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Macksimum Loyalty By Bryce Baird When Mack’s current line of trucks first poked their snouts out

Macksimum Loyalty

By Bryce Baird

When Mack’s current line of trucks first poked their snouts out the kennel, those that had a soft spot for the brand gave a sigh of relief. Mack was back. The French influence had been culled out of the breed, and now Mack’s Trident looks as staunch as. However, an automated

transmission, AdBlue tank and other features show that Mack’s pooches haven’t been killing time by sleeping on the porch ...

T he word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht racing crowd

hogtied it to their advertising cam - paign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means something other than the contrived manipulation the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain-storming session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of compa- nies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a product proved itself, and they got to trust the salesman,

loyalty was an unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown

from those old war horses,

misty-eyed when talking about

the brand was just a big the Leyland Octopus he spent question mark for those three
the brand was
just
a
big
the Leyland Octopus he spent
question mark for those
three and
a
half years driving
first few intrepid buyers.
for his dad, when he was barely
However,
there
were
out of his teens and working
plenty of operators in the
on some
of the ‘think-big’ pro-
South
Island
that
could
jects of the day at Twizel and
see
the
potential
in
the
Manapouri in the seventies and
eighties.
The Road Metal boys take
great pride
in
that pup
on
the
bonnet
so
it
was almost inevi-
table
that
a Trident was going
to appear in the colours after a
brands once upon a time –
believe it or not. Apart from
the recollections of war
veterans who’d seen the
Yanks use them in military
applications around the
globe during both World
Wars, they were once as
rare as a Ferrari seven-
tonne side-tipper on our
shores.
The small number of
Macks that ended up here
after the war were used
mainly in heavy haul or
house-shifting, but apart
Metals, however their loyalty to
the brand has never wavered.
In a great example of syn-
chronicity, their two brands
of choice eventually became
entwined, as Volvo now owns
Mack, which is reaping the ben-
efits by having an increased
amount of Volvo technology
built into its trucks.
Current Road Metals manag-
ing director, Murray Francis,
(Stan’s son) knows the strengths
of both brands and their place
in his fleet, but you don’t have
to scratch him very hard to find
that his favourite brand has a
pup bolted to the bonnet.
Having said that, he still gets
long run of R-series, CH’s, Visions and then a Granite.
Road Metals went all out with this Trident, blitzing it with chrome
and accessories and making the Christchurch based truck a
standout rig in a city that probably has one of the highest densi-
ties of bulk truck and trailer rigs working in the world at present.
Road Metals runs 23 mainly truck and trailer Mack combinations
in the operation that includes four Volvo FM series and a couple
of Mack eight-wheeler MC models converted to water trucks,
and a crane truck. They have 68 employees spread between
their Christchurch and Oamaru bases, and have three quarries
in Christchurch, one a joint venture with Isaac Construction, and
another 214 hectare (500 acre) quarry about to open at Rolleston,
brand, and the lower half
of the island became a
bit of a Mack Mecca by
the time legendary truck
salesman Ron Carpenter
had finished with it.
Stan Francis of North
Otago Road Metals could
see that these big burly
Yank rigs were just the
ticket for the work his com-
panies were engaged in,
and that they were a huge
improvement over the
British gear he’d started
with back in 1955.
The N.O.R.M. R-series
Macks eventually became
legendary down south,
and together with the other
brand they took a shine
to, Volvo, the die was set.
The company has since
changed its name to Road
making four in the area that should provide 100 years of resource
Murray says. It’s been an expensive process that has taken three
and a half years in the environment court and $1.5 million in costs
that Murray says, “aged me ten years I reckon! I won’t see much
benefit from this, but the next generation and the one after that
will thank me for it!” he predicts.
Murray has a great sense of history and brand loyalty, and
Road Metals’ long term plans for the future will probably mean
good things for Motor Truck Distributors.

from those old war horses,

misty-eyed when talking about

the brand was just a big

 

the Leyland Octopus he spent

question mark for those

three and

a half years driving

first few intrepid buyers.

for his dad, when he was barely

However, there

were

out of his teens and working

plenty of operators in the

on some

of the ‘think-big’ pro-

South Island that

could

jects of the day at Twizel and

T he word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht racing crowd

hogtied it to their advertising cam - paign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means something other than the contrived manipulation the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain-storming session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of compa- nies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a product proved itself, and they got to trust the salesman,

loyalty was an unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown

see the potential in the

Manapouri in the seventies and eighties. The Road Metal boys take

great pride

 

in

that pup

on

the

bonnet

so

it

was almost inevi-

table

that

a Trident was going

to appear in the colours after a

long run of R-series, CH’s, Visions and then a Granite. Road Metals went all out with this Trident, blitzing it with chrome and accessories and making the Christchurch based truck a standout rig in a city that probably has one of the highest densi- ties of bulk truck and trailer rigs working in the world at present. Road Metals runs 23 mainly truck and trailer Mack combinations in the operation that includes four Volvo FM series and a couple of Mack eight-wheeler MC models converted to water trucks, and a crane truck. They have 68 employees spread between their Christchurch and Oamaru bases, and have three quarries in Christchurch, one a joint venture with Isaac Construction, and another 214 hectare (500 acre) quarry about to open at Rolleston,

brands once upon a time – believe it or not. Apart from the recollections of war
brands once upon a time –
believe it or not. Apart from
the recollections of war
veterans who’d seen the
Yanks use them in military
applications around the
globe during both World
Wars, they were once as
rare as a Ferrari seven-
tonne side-tipper on our
shores.
The small number of
Macks that ended up here
after the war were used
mainly in heavy haul or
house-shifting, but apart
Metals, however their loyalty to
the brand has never wavered.
In a great example of syn-
chronicity, their two brands
of choice eventually became
entwined, as Volvo now owns
Mack, which is reaping the ben-
efits by having an increased
amount of Volvo technology
built into its trucks.
Current Road Metals manag-
ing director, Murray Francis,
(Stan’s son) knows the strengths
of both brands and their place
in his fleet, but you don’t have
to scratch him very hard to find
that his favourite brand has a
pup bolted to the bonnet.
Having said that, he still gets
brand, and the lower half
of
the island
became a

bit of a Mack Mecca by the time legendary truck salesman Ron Carpenter had finished with it. Stan Francis of North Otago Road Metals could see that these big burly Yank rigs were just the ticket for the work his com- panies were engaged in, and that they were a huge improvement over the British gear he’d started with back in 1955. The N.O.R.M. R-series Macks eventually became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The company has since changed its name to Road

making four in the area that should provide 100 years of resource Murray says. It’s been an expensive process that has taken three and a half years in the environment court and $1.5 million in costs that Murray says, “aged me ten years I reckon! I won’t see much benefit from this, but the next generation and the one after that will thank me for it!” he predicts. Murray has a great sense of history and brand loyalty, and Road Metals’ long term plans for the future will probably mean good things for Motor Truck Distributors.

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three now, and we like the better cooling and think they are a stronger truck for the job and we probably now prefer the Trident over the Granite to be honest.” Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger, harder, more capable tool for the job with the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of 131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets 106 tonne. The Trident gets a power boost and a stronger spec if you need it too. That suits Road Metals as they are air-horn deep in the Christchurch deconstruction and rebuild work and know there is plenty of work for the rig over the next few decades. Murray’s son Dan Francis, the third generation in the company, was happy to throw a bit of bling at the truck when he specified what they wanted, as it’s going to be around for a long time and much is going to be asked of it over the next few decades.

The attention to detail on this rig is impressive, such as the Ali Arc bumper, stainless air-intake caps, and even white aerials to better match the company colours! Quenton Cattle, who at 39 has ticked off a lot of boxes on his driving wish list, is plenty thrilled to be entrusted with Road Metal’s new flagship. We caught up with Quenton at dawn on a typical day at the coal face that would see him scooting around the city carting aggregate from quarry to wherever it was needed, but the main focus at the moment for the Mack is a massive new subdivision on Preston’s Road north of Christchurch, that is being readied for a couple of thousand new houses. “It has to be said that Quenton didn’t want to be put on the truck in all honesty,” Murray claims, “he liked the CH he was on and it was hard to get him out of it.” Quenton had a couple of reservations, the prime one being that he didn’t really want to be put into a truck with an automated transmission, but he had grown fond of the old Mack. He says that when he drives manual transmissions, “I don’t use a clutch, and Murray said, ‘well you won’t mind the auto then!’

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his attention to detail and how thoroughly he prepares for and carries out his tasks is quite some- thing to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real pas- sion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road down south and their level of professional- ism and how well they present their gear is bordering on legendary. It’s probably unfair to single anyone out from the old brigade, Road Metals still have five of the original dozen drivers they had in the Twizel days on the payroll, but Billy Sergeant is prob- ably the best known of that team down south and it’d be fair to say that Quenton is carrying the torch that Billy lit when he jumped into his R-series Mack back in the seventies. In fact, Quenton said that the only driv- ers he’d like to see in this truck if he took a break would be either Billy or Murray. And we suspect Murray would only be allowed a drive because he owns it! Quenton’s passion for trucking was ignit- ed when he worked at a local garage at Washdyke, where some of the customers were truckies. His first experience behind the wheel was in a TK Bedford artic which he used to cart urea between Ravensdown and Timaru Port when he was working for Bob Merhtens. He progressed to driving Hino FS and Nissan CW330s for City Care on landfill cartage in Christchurch, shuttling between the refuse facilities at Bromley, Styx and Parkhouse and the Burwood land- fill carting rubbish and green-waste. But he had ambitions to drive bigger gear and hopped over the ditch to Perth where he attended a driving school attain- ing the credentials to drive road trains. He achieved a 99 percent pass rate which gave him his MC (multi-combination) rating, and then started working for West Australia Freightliners in a K104 Aerodyne B-double doing a Perth-Brisbane-Sydney run two-up. Eventually the work overwhelmed him, with the distances and time on the road burning him out and he returned to New Zealand and started driving for Neta New Zealand on a 450hp Nissan Diesel which he spec’d with extra lights, air-horn and other items. He was hunted down by Steve Laing in Oz who convinced him to come back and

drive again and he stepped into “pocket- sized” road trains of 90-tonne all up carting from Iron Knob for BHP Steelworks. After a spell in a C-15 powered Sterling B-double in Wollongong, he eventually found himself running a crushing plant in Queensland. He’d rented a place for two and a half years that came with a German Shepherd dog, Heidi, as part of the deal. He moved on and to cut a long story short, he found out a few months later that Heidi was in a terrible state with the new tenants not looking after her. He phoned the owner, who was overseas, and said he was taking the dog. He brought her back home to New Zealand, where she regained her health and blossomed. He still hankered for Australia and made his way back there, with Heidi of course, but neither were happy, so he came back again which was when Murray came into the picture. “Heidi was the only reason I came back to New Zealand,” Quenton mused, and he effectively gave up his road train dreams to care for the dog. Murray Francis heard the story and even though he didn’t have a position at the time, took him on because, “anyone who would do that for a dog has got to be a good person in my book,” and being a dog lover himself, he helped house Quenton, and Heidi who lasted another five years. Quenton still had the itch to drive road trains and had one last spin of the dice to get it out of his system, however the job didn’t meet expectations. He was driving a Mack Titan with a Cummins 620 doing the sweating. With gross weights of 171.5 tonne, four trailers and an overall length of 57.5 metres, that Cummins probably didn’t do much grinning, as Quenton says, “the work was tough on the trucks”. “It was preferred that you didn’t use your engine brake with these combinations, you ease up and roll for a couple of kilometres before intersections,” he remembers. But the real crunch for him, besides the terrible living conditions (the accommodation was right beside the workshop) was that animal strikes were an inevitable part of the job. “If we hit a horse or a cow we had to finish the job with what we had on the truck, usually a hammer. Being animal mad, I couldn’t physically do it, and was lucky that I never had to,” Quenton says. Murray had held his job and his old truck open for him, and even paid for his flight back gambling that road train work isn’t always what it is cracked up to be and picking that Quenton

Kiwi trucker leads the V8 Supercars
Kiwi trucker leads the V8
Supercars
Mainfreight show
Mainfreight show
Classic trucking
Classic trucking

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

A couple of Mainfreight drivers and their partners got together and organised a get together and show for Mainfreight trucks. They arrived from all over the North Island, New Zealand Trucking was there to record some of the highlights.

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

4

Editorial

  • 50 Classic Trucking

  • 82 Road Transport Association NZ

6

Truckstop

  • 58 Aussie Angles

  • 84 Legal Lines

  • 24 THE Expo review

  • 62 International Truckstop

  • 86 NZ Trucking Association

  • 31 Murray Jensen

  • 66 Light Commercials

  • 88 National Road Carriers

  • 36 Mahalo Contracting

  • 74 T-Rex

  • 89 New Rigs

  • 38 Looking Back

  • 76 Truck Torque

  • 92 Pin Up Board

  • 40 Truck Stops Invercargill

  • 78 Road Transport Forum

  • 94 Last Load

  • 48 Top Truck

  • 80 Political Point

Kiwi trucker leads the V8 Supercars Mainfreight show Classic trucking Few drivers live the dream life
MACKsimum Loyalty Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check
MACKsimum Loyalty
Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals
when he visits to check out the latesr variant of
the Mack Trident, and let us know how loyal the
new Volvo influenced bulldog is to its roots.

Co

NTE

NTS

Macksimum Loyalty
Macksimum Loyalty

T he word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht racing

crowd hogtied it to their adver - tising campaign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means something other than the con - trived manipulation the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain-storming session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of compa- nies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a prod- uct proved itself, and they got to trust the salesman, loyalty was an

unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown

brands

once

upon

a

time

believe it or not. Apart from the recollections of war veterans who’d seen the Yanks use them in military applications around the globe during both World Wars, they were once as rare as a Ferrari seven-tonne side-tipper on our shores. The small number of Macks that ended up here after the war were used mainly in heavy haul or house-shifting, but apart from those old war horses, the brand was just a big question mark for those first few intrepid buyers. However, there were plenty of operators in the South Island that could see the potential in the brand, and the lower half of the island became a bit of a Mack Mecca by the time legendary truck salesman Ron Carpenter had finished with it. Stan Francis of North Otago Road Metals could see that these big burly Yank rigs were just the ticket for the work his companies

were engaged in, and that they were a huge improvement over the British gear he’d started with

back in 1955. The N.O.R.M. R-series Macks eventually became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The com- pany has since changed its name to Road Metals, however their loyalty to the brand has never wavered. In a great example of synchro- nicity, their two brands of choice eventually became entwined, as Volvo now owns Mack, which is reaping the benefits by having an increased amount of Volvo tech- nology built into its trucks. Current Road Metals managing director, Murray Francis, (Stan’s son) knows the strengths of both brands and their place in his fleet, but you don’t have to scratch him very hard to find that his favourite brand has a pup bolted to the bonnet. Having said that, he still gets misty-eyed when talking about the Leyland Octopus he spent three

and a half years driving for his

dad, when he was barely out of his teens and working on some of the ‘think-big’ projects of the day at Twizel and Manapouri in the seventies and eighties. The Road Metal boys take great pride in that pup on the bonnet so it was almost inevitable that a Trident was going to appear in the colours after a long run of R-series, CH’s, Visions and then a Granite. Road Metals went all out with this Trident, blitzing it with chrome and accessories and making the Christchurch based truck a stand- out rig in a city that probably has one of the highest densities of bulk truck and trailer rigs working in the world at present. Road Metals runs 23 mainly truck and trailer Mack combina- tions in the operation that includes four Volvo FM series and a cou- ple of Mack eight-wheeler MC models converted to water trucks, and a crane truck. They have 68 employees spread between their Christchurch and Oamaru bases, and have three quarries in Christchurch, one a joint ven- ture with Isaac Construction, and another 214 hectare (500 acre) quarry about to open at Rolleston,

making four in the area that should provide 100 years of resource Murray says. It’s been an expensive process that has taken three and a half years in the environment court and $1.5 million in costs that Murray says, “aged me ten years I reckon! I won’t see much benefit from this, but the next generation and the one after that will thank me for it!” he predicts. Murray has a great sense of his- tory and brand loyalty, and Road Metals’ long term plans for the future will probably mean good things for Motor Truck Distributors. The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three now, and we like the bet- ter cooling and think they are a stronger truck for the job and we probably now prefer the Trident over the Granite to be honest.” Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger, harder, more capa- ble tool for the job with the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of 131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets 106 tonne. The Trident gets a power boost and a stronger spec if you need it too. That suits Road Metals as they are air-horn deep in the Christchurch decon- struction and rebuild work and know there is plenty of work for the rig over the next few decades. Murray’s son Dan Francis, the third generation in the company, was happy to throw a bit of bling at the truck when he specified what they wanted, as it’s going to be around for a long time and much is going to be asked of it over the next few decades. The attention to detail on this rig is impressive, such as the Ali Arc bumper, stainless air-intake caps, and even white aerials to better match the company col- ours! Quenton Cattle, who at 39 has ticked off a lot of boxes on his driving wish list, is plenty thrilled to be entrusted with Road Metal’s new flagship. We caught up with Quenton at dawn on a typical day at the coal

Macksimum Loyalty T he word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht

The Road Metals boys are known for keeping their gear looking stand-out, and this rig’s Transport Trailer’s bin and four- axle trailer are equally as impressive as is the Mack.

face that would see him scooting around the city carting aggregate from quarry to wherever it was needed, but the main focus at the moment for the Mack is a mas- sive new subdivision on Preston’s Road north of Christchurch, that is being readied for a couple of thousand new houses. “It has to be said that Quenton didn’t want to be put on the truck in all honesty,” Murray claims, “he liked the CH he was on and it was hard to get him out of it.” Quenton had a couple of res- ervations, the prime one being that he didn’t really want to be put into a truck with an automated transmission, but he had grown fond of the old Mack. He says that when he drives manual transmis- sions, “I don’t use a clutch, and Murray said, ‘well you won’t mind the auto then Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his attention to detail and how thor- oughly he prepares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to

Macksimum Loyalty T he word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht

see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”.

Macksimum

Loyalty

Macksimum Loyalty By Bryce Baird WHEN MACK’S CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT

Macksimum

Loyalty

By Bryce Baird

WHEN MACK’S CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. MACK WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW MACK’S TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT MACK’S POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCH ...

Macksimum Loyalty By Bryce Baird WHEN MACK’S CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT
Contents Mainfreight show pg.45 Kiwi trucker leads the V8 Supercars pg.14 Classic trucking pg.60 MACKsimum Loyalty
Contents
Mainfreight show
pg.45
Kiwi trucker leads the V8 Supercars
pg.14
Classic trucking
pg.60
MACKsimum Loyalty
Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road
Metals when he visits to check out the
latesr variant of the Mack Trident,
and let us know how loyal the new
Volvo influenced bulldog is to its
roots.
102

Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check out the latesr variant of the Mack Trident, and let us know how loyal the new Volvo influenced bulldog is to its roots.

1

Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check out the
By Bryce Baird 01 ... show that Mack’s pooches haven’t been killing time by sleeping on
By Bryce Baird
01
...
show that Mack’s pooches haven’t been killing time by
sleeping on the porch

14

Macksimum

Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation.

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three now, and we like the better cooling and think they are a strong- er truck for the job and we probably now prefer the Trident over the Granite to be honest.” Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger, harder, more capable tool for the job with the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of 131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets 106 tonne. The Trident gets a power boost and a stronger spec if you need it too. That suits Road Metals as they are air-horn deep in the Christchurch deconstruction and rebuild work and know there is plenty of work for the rig over the next few decades. Murray’s son Dan Francis, the third generation in the

NZ Trucking

11

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion to detail and how thoroughly he pre- pares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road down south and their level of profes- sionalism and how well they present their gear is bordering on legendary. It’s prob- ably unfair to single anyone out from the old brigade, Road Metals still have five of the original dozen drivers they had in the Twizel days on the payroll, but Billy Sergeant is probably the best known of that team down south and it’d be fair to say that Quenton is carrying the torch that Billy lit when he jumped into his R-series Mack back in the seventies. In fact, Quenton said that the only driv- ers he’d like to see in this truck if he took a break would be either Billy or Murray. And we suspect Murray would only be allowed a drive because he owns it! Quenton’s passion for trucking was ignited when he worked at a local garage at Washdyke, where some of the custom- ers were truckies. His first experience behind the wheel was in a TK Bedford artic which he used to cart urea between Ravensdown and Timaru Port when he was working for Bob Merhtens. He pro- gressed to driving Hino FS and Nissan CW330s for City Care on landfill cart- age in Christchurch, shuttling between the refuse facilities at Bromley, Styx and Parkhouse and the Burwood landfill cart- ing rubbish and green-waste. But he had ambitions to drive big- ger gear and hopped over the ditch to Perth where he attended a driving school attaining the credentials to drive road trains. He achieved a 99 percent pass rate

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion
Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion to detail and how thoroughly he pre- pares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road down south and their level of profes- sionalism and how well they present their gear is bordering on legendary. It’s prob- ably unfair to single anyone out from the old brigade, Road Metals still have five of the original dozen drivers they had in the Twizel days on the payroll, but Billy Sergeant is probably the best known of that team down south and it’d be fair to say that Quenton is carrying the torch

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion to detail and how thoroughly he pre- pares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion to detail and how thoroughly he pre- pares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road down south and their level of profes- sionalism and how well they present their gear is bordering on legendary. It’s prob- ably unfair to single anyone out from the old brigade, Road Metals still have five of the original dozen drivers they had in the Twizel days on the payroll, but Billy Sergeant is probably the best known of that team down south and it’d be fair to say that Quenton is carrying the torch that Billy lit when he jumped into his R-series Mack back in the seventies. In fact, Quenton said that the only driv- ers he’d like to see in this truck if he took a break would be either Billy or Murray. And we suspect Murray would only be allowed a drive because he owns it! Quenton’s passion for trucking was

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion

Damn – he’s got me I thought!” His dedication to the job and his atten- tion to detail and how thoroughly he pre- pares for and carries out his tasks is quite something to behold and it didn’t take us long to see why Murray wanted Quenton on the Trident, as he treats this rig like it was his first born. Quenton considers that he’s found a good workplace, he says, “that’s what I love about this company, they have a real passion for trucking”. Road Metals’ drivers have long been regarded as amongst the best on the road down south and their level of profes- sionalism and how well they present their gear is bordering on legendary. It’s prob- ably unfair to single anyone out from the old brigade, Road Metals still have five of the original dozen drivers they had in the Twizel days on the payroll, but Billy Sergeant is probably the best known of that team down south and it’d be fair to say that Quenton is carrying the torch that Billy lit when he jumped into his R-series Mack back in the seventies. In fact, Quenton said that the only driv- ers he’d like to see in this truck if he took a break would be either Billy or Murray. And we suspect Murray would only be allowed a drive because he owns it! Quenton’s passion for trucking was ignited when he worked at a local garage at Washdyke, where some of the custom-

ers were truckies. His first experience behind the wheel was in a TK Bedford artic which he used to cart urea between Ravensdown and Timaru Port when he was working for Bob Merhtens. He pro- gressed to driving Hino FS and Nissan CW330s for City Care on landfill cart- age in Christchurch, shuttling between the refuse facilities at Bromley, Styx and Parkhouse and the Burwood landfill cart- ing rubbish and green-waste. But he had ambitions to drive big- ger gear and hopped over the ditch to Perth where he attended a driving school

NZ Trucking

13

From the Mercedes-Benz LK to the new Arocs

More than 110 years of construction sector experience

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three- pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three- pointed star date back many years:

Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks and breweries that recognised its advantages – in defiance of the general air of scepticism that sur- rounded this technical upstart. As early as 1897, just one year after the invention of the truck by Gottlieb Daimler, the Daimler Motor Company launched a vehicle that would carry a payload of five tonnes. The arrival of what became known as winched tippers in 1904 subsequently paved the way for the transport of heavy bulk goods. With the help of a crank and a toothed rack, it was now possible to tilt one side of the load platform upwards. With the correct crank ratio, two people could easily deal with

Mercedes-Benz has been building construc- tion trucks for many years: the biggest tipper

in the pre-war era was the three-axle LK

10.000.

From the Mercedes-Benz LK to the new Arocs More than 110 years of construction sector experience

NZ Trucking

From the Mercedes-Benz LK to the new Arocs More than 110 years of construction sector experience

Truck Stop

Robust concept: quality wins through Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star
Robust concept: quality wins through Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star

Robust concept: quality wins through

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks and breweries that recognised its advantages – in defiance of the general air of scepticism that surrounded this technical upstart. As early as 1897, just one year after the invention of the truck by Gottlieb Daimler, the Daimler Motor Company launched a vehicle that would carry a payload of five tonnes. The arrival of what became known as winched tippers in 1904 subsequently paved the way for the transport of heavy bulk goods. With the help of a crank and a toothed rack, it was now possible to tilt one side of the load platform upwards. With the cor- rect crank ratio, two people could easily deal with a five tonne load with just two winches per truck. Things were still being done this way well into the 1920s, when the hydraulic lift ram began to take over from manual labour as a means of tilting the platform. At this point the three-way tipper was born. With the hydraulic ram as the driving force, bulk goods could now be tipped off in three directions instead of just two, as had been the case until then. The dedicated tipper however, as seen working on construction sites to this day, did still not exist. The structure used back then as a chassis by both the building industry and disposal companies was technically pretty much the same as that used for road vehicles with a shorter rear overhang or certain modifications to the suspension and frame to differentiate it. Nevertheless, even that very first Daimler truck anticipated the plan- etary axles that are still used on construction vehicles today. The belt transmission transferred the engine power to a shaft mounted at right- angles to the longitudinal axis of the vehicle. At each end of this shaft was a pinion that gripped the sprockets on the inside of a gearwheel, which in its turn was securely connected to the wheel being driven. In the years running up to the war, tipper payload was gradually increased by Mercedes-Benz to ten tonnes, as carried by the three-axle LK 10000 of 1937. Also known as the “Reichsautobahn-Strassendienstwagen” (or “state highway services vehicle”) it featured a double-drive rear axle (6x4 configuration). From 1949 onwards medium-sized conventional bonneted trucks such as the LK 3250 and LK 3500 came into their own as tippers working on post-war reconstruction. Heavy duty two-axle tippers then rejoined the range in the mid-1950s, but it was not until the 1960s that Daimler-Benz once

again built a three-axle model for the construction sector.

By the time those first heavy duty three-axle mod- els, with their 6x4 axle configuration, came
By the time those first heavy duty three-axle mod-
els, with their 6x4 axle configuration, came onto the
market in 1964, they found themselves up against
established competition from a variety of sources.
Such vehicles bore the name Büssing, Henschel,
Krupp, Magirus or MAN; all brands already offering
a 6x4 or 6x6 by the time the short-nosed Mercedes
known as the LK or LAK 2220 appeared on the
scene. That these vehicles would ultimately become
such firm favourites with drivers, above all in the
Middle East and Africa, that they would go on to
be used for a good 30 years, was something that
CLASSIC TRUCKING
CLASSIC
TRUCKING

from the mercedes-benz LK

More than 110 years of construction sector experience

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back

to the new arocs

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

Contents
Contents
Contents M ainfreight S how 45 Contents virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts

M ainfreight S how 45

Contents

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star

Contents M ainfreight S how 45 Contents virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts

K iwi T rucker 14

Contents M ainfreight S how 45 Contents virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts

leads the V8 Supercars

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks and

Contents M ainfreight S how 45 Contents virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts

C lassic Trucking 60

Contents

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germa- ny boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks and

virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three- pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-

Virtually every second construction vehi- cle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks and breweries that recognised its advan- tages – in defiance of the general air of

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

“ITS ALL ABOUT THE DETAILS”

Virtually every second construction vehi- cle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sector’s traditional links with the three-pointed star

date back many years: Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ experience in the construction field behind it. In the early days of the truck it was the brickworks

Context

1.

Mainfreight show

pg.45

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sec- tor’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ ex- perience in the construc- tion field behind it. In the

2.

Kiwi trucker leads the V8 Supercars pg.14

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sec- tor’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ ex- perience in the construc- tion field behind it. In the

3.

Classic trucking

pg.60

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sec- tor’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ ex- perience in the construc- tion field behind it. In the

4.

MACKsimum Loyalty

pg.120

Virtually every second construction vehicle in Germany boasts the three-pointed star on its radiator grille. The sec- tor’s traditional links with the three-pointed star date back many years:

Mercedes-Benz these days has 110 years’ ex- perience in the construc- tion field behind it. In the

PART

PART

1 2

Classic Trucking

Pg.14

Also

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

4

6

24

31

36

38

40

48

50

58

62

66

Editorial Truckstop

THE Expo review

Murray Jensen

Mahalo Contracting

Looking Back

Truck Stops Invercargill

Top Truck

Classic Trucking

Aussie Angles

International Truckstop

Light Commercials

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

66

74

76

78

80

82

84

86

88

89

92

94

Light Commercials

T-Rex

Truck Torque

Road Transport Forum

Political Point

Road Transport Association NZ

Legal Lines

NZ Trucking Association

National Road Carriers

New Rigs

Pin Up Board

Last Load

PART

PART

PART

3 4 5

V8 Supercars

Pg.14

MACKsimum Loyalty

Pg.14

Mainfreight show

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check out the latesr variant of the Mack Trident, and let us know how loyal the new Volvo influenced bulldog is to its roots.

Pg.14

PART PART 1 2 Classic Trucking Pg.14 Also Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi

A couple of Mainfreight drivers and their partners got together and organised a get together and show for Mainfreight trucks. They arrived from all over the North Island, New Zealand Trucking was there to record some of the highlights.

01 Classic Trucking

pg. 14- 40

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

03 Classic Trucking

pg. 14- 40

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

01 Classic Trucking pg. 14- 40 Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason

02 Classic Trucking

pg. 14- 40

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

04 Classic Trucking

pg. 14- 40

Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason Routley does. He drives the black Kenworth K200 that carries the V8 Supercars safety cars around Australia. Taylor Mosen met with him and got the lowdown on his job.

01 Classic Trucking pg. 14- 40 Few drivers live the dream life that Kiwi trucker Jason

4

Editorial

  • 48 Top Truck

  • 74 T-Rex

  • 88 National Road Carriers

6

Truckstop

  • 50 Classic Trucking

  • 76 Truck Torque

  • 89 New Rigs

  • 24 THE Expo review

  • 58 Aussie Angles

  • 78 Road Transport Forum

  • 92 Pin Up Board

  • 31 Murray Jensen

  • 62 International Truckstop

  • 80 Political Point

  • 94 Last Load

  • 36 Mahalo Contracting

  • 66 Light Commercials

  • 82 Road Transport Association NZ

  • 38 Looking Back

  • 84 Legal Lines

  • 40 Truck Stops Invercargill

  • 86 NZ Trucking Association

FOCUS

MACKSIMUM

BY JOHN MURPHY

LOYOLTY

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well
The company have had most of the range
of Mack conventionals over the years as
well as COE Qantum and MC versions
under their colours.
The company have had most of the range
of Mack conventionals over the years as
well as COE Qantum and MC versions
under their colours.
Murray admits that he’s been very happy
with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident
has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got
three now, and we like the better cooling
and think they are a stronger truck for the
job and we probably now prefer the Trident
over the Granite to be honest.”
Murray admits that he’s been very happy
with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident
has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got
three now, and we like the better cooling
and think they are a stronger truck for the
job and we probably now prefer the Trident
over the Granite to be honest.”
Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger,
harder, more capable tool for the job with
the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of
131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets
Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger,
harder, more capable tool for the job with
the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of
131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets

NZ TRUCKING 15

MACKSIMUM

LOYALTY

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals over the years as well
The company have had most of the range
of Mack conventionals over the years as
well as COE Qantum and MC versions
under their colours.
The company have had most of the range
of Mack conventionals over the years as
well as COE Qantum and MC versions
under their colours.
Murray admits that he’s been very happy
with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident
has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got
three now, and we like the better cooling
and think they are a stronger truck for the
job and we probably now prefer the Trident
over the Granite to be honest.”
Murray admits that he’s been very happy
with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident
has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got
three now, and we like the better cooling
and think they are a stronger truck for the
job and we probably now prefer the Trident
over the Granite to be honest.”
Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger,
harder, more capable tool for the job with
the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of
131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets
Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger,
harder, more capable tool for the job with
the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of
131 tonne whereas the Granite only gets

Featured Article

Featured Article 10 24 40 44

10

Featured Article 10 24 40 44
Featured Article 10 24 40 44
Featured Article 10 24 40 44
Featured Article 10 24 40 44
Featured Article 10 24 40 44
Featured Article 10 24 40 44
24 40

24

 
24 40
   

40

24 40 44
24 40 44
24 40 44
 

44

44
 

MACKSIMUM LOYOLTY

Bryce Baird

The company

have had

most of

the range

of

Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three now, and we like the

MACK SIMUM LOYOLTY Bryce Baird The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals

Mack truck on site, Albany, 2013

Macksimum

By Bryce Baird

The company have had most of the range of Mack conventionals

over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their

colours.

Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he

thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three

now, and we like the better cooling and think they are a stronger

truck for the job and we probably now prefer the Trident over the

Granite to be honest.”

Compared to the Granite, you get a bigger, harder, more capable

tool for the job with the Trident, it can be spec’d with a GCM of 131

tonne whereas the Granite only gets 106 tonne. The Trident gets

a power boost and a stronger spec if you need it too. That suits

Road Metals as they are air-horn deep in the Christchurch decon-

struction and rebuild work and know there is plenty of work for the

rig over the next few decades. Murray’s son Dan Francis, the third

generation in the company, was happy to throw a bit of bling at

the truck when he specified what they wanted, as it’s going to be

around for a long time and much is going to be asked of it over the

next few decades.

The attention to detail on this rig is impressive, such as the Ali

Arc bumper, stainless air-intake caps, and even white aerials to

better match the company colours! Quenton Cattle, who at 39 has

ticked off a lot of boxes on his driving wish list, is plenty thrilled to

be entrusted with Road Metal’s new flagship.

We caught up with Quenton at dawn on a typical day at the coal

face that would see him scooting around the city carting aggregate

from quarry to wherever it was needed, but the main focus at the

Mack truck on site, Albany, 2013 “Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite,
Mack truck on site, Albany, 2013
“Murray admits that he’s been very happy with
the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more

to offer his operation”

P 92 -

The company have had most of the range of Mack convention- als over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the Trident has more to offer his operation. “We’ve got three now, and we like the better cooling and think they

BRYCE

BAIRD

MACKSIMUM LOYOLTY

SINCE

1989

F r o m than t h e M e r c e d e s
F r o m
than
t h e
M e r c e d e s - B e n z
L K
t o
t h e
n e w
A r o c s
M o r e
110
years
of
construction
sector
experience

-PG-

177

From the Mercedes-Benz LK to the new Arocs

178

BRYCE BAIRD MACK SINCE 1989
BRYCE
BAIRD
MACK
SINCE
1989

THE

MACKSIMUM

MACKSIMUM

1

BRYCE BAIRD

The company have had most of the range of Mack con- ventionals over the years as

The company have had most of the range of Mack con- ventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray admits that he’s been very happy with the Granite, but he thinks the

MACKSIMUM

The range of Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions under their colours. Murray

of

the

company have

had most

The range of Mack conventionals over the years as well as COE Qantum and MC versions

M ACKSIMUM LOYALTY

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

culled out of the breed, and now Mack’s Trident looks as staunch as. However, an automated transmission, Mack was back. The French influence had been culled out of the breed, and

MACKS

LOYAL

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

culled out of the breed, and now

M ACKSIMUM LOYALTY BY: BRYCE PALLFAY Photography: SEASHBC JVSJFINKCK When Mack’s current line of trucks first

MACKSIMUM

LOYALTY

BY: BRYCE PALLFAY

Photography: SEASHBC JVSJFINKCK

M ACKSIMUM LOYALTY BY: BRYCE PALLFAY Photography: SEASHBC JVSJFINKCK When Mack’s current line of trucks first

When Mack’s current line of trucks first poked their snouts out the kennel, those that had a soft spot for the brand gave a sigh of relief. Mack was back.

The French influence had been culled out of the breed, and now Mack’s Trident looks as staunch as. However, an automated transmission, AdBlue tank and other features show

that Mack’s pooches haven’t been killing time by sleeping on the porch

...

to find that his

favourite brand has a pup bolted to the bonnet. Having said that, he still gets misty-eyed when talking about the Leyland Octopus he spent three and a half years driving for his dad, when he was barely out of his teens and working on some of the ‘think-big’ projects of the day at Twizel and Manapouri in the

KNOW YOUR

RIGHTS

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL,
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL,
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL,

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL,

THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL,

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

M

he

word

never been

loyal

has

quite the

same since the ocean

yacht racing crowd hogtied it to their advertising cam - paign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means something other than the contrived manipulation the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain- storming session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of com-

92/ NZ TRUCKING

panies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a product proved itself, and they got to trust the sales- man, loyalty was an unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown back in 1955. The N.O.R.M. R-series

Macks eventually became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The company has since changed its name to Road Metals, however their loyalty to the brand has never wavered. In a great example of syn- chronicity, their two brands of choice eventually became entwined, as Volvo now owns Mack, which is reaping the ben- efits by having an increased amount of Volvo technology built into its trucks. Current Road Metals manag-

Mhe word loyal has never been quite the same since the ocean yacht racing crowd hog- tied it to their advertising cam- paign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means something other than the con- trived manipulation the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain-storm- ing session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of com- panies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a product proved itself, and they got to trust the sales- man, loyalty was an unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown back in 1955. The N.O.R.M. R-series Macks eventually became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The company

has since changed its name to Road Metals, however their loyalty to the brand has never wavered. In a great example of syn- chronicity, their two brands of choice eventually became entwined, as Volvo now owns Mack, which is reaping the ben- efits by having an increased amount of Volvo technology built into its trucks. Current Road Metals manag- ing director, Murray Francis, (Stan’s son) knows the strengths of both brands and their place in his fleet, but you don’t have to scratch him very hard to find that his favourite brand has a pup bolted to the bonnet. Having said that, he still gets misty-eyed when talking about the Leyland Octopus he spent three and a half years driving for his dad, when he was bare- ly out of his teens and work- ing on some of the ‘think-big’ projects of the day at Twizel and Manapouri in the seven- ties and eighties. The Road Metal boys take great pride in that pup on the bonnet so it was almost inevi- table that a Trident was going to appear in the colours after a long run of R-series, CH’s, Visions and then a Granite. Road Metals went all out

with this Trident, blitzing it with chrome and accessories and making the Christchurch based truck a standout rig in a city that probably has one of the highest densities of bulk truck and trailer rigs working in the world at present. Road Metals runs 23 mainly truck and trailer Mack combi- nations in the operation that includes four Volvo FM series and a couple of Mack eight- wheeler MC models converted to water trucks, and a crane truck. They have 68 employ- ees spread between their Christchurch and Oamaru bases, and have three quarries in Christchurch, one a joint ven- ture with Isaac Construction, and another 214 hectare (500 acre) quarry about to open at Rolleston, Macks eventu- ally became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The company has since changed its name to Road Metals, how- ever their loyalty to the brand has never wavered. In a great example of syn- chronicity, their two brands of choice eventually became entwined, as Volvo now owns Mack, which is reaping the ben- efits by having an increased amount of Volvo technology

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT

MACKSIMUM

LOYALTY

TRUCK

IN

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT

ENVIRONMENT

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK.

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT
MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT

THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK IN ENVIRONMENT WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT
MACKSIUMUM M he word loyal has n e v e r been quite the same since

MACKSIUMUM

MACKSIUMUM M he word loyal has n e v e r been quite the same since

M he word

loyal has

n

e

v e r

been quite the same since the ocean yacht racing crowd hogtied it to their advertis - ing campaign during the glory days of the America’s Cup. However, down in the lower half of the South Island it still means some - thing other than the contrived manipula- tion the word has been degraded to. Down south loyalty is earned, not created during a brain-storming session in an ad agency. In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of companies that are either brand heavy or brand absolute, thanks to loyalty. Those salesmen that had the energy to

throw on a thick coat, chuck the snow-chains in the boot of the HQ Holden and head south to cold-call and hard-sell products that were at the time unknown, found fertile ground in the south, where once a product proved itself, and they got to trust the salesman, loyalty was an unspoken part of the deal. Mack was one of those unknown back in

1955.

The N.O.R.M. R-series Macks eventually became legendary down south, and together with the other brand they took a shine to, Volvo, the die was set. The company has since changed its name to Road Metals, however their loyalty to the brand has never wavered. In a great example of synchronicity, their two brands of choice eventually became

entwined, as Volvo now owns Mack, which is reaping the benefits by having an increased amount of Volvo technology built into its

trucks. Current Road Metals managing direc - tor, Murray Francis, (Stan’s son) knows the strengths of both brands and their place in his fleet, but you don’t have to scratch him very hard to find that his favourite brand has a pup bolted to the bonnet. Having said that, he still gets misty-eyed when talking about the Leyland Octopus he spent three and a half years driving for his dad, when he was barely out of his teens and working on some of the ‘think-big’ projects of the day at Twizel and Manapouri in the seven- ties and eighties. The Road Metal boys take great pride in that pup on the bonnet so it was almost inevitable that a Trident was going to appear in the col- ours after a long run of R-series, CH’s, Visions and then a Granite. Road Metals went all out with this Trident, blitzing it with chrome and accessories and making the Christchurch based truck a stand- out rig in a city that probably has one of the highest densities of bulk truck and trailer rigs working in the world at present. Road Metals runs 23 mainly truck and trail- er Mack combinations in the operation that includes four Volvo FM series and a couple of Mack eight-wheeler MC models converted to water trucks, and a crane truck. They have 68 employees spread between their Christchurch and Oamaru bases, and have three quarries in Christchurch, one a joint venture with Isaac Construction, and another 214 hectare (500 acre) quarry about to open at Rolleston,

 
 

M

ACK

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

NEW ZEALAND TRUCKING/PAGE 102/ FEATURED ARTICLE

 
 

M

ACK

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

NEW ZEALAND TRUCKING/PAGE 102/ FEATURED ARTICLE

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS
MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK.

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS

THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS
MACKSIMUM LOYALTY TRUCK BY BRYCE BAIRD WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS

C

CONTENTS

4. EDITORIAL

6. TRUCKSTOP

24.

THE EXPO REVIEW

31.

MURRAY JENSEN

32.

KIWI TRUCKER LEADES THE V8 SUPERCARS

36.

MAHALO CONTRACTING

38.

LOOKING BACK

40.

TRUCK STOP INVERCARGILL

44.

MAINFREIGHT SHOW

48. TOP TRUCK

50.

CLASSIC TRUCKING

58.

AUSSIE ANGLES

62.

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKSTOP

66.

LIGHT COMMERCIALS

74. T-REX

76.

TRUCK TORQUE

78.

ROAD TRANSPORT FORUM

80.

POLITICAL POINT

82.

ROAD TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION NZ

84. LEGAL LINES

86.

NZ TRUCKING ASSOCIATION

88.

NATIONAL ROAD CARRIERS

89. NEW RIGS

92.

PIN UP BOARD

94. LAST LOAD

95.

TRUCK TRADER

16/ MACKSIMUM LOYALTY

In the lower half of the South Island there are plenty of companies that are either
In the lower half of the South
Island there are plenty of
companies that are either
brand heavy or brand
absolute, thanks to loyalty.
Those salesmen that had the
energy to throw on a thick
coat, chuck the snow-chains
in the boot of the HQ Holden
and However, there were
plenty of operators in the
South Island that could see
the potential in the brand,
and the lower half of the
island became a bit of a Mack
Mecca by the time legendary
truck salesman Ron Carpenter
had finished with it.
Stan Francis of North Otago
Road Metals could see that
these big burly Yank rigs were
just the ticket for the work
his companies were engaged
in, and that they were a huge
improvement over the British
gear he’d started with back in
was set. The company has
since changed its name to
Road Metals, however their
loyalty to the brand has never
wavered.
In a great example of
synchronicity, their two
brands of choice eventually
became entwined, as Volvo
now owns Mack, which is
1955.
The N.O.R.M. R-series Macks
eventually became legendary
down south, and together
with the other brand they
took a shine to, Volvo, the die
reaping the benefits by having
an increased amount of Volvo
technology built into its
trucks.
Current Road Metals
managing director, Murray
since changed its name to
Road Metals, however their
loyalty to the brand has never
wavered.
In a great example of
synchronicity, their two
brands of choice eventually
became entwined, as Volvo
now owns Mack, which is
reaping the benefits by having
an increased amount of Volvo
technology built into its
trucks.
Current Road Metals
managing director, Murray
Francis, (Stan’s son) knows
the strengths of both brands
and their place in his fleet,
but you don’t have to scratch
him very hard to find that
his favourite brand has a pup
bolted to the bonnet.
Having said that, he still gets
misty-eyed when talking
about the Leyland Octopus he
spent three and a half years
driving for his dad, when he
was barely out of his teens
and working on some of the
‘think-big’ projects of the day
at Twizel and Manapouri in
the seventies and eighties.
The Road Metal boys take
great pride in that pup on
the bonnet so it was almost
inevitable that a Trident was
going to appear in the colours
after a long run of R-series,
CH’s, Visions and then a
Granite.
Road Metals went all out with
this Trident, blitzing it with
chrome and accessories and
making the Christchurch
based truck a standout rig in a
city that probably has one of
the highest densities of bulk
truck and trailer rigs working
 

M

ACK

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR THE BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK. THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

NEW ZEALAND TRUCKING/PAGE 102/ FEATURED ARTICLE

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD
WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE
OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED
THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE
KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD
A SOFT SPOT FOR THE
BRAND GAVE A SIGH OF
RELIEF. Mack WAS BACK.

MACKSIMUM

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD

LOYALTY

BY CHIP KIDO

WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD
WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD
WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD
WHEN Mack’s CURRENT LINE OF TRUCKS FIRST POKED THEIR SNOUTS OUT THE KENNEL, THOSE THAT HAD

THE FRENCH INFLUENCE HAD BEEN CULLED OUT OF THE BREED, AND NOW Mack’s TRIDENT LOOKS AS STAUNCH AS. HOWEVER, AN AUTOMATED TRANSMISSION, ADBLUE TANK AND OTHER FEATURES SHOW THAT Mack’s POOCHES HAVEN’T BEEN KILLING TIME BY SLEEPING ON THE PORCh ...

Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check out the
Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals
when he visits to check out the latesr
variant of the Mack Trident,
Bryce Baird findss a dog lover at road Metals when he visits to check out the