files, floppy diskettes, zip disks, and tape drives. Backups can be easily managed using the SQL Server Enterprise Manager. The master and msdb databases should be on the same backup schedule as the Runtime database.

Backing Up the Database


Note Any transactions that are in progress when the backup is performed are rolled back if that backup is later restored. To backup the database 1. In Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the IndustrialSQL Server, and then expand Databases.

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2. 3.

Right-click on the Runtime database, point to All Tasks, and then click Backup Database. The SQL Server Backup dialog box appears. Click the General tab.

4. 5.

In the Database box, select Runtime. To use an existing backup device or file for the backup, select the destination in the Destination window and then click OK to begin the backup. Tip For details on a particular backup destination, select the destination in the list and then click Contents.

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6.

If you do not have a backup destination defined, click Add to add a new destination. The Select Backup Destination dialog box appears.

7.

Select to back up to either a file or device. File name Type or browse to a path for the location of the backup file. Be sure that you have enough free disk space to store the backup. Backup device Select an existing backup device or select <New Backup Device>. The Backup Device Properties dialog box appears. In the File name box, type a name for the device. As you type the name, the path for the backup will be modified. Verify that the path for the backup is correct. When you are done, click OK to create the backup device.

8. 9.

Click OK to close the Select Backup Destination dialog box. The newly-created backup device now appears in the Destination window of the SQL Server Backup dialog box. Select the new backup device.

10. Click OK to perform the backup. You can configure various options for database backups, such as an expiration date for a backup. You can also schedule automatic backups. For a complete description of database backup and restoration using SQL Server Enterprise Manager, including scheduling recommendations and transaction log backup, see your SQL Server Enterprise Manager documentation.

Restoring the Database


When you restore a database from backup, any information saved to the database since the backup was performed is overwritten with the restored information. All changes to the database since the backup are lost. Also, any transactions in progress when the backup was performed are rolled back.

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To restore the database 1. 2. 3. In Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the IndustrialSQL Server, and then expand Databases. Right-click on the Runtime database, point to All Tasks, and then click Restore Database. The Restore Database dialog box appears. Click the General tab.

4. 5. 6. 7.

In the Restore as database list, select the Runtime database. Select Database from the Restore options. In the First backup to restore list, select the desired backup. Click OK. The information is restored.

You can configure various options for database restoration. For more information on restoring from a backup using SQL Server Enterprise Manager, see your SQL Server Enterprise Manager documentation.

Managing a Runtime Database Object


A database object is a component of a database: table, index, trigger, view, key, constraint, default, rule, user-defined data type, or stored procedure. Anything that has a name and consumes space in a database is an object.

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Note Do not edit any of the pre-configured tables, stored procedures, or views that are shipped with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. To manage database objects 1. 2. 3. 4. In Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the IndustrialSQL Server, and then expand Databases. Expand the Runtime database. All of the object groups in the database appear under the Runtime folder. To view all of the objects in a group, select the group in the console tree. To manage any database object, simply double-click on the object in the details pane. A dialog box for managing that object appears. For example, the Table Properties dialog box appears when you double-click an IndustrialSQL Server historian table. 5. Click OK.

For more information on managing database objects, see your Microsoft documentation.

Space Management for Event and Summary History


If you configured the IndustrialSQL Server historian to detect events, each detected event is logged into the EventHistory table of the Runtime database. If you configured summary actions, the aggregated values are stored in the SummaryHistory table. The duration for which event and summary history are kept is specified by a historian system parameter. Duration defaults are as follows: History Event Summary Duration 7 days (168 hours) 14 days (336 hours)

For information on changing the value of a system parameter, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. For more information on the event system, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Managing IndustrialSQL Server Historian History Blocks


Historical tag values from the plant floor are stored to hard disk in special sets of files called history blocks.

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For information on history blocks, see "History Blocks" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Viewing History Blocks


To view history block information 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then select History Blocks. The history block information appears in the details pane.

Column descriptions are as follows: Start Time The starting timestamp for the history block. End Time The ending timestamp for the history block. Location The path to the storage location. The circular storage location must be a local drive on the server machine, and the path must be specified using normal drive letter notation (for example, c:\InSQL\Data\Circular). The alternate, buffer, and permanent storage locations can be anywhere on the network, provided that the ArchestrA service user has full access to those network locations. For the Windows 2000 operating system, remote storage locations can be specified either as mapped drives or by using UNC notation. For the Windows Server 2003 operating system, the locations must be specified using UNC notation. Duration The time span for the history block. TimeZone The time zone of the history block. GMT Bias The time offset from Greenwich Mean Time. The data shown in the details pane is not automatically refreshed. To refresh the list from the history block information held by the Configuration Manager, right-click on History Blocks in the console tree and then click Refresh. In most cases, this type of refresh is all that is needed.

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However, if you manually move a large history block in or out of your history folder and do not see the changes in the details pane, you may need to force the Configuration Manager to rescan the blocks. To do this, right-click on History Blocks, point to All Tasks, and then click Rescan History Blocks. Then, refresh the details pane. A yellow icon for a history block indicates that all tag information is loaded into memory, and you can query and insert data for that block. The block is considered to be "online." If the icon is grey, the tag information is not loaded, and the block is considered to be "offline." If you have enabled memory management for the system, tag information is loaded as needed for requested blocks. For more information on memory management, see "Memory Management for Data Storage" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Starting a New History Block


You can manually stop data from being written to the current history block and start a new one. This process can take up to approximately 10 minutes, but no data is lost. The system must have been running for approximately five minutes after startup before a new history block can be started. To manually start a new history block 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console. Right-click History Blocks, point to All Tasks, and then click Start New History Block. The Start New History Block confirmation box appears. Click OK.

Note You can also start a new history block using the xp_NewHistoryBlock extended stored procedure. For more information, see Chapter 4, "Stored Procedures," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Database Reference.

Editing History Block Storage Locations


The IndustrialSQL Server historian stores history blocks in one or more of the following storage locations on a hard disk you specify: circular, permanent, buffer, and alternate. Paths to these storage locations are specified when the historian is installed. With the exception of the circular path, all data path changes are dynamic. Only changes to the circular path require reinitializing the system (that is, a complete shutdown and restart of the historian). Also, if a change is made to the default data paths, these directories must be manually created. The System Management Console validates the path you specify. For more information on storage locations, see "History Block Storage Locations" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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To edit storage locations 1. 2. 3. 4. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Storage. Select Storage Locations. All defined storage locations appear in the details pane. Right-click on the storage location to edit, and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears.

5.

In the Path box, type the path to the storage location. The circular storage location must be a local drive on the server machine, and the path must be specified using normal drive letter notation (for example, c:\InSQL\Data\Circular). The alternate, buffer, and permanent storage locations can be anywhere on the network, provided that the ArchestrA service user has full access to those network locations. For the Windows 2000 operating system, remote storage locations can be specified either as mapped drives or by using UNC notation. For the Windows Server 2003 operating system, the locations must be specified using UNC notation. If the path you specify does not currently exist, it is created. Note The paths to the storage areas are relative to the computer on which the historian is running. If you are running System Management Console on a separate network computer than the historian, the paths may not be same.

6.

To disable the use of this path, click Path is Disabled. This option is not available for the circular storage location.

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7.

In the Deletion Threshold box, type the minimum amount of disk space, in megabytes, at which the system attempts to start freeing up space. The threshold applies to circular and alternate storage only. Typically, you should multiply the size of the average history block (before any compression) by 1.5 to determine the minimum threshold. In the Maximum Size box, type the limit, in megabytes, for the amount of data to be stored to the specified location. The maximum size applies to circular and alternate storage only. If the maximum size is set to 0, all available space at the storage location is used. In the Maximum Age box, type the age, in days, of data that will be deleted by system to free up disk space. The threshold applies to circular and alternate storage only. The minimum age is 2 days. A value of 0 indicates that no age threshold is applied. Note The Deletion Threshold, Maximum Size, and Maximum Age options are unavailable for the permanent and buffer storage areas.

8.

9.

10. Click OK.

Backing Up History Blocks


As history blocks are created, it may be necessary to move some of the data files to long-term storage media to make room for new history blocks to be stored to disk. You can also back up history blocks or portions of history blocks to the permanent storage area. Note A new block is created if any data file becomes larger than 1.5 GB.

Backing up history blocks to storage media. It is highly recommended that you back up the history blocks to long-term storage media such as to DAT tape or to CDs. You can perform backups using the Windows Backup utility. For detailed information on how to back up and restore data files using the Windows Backup utility, see your Microsoft Windows documentation. Although historical data backed up to removable media is not readily available to client applications, the data is still accessible if you retrieve the files from the tape and place them on a hard disk. If you have a current record of DAT tapes and the files they contain, you can more easily retrieve the information.

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Backing up history blocks to the permanent storage location. You can copy history blocks or a subset of history blocks to the "archive" historical path (permanent storage area). This allows for the "capture" of a plant event by reducing the size of the history block. For example, a plant trip time span might be of two hours. These two hours will be put in a history block of 24 hours for most cases. A "snapshot" of these two hours can be copied to the archive path. To copy a subset of data, use the xp_DiskCopy extended stored procedure. For more information on the extended stored procedures, see Chapter 4, "Stored Procedures," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Database Reference.

Note Microsoft SQL Server caches previously retrieved data for use in future queries during the current logon. If the history blocks have been altered in any way (for example, as a result of a history block copy), clients must disconnect and reconnect to the server so that the cache is refreshed with the latest data.

Adding History Blocks from Prior Versions to the System


You can add existing history blocks from prior versions to the system. You can add any combination of blocks from prior versions. The only restriction is that earlier version history blocks are always followed by later version history blocks. To add a history block

In Windows Explorer, copy one or more legacy history blocks to the \Permanent data folder of the historian.

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Importing, Inserting, or Updating History Data

If you have existing InTouch history data, you can easily import it into the IndustrialSQL Server extension tables using the InTouch History Importer utility. In addition, you can import any history data by manually formatting it in a CSV file according to a specification and then copying the file into a special folder on the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer. Using Transact-SQL INSERT and UPDATE statements, you can insert or update history data in the IndustrialSQL Server extension tables. You can track modifications to history data. For more information, see "Modification Tracking for Historical Data Changes" in Chapter 2, "SystemLevel Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Contents Importing Data from an InTouch History File Importing Data from CSV Files Inserting or Updating Data via Transact-SQL Statements Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data

Importing Data from an InTouch History File


The InTouch History Importer (InSQLITHist.exe) is a stand-alone utility that allows you to import existing InTouch history data into the IndustrialSQL Server history blocks. InTouch history data is stored in one or more .lgh files located in the InTouch application folder. Before you start the import, be sure that:

You can access the .lgh files. The InTouch HMI software is not required to be installed on the same computer as the InTouch History Importer, and InTouch is not required to be running. The importer can import history data generated with InTouch HMI software version 7.0 or later.

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The tag definitions already exist in the IndustrialSQL Server database. The easiest way to make sure that you have all of the definitions is to use the IndustrialSQL Server Tag Importer to import the contents of the InTouch tagname database. For more information, see "Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary" on page 69. You can log on to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. The InTouch History Importer requires a logon to the historian to retrieve a list of all currently imported InTouch nodes. You have security access to the historian \FastLoad folder. The InTouch History Importer converts selected .lgh files to CSV files and then copies them into the \FastLoad folder. For more information, see "Configuring CSV File Import Folders" on page 142. The storage and manual storage processes are running. These processes monitor the \FastLoad folder and import any CSV files that are copied there. The full path to the InTouch .lgh files (including the name of the actual .lgh file) is not longer than 64 characters. This limitation is inherent in the underlying InTouch infrastructure used to access .lgh files. If the path is longer than 64 characters, the importer produces an error message and prevents the import from continuing. If necessary, use a mapped drive or a drive substitution to shorten the name of path. The InTouch HMI software is not currently storing data to the .lgh file that you plan to import. You change the value of the AllowOriginals system parameter to 1. This allows you to insert original data for I/O Servers. For more information on editing system parameters, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. The data you want to import will not interfere with data in the current history block for the same tags. For example, suppose you importe tag definitions from an InTouch application and are currently storing the tag values received from the I/O Server in the historian. If you attempt to import existing InTouch data for these same tags, and the timestamps of the data to be imported fall within the current history block, the import may produce unexpected results. Wait until the next history block is created before you attempt to import the existing InTouch data. The fast load import mechanism used by the InTouch History Importer is intended for importing data into history for periods where no data for the tags currently exists. For delta stored tags, importing into a region where data already exists results in the addition of the new points. For cyclically stored values, however, the new points are imported on top of the existing cyclic values. For more information on fast load imports, see "About Fast Load CSV File Imports" on page 143.

Performing the InTouch Data Import


Before you perform the import, review the requirements in "Importing Data from an InTouch History File" on page 135.

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To import history data from InTouch HMI software 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Wonderware, point to IndustrialSQL Server, and then click Import InTouch Historical Data. The InTouch History Importer Wizard - Welcome dialog box appears.

2.

Click Next. The Connections dialog box appears.

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3.

Provide a login for the IndustrialSQL Server historian. The importer needs to connect to the historian to access information about imported InTouch nodes. Click Use Windows authentication to use your Windows login information to connect to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Click Use SQL Server authentication to use a SQL Server login. Type a valid SQL Server username and password.

4.

Click Next. The Source InTouch Nodes dialog box appears.

5.

In the InTouch Nodes window, select the name of the InTouch node (computer) from which you want to import data. Note If the desired node is not listed, you need to first import the tagname database. For more information, see "Importing an InTouch Data Dictionary" on page 69.

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6.

Click Next. The .LGH Files dialog box appears.

7.

Click Add (Browse) to specify one or more InTouch history files (.lgh) to import. The Open dialog box appears.

8.

Browse to the InTouch application folder, select one or more .lgh files, and then click Open. You must select .lgh files from the InTouch node that you previously specified. The files are added to the Input .LGH file selection window in the wizard. To remove a file, select it and then click Remove.

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9.

Click Next. The Import Status dialog box appears.

10. Verify the history files to import and then click Next. The Import Done dialog box appears.

The results of the import are shown in the window. If no errors are reported, the selected .lgh files were successfully converted to CSV files and copied into the /FastLoad folder.

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Note The history importer does not report whether the data in the resultant CSV files is successfully imported into the IndustrialSQL Server extension tables. 11. Click Finish. If the import completes successfully, a record is logged to the Logger. Certain failure conditions and any user-initiated cancellations are also logged.

Importing Data from CSV Files


You can import data into the history blocks, as long as the data is formatted according to a specific comma-separated values (CSV) format. The basic steps for importing data are: 1. Configure the data import folder, which is where you will put your formatted CSV files. For more information, see "Configuring CSV File Import Folders" on page 142. Add tag definitions to the IndustrialSQL Server database for all of the data values you plan to import. Importing data for a tag that is not defined results in an error. If you are importing legacy InTouch data, you can use the Tag Importer to import a tagname database, which contains the tag definitions. Otherwise, you must manually add the tag definitions. For information on importing an InTouch tagname database, see Chapter 3, "Importing and Exporting Configuration Information." For information on adding tag definitions manually, see Chapter 2, "Configuring Tags." Determine the type of import, either normal or "fast load." For more information, see "About Normal CSV File Imports" on page 143 and "About Fast Load CSV File Imports" on page 143. Determine if you want to insert original data for I/O Server tags. By default, the system does not insert original data for I/O Server tags via CSV. However, you can change this setting by changing the value of the AllowOriginals system parameter to 1. For more information on editing system parameters, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. Format the CSV file according to the import type. For more information, see "Formatting the CSV File for a Normal Import" on page 144 or "Formatting the CSV File for a Fast Load Import" on page 147. Place the file into the appropriate data import folder, where it is automatically processed by the system. For more information, see "Copying a CSV File into an Import Folder" on page 150.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Note You can use the InTouch History Importer to automatically create properly-formatted CSV files from existing InTouch history files (.lgh) and have them copied into the \FastLoad folder. For more information, see "Importing Data from an InTouch History File" on page 135. If you are inserting or updating values that have a time period spanning across or included in a current gap in the history blocks, a new block can optionally be created to "patch" the gap and hold the insert/update.

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For a comparison of the various import methods, see "Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data" on page 156.

Configuring CSV File Import Folders


By default, the import folders are created in the main InSQL data folder when the product is installed. For example, if you specified D:\InSQL\DATA\Circular as the circular data folder, the CSV data import folders is D:InSQL\DATA\DataImport, which is shown in the following illustration:

Important! If you leave the data import path at the default location (on the drive hosting the circular data folder), placing large CSV files in a data import folder may prompt the IndustrialSQL Server disk management subsystem to immediately start moving or deleting history blocks to maintain the configured amount of required free space on the disk. It is highly recommended to change the data import folder to a different drive than your circular storage. The different import folders are described in the following table: Import Folder \DataImport \FastLoad Description Used for normal CSV import files. Used for "fast load" CSV import files. Files in this folder are processed one at a time, in the order that they appear in Windows Explorer as you are viewing the folder contents. Used by MDAS. If the amount of data spans multiple 64 KB chunks, files are collected in the \Support subdirectory until all of the data is received. The files are then copied to the \Manual folder for inclusion into history. To change the import folder 1. Use Windows Explorer to create the new folder. Note Be sure that you maintain the \Manual\Support subfolder and optional \FastLoad subfolder. You cannot change the name of the \FastLoad or the \Support folder to another name.

\Manual

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2.

Edit the DataImportPath system parameter to specify the new data import folder. For more information on editing system parameters, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. Restart the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

3.

About Normal CSV File Imports


Use the normal import mechanism if you primarily want to modify a small amount of existing data stored in the IndustrialSQL Server historian or store a small amount of new values. The insert of an entire CSV file results in a single new version of the data. If an inserted data point falls exactly on an existing timestamp, the data value is added to history. The existing data is maintained in history. For guidelines on using this import method versus other import methods, see "Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data" on page 156.

About Fast Load CSV File Imports


Using the "fast load" CSV import mechanism, you can import original data very quickly, using essentially the same CSV file format as for a normal import, with some modifications. A "fast load" import is much faster than a normal CSV import. For example, a CSV file that is 4 MB imports approximately 100 times faster. For larger files, the speed improvement gets substantially better. Also, there are no restrictions on the size of the file to import, or the number of tags or data values in the file. However, the data that is contained in the CSV file for a fast load import must be formatted in time sequential order. It is this ordering that allows the system to process a fast load CSV file more quickly than a normal CSV file. Put a formatted CSV file into a special \FastLoad import folder. For guidelines on using this import method versus other import methods, see "Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data" on page 156.

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General File Format for a CSV Import


The CSV file format for imports is as follows.
Missing Block Behavior: 0 = Do not create replacement blocks 1 = Create replacement blocks 10 = FastLoad ORIGINAL VALUES specified by TagName 11 = FastLoad ORIGINAL VALUES specified by wwTagKey

Time Format: 0 = UTC (Time zone is ignored) 1 = LOCAL

Time Zone

ASCII | YevgenyN|1|Server Local|1|1 MANUALst1|0|2002/04/24|13:50:00.000|2002/04/24|13:51:00.000|1|STR0|192 MANUALst1|0|2002/04/24|13:52:00.000|2002/04/24|13:53:00.000|1|STR10|192 MANUALst1|0|2002/04/24|13:54:00.000|2002/04/24|13:55:00.000|1|STR20|192


Operation Type (ignored for FastLoad): 0 = ORIGINAL VALUE 1 = INSERT 2 = UPDATE 3 = MULTIPOINT UPDATE Values in: 0 = EU 1 = RAW

Time Span of Replacement Blocks: 0 = Recreate blocks from first point to present time 1 = Recreate blocks for the duration of CSV data 2 = Do not propagate the last values (for FastLoad only)

End Date/Time for UPDATE only (do not use for FastLoad)

OPCQuality

Formatting the CSV File for a Normal Import


To import external data into the history blocks, you must format your data according to the CSV file format as outlined in the following table. For a general illustration of the format, see "General File Format for a CSV Import" on page 144. You can name the CSV file anything you want. For the format, note that:

Only one operation type per line is allowed. Multiple records per line of the same operation type is allowed. A multipoint update is a sequence of updates where the beginning of an update period is the end of the previous update. A multipoint update is faster than a simple sequence of inserts because a single version is used for all values. Use a multipoint update to mask underlying data with a new set of values for the specified time period.

Fields 3 and 4 of the values are used in single point update only and must be excluded from the record for a multipoint update. A single point update refers to the situation when an update value is assigned to a time period specified by the start date/time and end date/time. A multipoint update is an update in which each value replaces the value at a single date/time specified in the record. The value specified in each record is held as the latest value until the next record. The last record is ignored in a multipoint update. The last record (time wise) will indicate the end of the previous update period. The value will be ignored.

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Line Header 1 2 3

Field 0 0 0 1 2

Description Description of the CSV file format, either UNICODE or ASCII. Character that is used as a delimiter. This can be either a comma ( , ) or a pipe ( | ). User name Time format: 0 = UTC; 1 = Local. Name of the time zone for the timestamps in the CSV file.

If field 1 is set to 0, the value of this field is ignored. However, a value that is at least 1 character long must appear for this field. If field 1 is set to 1, the value of this field is the literal name of the time zone, as it is specified in the TimeZone table. To use the local time of the IndustrialSQL Server historian, specify "Server Local" for this field.

Default behavior if a missing history block is encountered: 0 = Do not create replacement blocks; 1 = Create replacement blocks. If this field is set to 0, and data values in the CSV fall within a time period where no blocks are present, then no data is inserted. Time span for the replacement block(s): 0 = Recreate block from first data value to the present time; 1 = Recreate block for the duration of the CSV file data.


Value 4 ... n 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

If field 4 is set to 0, then the value of this field is ignored. If this field is set to 0, then history blocks are recreated from the time of the first value to the current time. If this field is set to 1, only the history blocks necessary to import all data in file are recreated. The start and end times for the history block is adjusted based on the current block duration setting or the start and end times of existing blocks.

Tag name Operation type: 0 = Original value; 1 = Insert; 2 = Update; 3 = Multipoint update. Value start date, formatted as: YYYY/MM/DD Value start time, formatted as: HH:MM:SS.MSEC (This field is used only in the case of an update.) Value end date, formatted as: YYYY/MM/DD (This field is used only in the case of an update.) Value end time, formatted as: HH:MM:SS.MSEC Indicates whether the value is already in the proper format or whether you want to scale the value after the import. Values are: 0 = Engineering units; 1 = Raw value. The value to import. The value can be a NULL.

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Line

Field 8 ...n

Description The OPC Quality value. Fields 2 through 8 can be repeated.

If two multipoint update CSV files for the same tag are simultaneously copied to the \DataImport directory, the update spans across the total time for the two files. A query returning latest data hides (masks) the original version of the data from the end of the first file to the start of the second file. For example, if the update in one file ranges from 00:00:00 to 00:05:00, and the other ranges from 00:10:00 to 00:15:00, the result is an update starting at 00:00:00 and ending at 00:15:00 ("latest"); the original data from 00:05:00 to 00:10:00 is masked as "original" data. No data is lost. To view either data from a query, use the wwVersion column to specify either "original" or "latest." By default, the latest data is shown. To prevent the masking of the original data, process the CSV files one at a time. It is recommended not to use both inserts and original inserts for the same tag in the same file or files processed together. When configuring the scaling setting (field 6), keep in mind that the data conversion to engineering units (a setting of 0) is performed before the value is stored. The reverse of the scaling formula for the tag is used to convert the data before storage. During retrieval, the scaling formula is applied so that the original inserted values are returned. For integer type tags, if the value after the conversion is not an integer value, it is rounded off. The rounding off can change the value to be exactly the same as the previous value, and thus the rounded off value is not stored to disk if delta storage is used. If the tag is a real type tag, the rounding off does not occur, and all values are stored. The value to insert can be a NULL. For more information, see "Handling of NULL Values in CSV Files" on page 149.

Example CSV Files for a Normal Import


The following is an example of an insert of data values for a single tag, "ReactTemp." The pipe ( | ) is used as a delimiter.

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The following is an example of an update of data values for a single tag, "Man1." A comma ( , ) is used as a delimiter.

The following is an example of a multipoint update of data values for a single tag. A comma ( , ) is used as a delimiter. The last value is ignored.

Formatting the CSV File for a Fast Load Import


Important! The data points must be sorted in time sequential order for a successful "fast load" import. The format for the fast load CSV file is essentially the same as the normal format, with a few exceptions. For a general illustration of the CSV format, see "General File Format for a CSV Import" on page 144. For a detailed description of the normal format, see "Formatting the CSV File for a Normal Import" on page 144 The fast load format exceptions are:

All data in the file is treated as original data. The Operation Type field in the file header is ignored. The Missing Block Behavior field in the header is used for a different purpose. A value of 10 denotes that tags in the file are specified by name, whereas a value of 11 denotes that the wwTagKey attribute is used to specify tags. By default, missing blocks are created as necessary.

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The Time Span of Replacement Blocks field includes an additional option. A value of 2 denotes that the last values for tags are not propagated for a fast load import. A fast load import inserts data values as "original" values. These values are typically inserted (or "propagated") in history blocks subsequent to the first block affected by the import, either up to the next pre-existing original value of that tag or up to the current time. This propagation is the most time-consuming part of the fast load process because it is implemented on per-tag basis and includes intensive file I/O.

If this field is set to 0, then history blocks are recreated from the time of the first value to the current time. The fast load process finds all of the gaps in the history block sequence and creates replacement blocks to cover those gaps. Then, every last value of every tag is propagated up to the next pre-existing original value for that tag or up to the current time. If there are no more pre-existing values for a tag, then the last value is added to the active image and is visible to retrieval for the current time. This is the recommended "fast load" mode of operation. If this field is set to 1, only the history blocks necessary to import all of the data in file are recreated. The fast load process does not patch gaps in the history block sequence. In this case, the last value is propagated only up to the first gap. However, if no gaps exist, the last value is propagated to the current time or to the next original value. Because the propagation of the last value depends on the history timeline, it is recommended to use a value of 0 or 2 instead of a value of 1. The value of 1 is supported only for backward compatibility. If this field is set to 2, the last values for each tag are inserted, but propagation into subsequent history blocks does not occur and the values are not added to the active image. The values can only be retrieved if the query interval includes the timestamps of the inserted values. Under normal circumstances, avoid using this mode, because disabling propagation deviates from the "original" data model, in which original values are expected to be propagated to the current time. Typically, you would only want to use this mode to insert a large number of consecutive fast load CSV files belonging to one continuous timeline, and you are experiencing slow performance.

The actual data values in the file must be in time sequential order, starting at the top of the file. This is the most important requirement. Values that have out-of-sequence timestamps are ignored. If a data value in the file has a timestamp that is earlier than the timestamp in the previous line in the file, the data value is discarded, regardless of whether it belongs to the same tag or a different tag. The file should contain only one data value per line.

Example CSV Files for a Fast Load Import


The following is an example of an insert of original data values for a single tag, "Manual_01." The pipe ( | ) is used as a delimiter.
ASCII |

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RolandoM|1|Server Local|10|0 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:00:17.000|0|22|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:01:17.000|0|23|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:02:17.000|0|24|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:03:17.000|0|25|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:04:17.000|0|26|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:05:17.000|0|27|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:06:17.000|0|28|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:07:17.000|0|29|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:08:17.000|0|30|192 Manual_01|0|2004/12/08|04:09:17.000|0|31|192

The following is an example of an insert of original data values for a single tag, identified by a wwTagKey of 777. A comma ( , ) is used as a delimiter. The file is saved as UNICODE, where every character is represented by two bytes.
UNICODE , MikeA,1,Server Local,11,2 777,0,2004/12/09,12:05:24.000,0,100,192 777,0,2004/12/09,12:48:36.000,0,101,192 777,0,2004/12/09,13:31:48.000,0,102,192 777,0,2004/12/09,14:15:00.000,0,103,192 777,0,2004/12/09,14:58:12.000,0,104,192 777,0,2004/12/09,15:41:24.000,0,105,192 777,0,2004/12/09,16:24:36.000,0,106,192 777,0,2004/12/09,17:07:48.000,0,107,192 777,0,2004/12/09,17:51:00.000,0,108,192

Handling of NULL Values in CSV Files


The value to insert can be a NULL. If the OPC Quality in the CSV file is between 0 to 63, then:

The NULL value is stored. The Quality Detail is set to 249 (not a number). The OPC Quality is what was specified in the CSV file.

If the OPC Quality in the CSV file is greater than 63, then: The value that was specified in the CSV file is stored. The Quality Detail is set to 192 (unless the value specified is NULL in the CSV file, in which case the Quality Detail is set to 249). The OPC Quality is what was specified in the CSV file (unless the value specified is NULL in the CSV file).

If the value is not NULL, but the OPC Quality is less than 63, then: A NULL value is stored. The Quality Detail is set to 249 (not a number). The OPC Quality is what was specified in the CSV file.

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Copying a CSV File into an Import Folder


After you copy one or more CSV files to an import folder, the IndustrialSQL Server historian attempts to read the file(s) only one time. If the read is successful, the data is automatically converted and merged in with the appropriate history block according to the date range provided in the CSV file. The CSV file is then deleted from the directory. If an error occurs during the import, the CSV file is moved to the \Support folder. A message is also posted in the error log. At any given time, the manual storage service processes either fast load CSV files or normal CSV files; the two types are not processed concurrently. Do not attempt a CSV file import if the manual storage process is initializing, as indicated by the icon in the status display of the Management Console. Be sure that the access for the history blocks is read/write (if you copy them from a CD or DVD, for example, they are read-only). Also, if you copy a large number of history blocks, it is a good idea to request a history block scan.

Inserting or Updating Data via Transact-SQL Statements


Using the Transact-SQL INSERT and UPDATE statements, you can insert or update data in the AnalogHistory, DiscreteHistory, StringHistory, and History tables (Value and QualityDetail only). The IndustrialSQL Server historian uses the same security defined for SQL Server for inserting and updating data. However, you cannot delete any data value from storage. If you are attempting to insert or update values whose time period spans across missing history blocks, the necessary history block(s) are recreated for the duration of the data. You cannot insert or update values for a time span that includes existing data blocks created by versions prior to the IndustrialSQL Server 8.0 historian. For guidelines on using this import method versus other import methods, see "Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data" on page 156.

INSERT ... VALUES Syntax


An INSERT statement with a VALUES clause is supported only if you use the four-part syntax. Syntax
INSERT [INTO] {table_name | view_name} (column_list) VALUES ({DateTime: constant | variable}, {TagName: constant | variable}, {Value: constant | variable} [, {QualityDetail: constant | variable}] [, {wwTimeZone: constant | variable}] [, {wwVersion: constant | variable}] )

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Using variables in the VALUES clause is permitted only with four-part naming. For more information, see "Using the Four-Part Naming Convention" on page 98. Arguments table_name The name of the extension table into which you want to insert the data. Valid values are: AnalogHistory, DiscreteHistory, StringHistory or History. view_name The corresponding view name for an extension table. Valid values are: v_AnalogHistory, v_DiscreteHistory, v_StringHistory or v_History. column_list Mandatory columns are DateTime, TagName and Value. QualityDetail, wwTimeZone, and wwVersion are optional columns. If the QualityDetail column is omitted in an INSERT VALUES statement, a QualityDetail value of 192 (Good) is inserted automatically. If the wwTimeZone column is omitted, the time zone of the server is assumed. The wwVersion column defaults to 'original' for non-I/O Server tags and to 'latest' for I/O Server tags. Due to a restriction in Microsoft SQL Server, it is not possible to insert data into the vValue (variant) column of the History table. The column_list parameter, which is optional in a regular SQL INSERT VALUES statement, is mandatory for the IndustrialSQL Server historian INSERT VALUES syntax. Examples The following examples show valid INSERT VALUES statements using the "four-part" query syntax. For more information on four-part queries, see "Query Syntax for the INSQL OLE DB Provider" on page 98.
INSERT INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail) VALUES ('1999-11-11 16:05:10', 'NonIOTag1', 56, 192) INSERT INTO INSQL.Runtime.dbo.History (DateTime, TagName, Value, wwTimeZone, wwVersion) VALUES ('1999-11-11 16:05:10', 'IOstring1', 'Batch 10', 'Eastern Standard Time', 'latest')

You can also use the view name in place of the four-part name. For example, in the following queries, v_History and v_AnalogHistory are used instead of the four-part name INSQL.Runtime.dbo.History and INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory, respectively.
INSERT v_History (TagName, QualityDetail, Value, DateTime) VALUES ('NonIOtag1', 192, 56, '1999-11-11 16:05:10') INSERT INTO v_History (TagName, DateTime, Value, QualityDetail) SELECT 'ManualReactTemp', DateTime, 32 + Value * 9 / 5, 192 FROM v_AnalogHistory WHERE TagName = 'ReactTemp' AND DateTime >= dateadd(mi, -50, getdate())

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AND DateTime < dateadd(mi, -10, getdate()) AND wwRetrievalMode = 'Delta'

You can use SQL variables in a four-part query. For example.


DECLARE @Value float DECLARE @DateTime DateTime SET @Value = 1.2345 SET @DateTime = DateAdd(Minute, -10, GetDate()) INSERT v_History (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail) VALUES (@DateTime, 'NonIOTag1', @Value, 192)

Using the wwVersion Parameter for INSERTs


You can use the wwVersion parameter to specify different handling for data that you are inserting. You can insert real-time data or non-real-time data ("late" or "old" data). For non-real-time data, you have the option of creating new versions for the values that you insert. Regardless of the value of the wwVersion parameter, you can only insert quality detail values of either 192 (GOOD) or 0-63 (NULL). Any other values are not valid.

Inserting Real-time Original Data


Real-time data insertion via an INSERT statement is supported for all non-I/O Server tags. Data that is acquired in this manner is handled just like real-time data coming from an I/O Server tag. You insert real-time data into history by specifying REALTIME for the value of the wwVersion parameter in a Transact-SQL INSERT statement. All data inserted as real-time data is assumed to be "original" data. "Original" data is the first data value that is stored for a particular timestamp. Real-time data is always inserted into the current history block and incorporated into the primary (real-time) data stream. This eliminates the peformance overhead that is associated with inserting and/or versioning nonreal-time data, thus making the inserts very efficient. For more information on data streams, see "About Snapshot Files" on page 91 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. For example, you can create a client application that uses Transact-SQL INSERT statements to insert real-time data into the system. This functionality is similar to an MDAS-enabled client application. The following restrictions apply to a real-time insert.

You cannot insert real-time data for an I/O Server tag. You must have SQL Server permissions to perform an insert. The storage method for the tag should be of type delta, with no deadbands.

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The value of the DateTime column in the INSERT statement must be no more than 30 seconds behind or ahead of the current server time. If the timestamp is a date in the future, relative to the IndustrialSQL Server historian time, but still within a +/- 30 second, the tag value is stamped with current historian time. If the timestamp is more than 30 seconds ahead or behind the historian time, the tag value is not inserted into history. The InSQL OLE DB provider does not verify this condition and does not return an error message.

In the following example, a value is inserted for 'MyAnalogTag1' directly into the primary data stream. The timestamp for the value is determined by the result of the getdate() function:
INSERT INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail, wwVersion) VALUES(getdate(), 'MyAnalogTag1', 10, 192, 'REALTIME')

You can also allow the system to timestamp the value by specifying a NULL value for the DateTime column. The timestamp is the current time of the historian. For example:
INSERT INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail, wwVersion) VALUES(null, 'MyAnalogTag1', 10, 192, 'REALTIME')

Note that this is a special case that is supported by the REALTIME parameter; under normal circumstances a NULL value for the DateTime column produces an error.

Inserting Non-Real-time Original Data


The first data value that is stored for a particular timestamp is considered to be "original" data. You insert original data into history by specifying ORIGINAL for the value of the wwVersion parameter in a Transact-SQL INSERT statement. Values inserted as original data are not considered real-time data, and therefore are stored in the secondary data stream(s). For more information on data streams, see "About Snapshot Files" on page 91 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. You can insert original data for both I/O Server tags and non-I/O Server tags. However, to insert original data for I/O Server tags, the AllowOriginals system parameter must be set to 1. For more information, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide. The timestamp of the data to insert can be any time except in the future, relative to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. If original data is already stored in the history blocks with the same timestamps as the data you are inserting, the system retains the first set of original values and adds the second set of original values as well, resulting in multiple original values for the same timestamps. If you specify to retrieve original values, there is no way to determine the order in which the values were inserted. In a case such as this, it is better to insert versioned data, if the added performance overhead is not a problem. IndustrialSQL Server Historian Administration Guide

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The following query inserts an original value for 'NonIOTag1' into history:
INSERT INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail, wwVersion) VALUES('2002-11-11 16:05:10', 'NonIOTag1', 10, 192, 'ORIGINAL')

Inserting Non-Real-time Versioned Data


The IndustrialSQL Server historian supports multiple versions of a tag value for a particular timestamp. If a tag value currently exists in history, you can insert another value with the same timestamp and allow the historian to add internal version information so that the order of insertion is preserved. You insert versioned data into history by specifying LATEST for the value of the wwVersion parameter in a Transact-SQL INSERT statement. This is essentially the same as performing an update, but without some of the limitations. You can insert versioned data for both I/O Server tags and non-I/O Server tags. The timestamp can be any time except in the future, relative to the historian. Values inserted as versioned data are not considered real-time data, and therefore are stored in the secondary data stream(s). For more information on data streams, see "About Snapshot Files" on page 91 in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. The following query inserts a versioned value for 'NonIOTag1' into history:
INSERT INSQL.Runtime.dbo.AnalogHistory (DateTime, TagName, Value, QualityDetail, wwVersion) VALUES('2002-11-11 16:05:10', 'NonIOTag1', 15, 192, 'LATEST')

Note Only the first (original) and last (latest) version of a tag value are exposed for retrieval.

UPDATE Syntax
The IndustrialSQL Server historian implements UPDATE only via the OPENQUERY function, not via four-part syntax. The reason for this is the method of implementation of UPDATE in Microsoft SQL Server. If you attempt to update values using the four-part query syntax, you will receive an error. Also, a limitation of using the OPENQUERY function is that SQL variables cannot be used in the UPDATE statement. Updating data in history always results in a new history version, and may be performed multiple times; however, only the original or the latest version of the data is available upon retrieval. Syntax The syntax of the UPDATE statement in the OPENQUERY portion is:
SELECT * FROM OpenQuery(INSQL, 'UPDATE { table_name } SET column_name = constant [,...n]

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WHERE <search_condition>')

Arguments table_name The name of the extension table into which you want to update the data. Valid values are: AnalogHistory, DiscreteHistory, StringHistory or History. column_name Valid values are: Value, QualityDetail. (Update of the vValue column of the History table is not supported.) Remarks For the <search_condition>, DateTime and TagName search criteria are mandatory. The DateTime criterion must refer to a time range; an update at a single time point ('DateTime=') is not supported. Important! When updating data using the OLE DB provider, the greater than operator (>) and the less than operator (<) are always interpreted as >= and <=, respectively. For more information, see Example 2 in this section.
DateTime >[=] earlier_datetime_value AND DateTime <[=] later_datetime_value

Similarly, TagName may refer to one or more tags:


TagName = ...

-orTagName [NOT] LIKE ...

-orTagName IN ( ... ) 'TagName NOT IN ()' is not supported. This is similar to the capabilities

of OpenQuery SELECT; 'NOT IN' syntax is also not supported here. As with INSERT VALUES, wwTimeZone is optional. If not specified, the time zone defaults to the time zone of the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Important! Other types of search conditions (for example, using a condition on Value) are not supported. Example 1 The supported UPDATE syntax is shown in the following example:
SELECT * FROM OPENQUERY(INSQL, 'UPDATE History SET Value = 10, QualityDetail = 192 WHERE TagName LIKE "Line1V%" AND DateTime >= "1999-11-11 16:05:10" AND DateTime <= "1999-11-11 16:05:40" ')

This query sets the Value to 10 and the QualityDetail to 192 for all data values for the specified tags, when the specified DateTime criteria are met.

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Example 2 For the following query, the data that is updated will include the timestamps of 2002-10-03 14:59:59 and 2002-10-03 16:00:00, respectively. Existing points at these timestamps will therefore be affected by the update.
SELECT * FROM OPENQUERY(INSQL, 'UPDATE History SET Value = 1, QualityDetail = 192 WHERE TagName = "Manual_AD32SI1" AND DateTime > "2002-10-03 14:59:59" AND DateTime < "2002-10-03 16:00:00" ')

Guidelines for Importing, Inserting, and Updating History Data


Use the following guidelines to help you decide the best way to import or insert data into history. Each method has its strengths for certain applications, and often you will need to balance the need for speed against some limitations. For a normal CSV import, the CSV file format and the format of the data contained within the file is very flexible. However, this flexibility requires the system to perform a large amount of processing on the data before it can be imported. Thus, there is an inverse relationship between amount of data to process and import speed. The time required to process a file is at least exponentially related to the number of values contained in the file. Additional factors for a normal import are:

If multiple files are to be processed at the same time, the total size of the CSV file is limited to less than 4 MB. The CSV file cannot contain more than 100,000 data values. The number of tags represented in the file cannot exceed 1024. Single files of up to 6 MB will be processed, provided that it does not exceed the file data and tag limits.

Performing a non-real-time inserts via a Transact-SQL statement also requires a large amount of data processing. For both normal CSV imports and non-real-time inserts, avoid creating an application that performs a high number of these types of operations per day. For example, an application that performs 100 individual non-real-time insert operations per day may cause the limits for the system to be exceeded. Although there is increased processing overhead for larger imports and inserts, it is better to reduce the number of operations to stay within the acceptable limits. If you have a high number of operations per day, and increasing the number of values per operation is not feasible, then you can insert the data into a manual history table or custom table and then move data in batches to the extension tables using an INSERT INTO ... SELECT statement.

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The fastest way to insert/import data into the system is to use one of the methods that employ the real-time storage service to get the data into the history blocks. These include real-time inserts via Transact-SQL statements and "fast load" CSV imports. Real-time inserts can occur at a fairly high speed, so use this method when possible. Performing a "fast load" CSV import is also a high-speed option. To do a "fast load" import, however, the data must be in time-series order. Generally, use the fast load import if:

It is not is not feasible to perform a normal CSV import. You need to import very large CSV files. You want storage rules applied to the data you are importing. A normal CSV import does not apply storage rules; everything is stored as a delta.

Be aware of the performance and memory requirements for using a fast load import. Every time you import a fast load CSV file, a new data stream is created in history, and new tag versions are added to the history block tag information file. The tag information is kept in the memory of the IndustrialSQL Server Indexing Service, which is not limited by default. If you execute a large number of fast load imports on a regular basis, the 2 GB memory limit imposed by the operating system may be reached, and the historian will not be able to load new versions of history blocks. To prevent this, enable the IndustrialSQL Server Indexing Service memory management by setting the HistoryCacheSize system parameter to some reasonable value. For example, 20 percent of physical RAM. A similar problem of excessive memory consumption by the Indexing Service may occur if you perform not just "fast load" imports, but any other modifications of old data (inserts/updates/normal CSV imports) on regular basis. In general, if you have any batch processes running regularly and performing old data modification, it is recommended that you enable the Indexing Service memory management. For more information on memory management, see "Memory Management for Data Storage" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Also, do not import fast load data for a tag if there is existing stored data for that tag in the same time range. It is recommended to set the Time Span of Replacement Blocks field to 0 to ensure the propagation of the last value into the current block and the active image. If you need to perform a "fast load" import for several consecutive days of data, where one day corresponds to one "fast load" CSV file, it is recommended to perform the import in reverse order. That is, you first import the "fast load" CSV file of the latest day, then file of the day before, and so on. By using this approach, you limit the propagation of the last value for every tag by the next day, and the whole import process will take less time and require less memory for storing new tag versions. For more information on the Time Span of Replacement Blocks field, see "Formatting the CSV File for a Fast Load Import" on page 147. To give you an estimate of relative performance among the different options, consider a system that can handle 100,000 real-time values per second from an IDAS. This system should be able to handle:

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5,000 values per second via a real-time inserts (Transact-SQL). 100 values per second via a normal CSV import. 1,000 values per second via a fast load CSV import or an INSERT INTO ... SELECT statement.

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Managing Security

Security is managed using the following tools.

Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager. Use this application to manage access to the SQL Server and databases. ArchestrA Change Network Account utility. Use this utility to modify the Windows login for the historian services.

For information about the different levels of security, as well as default IndustrialSQL Server historian logins, see "Security" in Chapter 2, "SystemLevel Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Contents Verifying the Authentication Mode for a SQL Server Managing Logins Managing Users and Roles Managing Permissions Managing Passwords Adding a User to a Windows Operating System Group Changing the Windows Login for IndustrialSQL Server Historian Services

Verifying the Authentication Mode for a SQL Server


The IndustrialSQL Server historian is compatible with either Windows authentication mode or mixed mode (Windows authentication and SQL Server authentication). Windows authentication is recommended. To verify the authentication mode 1. 2. 3. Start SQL Server Enterprise Manager. In the console tree, right-click on the SQL Server. In the shortcut menu that appears, click Properties. The SQL Server Properties dialog box appears.

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4.

Click the Security tab.

5.

Verify the authentication mode. The SQL Server and Windows option corresponds to mixed mode authentication. If you change the authentication mode, you must stop and restart the SQL Server. Also, modification tracking in the historian, if enabled, will not occur until you restart the historian. The IndustrialSQL Server services log on to SQL Server using the ArchestrA user account, which is a Windows account. For information, see "Default Windows Login for IndustrialSQL Server Historian Services" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

6.

Click OK.

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Managing Logins
A login account must be added to the Microsoft SQL Server before a user can access a SQL Server. By default, only members of the sysadmin server role can add SQL Server logins. Logins are managed using SQL Server Enterprise Manager. Note Creating individual login accounts for each user is not required if Windows authentication mode is used in SQL Server. You can map Windows user accounts to SQL Server roles using the SQL Server Enterprise Manager. For more information, see "Adding a User to a Role" on page 167. A member of the sysadmin server role can add logins and configure certain login options, such as a username (login ID), password, a default database, and a default language. If the user is not assigned a username in the default database, the user's login name is used. In addition to the default Microsoft SQL Server logins, four more default logins are created during IndustrialSQL Server historian installation: aaAdmin, aadbo, aaPower, and aaUser. If a large number of users will be connecting to the database with the same set of permissions, creating a single database role to grant access for all of these users will reduce the work involved in account management. The individual users can then be added to the database role. For more information, see your Microsoft documentation. Three Windows security groups are created when you install the historian: aaAdministrators, aaPowerUsers, and aaUsers. These groups are mapped to SQL Server database roles of the same name. You can assign different levels of capability to users by adding the users to the Windows groups. For more information about default IndustrialSQL Server logins and Windows security groups, see "Security" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. If you are a member of the sysadmin server role, you can add, modify, and remove logins, as well as administer database roles. For detailed information on managing logins, see your Microsoft documentation.

Viewing Login Properties


To view properties for a login 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Security and then click Logins. The default logins appear in the details pane. Double-click the login for which you want to see the properties. The SQL Server Login Properties dialog box appears.

2. 3.

For information on configuring login properties, see your Microsoft documentation.

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Adding a Login
You can add a login that uses either Windows authentication (recommended) or SQL Server authentication. To add a login 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Security and then right-click on the Logins folder. In the shortcut menu that appears, click New Login. The SQL Server Login Properties dialog box appears.

2. 3.

4. 5.

Do the following: In the Name box, type the name of the new login. If you are using Windows authentication, click the ellipsis button and browse the network for a Windows user account. In the Authentication group, configure the new login to use Windows authentication or SQL Server authentication. If you use SQL Server authentication, you must enter a password for the login. In the Database list, select the database that the login will use by default.

6.

7.

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8. 9.

Select a language from the Language list, or leave as <Default> to use United States English. Click the Server Roles tab.

10. To assign the new login to an existing server role(s), select the appropriate check box in the list. This will probably not be necessary unless you are defining a power user who will require specific administrative capabilities on the server.

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11. Click the Database Access tab.

12. The User column contains the username to map to the login ID. The default username is the same as the login name. 13. Select the databases that can be accessed by the new login. IndustrialSQL Server historian users generally require access to the Runtime and Holding databases. They only need access to the master database if they are to be granted administrative (or higher) privileges. When you select a database, available database roles for that database appear in the Database Roles list. By default, all new logins are a member of the Public database role. You can select an additional or different role for the login for a particular database. 14. When you have configured the login, click OK. 15. If you created a login with a SQL Server password, you are prompted to confirm the new password. Confirm the password and then click OK.

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Managing Users and Roles


To make managing a large number of database users easier, each username can be assigned to a Microsoft SQL Server role. All members of a role inherit the permissions that are assigned to that role. For example, if the user "MaryH" is added to the "aaPowerUsers" role, that user is automatically granted the permissions for that role. If a role name is not specified, the user is added only to the public role, which includes all users. There are two types of roles: server roles and database roles. You can assign Windows users and user groups, as well as Microsoft SQL Server users and roles, to roles. For more information about default IndustrialSQL Server users and roles, see "Security" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Viewing All Users and Roles for a Database


To view all users and roles 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Databases and then expand the database for which you want to view all users and roles. For example, the Runtime database.

2.

3. 4.

To view all users, click Users. All users appear in the details pane. To view all roles, click Roles. All roles appear in the details pane.

Adding a New Database User


To add a database user 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Databases and then expand the database to which you want to add the new user. For example, expand the Runtime database.

2.

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3.

Right-click Users and then click New Database User. The Database User Properties dialog box appears.

4.

In the Login name list, select the login ID to associate with the username. You can also select <new> and then type a new login ID to be added to the system at the same time as the database user. In the User name box, type the new username. In the Database role membership window, select the database role that the user will be a member of. Click OK.

5. 6. 7.

Adding a New Database Role


Using database roles makes managing permissions for a large number of users easier. You can create a role, set up permissions for the role, and add users to a role. All users inherit the permissions of the role to which they belong. A database user can belong to many roles. To create a role 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

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2. 3.

Expand Databases and then expand the database to which you want to add the new user. For example, expand the Runtime database. Right-click Roles and then click New Database Role. The Database Role Properties dialog box appears.

4. 5. 6.

In the Name box, type the name of the new role. To add users to the new role, click Add. In the dialog box that appears, select the user from the list and then click OK. Click OK.

Adding a User to a Role


To add a user to a role, you must have system administrator permissions. To add a user to a role 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Databases and then expand the database to which you want to add the user to a role. For example, expand the Runtime database.

2.

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3.

Click Roles. In the details pane, right-click on the role to which you want to add a user and then click Properties. The Database Role Properties dialog box appears.

4. 5.

Click Add. In the dialog box that appears, select the user from the list and then click OK. Click OK.

Managing Permissions
Permissions are the allowed actions that a user can perform in a designated SQL Server database. You can give object or statement permissions to any user or database role. Users inherit the permissions of any roles to which they belong.

Setting Object Permissions


Object permissions control the actions that a user can perform on database objects, such as tables, indexes, views, defaults, triggers, rules, and procedures. You must be the owner (creator) of an object to grant and revoke permissions. You can grant object permissions by user and role, and by object.

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To grant object permissions by object 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Databases and then expand the database to which you want to add the object permission. For example, expand the Runtime database. Click the object type in the database list (table, stored procedure, view, and so on) to view all of the objects of that type. In the details pane, right-click on the object and then click Properties. The Object Properties dialog box appears. Click Permissions. The Object Properties - Permissions dialog box appears.

2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7.

For each user or role, select permissions to grant for the object. Click OK.

To grant object permissions by user or database role 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Databases and then expand the database to which you want to add the object permission. For example, expand the Runtime database.

2.

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3. 4. 5.

Click either Users or Roles. In the details pane, right-click on the user/role and then click Properties. The Database User Properties dialog box appears. Click Permissions. The Database User Properties - Permissions dialog box appears.

6. 7.

Select the object for which you want to grant permissions, and then select the permissions to grant. Click OK.

Setting Statement Permissions


Statement permissions control who can issue particular Transact-SQL statements, such as SELECT, INSERT, or DELETE. You must be a member of the sysadmin or db_owner roles to grant and revoke statement permissions. Note CREATE DATABASE permissions can only be set from the master database. To set statement permissions 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

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2. 3. 4.

Expand Databases and then right-click the database for which you want to set statement permissions. For example, right-click the Runtime database. Click Properties. The Database Properties dialog box appears. Click the Permissions tab.

5. 6.

Select the user or role to which you want to grant permissions, and then select the permissions to grant. Click OK.

Managing Passwords
The default passwords for all of the pre-configured IndustrialSQL Server historian users are based on the user names. For example, the password for "aaUser" is "pwUser." Important! If you are using mixed mode authentication, it is very important to have a password for the system administrator (sa) for the Microsoft SQL Server. If any user does not have a password, Wonderware reserves the right to refuse Technical Support services.

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If you are a member of the sysadmin role, you can change the password for any login. If you are not a member of the sysadmin role, you can modify only your own password. To change a password 1. In SQL Server Enterprise Manager, expand the server group and then expand the SQL Server associated with the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Expand Security and then click on Logins. In the details pane, right-click the user for which you want to change the password and then click Properties. The SQL Server Login Properties dialog box appears.

2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

In the Password box, type the new password. Click OK. In the dialog box that appears, confirm the new password and then click OK.

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Adding a User to a Windows Operating System Group


When the IndustrialSQL Server historian is installed, default Windows security groups are created on the server computer and are automatically configured to be members of the database roles with the same names. If Windows authentication mode is used with SQL Server, you can simply add Windows users to these groups. You must be an administrator to add a user to a group. To add a user to a group 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Computer Management. The Computer Management console appears.

2. 3.

Expand System Tools, expand Local Users and Groups, and then click Groups. In the details pane, right-click on the name of the historian group to which you want to add a user.

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4.

In the shortcut menu that appears, click Add to Group. The <Group Name> Properties dialog box appears.

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5.

Click Add. The Select Users or Groups dialog box appears.

6. 7. 8. 9.

Select the user(s) and/or other group(s) to add to the historian group. Click Add. Click OK. The <Group Name> Properties dialog box appears, showing the new user(s) and/or group(s) in the Members window. Click OK.

Changing the Windows Login for IndustrialSQL Server Historian Services


Use the ArchestrA Change Network Account Utility to change the Windows login for the IndustrialSQL Server historian services. WARNING! Changing the Windows login account affects all ArchestrA components that run as services, not just historian services. If you change the account, you will be required to restart the computer.

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To change the Windows login ID 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to the Wonderware program group, point to Common, and then click Change Network Account. The Change Network Account dialog box appears.

2.

Enter the parameters for the Windows login. For more information, see the Change Network Account Utility documentation.

3.

Click OK.

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Viewing or Changing SystemWide Properties

Some administrative tasks apply to the entire IndustrialSQL Server historian system, such as configuring system parameters or committing configuration changes. You can also view a system report that includes information such as tag counts and data acquisition details.

Contents Viewing License Information Editing System Parameters Committing Configuration Changes Turning Modification Tracking On/Off Viewing Database Modifications Viewing the Runtime Database Report Changing the Default Network Protocol

Viewing License Information


For more information on licensing, see "Licensing" in Chapter 1, "Requirements and Recommendations," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Installation Guide. To view license information 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group, then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click View License Information. The License Information dialog box appears.

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3.

Click the General tab.

4.

Review the general license options: Server The IndustrialSQL Server historian to which the options apply. Status The status of license validation. Tag Count The total number of tags for which the historian will acquire and store data. The tag count does not apply to system and event tags. Serial Number A unique number that is associated with the purchase of a license by a customer. Vendor The name of the company that sold the license. Licensee The name under which the license is registered.

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5.

Click the Features tab.

6.

Review the features available for the license. Tag Count The total number of tags for which the historian will acquire and store data. The tag count does not apply to system and event tags. Clustered Operation Indicates whether the historian is licensed to run on a Microsoft failover cluster. If the historian is running on a cluster and this feature line exists, "Valid" is shown. If the feature line does not exist, "Unlicensed" is shown. If the historian is not running on a cluster, "N/A" is shown. Server Operating System Indicates whether the historian is licensed to run on a particular Microsoft Server operating system. If the historian is running on a licensed server operating system and this feature line exists, "Valid" is shown. If the feature line does not exist, "Unlicensed" is shown. If the historian is not running on a server operating system, "N/A" is shown. Number of Remote IDAS Allowed The maximum number of remote IDASs allowed. Data Modification Indicates whether modifications to historical data is allowed. History Duration (Days) The maximum duration, in days, of historical data that is allowed.

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Number of Processors Allowed The maximum number of processors (CPUs) allowed in the historian computer. 7. Click OK.

Refreshing the License Information


The Configuration Manager provides updated license information according to the refresh rate for the IndustrialSQL Server status display, if enabled. However, you can manually force the Configuration Manager to read the license file and refresh the license information. Note Reading the license file may take a few minutes if you have drastically changed your tag counts since the last read. To refresh the license information 1. 2. 3. In the System Management Console, expand a server group, then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Refresh License Information. A confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK.

Editing System Parameters


Note Not all system parameters are editable. For a list of system parameters, see "System Parameters" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. To edit a system parameter 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group, expand the server, and then expand Configuration Editor. Expand System Configuration and then click Parameters. A list of all of the system parameters appears in the details pane.

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3.

Double-click the system parameter you want to edit. The System Parameter Properties dialog box appears.

4. 5. 6.

In the Value box, type a new value of the system parameter. (Optional) In the Description box, type a new description of the system parameter. Click OK.

Adding a System Parameter


You can create your own named system parameters for the IndustrialSQL Server historian by adding rows to the SystemParameter table using a SQL script.

Committing Configuration Changes


After you make a change to the database (for example, add a tag), you must commit the change to the IndustrialSQL Server historian system. All database changes are immediately implemented. However, database modifications are not applied to the system until you commit them. You are committing the changes to the system, not the database. The system reconfigures itself with no interruption for unaffected objects in the database. Changes cannot be committed:

During the first five minutes after starting the historian. During the creation of a new data block because of a prior change.

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For more information, see "Dynamic Configuration" in Chapter 3, "Configuration Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. To commit configuration changes to the system 1. 2. In the System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Configuration Editor (or any sub-items in the console tree) and then click Commit Pending Changes. The Commit Pending Changes - Confirmation dialog box appears.

3.

To view a list of the pending changes, click Display.

Column descriptions are as follows: Object Type Used to indicate the type of object to which the modifications apply. Status Used to indicate the type of modification. Object Key The unique identifier of the modified object. If the modified object is a system parameter, the value will be 0. For all other object types, the value is from one of the following tables and columns: IODriver.IODriverKey; IOServer.IOServerKey; Topic.TopicKey; Tag.wwTagKey; StorageLocation.StorageType; SnapshotDetail.StorageSize. Item The key identifier for the column modified in the table. For example, TagName for the Tag table, Name for the Topic table, and so on. 4. 5. To commit the outstanding changes, click Commit. An information box appears, showing the status of the reconfiguration.

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6.

Click OK.

Turning Modification Tracking On/Off


Use the ModLogTrackingStatus system parameter to configure modification tracking. The following table describes the allowable values: Value 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Type of Modification(s) Tracked inserts updates inserts + updates deletions inserts + deletions updates + deletions inserts + updates + deletions

For information on editing system parameters, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. For more information on modification tracking, see "Modification Tracking" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Viewing Database Modifications


For more information on modification tracking, see "Modification Tracking" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. You can search for all database modifications or apply filtering to return modifications for only those tables and columns you specify. Note To view database modifications, you must enable modification tracking. For more information, see "Turning Modification Tracking On/Off" on page 183. To view a current list of modifications 1. In the System Management Console, expand a server group, and then expand a server.

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2.

Right-click on Configuration Editor (or any sub-items in the console tree) and then click Track Modifications. The Modification Tracker Selection dialog box appears.

3.

In the Modification Date area, configure the time span for the search. All Modification Dates Returns all changes to table columns made since modification tracking was first enabled. Between Returns all modifications between the start date and end date that you specify. Click the date arrow to access a calendar in which you can pick the date. During the Previous Returns all modifications for a recent time period. Durations can be in minutes, hours, days, weeks, or months.

4. 5.

In the Modification Type area, select the type(s) of modifications to search for. In the Object Type area, set the type of modifications to search for. Table Name Returns modifications for all tables in the database or for a specified table. Only tables that currently have modifications appear in the list.

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Column Name Returns modifications for a specified column in the selected table. This option is only available if you select to filter on a single table. Object Key The key identifier for the column modified in the table. For example, TagName for the Tag table, Name for the Topic table, and so on. 6. 7. To reset the dialog box options back to the defaults, click Clear. Click Search to search for database modifications according to the filter options you select. A list of all matching modifications appears.

Column descriptions are as follows: Date and Time The timestamp of when the modification occurred. Table The name of the modified object. Column The name of the modified column. Modification Type The type of modification. Row Key The key identifier for the column modified in the table. For example, TagName for the Tag table, Name for the Topic table, and so on. New Value The new value stored in the column, if the modification was to a configuration table. For modifications to history data, this column contains the total count of consecutive value updates attempted. Old Value The value stored in the column before the modification was made, if the modification was to a configuration table. For modifications to history data using SQL INSERT and UPDATE statements, this column contains the timestamp of the earliest data affected by the INSERT or UPDATE operation. If multiple changes are made to the same data, then only the most recent change will be contained in this column. This column is not used for modifications made to history data using a CSV file.

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User The name of the database user that made the modification. The value of this column reflects the Windows authentication user name (for example, DOMAIN\user_login_name) or the SQL Server authentication user name (for example, dbo), depending on how the user is logged into the SQL Server when the modification is made. In the case of a CSV file import, this column contains the user name as it appears in the CSV file. 8. 9. To sort on a column, click the column name at the top of the window. Click Cancel to close the dialog box.

Viewing the Runtime Database Report


The Runtime database report includes information such as:


1.

System parameters Total number of licensed tags Number of cyclically-stored tags for each storage rate Number of analog tags for each storage type (delta, cyclic, or "forced") Acquisition subsystem details Event tag definitions Summary information

To view the database report In the System Management Console, expand a server group, and then expand a server.

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2.

Click Configuration Editor. The report appears in the details pane.

3. 4.

Click on a major heading in the report to view a list of objects for that category. To select, copy, or print the information, right-click in the window and then click the appropriate command from the shortcut menu.

Changing the Default Network Protocol


IndustrialSQL client/server connections are set up in the same way as Microsoft SQL Server connections. No additional configuration is required to run client applications against the IndustrialSQL Server historian if you are using the default named pipes protocol. However, you can change the client configuration parameters by using the SQL Server Client Network Utility. The historian supports clients using NetLibraries for named pipes, IPX/SPX, TCP/IP sockets, and any other protocol supported by Microsoft SQL Server. For more information changing the network protocol used by clients, see the documentation for the Microsoft SQL Server Client Network Utility.

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Monitoring the System

Performance of the IndustrialSQL Server historian can be considered in two conceptual contexts; as processes running within the Windows operating system, and as software modules acquiring and storing data.

Contents Monitoring the General Status of an IndustrialSQL Server Historian Monitoring Data Acquisition Monitoring Client Connections Monitoring System Messages Monitoring System Tags from within InTouch HMI Software Using Windows Performance Logs and Alerts Viewing Message Logs from Previous Versions

Monitoring the General Status of an IndustrialSQL Server Historian


To monitor the status 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then click Status. The overall status information appears in the details pane.

A snapshot of the current system status. For more information, see "Viewing the Current System Status" on page 190. The status of different components of the system. For more information, see "Viewing the Status of System Modules" on page 192. A log of status messages. For more information, see "Viewing System Status Messages" on page 193.

Note The information in the details pane is refreshed according to the rate specified in the registration properties for the server. For more information, see "Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians" on page 16.

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Viewing the Current System Status


The system status window of the details pane shows the current values for key system tags.

Many of the items in the display are self-explanatory. All timestamps reflect the time of the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer, which may be different than for the System Management Console that is running on a remote computer. However, all timestamps are formatted according to the Windows regional settings for the local computer. Descriptions for some of the items are as follows: Time of last reconfiguration The time that the last reconfiguration of the system was committed. For more information, see "Dynamic Configuration" in Chapter 3, "Configuration Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. System status The current status of the system.The icon for the corresponding server in the console tree will reflect the current state. Icon State Connecting Unchecked Starting Running Stopping

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Icon

State Stopped Disconnected

License status The status of license validation. For more information on licensing, see "Licensing" in Chapter 1, "Requirements and Recommendations," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Installation Guide. Number of tags in database The total number of all tags in the database. Number of licensed tags in database The total number of tags for which the historian will acquire and store data. The tag count does not apply to system and event tags. Total number of data values received The number of tag values received since the System Management Console was started up. This value is continuously updated as long as the system is running. Overall data rate Average rate (per second) at which data values are acquired by the system. Fatal errors, critical errors, errors and warnings The number of errors detected since the IndustrialSQL Server historian was restarted or since an error reset was performed. For more information on errors, see "System Messages" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Time of last error reset The time that the error count was reset back to 0. For more information, see "Resetting Error Counts" on page 191. Space available on XXX path The total amount of space for historical data storage in the storage location. For more information about storage locations, see "History Block Storage Locations" in Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. System version The current version of the IndustrialSQL Server historian.

Resetting Error Counts


Error counts are automatically set to zero at system startup and shutdown. You can also set the error counts back to zero at any time. To reset error counts 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Right-click on Management Console, point to All Tasks, and then click Reset Error Counts. The Reset InSQL Server Error Counts confirmation box appears.

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3.

Click OK. The number of errors shown in the system status window resets to 0.

Viewing the Status of System Modules


The module status window of the details pane indicates whether or not the module is started.

See the following table to find out more about each of these modules. Module Storage, manual storage, and indexing Event system For more information, see Chapter 5, "Data Storage Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Retreival, OLE DB provider, InSQLIOS System driver

Data acquisition

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Viewing System Status Messages


Status messages are shown in the bottom window of the details pane. These messages are also written to the ArchestrA Log Viewer (not all messages written to the Log Viewer are shown here). For more information on the Log Viewer, see "Monitoring System Messages" on page 195.

Monitoring Data Acquisition


You can monitor the status of data acquisition from all configured data sources. This allows you to monitor how individual data sources are performing compared to past history or to another data source. For more information on data acquisition, see Chapter 4, "Data Acquisition Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. To view data acquisition status 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then click Data Acquisition. The data acquisition information will appear in the details pane.

Note The information in the details pane is refreshed according to the rate specified in the registration properties for the server. For more information, see "Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians" on page 16. Column descriptions are as follows: Computer The name of the computer on which the data source runs. Topic The name of the topic.

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Protocol The protocol used by the IndustrialSQL Server historian to communicate with the data source. Tags The total number of tags associated with the data source. Status The status of data acquisition from the data source. Values The total number of tag values received from the data source. Rate Average number of data values received from the topic, per second. Connections Number of connections to the I/O Server for the topic. This number is incremented.

Monitoring Client Connections


To view the client connection status 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then click Clients. The client connection information will appear in the details pane.

Note The information in the details pane is refreshed according to the rate specified in the registration properties for the server. For more information, see "Registering IndustrialSQL Server Historians" on page 16. Column descriptions are as follows: ID Unique number that the IndustrialSQL Server historian assigns to the client. Application The executable name of the application that is accessing the historian. Computer The name of the computer on which the application in running. User The Windows login name under which the client application is running. Connected At The start time of the connection. Duration The length of time that the client has been connected.

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For the Connected At and Duration columns, the timestamp reflects the time of the historian, shown using the Windows regional settings for the local computer.

Monitoring System Messages


System messages provide information about the state of the IndustrialSQL Server historian as it starts up, runs, or shuts down. For more information about system messages, see "System Messages" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. From within the System Management Console, you can view the system messages generated by the IndustrialSQL Server historian using the Log Viewer. To view system messages 1. 2. In the console tree, expand Log Viewer and then expand Default Group. Click Local. All of the messages appear in the details pane.

For more information on the Log Viewer, see the Log Viewer documentation.

Viewing Errors in the Windows Event Viewer


The Event Viewer is an administrative tool provided with Windows for managing error log files. It allows the logs on any workstation or server to be viewed from any other workstation or server that is connected via a network. The Event Viewer can be used to check the logs for the following type of messages:

Error messages from the operating system. Messages confirming that scheduled Windows events occurred correctly. Error messages from IndustrialSQL Server historian.

There are hundreds of messages that can appear in the logs, depending on how your system is configured and how healthy it is. It is important to know what the messages mean and what action is required.

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To view errors in the Event Viewer 1. 2. 3. 4. Start up the Event Viewer. In the console tree, click Application. Messages from all applications appear in the details pane. On the View menu, click Filter. The Application Properties dialog box appears. Click the Filter tab.

5.

In the Event source list, click Historian.

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6.

Click OK. The details pane shows only IndustrialSQL Server historian errors.

7.

To view the message text, double-click on the message in the details pane.

Monitoring System Tags from within InTouch HMI Software


The overall health of an IndustrialSQL Server historian is monitored continuously by a dedicated system driver. Critical system variables (throughput rates, errors, remaining disk space, and so on) and timing counters are acquired by the system driver and stored in the same manner as plant tags. This driver allows remote monitoring of the current and historical state of the historian, and alerts users to problems in the system. For more information on the system tags, see "The System Driver and System Tags" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. For example, you can write an InTouch application that monitors the historian system health tags. Monitoring the overall health via the system tags is done from the "top" of the system, ensuring that each layer of the system is working properly, from the acquisition layer up through the historian:

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Using Windows Performance Logs and Alerts


You can use Microsoft Performance Logs and Alerts console to monitor system variables that pertain to your computer's operating system and hardware. Performance Logs and Alerts allows you to view different types of counters that have been incorporated into the Windows operating system. In Performance Logs and Alerts, "counters" are associated with objects and with instances of objects. Objects include memory, processes, servers, system, and so on. Instances of objects identify, for example, specific processes. Counters include such measurements as percentage of processor time, private bytes, available memory, and so on. The available counters depend on the object and the instances selected. You can select one or more process instances so that the Performance Logs and Alerts provides measurements of counters for, for example, all the IndustrialSQL Server historian processes running within the Windows operating system. Using counters within Performance Logs and Alerts can provide valuable information to assist in system tuning and to identify bottlenecks in a sluggish system. Using the Pool Non-paged Bytes counter of the memory object, for instance, can identify memory leaks that contribute to a poorly responsive system. For information on using Performance Logs and Alerts, see the documentation for your Windows operating system.

Viewing Message Logs from Previous Versions


A message log is a file that stores information about the state of the IndustrialSQL Server as it starts up, runs, or shuts down. For more information about system messages, see "System Messages" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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Message logs only appear in the Management Console if you upgraded from a version prior to IndustrialSQL Server 9.0 and retained both the database and the data files. IndustrialSQL Server versions 9.0 and later log errors to the ArchestrA Logger, where they can be viewed with the ArchestrA Log Viewer. From within the System Management Console, you can view a list of all message log files and all of the messages contained within each one. The timestamps included in the message display are formatted according to the Windows regional settings for the local computer.

Viewing Message Logs in the System Management Console


The timestamps shown in the details pane reflect the time of the IndustrialSQL Server historian, shown using the Windows regional settings for the local computer. Note Message logs only appear in the Management Console if you upgraded from a version prior to IndustrialSQL Server 9.0. To view a message log 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then click Log. The message logs appear in the details pane.

Note The log file data is refreshed upon the initial display, but is not automatically refreshed after that. To manually refresh the view, rightclick in the details pane and then click Refresh. Column descriptions are as follows: Name The filename of the message log. To see the full path to the log file, select Log in the Console tree. On the View menu, click Add/Remove Columns. In the Add/Remove Columns dialog box, move "Full Name" from the Available columns window to the Displayed columns window. Click OK. Size The current size of the file.

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Created The date that the log file was created. Modified The timestamp of the most recent addition to the log file. 3. To view the contents of a log, double-click on it.

The message data is automatically refreshed about once every second. Column descriptions are as follows: Logged at The date that the message was written to the system log, in the local time of the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Type The type of system message. Message The message text. Parameters Optional details pertaining to the message text. For example, for the message "Disk space remaining on circular path" the parameter would contain the number of MB. Count Used to prevent "flooding" conditions in the log file. If a particular message is generated numerous times during a relatively short period of time, the message is written to the log file only once, and the total number of times that it occurred appears in this column. Module A unique number assigned to the IndustrialSQL Server subsystem that generated the message. Host The computer on which the IndustrialSQL Server subsystem runs. File Used to indicate the program file that contains the line of code that an error message comes from. Used for debugging. Line Used to indicate the line of code that an error message comes from. Used for debugging.

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Code Unique identifier for the message text string in a particular language. This value is stored in the TextKey column of the LocalizedText table. First Instance Typically, the same as the Logged At column, except when the generation of multiple errors prevents timely logging of the message. This column shows when the first message was generated. Sequence Unique identifier for the line in the log file. You can rearrange or hide any of the columns in the details pane. To relocate a column, select the column header and, while holding down the right mouse button, drag the header to the desired location. To hide a column, right-click on the column header and deselect the column name from the list.

Changing the Default Language for the System Messages


You can change the default language for system messages (for example, errors) in the System Management Console. You must have the required language fonts installed on the System Management Console computer for the messages to display correctly. Note Changing the language for the display of system messages does not change the default language of the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Note Message logs only appear in the Management Console if you upgraded from a version prior to IndustrialSQL Server 9.0. To change the default language for system messages 1. 2. 3. 4. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then expand Log. Right-click on the log file. In the shortcut menu that appears, point to All Tasks and then click Load Messages. The Download Message Text dialog box appears.

5. 6.

In the Message Text Language list, select the new language for the message text. Click OK. System messages immediately appear in the selected language.

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Changing the Log Path


The path to the system message log folder is specified by the LogPath system parameter. For information on changing the value, see "Editing System Parameters" on page 180. Note Message logs only appear in the Management Console if you upgraded from a version prior to IndustrialSQL Server 9.0.

Copying or Saving the Contents of the Log


You can copy some or all of the contents of the log file and paste it into any Windows application that can accept information from the Windows clipboard. You can also save single, multiple, or all messages to a CSV file. Note Message logs only appear in the Management Console if you upgraded from a version prior to IndustrialSQL Server 9.0. To copy the log contents 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Management Console and then expand Log. Click the log file. The contents of the log appears in the details pane. Select the message(s) to copy. Right-click in the details pane and click Copy (or Copy All). Open the Windows application to which you want to copy the information and paste in the contents.

To save the log contents 1. 2. In the System Management Console tree, expand Log and then click the log file. The contents of the log appears in the details pane. Select the message(s) to save.

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3.

Right-click in the details pane and click Save (or Save All). The Save As dialog box appears.

4. 5.

In the Save in list, select a folder into which to save the file. In the Save as type list, select the file type. Note If you double-click an ANSI CSV file in Windows Explorer, the file opens in Microsoft Excel. To view the contents of a unicode CSV file in Excel, you must open the file from within Excel and then convert the content when prompted. By default, Excel shows the milliseconds for the timestamp in tenths of a second. You can see milliseconds by creating a custom date format that includes the "mm:ss:0" number format code and applying it to the column that contains the timestamps.

6. 7.

In the File name box, type a name for the file. Click Save.

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1 0

Configuring Events

You can use the event subsystem to set up the detection of events and to associate actions with those events. At a basic level, anything that can be determined by looking at historical or system data can be used as an event. Important! The event system is not a real-time system; rather, it operates on historical data. For real-time alarming, use an application such as InTouch HMI software. When setting up an event, you will need to provide the following information:

The criteria for the event. For example, the value of an analog tag being equal to 1500 could be an event. Also, the system clock on the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer reaching 9:30 a.m. on Monday morning could be an event. How often you want the event subsystem to check if the event has occurred. This is called event detection. Whether or not you want information about the event detection logged in the database. Whether or not you want to execute an action as a result of a successful event detection and the type of action. For example, send an e-mail.

The configuration information for the detection and action for a particular event must be given a unique name, which is stored as an event tag. For conceptual information on the event system, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

Contents Accessing Event Information Adding an Event Tag Editing General Information for an Event Tag Configuring Detectors Configuring Actions Using the Tag Finder Retrieving Logged Event Data Viewing Summary Information
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Using ActiveEvent

Accessing Event Information


To access event information 1. 2. 3. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Click Event Tags. All configured event tags appear in the details pane.

Adding an Event Tag


To add an event tag 1. 2. 3. 4. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Click Event Tags. Start the Event Tag wizard by doing any of the following:

Click the

button on the toolbar.

On the Action menu, click New Tag. Right-click Event Tags, and then click New Tag.

The New Event Tag wizard appears.

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5.

In the Unique Tag Name box, type a unique name for the event tag. For information on allowable tagnames, see "Naming Conventions for Tags" in Chapter 2, "System-Level Functionality," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide. Click Next. You are prompted to define general information for the event tag.

6.

7.

Configure the general options for the event tag. For more information, see "Editing General Information for an Event Tag" on page 209.

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8.

Click Next. You are prompted to configure the detector for the event tag.

9.

Configure the detector for the event tag. Detectors are external, generic SQL, analog specific value, discrete specific value, and schedule. The lower portion of the dialog box changes based on the detector type that you select. For information on configuring an external detector, see "Configuring an External Detector" on page 214. For information on configuring an analog or discrete specific value detector, see "Configuring a Specific Value Detector" on page 211. For information on configuring a schedule detector, see "Configuring a Schedule Detector" on page 213. For information on configuring a generic SQL detector, see "Configuring a Generic SQL Detector" on page 213.

10. Click Next.

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11. You are prompted to configure the action for the event tag.

12. Configure the action for the event tag. Actions are none, generic SQL, snapshot, e-mail, deadband, and summary. The lower portion of the dialog box changes based on the action type that you select. For information on configuring a generic SQL action, see "Configuring a Generic SQL Action" on page 217. For information on configuring a snapshot action, see "Configuring a Snapshot Action" on page 216. For information on configuring an e-mail action, see "Configuring an Email Action" on page 218. For information on configuring a deadband action, see "Configuring a Deadband Action" on page 215. For information on configuring a summary action, see "Configuring a Summary Action" on page 222. 13. Click Finish.

Editing General Information for an Event Tag


General information for an event tag includes information about the tag definition. Event detectors and actions are defined separately and then associated with an event tag. To edit general information for an event tag 1. 2. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration.

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3. 4. 5.

Click Event Tags. In the details pane, double-click on the event tag to edit. The Properties dialog box appears. Click the General property tab.

6. 7. 8.

In the Description box, type a description of the tag. Click Enabled to allow the detector and action for this event tag to run. Click Logged to specify whether or not to log events for this tag into the EventHistory table. Event logging can only be turned off if no associated actions are configured. In the Priority list, select a priority level for the action, either critical or normal. The priority level determines the sorting queue to which the action will be sent. The critical queue is used for highly important events. If a system overload condition occurs, events that are given a critical priority will always be processed first. Events that are given a normal priority will be processed after any critical events and may possibly be dropped (that is, not performed) on an overloaded system. For more information, see "Event Action Priorities" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

9.

10. Click OK.

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Configuring Detectors
You can set up the following types of detectors: analog specific value, discrete specific value, schedule, generic SQL, and external. Note If you change an event tag from using any SQL based detector to a time based detector, or vice-versa, stop and restart the event system. Or, delete the existing event tag and recreate it using the desired dectector.

Configuring a Specific Value Detector


The configuration is basically the same for analog and discrete specific value detectors, with only a few small differences. To configure a specific value detector 1. In the Detector Type list, select Analog Specific Value or Discrete Specific Value.

2.

In the Time Interval box, type the interval, in milliseconds, at which the system checks to see if the event conditions specified by the detector occurred. This value must be greater than or equal to 500 milliseconds, and less than or equal to 1 hour (3600000 ms). Be careful when assigning time intervals to event tags. For more information, see "Time Intervals for SQL-Based Detectors" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

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3.

In the Edge Detection list, select the "edge" for the event detection. A leading edge detection returns only rows that are the first to successfully meet the criteria (return true) after a row did not successfully meet the criteria (returned false). A trailing edge detection returns only rows that are the first to fail the criteria (return false) after a row successfully met the criteria (returned true). For more information, see "wwEdgeDetection" in Chapter 6, "Data Retrieval Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

4.

In the Tag Name box, type the name of the tag to which the event criteria will be applied. To search the database for a tag, click Search. The Tag Finder dialog box appears, in which you can query the database for tags. For more information, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225. Set the value criteria for the tag. If you are configuring an analog specific value detector, in the Operator box, select an operator for the criteria. Then, in the Detection Value box, type a value against which the stored values for the tag are compared to determine if the event occurred.

5.

If you are configuring a discrete specific value detector, in the State Value list, select the target state of the discrete tag that causes the event to occur.

6.

If you selected None in Edge Detection list, you can specify a resolution for the data. In the Resolution box, type a sampling rate, in milliseconds, for retrieving the data in cyclic mode. The system returns values stored over the requested time period at the interval specified by the resolution. For example, if you specify a 5000 ms resolution, the system queries for all data during the time period and then only returns those values that occur at each 5000 ms interval, starting with the start date and ending with the end date.

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Configuring a Schedule Detector


To configure a schedule detector 1. In the Detector Type list, select Schedule.

2.

In the Frequency area, select how often you want the event to occur. When you select a frequency, different options to the right of the Frequency group become available.

3.

Configure the time specific for the selected frequency.

Configuring a Generic SQL Detector


The IndustrialSQL Server historian does not validate the SQL query syntax. First test the SQL query using a tool such as Microsoft SQL Server Query Analyzer.

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To configure a generic SQL detector 1. In the Detector Type list, select Generic SQL.

2.

In the Time Interval box, type the interval, in milliseconds, at which the system checks to see if the event conditions specified by the detector occurred. This value must be greater than or equal to 500 milliseconds, and less than or equal to 1 hour (3600000 ms). Be careful when assigning time intervals to event tags. For more information, see "Time Intervals for SQL-Based Detectors" in Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

3.

In the Detector Query window, enter the ad-hoc query that detects the event. To open a list of SQL templates to use for your query, click Templates. To clear the window, click Clear.

4.

Configuring an External Detector


An external detector is triggered using the IndustrialSQL Server historian ActiveEvent control. The detector is a COM component and has an external interface. An InTouch or Visual Basic script can trigger a historian event by using the ActiveEvent methods, which are similar to functions. Using the InvokeEventEx() method causes an external event to be detected within the event system. After you select "External" as your detector type, you need to configure the security attributes for the ActiveEvent control and write the script that invokes the event. For more information, see "Using ActiveEvent" on page 231.

Configuring Actions
You can set up the following types of actions: deadband, snapshot, generic SQL, e-mail, and summary.

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Configuring a Deadband Action


To configure a deadband action 1. In the Action Type list, select Deadband.

2.

To add one or more tags for which to set a new deadband, click Add. The Tag Finder dialog box appears, in which you can query the database for tags. For more information, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225. Select a tag in the Tag List list, and then click Properties. The Deadband Properties dialog box appears.

3.

4.

Configure the appropriate deadband(s) for the tag. Apply Time Deadband The minimum time, in milliseconds, between stored values for a single tag. Any value changes that occur within the time deadband are not stored. The time deadband applies to delta storage only. A time deadband of 0 indicates that the system will store the value of the tag each time it changes.

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Apply Value Deadband The percentage of the difference between the minimum and maximum engineering units for the tag. Any data values that change less than the specified deadband are not stored. The value deadband applies to delta storage only. A value of 0 indicates that a value deadband will not be applied. The value deadband applies only to analog tags. 5. 6. 7. Click OK. The changes appear in the Tag List window. To delete a tag from the Tag List window, select the tag and then click Delete. (Optional) In the Post Detector Delay box, type the amount of time, in milliseconds, that must elapse after an event is detected before the event action can be executed.

Note If the tag list contains a tag that is deleted from the Runtime database, then the word "Deleted" appears as the tag type for the tag.

Configuring a Snapshot Action


A snapshot action records the values of a selected mix of analog, discrete, and string tags at the time that the event occurred. To configure a snapshot action 1. In the Action Type list, select Snapshot.

All tags included in the snapshot are listed in the Snapshot Tag List list. Snapshots can include analog, discrete, and string tags. 2. To add one or more tags, click Add. The Tag Finder dialog box appears, in which you can query the database for tags. For more information, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225. To delete a tag, select the tag in the Snapshot Tag List list and then click Delete.

3.

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4.

(Optional) In the Post Detector Delay box, type the amount of time, in milliseconds, that must elapse after an event is detected before the event action can be executed.

Configuring a Generic SQL Action


The IndustrialSQL Server historian does not validate the SQL query syntax. First test the SQL query using a tool such as Microsoft SQL Server Query Analyzer. To configure a generic SQL action 1. In the Action Type list, select Generic SQL.

2.

In the Action Query window, enter the ad-hoc query that detects the event. To access a list of SQL templates to use for your query, click Templates. For information on using event system variables in your query, see Chapter 7, "Event Subsystem," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Concepts Guide.

3. 4.

To clear the window, click Clear. (Optional) In the Post Detector Delay box, type the amount of time, in milliseconds, that must elapse after an event is detected before the event action can be executed.

Generic SQL Action Template for Executing a Command


To configure a generic SQL statement that executes a command, select the "Invoke an External Application" option in the list of generic SQL action templates:
master..xp_cmdshell '<Your Command>', no_output

In the syntax, replace <Your Command> with the desired command. Be sure to enclose the command in single quotes. For example:

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master..xp_cmdshell 'dir *.exe', no_output

The xp_cmdshell extended stored procedure does not start up a Windows application. You can only execute simple DOS commands, batch files or executables (.EXEs) that do not display a user-interface window. You must have the correct permissions set for the xp_cmdshell extended stored procedure for it to run. For more information, see your Microsoft SQL Server documentation.

Generic SQL Action Templates for E-mail


WARNING! MAPI is not cluster-aware; therefore, SQL Mail is not fully supportable when used on a SQL Server Failover Cluster. If SQL Mail is used with clustering, Microsoft does not provide any guarantees of stability or availability and may only provide support on a "reasonable effort" basis. To configure a generic SQL statement that sends an e-mail message, select one of the "Send an E-mail message" options (one with a query and one without) in the list of generic SQL action templates. For example:
master..xp_sendmail @recipients = <ToWhom>, @message = 'The event @EventTagName occured at @EventTime', @query = <"Your query">, @no_output = 'true'

In the second line of the syntax, replace <ToWhom> with the e-mail display name or complete e-mail address of the intended recipient or recipients. Assign the e-mail message to the @message variable. Be sure to enclose the recipient(s) and the message in single quotes. For example:
master..xp_sendmail @recipients = 'John Doe', @message = 'Check this out', @query = 'SELECT TagName, DateTime FROM EventHistory WHERE TagName = "SysStatusEvent" AND DateTime = (SELECT Max (DateTime) FROM EventHistory WHERE TagName = "SysStatusEvent")', @no_output = 'true'

You must have the Microsoft SQL Server and the SQL Mail component set up properly in order for the xp_sendmail extended stored procedure to work correctly. For more information, see "Configuring an E-mail Action" on page 218.

Configuring an E-mail Action


An e-mail action sends a pre-configured e-mail message when an event occurs. For the event system to support e-mail actions, you must properly configure all of the following:

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SQL Server login Microsoft Outlook Mail Client SQL Mail functionality for Microsoft SQL Server E-mail action for the event system

Setting Up Microsoft SQL Server


For Microsoft SQL Mail to work correctly, Microsoft SQL Server must be configured to log on with a user account that has a valid MAPI mail profile. Perform these steps on the computer running the Microsoft SQL Server Service that will process the e-mail event. 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Component Services. The Component Services console appears.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

In the console tree, click Services. In the results pane, right-click on MSSQLServer and then click Properties. The Properties dialog box appears. Click the General tab. In the Startup Type list, click Automatic. Click the Log On tab. In the Log On As area, click This account. Enter the user account (domain or local) or click Browse to browse for a valid account. The user account you select needs to have a valid MAPI mail profile set up. For information on determining the MAPI mail profile, see "Determining the Microsoft Outlook Mail Profile" on page 220.

8.

In the Password and Confirm Password boxes, enter the password for the user account.

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9.

Click OK.

10. Right-click the MSSQL Server service in the results pane, and then click Stop to stop the service. 11. After the MSSQL service stops, right-click the MSSQL Server service in the results pane, and then click Start to restart the service. 12. Close the Component Services console. The next step in setting up an e-mail action is to determine the Microsoft Outlook profile. For more information, see "Determining the Microsoft Outlook Mail Profile" on page 220.

Determining the Microsoft Outlook Mail Profile


To properly set up the Microsoft SQL Server e-mail configuration, you will need to know the name of the MAPI mail profile for the MSSQL Server service logon account. You must determine the MAPI profile name on the computer running MSSQL Server. To determine the MAPI profile name 1. 2. 3. In Control Panel, double-click Mail. Click Show Profiles. Determine the MAPI mail profile. The mail profile is commonly set to "MS Exchange Settings" so that the use the user's profile on an Exchange Server is used. 4. Click OK.

For more information on configuring user accounts for the Exchange Client, see your Microsoft documentation. The next step in setting up an e-mail action is to configuring SQL mail in SQL Server Enterprise Manager. For more information, see "Setting Up SQL Mail in SQL Enterprise Manager" on page 220.

Setting Up SQL Mail in SQL Enterprise Manager


SQL mail is set up using the SQL Server Enterprise Manager. Make sure that the Microsoft SQL Server is running. For more information on configuring mail profiles, see your Microsoft SQL Server documentation.

Configuring the E-mail Action


Note Only Microsoft Outlook addresses can be used. Internet addresses are not directly supported.

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To configure an e-mail action 1. In the Action Type list, select E-mail.

2.

In the To line, enter the Outlook e-mail address of the person(s) to whom you want to send the e-mail message when the event occurs. You can also send a copy of the e-mail to one or more persons in the Cc line. You can access the address book of the e-mail account by clicking the To or Cc button.

3. 4. 5.

In the Subject line, enter a synopsis of the e-mail. If you do not provide text for the subject line, "SQL Server Message" is used by default. Enter the e-mail text in the Message window. (Optional) In the Post Detector Delay box, type the amount of time, in milliseconds, that must elapse after an event is detected before the event action can be executed.

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Configuring a Summary Action


To configure a summary action 1. In the Action Type list, select Summary.

2. 3.

To add a new summary operation, click Add and define the operation. For more information, see "Adding a Summary Operation" on page 222. To assign analog or discrete tags to a summary operation, select the summary operation in the list and then click Tags. For more information on adding a summary tag, see "Assigning a Tag to a Summary Operation" on page 224. To delete a summary action, select the summary operation in the window and then click Delete. To clear the window of all summary operations, click Clear All. To modify a summary action, select the summary operation in the window and then click Properties. For more information on the dialog box that appears, see "Adding a Summary Operation" on page 222. If you modify a summary operation, you may see inconsistencies between old summary data and new summary data. You can not save the modified summary operation if its criteria is identical to an existing summary operation associated with the current event tag.

4. 5. 6.

7.

(Optional) In the Post Detector Delay box, type the amount of time, in milliseconds, that must elapse after an event is detected before the event action can be executed.

Adding a Summary Operation


You can add multiple summary operations for a single summary action, as long as no two summary operations have the exact same configuration.

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To add a summary operation 1. In the summary action options, click Add. The Summary Operation Properties dialog box appears.

2. 3.

In the Calculation Type list, select the type of calculation to be performed: SUM, MAX, MIN, or AVG. In the Time Stamp list, select the timestamp to use when storing the result of the calculation. This can either be the time of when the calculation period starts or the time when it ends. In the Resolution box, enter sampling rate, in milliseconds, for retrieving the data in cyclic mode. The system returns values stored over the requested time period at the interval specified by the resolution. For example, if you specify a 5000 ms resolution, the system queries for all data during the time period and then only returns those values that occur at each 5000 ms interval, starting with the start date and ending with the end date. In general, the higher the resolution, the more accurate the result, because you are including more values into your aggregation. However, the calculation takes longer and consume more server resources. Avoid very fine resolutions for summary actions associated with schedule detectors that cover long periods of time, such as weekly. Resolution is also very useful when calculating SUMS. For example, setting the resolution to 60,000 milliseconds for a flow in gallons per minute automatically produces a result that is the total volume.

4.

5.

In the Duration group, select the period for which the calculation must be performed. For example, if you are associating a summary action with a duration of 1 hour with a detector that is scheduled for 3:00 a.m. every Monday, then the system performs the aggregation on values stored between 2:00 a.m. and 3:00 a.m. on Mondays.

6. 7.

In the Description box, type a description of the summary operation. Click OK.

The new summary operation now appears in the summary action grid.

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Assigning a Tag to a Summary Operation


You can add more than one tag to a single summary. Note You cannot add string tags to a summary operation. To assign a tag to a summary operation 1. In the summary action options, select the summary operation in the list and then click Tags. The Summary Tag List dialog box appears.

2.

To search for a tag in the database, click Add. The Tag Finder dialog box appears, in which you can query the database for tags. For more information, see "Using the Tag Finder" on page 225.

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3.

After you add a tag, select the tag in the list and then click Properties. The Summary Tag List Properties dialog box appears.

4.

In the Lower Limit and Upper Limit boxes, set the validity range for the summary tag. Setting a validity range allows you to control the lower or higher limits at which the calculation is performed. Upper Limit The upper limit of validity for the tag's value. Values higher than this limit are not used in the calculation. By default, this value is set to 1000000000. Lower Limit The lower limit of validity for the tag's value. Values lower than this limit are not used in the calculation. By default, this value is set to -1000000000. For example, if the lower validity range is 1000, the calculation algorithm ignores all returned data with a value lower than 1000 when performing the aggregation.

5.

In the Description box, type a description of the summarized tag. This normally describes the result of the operation, although this description can be the same as that of the tag on which the operation is performed. Click OK. The new summary operation tag will appears in the Summary Tag List dialog box. To delete a summary tag from the list, select the tag and then click Delete. To delete all of the summary tags, click Clear All.

6. 7. 8.

Using the Tag Finder


You can search the database for tags using the Tag Finder dialog box. This dialog box can be accessed, for example, by clicking the Search or Add button in a dialog box.

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Using the Tag Finder, you can quickly search the database for tags that match a particular search pattern for either a tagname or a tag's description. You can either search for tags by using the point-and-click interface or by typing in your own SQL statement. After the Tag Finder returns a set of tags that match the query, you can select the ones you want to include.

Using the Form Query Tab


Use the Form Query tab of the Tag Finder dialog box to select the criteria for the database search.

To form and execute the query 1. 2. In the Tag Name list, choose the phrase for the search criteria for the tagname. For example, "Ends with." Enter the tagname search parameters for the query. For example, "level". When searching for tags, you only need to specify wildcard characters to exclude a middle portion of the search word. For example, "le%el". To exclude the parameter for a search, click Not. To add search parameters for a tag's description, select a logical operator from the Operator list. In the Description list, choose the phrase for the search criteria for the tag description. This field is optional.

3. 4. 5.

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6.

Enter the tag description search parameters for the query. This field is optional. When searching for tags, you only need wildcard characters to exclude a middle portion of the description. To exclude the parameter for a search, click Not. In the Tag Types area, select a tag group to search. After you set the query parameters, click Find Now to run the query. The results of a tag search appears in the Found Tags window of the Tag Finder dialog box.

7. 8. 9.

10. To add a tag, select the tag in the Found Tags window and then use the arrow button to move the selected tag into the Target Tags window. 11. Click OK. To view the syntax used to query the database, click the SQL Query tab.

Using the SQL Query Tab


Use the SQL Query tab of the Tag Finder dialog box to enter and run your own SQL queries against the database.

To form and execute the query 1. In the query window, type in the WHERE clause parameters for the SQL query.

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Note You cannot change the SELECT statement. The required tables and columns for the query result are already entered for you. 2. After you enter the query parameters, click Find Now to run the query. The results of a tag search appears in the Found Tags area of the Tag Finder dialog box. 3. 4. To add a tag, select the tag in the Found Tags window and then use the arrow button to move the selected tag into the Target Tags window. Click OK.

Retrieving Logged Event Data


When an event is detected, the event system logs the following into the EventHistory table: 1) the name of the event tag to which the criteria is associated; 2) the date/time stamp of the event occurrence; 3) the time the event is detected, and 4) the detection criteria information. The detection criteria information, shown in the Edge column, is as follows: Value 0 1 2 3 4 5 Description Trailing Edge Detection (SQL Detectors) Leading Edge Detection (SQL Detectors) Detection on Both Edges (SQL Detectors) No Edge Detection (SQL Detectors) Schedule Detection External Detection

If a snapshot action was configured for the event, the snapshot data is logged between the SnapshotTag table and the snapshot table for the tag type (for example, the AnalogSnapshot table). If a summary action is configured for the event, the aggregated data is stored in the SummaryHistory and SummaryData tables. To view the event history, perform a query on EventHistory table. For example, an event tag, "EventTag1" detects when the value of "ReactLevel" was equal to 2000. The query to retrieve the event history on January 1, 2001, between 12:36 p.m. and 12:41 p.m. is:
SELECT * FROM EventHistory WHERE TagName = 'EventTag1' AND DateTime >= 'Jan 1 2001 12:36 PM' AND DateTime <= 'Jan 1 2001 12:41 PM'

To view action snapshot information for an event tag (no wildcards allowed), use the v_EventSnapshot view and specify the name of the event tag as the event in the WHERE clause. For example:
SELECT * FROM v_EventSnapshot WHERE Event = 'EventTag1'

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This query returns the name of the event tag, the time of the event occurrence, and the detection time, as well as the name, value, and quality for each tag in the snapshot. One row is returned for each tag value.

Viewing Summary Information


If you configure summary actions in the event system, you can view information pertaining to them in the console tree. You can also view the summary history. To view summary information 1. 2. 3. In the console tree, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Expand Summaries.

4. 5.

To view all summaries sorted according to name of the event tag, expand Event Tag View. To view all summaries grouped by summary operation (AVG, MIN, MAX, SUM), expand Operation View.

Viewing Summary Tag Properties


If you select the summary operation details item ("Dur. xxxx, Res. xxxx, Timestamp x") in the console tree, the summary tag properties appear in the details pane. The columns for the properties are as follows: Tag Name The name of the tag to be summarized. Description The description of the summarized tag. This normally describes the result of the operation, although this description can be the same as that of the tag on which the operation is performed. Upper Limit The upper limit of validity for the tag's value. Values higher than this limit are not used in the calculation. By default, this value is set to 1000000000.

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Lower Limit The lower limit of validity for the tag's value. Values lower than this limit are not used in the calculation. By default, this value is set to -1000000000.

Viewing Data for a Summary Tag


To view the summary data for a event tag, click the summary operation details item ("Dur. xxxx, Res. xxxx, Timestamp x") in the console tree. The summary tag properties appear in the details pane. Double-click on a summary tag in the pane.

The columns are as follows: TagName The unique name of the tag within the IndustrialSQL Server system. Summary Date The date applicable to the results of the calculation. It is either the time of the beginning or end of the calculation period, as specified by the summary operation definition. Value The value of the summary. Quality The basic data quality indicator associated with the data value.

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Viewing History for a Summary Operation


To view the summary history for a particular operation, right-click on the summary operation details item ("Dur. xxxx, Res. xxxx, Timestamp x") in the console tree and click Properties.

The columns are as follows: Summary Date The date applicable to the results of the calculation. It is either the time of the beginning or end of the calculation period, as specified by the summary operation definition. Operation Start The timestamp at which the calculation started for the operation. Operation End The timestamp at which the calculation completed for the operation.

Using ActiveEvent
ActiveEvent is an ActiveX control that allows you to notify the event subsystem when an event occurs in another application, such as InTouch HMI software. ActiveEvent is script-based. You can use it in any application that uses a COM-enabled scripting language to detect an event for that application. COM-enabled scripting languages include InTouch scripting and Visual Basic.

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After you install the ActiveEvent control on an InTouch computer using the IndustrialSQL Server historian installation program, ActiveEvent does not automatically appear in the list of available ActiveX objects for use within WindowMaker. You need to run the Wizard/ActiveX installation from within WindowMaker, as well. For more information on performing a Wizard/ ActiveX installation, see your InTouch documentation. To enable external event detection for the historian, you must: 1. Create an event tag in the historian to store the event occurrence information. Make sure that the detection type is set to External. You can define the event tag so that the event is associated with an action that is triggered from the historian, such as executing a SQL script, sending an e-mail message, or recording the values of a set of tags at the time the event occurred. For more information, see "Adding an Event Tag" on page 206. 2. Install the ActiveEvent control so that it can be used in the ActiveX container application (for example, in InTouch HMI software). For more information on installing the ActiveEvent control, see "IndustrialSQL Server Historian Installation Features" in Chapter 2, "Installation," in your IndustrialSQL Server Historian Installation Guide. 3. Configure the DCOM security attributes for the external detector to be used with ActiveEvent. Security attributes must be set up on the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer. For information, see "Configuring Security Attributes for ActiveEvent" on page 232. 4. Write a script that notifies the historian event system of the external event. For more information, see "ActiveEvent Methods" on page 235. Important! You cannot use ActiveEvent in an InTouch 7.0 SP2 application. Synchronize the system time for the ActiveEvent computer with the system time for the historian. If the ActiveEvent computer time is ahead, the event system may generate NULL values for snapshot data.

Configuring Security Attributes for ActiveEvent


For ActiveEvent to work, security attributes (for example, permission to launch) must be correctly configured. Configure the security attributes on the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer using the DCOMCnfg.Exe program. To configure security attributes for ActiveEvent 1. 2. On the Windows Start menu, click Run. The Run dialog box appears. In the Open box, type DCOMCnfg.Exe.

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3.

Click OK. The Distributed COM Configuration Properties dialog box appears.

4. 5.

In the Applications list, select EventDetector Class. Click Properties. The EventDetector Class Properties dialog box appears.

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6.

Click the Security tab.

7.

Select Use custom access permissions and then click Edit. The Registry Value Permissions dialog box appears.

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8.

Click Add. The Add Users and Groups dialog box appears.

9.

In the Names list, select the Everyone group.

10. Click Add. 11. In the Type of Access list, select Allow Access. 12. Click OK. The Registry Value Permissions dialog box now shows the Everyone group with allowed access. 13. Click OK to return to the EventDetector Class Properties dialog box. 14. Select Use custom launch permissions and then click Edit. 15. Repeat steps 8 through 14 to add the Everyone group to the list of users who have launch permissions. In the Type of Access list of the Add Users and Groups dialog box, be sure to select Allow Launch. 16. Click OK to close the EventDetector Class Properties dialog box. 17. Click OK to close the DCOMCnfg.Exe program.

ActiveEvent Methods
Use ActiveEvent's methods in scripts to connect to an IndustrialSQL Server historian and trigger an event. The ActiveEvent control aids the remote triggering of events on the historian by first initializing with the historian computer name and event tag, and then calling the InvokeEventEx() method.

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ActiveEvent can be scripted using any scripting language that supports COM. For example, an InTouch script can trigger an IndustrialSQL event if you use this control in an InTouch application. You can also trigger an event from a Visual Basic script. Note ActiveEvent does not work in asynchronous mode in the InTouch HMI software. The following example InTouch script connects to a server named "InSQLServer1," adds the event tag called "ExternalEvent," and logs an "ExternalEvent" event tag event.
{ Connect ActiveEvent to your InSQL Server--only needs to be done once.} intResult = #InSQLEvent1.InitializeEx( "InSQLServer1"); {Was initialization successful or are we already initialized? } IF intResult == 0 OR intResult == 4 THEN intResult = #InSQLEvent1.AddEventTag("ExternalEvent"); IF intResult == 0 THEN intResult = #InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx("ExternalEvent"); IF intResult == 0 THEN sDisplayResult = "Logged event"; ELSE sDisplayResult = "Failed to log event"; ENDIF; ENDIF; ENDIF;

AddEventTag()
Adds an event tag to the active event tag list Method
AddEventTag(string EventTag)

Parameter EventTag Name of the event tag with which the ActiveEvent event detector is associated. ActiveEvent is used with an external type event detector. Returns Value 0 = Success. 2 = Unable to execute method because ActiveEvent is not initialized. 7 = Remote function call failed.

InitializeEx()
Creates a connection to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Method
InitializeEx(string ComputerName)

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Parameter ComputerName Name of the computer on which the historian is running. If you are not connecting to the historian over a network, use a blank string ("") for the computer name. Note You cannot use an IndustrialSQL Server historian alias for this parameter. Returns Value 0 = Success. 1 = Unknown failure. 3 = Unable to initialize ActiveEvent. 4 = ActiveEvent is already initialized. 7 = Remote function call failed. 8 = Unable to determine local computer name. Remarks After you initialize the historian, use the IsConnected property to determine if the connection was successful. Also, you only need to initialize with the server one time. You can invoke an unlimited number of events after initialization has occurred. If you are using the InTouch HMI software, initialization does not occur unless the ActiveEvent ActiveX control is part of an open window. This limits the use of the InvokeEventEx method within InTouch Application Scripts, Condition Scripts, Data Change Scripts, and so on. When you close an InTouch window, all ActiveX controls are automatically uninstantiated. See Also IsConnected InvokeEventEx()

InvokeEventAtTimeEx()
Triggers the event at a specified date/time. Method
InvokeEventAtTimeEx(string TagName, string EventDateTime)

Remarks You can invoke an unlimited number of events after you initialize with an IndustrialSQL Server historian. Parameter TagName Name of the event tag with which the ActiveEvent event detector is associated. ActiveEvent is used with an external type event detector.

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EventDateTime Date/time that you want the event triggered. This date is in local time for the historian. This parameter must be formatted as: YYYY-MM-DD hh:mi:ss.mmm Returns Value 0 = Success. 1 = Unknown failure. 2 = Unable to execute method because ActiveEvent is not initialized. 5 = Unable to perform date/time conversion due to invalid format. 6 = Date/time cannot be a future date. 7 = Remote function call failed. See Also InitializeEx() InvokeEventEx()

InvokeEventEx()
Triggers the event at the time this method is called. Method
InvokeEventEx(string EventTag)

Remarks You can invoke an unlimited number of events after you initialize with an IndustrialSQL Server historian. Parameter EventTag Name of the event tag with which the ActiveEvent event detector is associated. ActiveEvent is used with an external type event detector. Returns Value 0 = Success. 1 = Unknown failure. 2 = Unable to execute method because ActiveEvent is not initialized. 7 = Remote function call failed. See Also InitializeEx() InvokeEventAtTimeEx()

IsConnected
Determines whether a connection to the IndustrialSQL Server historian exists. Method
IsConnected

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Returns Value 1 = Connected to the historian; 0 = Not connected. See Also InitializeEx()

RemoveEventTag()
Removes an event tag from the active event tag list. Method
RemoveEventTag(string EventTag)

Parameter EventTag Name of the event tag to remove from the list of external events for the ActiveEvent control. Returns Value 0 = Success. 2 = Unable to execute method because ActiveEvent is not initialized. 7 = Remote DCOM call failed.

Scripting Example: Triggering Events within the InTouch HMI Software


To trigger an event within the InTouch HMI software, include these methods in an InTouch script, similar to the following:
#InSQLEvent1.InitializeEx("InSQL01"); {Initialized the server} #InSQLEvent1.AddEventTag("ASVTag"); #InSQLEvent1.AddEventTag("SysStatusEvent"); {Added event tag} #InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx("ASVTag"); #InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx("SysStatusEvent"); {Invoked event}

where:

InSQLEvent1 is the name of the instantiation of the ActiveEvent ActiveX control InSQL01 is the computer name for the IndustrialSQL Server historian (not an alias) ASVTag is the name of the event tag that is associated with this external detector

To add more tags to be detected, use the AddEventTag() method and use InvokeEventEx() specifying the tagname. A single ActiveEvent control handles many tags.

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Scripting Example: Triggering Multiple Events within Visual Basic


In this Visual Basic script, the initialization occurs with an IndustrialSQL Server historian running on a specified computer, and more than one event is invoked:
Private Sub Command1_Click() Dim ComputerName As String ComputerName = "Computer1" Dim TagName As String Dim Connected As Long TagName = "Event1" InSQLEvent1.InitializeEx ComputerName InSQLEvent1.AddEventTag TagName Connected = InSQLEvent1.IsConnected If Connected = 1 Then InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx TagName InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx TagName InSQLEvent1.InvokeEventEx TagName MsgBox ("Sent off three events") Else MsgBox ("Failed To Connect") End If End Sub

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1 1

Browsing the ArchestrA Model View using Historian Clients

You can configure WinPlatforms and AppEngines in the Industrial Application Server so that the ArchestrA model view for objects and attributes hosted by these objects can be replicated to the IndustrialSQL Server historian. Galaxies and objects in ArchestrA are represented in the historian as groups in the public namespace. You can then browse the model view representation using any historian client application that shows the historian public groups, such as ActiveFactory Trend.

Contents Model View Representation in the Historian Namespace Model View Replication to the Historian Replication Configuration using the IDE Enabling Replication at Runtime Viewing Historized Attributes in the IndustrialSQL Server Configuration
Editor

Browsing the Model Hierarchy in a Historian Client

Model View Representation in the Historian Namespace


The ArchestrA model view namespace is represented in the IndustrialSQL Server historian database as a public group namespace. Each Galaxy and object in the model view is represented as a namespace group in the database. The top-level group reflects the name of the Galaxy. The top-level Galaxy group contains a group for every child Area and object, so that the ArchestrA object hierarchy is accurately reflected in the group/sub-group structure. Only one Galaxy can be represented in a single historian.

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Each group under the Galaxy group is named according to the object in the model view that it represents. Each group can contain:

Additional child groups. Historian tagnames for the historized attributes of the object that the group represents. Groups that represent objects without any historized attributes, if the objects contain child objects with historized attributes or if they contain special types of objects, such as traceability objects.

The following illustrates the mapping between a sample ArchestrA model view namespace and the corresponding group namespace in the historian:

Model View Replication to the Historian


Model view replication is the process of sending the model view hierarchy information to the IndustrialSQL Server historian and incorporating it into the public group namespace. Replication is initiated by ArchestrA. Replication is a two-step process: 1. The historian is checked to see if there is a need to update the public group namespace with information from the model view. Replication only occurs when the public group namespace is determined to be out of sync with the model view, in terms of objects with historized attributes and/or special types of objects, such as traceability objects.

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2.

The required model view changes are transmitted to the historian and incorporated into the public namespace. During replication, only the object/attribute information that needs to change in the historian is transmitted and processed, with the exception of Area objects. For example, if one object is added to a Galaxy of 1000 objects, the new object will be the only entity transmitted to the historian and incorporated into the public group namespace. Because the amount of data for Area objects is small, all Area information is transmitted and processed, without negatively impacting performance.

ArchestrA objects and attributes that can be replicated include:

All historized attributes. All objects that contain historized attributes. All objects that contain other objects with historized attributes. This allows for representation of the complete hierarchy from the Galaxy level down to lowest-level object that has historized attributes, even if objects at intermediate levels do not have any historized attributes. Some special types of objects that do not typically have historized attributes, such as traceability objects. Also, their parent objects are replicated, as needed, to fill out the entire hierarchy.

Attributes that are not historized do not appear in the historian namespace. Replication occurs when:

Objects with historized attributes and/or traceability objects are deployed. Objects with historized attributes and/or traceability objects are redeployed. The historian starts up, and there was a relevant change to the model view while the historian was offline. There may be a delay in the replication, as the Industrial Application Server polls the historian to determine its status.

If you undeploy or delete an object, the changes will not be replicated until you perform a redeploy. If replication fails to complete (for example, due to a network failure), ArchestrA will try to send the model information again during the next scan cycle, until the replication succeeds. No error message is logged to the ArchestrA Logger if replication fails; however, you can log a custom message using the "ModelViewSync" custom log flag. If you replicate objects with more historized attributes than the allotment of "headroom" tags in the IndustrialSQL Server historian, and the attributes do not already exist in the historian, then the historian will a create new history block. You will not see the complete model view hierarchy replicated in the historian until the new history block is complete, which can take up to five minutes. For more information on headroom tags, see "Pre-allocating Memory for Future Tags" on page 67.

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Replication Configuration using the IDE


Use the Industrial Application Server IDE to enable or disable the automatic replication of the ArchestrA model view to the IndustrialSQL Server historian computer. Replication is configured at the platform and engine levels.

Configuring Replication for a WinPlatform


Configuring replication at the platform level simply enables any WinPlatform attributes, marked for historization, to be associated with the WinPlatform in the historian namespace. To configure model view replication for a WinPlatform 1. 2. Start the IDE. In the model view, browse to the WinPlatform that you want to configure.

3. 4.

Open the object editor for the selected WinPlatform. Click the Engine tab.

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5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Select the Enable storage to historian check box, if not already checked. Select the Enable Tag Hierarchy check box. In the Historian box, specify the name of the IndustrialSQL Server computer. Configure other history settings as required. Close the editor, saving your changes.

10. Close the IDE.

Configuring Replication for an AppEngine


Configuring replication at the engine level enables the replication of AppEngine attributes marked for historization, as well as the replication of all qualifying objects hosted by the AppEngine, and their attributes. To configure model view replication for an AppEngine 1. 2. Start the IDE. In the model view, browse to the AppEngine that you want to configure.

3.

Open the object editor for the selected AppEngine.

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4.

Click the General tab.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Select the Enable storage to historian check box, if not already checked. Select the Enable Tag Hierarchy check box. In the Historian box, specify the name of the IndustrialSQL Server computer. Configure other history settings as required. Close the editor, saving your changes.

10. Close the IDE.

Enabling Replication at Runtime


You can enable or disable replication at runtime without having to undeploy and redeploy the engine of any affected objects. To do this, set the Engine.Historian.EnableTagHierarchy attribute to True. This attribute is available for both WinPlatform and AppEngine objects.

Viewing Historized Attributes in the IndustrialSQL Server Configuration Editor


Note You cannot view the model hierarchy in the IndustrialSQL Server System Management Console. To view historized attributes 1. 2. 3. In the IndustrialSQL Server System Management Console, expand a server group and then expand a server. Expand Configuration Editor, expand System Configuration, and then expand Tag Configuration. Select any of the tag type groups, such as Analog Tags.

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4.

In the details pane shows all tags of that type, including historized attributes from Industrial Application Server.

Browsing the Model Hierarchy in a Historian Client


You can browse the ArchestrA model view hierarchy in any IndustrialSQL Server historian client that incorporates the Public Groups folder in the navigation tree, such as ActiveFactory Trend. It is recommended that you not modify the model view hierarchy replication either directly from the database or by using a historian client application such as ActiveFactory Trend. To browse the model hierarchy 1. Start an IndustrialSQL Server historian client, such as ActiveFactory Trend.

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2. 3. 4.

Connect to the historian. In the navigation tree, expand Public Groups. Expand the group that reflects the name of the Galaxy you want to browse.

5.

Navigate through the ArchestrA model view hierarchy and select a group representing an object with historized attributes.

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6.

Select attributes for which you want to view history data in the client. For example, when you select a group in the ActiveFactory Trend Tag Picker, the Tags pane shows a list of all the historian tagnames representing the historized attributes of the selected group (object).

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If only the objects at the bottom of the model view hierarchy are deployed, the names for the objects higher in the hierarchy are not available to clients. To enable replication of the hierarchy in other applications, ArchestrA generates generic names for the undeployed objects. Client applications display these generic names instead of the actual names that appear in the IDE.

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Index
Symbols
.MSC file 16 model view 247 buffers IDAS 105

A
acquisition 41, 101 configuring 101 configuring for analog tags 40 configuring for discrete tags 40 configuring for string tags 40 monitoring 25, 192, 193 action priority 210 actions See also event actions active image 43, 55, 61, 62, 121 ActiveEvent 214 methods 235 security 232 using 231 ActiveX control 231 AddEventTag() method 236 address string 41 administrative tools 11 InSQL Database Export/Import Utility 11 InTouch History Importer 11 Microsoft SQL Server 34 System Management Console 11 Windows operating system 35 alerts 198 analog tags adding 49 configuring 38 configuring acquisition 40 configuring general properties 38 configuring limits 44 configuring storage 42 configuring summaries 48 deleting 64 AppEngine configuring replication 245 application name I/O Server 41, 108, 110 ArchestrA user account 175 archive 133 ASCII 87 attributes 243 viewing 246 authentication mode 159, 161 autonomous startup 105 autostart 23

C
calculation 223 characters limit for string tags 60 client connections monitoring 25, 194 ComputerName parameter 237 configuration editing file 97 exporting 86, 88 importing 94 See also dynamic configuration Configuration Editor 13 about 27 connecting to SQL Server 28 toolbar buttons 29 version 32 console file 16 console tree 13, 14 contexts 45, 46 configuring 47 counter 40 CSV data example files 146, 148 fast load imports 143 file format 144, 147 import folder 150 importing 141, 142 normal imports 143 NULL values 149

D
data inserting 150 data acquisition See acquisition data blocks See history blocks data dictionary importing from InTouch 69 data files See history blocks, Runtime database data quality 230 data rate viewing status 191 data retrieval See retrieval data storage See storage data type managing 127 database backing up 124 restoring 126

B
backups history blocks 132 Runtime database 124 blocks See history blocks browsing

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Index

database files viewing details 123 database modifications 183 database object managing 127 database user 186 DCOM 232 DDE Windows Server 2003 73, 110 deadband 44, 56, 62, 80, 113, 117, 215, 216 swinging door 44, 80, 113, 117 time 44, 56, 62, 80, 113, 117, 215 value 44, 80, 113, 117, 216 deadband actions configuring 215 details pane 13 detectors See event detectors discrete tags adding 56 configuring 53 configuring acquisition 40 configuring general properties 53 configuring storage 54 deleting 64 disk space event history 128 status 191 summary history 128 document conventions 10 documentation set 9 domain 17 double-byte 62 dynamic configuration committing changes 181 status 190

E
edge detection 212 e-mail actions 218 configuring 218 e-mail profile 219 encoding format 87 engineering units 39 adding 52 configuring 50 editing 51 viewing defined 50 error count resetting 191 error messages monitoring 195 viewing 25 viewing in Event Viewer 195 See also system messages errors InSQL Database Export/Import Utility 87 viewing status 191 event actions configuring 209, 214 deadband actions configuring 215 e-mail actions

configuring 218 generic SQL actions configuring 217 snapshot actions configuring 216 summary actions configuring 222 event detectors configuring 208, 211 external detectors configuring 214 generic SQL detectors configuring 213 schedule detectors configuring 213 specific value detectors configuring 211 event history disk space 128 retrieving 228 event subsystem monitoring status 192 starting and stopping 20 event tags adding 206 configuring general properties 209 Event Viewer 195 EventDateTime parameter 238 EventHistory table 128, 228 events accessing information about 206 configuring 205 Runtime database 122 triggering in InTouch 239 triggering in Visual Basic 240 See also event actions, event detectors, summaries EventTag parameter 236, 238, 239 exporting configuration information 86 external detectors configuring 214

F
FALSE 58, 59 fast load imports 143 filter applying 31 removing or disabling 31 filtering tags in details pane 30 frequency 49

G
Galaxy 241 general properties configuring for analog tags 38 configuring for discrete tags 53 configuring for event tags 209 configuring for I/O Servers 109 configuring for IDASs 102 configuring for string tags 59

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253

configuring for topics 114 generic SQL actions configuring 217 generic SQL detectors configuring 213 groups See server groups, tag groups

H
headroom tags 67 history blocks adding from prior versions 133 backing up 132 creating 130 editing storage locations 130 importing data into 135, 141 managing 128 monitoring 25 refreshing list 129 rescanning 130 viewing details 129 viewing list 129 Holding database 121 imports 73

I
I/O conversations 119 I/O Server types adding 107 configuring 106 deleting 108 editing properties for 107 I/O Servers adding 113 configuring 109 configuring general properties 109 configuring storage rules 111 data processing 118 data processing interval 118 deleting 114 failover 110 importing definitions 70, 73 inserting versioned data 154 redirecting to InTouch 112 IDASs adding 105 autonomous startup timeout 105 buffers 105 configuring 102 configuring general properties 102 connection timeout 105 deleting 106 failover 103 primary 103 tagname database imports 82 import folders 142 importing configuration information 86 CSV data 141, 142 data dictionary 69 guidelines 156 See also tag importer

Industrial Application Server browsing 241 IndustrialSQL Server administering 11 configuring autostart 23 configuring startup options 21 creating groups 15 documentation set 9 logins 175 monitoring status 189 registration 16, 17, 18, 19 shutting down 22 starting 20 starting or stopping modules 20 stopping 20 system health 197 InitializeEx() method 236 INSERT statements 135, 150 syntax 150 inserting data guidelines 156 InSQL Console See also Management Console, Configuration Editor InSQL Database Export/Import Utility about 86 InSQL I/O Server monitoring status 192 starting and stopping 20, 21 InSQL OLE DB Provider See OLE DB provider InSQLIOS See InSQL I/O Server integral divisor 52 interpolation analog tags 40 InTouch ActiveEvent 232 importing history data 135 importing tagname database 69 redirecting I/O Server data 112 triggering events 239 InTouch History Importer 135 InTouch nodes importing 70 viewing associated tags 85 viewing properties 84 InvokeEventAtTimeEx() method 237 InvokeEventEx() method 238 IPX/SPX 187 IsConnected method 238

L
late data 118 license information refreshing 180 viewing 177 licensing viewing status 191 limit for summaries 225, 230 limit names 45, 46 configuring 48

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Index

limit type 45, 46 limits 45, 47 adding 46 configuring for analog tags 44 editing 46 for a storage location 132 for summaries 225, 229 priority 45, 46 linear scaling 42 log file See system message logs logins adding 162 IndustrialSQL Server 175 IndustrialSQL Server registration 17 managing 161 viewing properties 161

N
named pipes 187 namespace 241 network protocol changing 187

O
object permissions setting 168 objects 243 OLE DB provider monitoring status 192 operating system for I/O Servers 108 operations See summary operations original data inserting 153

M
Management Console 13 about 19 viewing status information 25 memory future tags 67 management 130 menu commands System Management Console 32 message logs administering 195 monitoring 195 viewing 198, 199 message pairs 54 adding 58 configuring 57 editing 57 viewing 57 messages status 193 Microsoft Management Console (MMC) 12 Microsoft SQL Server administrative tools 34 authentication mode 159 Configuration Editor 28 e-mail actions 219 mixed mode 159 model view 241 browsing 247 replication 242 representation 241 modification tracking Runtime database 122 turning on or off 183 viewing changes 183 monitoring client connections 194 data acquisition 193 message logs 195 status information 25 system 189 system tags 197

P
passwords managing 171 Performance Logs and Alerts 198 permissions managing 168 roles 166 setting for object 168 setting for statements 170 private groups 65 processing interval 118 properties viewing in the console 29 protocols 110, 194 changing 187 public groups 65

Q
quality 230

R
raw value 42 real-time data inserting 152 reconfiguration See dynamic configuration registration deleting 19 editing 18 IndustrialSQL Servers 16 re-importing See tag importer reinitialization topics 119 RemoveEventTag() method 239 replication configuring 244, 245 enabling at runtime 246 report Runtime database 186

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resolution 212, 223 restoring databases 126 retrieval monitoring status 192 roles adding 166 adding users 167 managing 165 viewing for a database 165 rollover value 40 rule managing 127 Runtime database 121 backing up 124 changing properties 122 managing 121, 124 viewing report 186

S
scaling 42 scan rate for event tags 211, 214 schedule detectors configuring 213 search 226 security ActiveEvent 232 authentication mode 159 IndustrialSQL Server registration 17 managing 159 managing logins 161 managing passwords 171 roles adding 166 adding users 167 managing 165 viewing 165 setting permissions 168, 170 users adding 165 adding to roles 167 managing 165 viewing 165 Windows groups 173 server groups 15 adding 15 creating in console 15 deleting 15 registered servers 19 renaming 15 snap-in 12 snapshot actions configuring 216 snapshot files 153 specific value detectors configuring 211 SQL Server See Microsoft SQL Server SQL Server Enterprise Manager 34 SQL Server logins See logins SQL Server Service Manager 35 statement permissions

setting 170 status IndustrialSQL Server 189 subsystems 192 viewing in Management Console 25 status bar 26 storage configuring for analog tags 42 configuring for discrete tags 54 configuring for string tags 60 managing 121 tagname database imports 79, 81 See also history blocks, storage locations storage locations history blocks 130 path 129, 131 storage rate 43 storage rules configuring for I/O Servers 111 configuring for topics 116 storage subsystem monitoring status 192 store-and-forward 103 data chunk size 104 duration 104 interval 104 stored procedures managing 127 string tags adding 62 configuring 59 configuring acquisition 40 configuring general properties 59 configuring storage 60 deleting 64 summaries configuring for analog tags 48 viewing tag properties 229 summary actions configuring 222 summary data viewing 229, 230 summary date 230, 231 summary history disk space 128 viewing 231 summary operations adding for event 222 adding tags 224 SummaryHistory table 128 swinging door deadband 44, 80, 113, 117 system monitoring 189 system driver monitoring status 192 system tags 197 System Management Console about 12 areas of 13 closing 33 creating items 30 creating server groups 15 deleting items 30 filtering tags 30

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Index

menu commands 32 starting 12 using 14 viewing historized attributes 246 viewing properties 29 system message logs changing path 202 copying contents 202 monitoring 26 saving contents 202 system messages changing language 201 system parameters adding 181 editing 180 system status monitoring 25, 190 system tags monitoring 197 system-wide properties managing 177

T
tables managing 127 tag count 178, 179, 191 tag definitions copying 64 Tag Finder 225 tag groups about 65 adding 65 adding tags 66 deleting 67 renaming 66 tag importer about 69 before importing 70 DDE I/O Servers 73 duplicate addresses 71 duplicate tagnames 71 Holding database 73 import order 70 machine names 72 node tags 85 performing a re-import 73 performing an import 73 re-importing 72 topic names 71 viewing node properties 84 tag references deleting 67 tagname database See data dictionary TagName parameter 237 Tagname.X file 85 importing 73 tags adding to a group 66 adding to summary operation 224 allocating memory 67 configuring 37 deleting 64

filtering in details pane 30 imported node 85 importing definitions from InTouch 69 information about 38 organizing into groups 65 searching for 225 viewing summary properties 229 TCP/IP 187 threshold for storage 132 IDAS 103 time deadband 44, 56, 62, 80, 113, 117, 215 time interval for event tags 211, 214 timeout 115 IDAS autonomous startup 105 IDAS connection 105 toolbar buttons Configuration Editor 29 topic names importing 71 topics 41, 115, 193 adding 118 configuring 114 configuring general properties 114 configuring storage rules 116 deleting 119 reinitializing 119 tracking See modification tracking transaction log viewing details 123 Transact-SQL 135, 150 TRUE 58, 59

U
Unicode 87 uniqueness string 76 unit of measure 39, 50, 51 UPDATE statements 135, 150 syntax 154 user account See logins users 186 adding 165 adding to a role 167 adding to Windows groups 173 managing 165 viewing for a database 165

V
value deadband 44, 80, 113, 117, 216 version Configuration Editor 32 viewing for system 191 versioned data inserting 154 Visual Basic triggering events 240

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W
Windows authentication 159 Windows login See logins Windows operating system administrative tools 35 Windows security groups adding users 173 Windows Server 2003 73, 110 WinPlatform configuring replication 244 wwVersion parameter INSERTs 152

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