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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________

Rev. 3/2010

RECOMMENDED READING LIST: BOOKS


Page 1 Page 8 Page 10 Page 11 Page 11 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Clinical Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy Hypnosis in Medicine, Dentistry, and Nursing Hypnosis and Children Regression to Prenatal and Birth Experience Experimental Hypnosis and Research Hypnosis Theory and Research Forensic Hypnosis, Memory, and Risks of Hypnosis Spirit Releasement and Soul Retrieval Ericksonian Hypnosis NLP History of Hypnosis

Clinical Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy


Allen, Roger P. (2004). Scripts and strategies in hypnotherapy: The complete works. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 337 pp. Presents a series of transcripts to be used in hypnotherapy sessions. Chapters cover specific scripts to be used with a variety of client problems. Scripts to be used for habit control, weight loss, fear and panic management, building self confidence, pain management, sexual issues, loss and bereavement, smoking cessation, recovering memory, and performance improvement are included. Therapy strategies and metaphors are also included. Barrios, Alfred A. (2009). Understanding hypnosis: Theory, scope and potential. Hauppauge, NY, US: Nova Science Publishers. 147 pp. Barnett, E. A. (1981). Analytical Hypnotherapy: Principles and Practice. Kingston, Canada: Junica Publishing Co. Ltd. Brink, Nicholas E. (2002). Grendel and his mother: Healing the traumas of childhood through dreams, imagery and hypnosis. Amityville, NY, US: Baywood Publishing Co. 186 pp. One cause of the behavioral, emotional and mental torment in a person's life is the psychological trauma that results from the actions and words of parents and others. This volume examines the effect of such trauma on a child's development and how the resulting torment eventually brings this child as an adult to psychotherapy. This trauma may be as subtle as a prenatal sigh of disappointment or as direct as physical or sexual abuse. Six clients are then led on a journey through the unconscious mind using dreamwork, hypnosis and imagery in the course of therapy to uncover and heal these traumas to free the client of torment. As recorded in the Old English myth of Beowulf, Beowulf frees the Danish King Hrothgar from 12 years of torment by killing two monsters, Grendel and his mother. This legend, when examined as an ancestral dream, offers a map for the journey through the unconscious mind to heal childhood trauma and provides an outline for this book. First, each client finds the strength to conquer the more immediate torment of the behavioral, emotional or thought disorder--Grendel--and then to uncover and overcome in a four-step process the deeper cause of his torment, the original trauma--Grendel's mother. Brown, D. P., & Fromm, E. (1986). Hypnotherapy & Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum. Burton, John. (2007). Understanding advanced hypnotic language patterns: A comprehensive guide. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 226 pp.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ In this book, John Burton goes into great depth on the subject if hypnotic language and also elaborates more on the concepts that comprise hypnotic language. The core idea presented is that a person's level of cognitive awareness significantly determines his functioning ability in life. Burton shows therapists how to expand their clients' cognitive awareness, specifically the cognitive and perceptual processes involved in meaning making. By doing so, therapists are more able to identify the specific awareness limitations of each of their clients and identify the specific cognitive perceptual ingredients that make up that client's problem. Drawing on this insight, therapists can then construct hypnotic language patterns that go right to the client's issues, invoking positive change. Numerous case examples are presented that include client assessments and dynamics, selecting and constructing hypnotic language patterns and applying the language patterns in therapy. Chapman, Robin A. (Ed). (2006). The Clinical Use of Hypnosis in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Practitioner's Casebook. New York, NY, US: Springer Publishing Co. 348 pp. Integrating cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with hypnosis may increase benefits to clients suffering from a broad range of mental and physical health problems. This practitioner's guide, written by clinical psychologists, educators, and hypnotists, brings together these two methods of treatment and provides a theoretical framework for their integration. By thoroughly reviewing the evidence-based research for the addition of hypnosis to cognitive behavioral treatments, and illustrating a variety of clinical applications, the contributors show how the integration can mean productive treatment of clients who might otherwise not progress as quickly or successfully. A useful final chapter addresses the process of becoming a practitioner of both CBT and hypnosis. Cheek, D.B., & LeCron, L. (1968). Clinical Hypnotherapy. New York: Grune & Stratton. Clark, J.C., & Jackson, J.A. (1983). Hypnosis & Behavior Therapy: The Treatment of Anxiety & Phobias. New York: Springer. Crasilneck, H. B., & Hall, J A. (1985). Clinical Hypnosis: Principles and Applications. Orlando: Grune & Stratton. Daitch, Carolyn. (2007). Affect regulation toolbox: Practical and effective hypnotic interventions for the overreactive client. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 289 pp. Affect regulation--control over one's emotions--has become a popular term in therapy over the past few decades, with emerging research in neuroscience and attachment paving the way for a better understanding of the root causes of our wayward feelings and behaviors. But much of the current research focuses on explaining models of normal affective development and theories for its dysregulation, rather than on its specific implications in a clinical setting. Now that we know so much about the origins of our erratic emotions, what can we do to control and normalize them? Carolyn Daitch's Affect Regulation Toolbox provides the answer, focusing on hypnosis as an effective way for individuals to learn how to regulate and control their excessive emotions, both inside and outside the therapy room. Conflicted interpersonal relationships, anxiety, stress, psychosomatic illness, and an inability to self-soothe, among other symptoms, can all lead to over-reactivity. For these clients, talk-therapy alone may be inadequate for providing longlasting behavioral changes that manage their highly reactive emotions. Hypnosis has been clinically proven to help clients reinterpret their stress response and self-manage their inappropriate reactions. In this book, Daitch expertly equips therapists to do just that, providing them with quick, practical, and easy-to-learn hypnotic interventions--or tools--to choose from in order to help clients regulate their over-reactivity. Degun-Mather, Marcia. (2006). Hypnosis, dissociation and survivors of child abuse: Understanding and treatment. Hoboken, NJ, US: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 244 pp. There is a strong argument for the educated and professional use of hypnosis in the field of trauma, particularly in facilitating the resolution of the trauma and processing of traumatic memories. This book draws attention to the importance of hypnosis in treating trauma cases, with particular reference to survivors of child abuse. It covers theories of traumatic stress, theories of hypnosis, and theories related to

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ the long-term effects of child abuse. Recent research in these areas is reviewed in full. The book can also be used as a clinician's guide to therapy, and offers safe and effective hypnotic interventions for clinicians treating survivors of child abuse. The treatment approach is predominantly cognitive-behavioral in orientation and uses hypnosis as a powerful addition to this. Key practical features include: (a) guidelines on how not to create false memories with hypnosis; (b) detailed descriptions of safe remembering techniques; (c) full guidelines on therapeutic procedures; and (d) helpful case illustrations. Hypnosis, dissociation and survivors of child abuse provides an updated perspective on hypnosis and its value in trauma. de Rios, Marlene D. (2001). Brief psychotherapy with the Latino immigrant client. New York, NY, US: Haworth Press. 191 pp. Intended for the practicing psychotherapist or student, this text examines which kinds of therapy work for the growing Latino immigrant population, looking at behavior modification, cognitive restructuring techniques, applications of hypnosis, and metaphors that can be used to help in brief interventions for clinical issues. Included in this text is a glossary of Spanish terms, appendices on hypnotic pain control inductions, sample tests, scales and diagrams, several case studies, and listings of Spanish language resources. Dowd, E. Thomas. (2000). Cognitive hypnotherapy. Lanham, MD, US: Jason Aronson. 240 pp. Combines applications of cognitive therapy and hypnotherapy into a unified approach to psychotherapy. First, the various models of cognitive therapy are described, followed by models of hypnotherapy and methods of hypnotic induction described in detail for the reader to implement the procedures, including samples of hypnotic dialogue. The major portion of the book examines the cognitive hypnotherapy model and procedures in the amelioration of a variety of psychological disorders, including its use in the reconstruction of memories (which are influenced by core cognitive schemata), a technique in childhood abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder. Next, the cognitive hypnotherapy model is applied to the enhancement of life by overcoming common blocks to effective performance. Finally, cognitive hypnotherapy is applied to overcoming the inevitable resistance that accompanies any attempts at significant psychological change. Edgette, John H.; Rowan, Tim. (2003). Winning the mind game: Using hypnosis in sport psychology. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 162 pp. This book focuses on helping the reader who has basic knowledge of how to use hypnosis in therapy to begin applying those skills in working with athletes, and the authors describe a number of advanced hypnotic interventions to bring about this therapeutic effect. Erickson, M. H., & Rossi, E. L. (1979). Hypnotherapy: An Exploratory Casebook. New York: Irvington. Flemons, Douglas. (2002). Of one mind: The logic of hypnosis, the practice of therapy. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 278 pp. The author uses what he calls his "metaphoric imagination" to get inside the subjective reality of his clients, to emphatically appreciate their predicament from their perspective. Once he is able to demonstrate his insider's grasp of his clients' experience, once he and they become "of one mind" about the nature and details of their distress, he can invite them to become of one mind with themselves--that is, to experience hypnosis, to lose track of the usual consciousness-imposed boundary between mind and body. This shift sets the stage for the therapeutic transformation of their problem. Explaining his relational approach through metaphors, anecdotes, and transcripts, Flemons demonstrates what hypnosis is and why it works, why clients' efforts to banish or control their symptom exacerbates it, and how therapists can best facilitate spontaneous collaborations with their clients. Gafner, George. (2006). More hypnotic inductions. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 140 pp. In response to the overwhelming success of his Handbook of Hypnotic Inductions, Gafner has expertly assembled a collection of brand new inductions, ready-made for clinical practice. Findings from recent

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ neuroimaging studies show the extent to which brain activation occurs during hypnosis, and more and more psychologists and counselors are turning to hypnosis as an effective adjunct to traditional modes of therapy. Gafner begins by introducing the topic of hypnosis, and making distinctions between it and guided imagery, meditation, trancework, and progressive muscle relaxation. Questions such as "Which clients are most likely to benefit from hypnosis?", "Which clients should not receive hypnosis?", and "How do inductions really work?" are addressed. After briefly summarizing the theoretical foundations and the six components of hypnosis-- pretrance discussion, induction, deepening, therapy, re-alerting, and debriefing-Gafner goes on to present the inductions in five main categories: (1) story inductions, (2) inductions for sleep, (3) inductions for children, (4) directive inductions, and (5) confusional inductions. Detailed scripts for inducing the hypnotic state are offered, as well as strategies for deepening, re-alerting, and debriefing, all followed by insightful clinical comments that highlight key strategies or offer alternative approaches. Gafner, George; Benson, Sonja. (2003). Hypnotic techniques: For standard psychotherapy and formal hypnosis. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 397 pp. Written with the needs of a broad range of therapists in mind, Hypnotic Techniques is an essential reference for both clinicians who practice standard psychotherapy, and those who have already integrated hypnosis into their practice. The companion volume to the acclaimed Handbook of Hypnotic Inductions, this book introduces the wealth of hypnotic applications for dissolving resistance and moving ahead in therapy. Broad in scope and flexible with respect to the theoretical bases, this new work assists clinicians in bringing the power of hypnotic techniques to bear in an extensive variety of therapeutic contexts. Hammond, D. C. (Ed.) (1988, 1994). Hypnotic Induction and Suggestion: An Introductory Manual. Des Plaines, IL: American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. Hammond, D. C. (Ed.) (1990). Handbook of Hypnotic Suggestions and Metaphors. New York: W. W. Norton. Havens, Ronald A. (2007). Self hypnosis for cosmic consciousness: Achieving altered states, mystical experiences, and spiritual enlightenment. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 245 pp. This book contains straightforward instructions for creating spiritual, religious, or mystical experiences within yourself and others. It offers detailed descriptions of these transformational epiphanies, as well as potential explanations for their short and long-term healing effects. More importantly, perhaps, it provides verbatim examples of hypnotic procedures that were specifically designed to precipitate such life-changing events. Each hypnosis script presented in this book demonstrates a complete trance session. Thus, each script begins with a trance induction, progresses through a semi-coherent set of direct and indirect (or metaphorical) suggestions, and ends with a trance termination process, though it is often difficult to tell exactly where one stage begins and the other ends. Hunter, Marlene E. (2007). Healing scripts: Using hypnosis to treat trauma and stress. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 174 pp. Healing scripts focuses on the use of hypnotherapy to help both trauma victims and individuals who are suffering from acute stress disorders. The field of trauma and stress treatment is constantly searching for new ideas and solutions and the hypnotic interventions detailed in this volume are welcome contributions to this area. They are designed to treat the source of the pain and anguish of trauma so that clients with long term problems can finally be offered some relief. Subjects covered include: pain (in all its forms); post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with sections on denial, hypervigilence and hyper-arousal; acute stress; sleep disorders; and dissociation disorders, including ego-strengthening and integration. The book also contains a separate section devoted to helping children suffering from acute stress and trauma. Hunter, Roy. (2005). Hypnosis for inner conflict resolution: Introducing parts therapy. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 189 pp. Why do so many clients experience inner conflicts that inhibit the successful attainment of important goals? Both counselors and hypnotherapists use techniques that help their clients change undesired habits or achieve personal and professional goals, yet, in spite of their best efforts, some clients still continue to

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ experience unresolved inner conflicts. This book describes an elegant approach to reconciling the conflicting "parts" of a client's personality. Parts therapy is based on the concept that our personality is composed of a number of various parts. Our personality parts are aspects of the subconscious, each with its respective job or function of the inner mind. Inner conflicts occur when we have two different parts of the subconscious pulling us in opposite directions. Closely allied to ego state therapy and voice dialogue, parts therapy uses hypnosis to identify conflicting parts that are damaging the well being of clients. These parts are then directed to negotiate with each other through the therapist to bring about a resolution. Leskowitz, Eric D. (Ed). (2000). Transpersonal hypnosis: Gateway to body, mind, and spirit. Boca Raton, FL, US: CRC Press. 188 pp. Transpersonal psychology and hypnotherapy are both at the forefront of current developments in the conceptualization and the treatment of illness. This book presents a multidimensional, energy-based view of human awareness that integrates numerous, disparate biological, psychological, and spiritual techniques. This timely book is part of the rising worldwide interest in holistic and spiritual practices to bring about greater health and happiness. It gives an overview of psychotherapy strategies that uses hypnotically accessed transpersonal states of consciousness to heal body, mind, and spirit. Each chapter adheres to a similar format, which includes both a historical overview and the theory behind the development of each technique. The emphasis is on experimental studies that medical and psychological symptoms responsive to these approaches. Lynn, Steven Jay; Kirsch, Irving. (2006). Essentials of clinical hypnosis: An evidence-based approach. Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. 271 pp. This book is essentially clinical in nature. But it is a clinical book with a research base. The clinical strategies and techniques that are presented are ones that the authors have used in their practice and that they have taught their graduate students to use. They are procedures with an evidential base. Many of the specific techniques they describe have been validated in clinical trials and outcome studies, and their approach to most strategic issues has been shaped by their understanding of the research literature in hypnosis, psychotherapy, and psychopathology. If there is a fundamental difference between this book and the many other guides that have been published on clinical applications of hypnosis, it is the degree to which the principles and practices the authors describe are evidence-based. Hence, the subtitle of this book. The authors aim to bring their enthusiasm for integrating hypnosis with empirically supported methods to a wide readership and to move hypnosis more securely into the mainstream of established clinical practice. Rhue, J. W., Lynn, S. J., & Kirsch, l. (1993). Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Rossi, E. L. (Ed.) (1980). The Collected Papers of Milton H. Erickson, M.D., Volumes I-IV. New York: Irvington. Spiegel, Herbert; Spiegel, David. (2004). Trance and treatment: Clinical uses of hypnosis (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA, US: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. 545 pp. This book has been written to make available to clinicians a brief, disciplined technique for mobilizing and learning from an individual's capacity to concentrate. In the past, there have been exaggerated fears about hypnosis and overblown statements of its efficacy. The authors' effort has been to bring scientific discipline to bear on the subject and to systematically explore its clinical use and limitations. They have written Trance and Treatment as an introduction for someone new to the subject of hypnosis, but they have also included material in sufficient depth so that therapists with wide experience in the field can acquire new perspectives. Their approach differs from the current clinical literature in emphasizing the importance of performing a systematic assessment of hypnotizability; their method is described in detail along with data relating performance on the HIP to personality style, psychopathology, and treatment outcome. Tramontana, Joseph. (2009). Hypnotically enhanced treatment for addictions: Alcohol abuse, drug abuse, gambling, weight control, and smoking cessation. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 144 pp.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ The purpose of this book is to offer new strategies, techniques, and scripts for use with problem drinkers, alcoholism, drug addiction, and gambling addiction in an outpatient population, as well as to review old and to present new techniques or combinations of techniques, strategies, and scripts for other addictions. The five addictions to be addressed are: alcohol abuse and dependency, drug abuse/addiction, gambling compulsions/obsessions and addictions, tobacco addiction (including cigars, pipes and chew), food addiction/compulsions. In the latter two, the "strategies and techniques" section will also address marketing and/or providing a package of sessions, with various preplanned scripts used in each session. Udolf, R. (1987). Handbook of Hypnosis for Professionals. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold. Voit, Rick; DeLaney, Molly. (2004). Hypnosis in clinical practice: Steps for mastering hypnotherapy. New York, NY, US: Brunner-Routledge. 159 pp. Warren, Muriel Prince. (2006). From trauma to transformation. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 278 pp. In this post 9/11 world therapists need to expand their toolboxes to deal with trauma and its effects. This book provides a new way of dealing with the devastating emotional residue of a traumatic event. It centers on the innovative application of hypnotherapy to help trauma victims "self-actualize", regain their lives, and move forward again. Many people are familiar with the famous "fight or flight" response to trauma, but few know about the "freeze" response. "Freeze" is the most dangerous of the trio since it inhibits any reaction and leaves the victim immobile. It can lead directly to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Also included is a brief survey of brain research and its implications. For clinicians, this volume outlines the effects of trauma on mind and body and provides comprehensive treatment plans for the mental disorders caused or exacerbated by trauma. Watkins, J. G. (1986). Hypnotherapeutic Techniques: Volume 1, The Practice of Clinical Hypnosis. New York: Irvington. Watkins, J. G. (1992). Hypnotherapeutic Techniques: Volume II, Hypnoanalytic Techniques. New York: Irvington. Watkins, John G.; Barabasz, Arreed. (2008). Advanced hypnotherapy: Hypnodynamic techniques. New York, NY, US: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. 352 pp. Advanced Hypnotherapy focuses on tested hypnoanalytic techniques, with step-by-step procedures for integrating hypnosis into psychoanalytic processes. In its examination of the latest thinking, research, and techniques, the book discusses historical origins of hypnosis as well as how to apply it to current events, such as using hypnosis in the treatment of trauma with soldiers coming out of the war in Iraq. The text shows how hypnosis can be combined with psychoanalysis to make it possible to understand the subjective world of clients. Its accessible nature, rich detail, and significant updates make the book an invaluable resource for the professional who wishes to incorporate hypnosis into his or her practice. With the authors' extensive and impressive knowledge, careful updates, and comprehensive coverage of the proper and appropriate techniques to use, this volume is an indispensable addition to the field. Weitzenhoffer, A. M. (1989). The Practice of Hypnotism, Volumes 1 & 2. New York: Wiley. Wester, W. C. (Ed.) (1987). Clinical Hypnosis: A Case Management Approach. Cincinnati: Behavioral Science Center. Wester, W. C., & Smith, A. H. (Eds.). Clinical Hypnosis: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott. Wolberg, L.R. (1964). Hypnoanalysis. New York: Grune & Stratton.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Wright, M.E. (1987). Clinical Practice of Hypnotherapy. New York: Guilford. Yager, Edwin K. (2009). Foundations of clinical hypnosis: From theory to practice. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 264 pp. This comprehensive volume is certain to become an invaluable textbook in the burgeoning field of clinical hypnosis. In it Dr. Yager covers everything there is to know about how to translate theory into practice across the range of clinical settings. His clear and thoughtful perspective will inform those who are new to the field and expand the understanding of those who have more experience. Divided into five parts, the book begins with a discussion of what hypnosis is (and isn't) and introduces the "concept" the "language" the "phenomena" the "tools" and "hypermnesia." In part two, the discussion turns to clinical considerations, addressing approaches to using hypnosis, the roles it can play in psychotherapy and some potential dangers and risks that may arise with its use. Part three looks at specific procedures, delineating the principles of trance induction, highlighting the particulars of hypnosis and sleep, and focusing on Dr. Yager's pioneering discoveries regarding subliminal therapy. Part four is devoted to Applications of Hypnosisfrom test taking to ocular correctionproviding a wide view of the power and possibility of hypnosis as one of the most efficacious treatment options available for an extraordinary range of challenges. The final section consists of a variety of additional relevant topics. The book closes with a useful glossary of terms and extensive reference list, plus a bibliography for further investigation into various unique applications. Yapko, Michael D. (Ed). (2006). Hypnosis and Treating Depression: Applications in Clinical Practice. New York, NY, US: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. 334 pp. Michael Yapko's seminal 1992 book, Hypnosis and the Treatment of Depressions, was the first book ever written on the subject of applying hypnosis in the treatment of depressed individuals. Since its publication, Yapko's work has not only withstood the test of colleagues previously dismissive of the merits of hypnosis as a tool of treatment, but has thrived in the face of it. Hypnosis and Treating Depression diversifies the range of topics to consider and increases the number of knowledgeable contributors on the subject of treating depression with hypnosis. The book features chapter contributions by highly experienced and wellknown experts on using hypnosis to treat specific forms of depression, with assessment and intervention strategies as well as sample transcripts of the use of hypnosis in therapy sessions. Yapko, Michael D. (2001). Treating depression with hypnosis: Integrating cognitive-behavioral and strategic approaches. New York, NY, US: Brunner-Routledge. 177 pp. Focuses on structuring and delivering of hypnotic interventions for major depression, with a substantial use of concepts and techniques from cognitive-behavioral and strategic approaches as a foundation. Current research on depression is used to emphasize the still growing knowledge of depression. Hypnosis has shown itself to be effective in not only reducing symptoms, but in teaching the skills (such as rational thinking, effective problem-solving and coping strategies, and positive relationship skills) that can prevent recurrences. Yapko, M. D. (1990). Trancework: An Introduction to the Practice of Clinical Hypnosis. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Zarren, Jordan I.; Eimer, Bruce N. (2002). Brief cognitive hypnosis: Facilitating the change of dysfunctional behavior. New York, NY, US: Springer Publishing Co. 300 pp. Presents the reader with various applications of hypnosis in clinical practice. Most importantly, this book focuses on brief clinical interventions which are both effacious and cost effective. The authors clearly describe a number of techniques for correcting dysfunctional behaviors such as irritating and/or self destructive habits, ameliorating anxiety disorders, treating pain, and managing troublesome side effects of various medical treatments and procedures. The authors also include a section on the use of brief cognitive hypnosis for smoking cessation.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________

Hypnosis in Medicine, Dentistry, and Nursing


Araoz, D.L. (1982). Hypnosis & Sex Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel. August, R.V. (1961). Hypnosis in Obstetrics. New York: McGraw-Hill. Barabasz, Arreed Franz (Ed); Olness, Karen (Ed); Boland, Robert (Ed); Kahn, Stephen (Ed). (2010). Medical hypnosis primer: Clinical and research evidence.New York, NY, US: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. 133 pp. This brief book contains chapters by top hypnosis authorities. It is a brief introduction to hypnosis. It is intended to (1) Briefly present the basic concepts of modern medical hypnosis. (2) Encourage health care practitioners to learn how to use hypnosis as an adjunct to standard medical care. (3) Support teaching and practice of hypnosis as a part of the required syllabus for every medical and nursing school as well as graduate programs in clinical and counseling psychology. Blanchard, Edward B. (2001). Irritable bowel syndrome: Psychosocial assessment and treatment. Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. 373 pp. Brown, Donald C. (Ed). (2009). Advances in the use of hypnosis for medicine, dentistry and pain prevention/management. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 238 pp. This book explores the biology of hypnosis and its applications in medicine, dentistry, pain prevention and management. Drawing from presentations at the 6th Annual Frontiers of Hypnosis Assembly held in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Dr. Brown has edited a volume that will be of interest to a broad swathe of clinicians. The chapters will inform and stimulate the thinking and practice of clinicians who already use hypnosis and those who are interested in knowing more about its efficacy and potential. Brown, D. P., & Fromm, E. (1987). Hypnosis and Behavioral Medicine. Hillsdale, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum. Ewin, Dabney. (2009). 101 things I wish I'd known when I started using hypnosis. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 128 pp. For over thirty years, Dabney Ewin has been teaching medical hypnosis at Tulane University. During all that time, he has worked with hundreds of patients and has taught hundreds of students, but the one thing that stands out during this illustrious career is that he has never stopped learning something new. This succinct volume is a testament to all the ideas that Dr. Ewin wished he had known about when he first started practicing hypnosis. The words, phrases, examples and illustrations presented here are designed to give any beginning or experienced student a foundation about the working of hypnosisa foundation that Dr. Ewin took more than 30 years to construct. Read this book one page at a time from the beginning, or simply browse through randomly, either way, the knowledge this volume provides will prove to be a blessing to anyone who is lucky enough to have it in his or her library. Frank, David; Mooney, Bernard. (2007). Hypnosis & counselling in the treatment of cancer and other chronic illness. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 142 pp. This important work discusses the therapeutic use of hypnosis in the treatment of cancer and other lifethreatening diseases. After setting out a brief history of hypnosis the authors present an invaluable series of case studies, in the course of which they examine: the science of hypnosis, successful integration of hypnosis into cancer treatment programmes, and myths surrounding the subject of hypnosis in therapy. The book raises questions about the direction medicine has taken with regard to chronic illness and considers possible future developments in this field. Overall, it presents compelling arguments for offering hypnosis to cancer sufferers and provides crucial insights into the body's healing abilities. A work of immense importance to medical professionals and everyone else dealing with chronic diseases.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Frank, David; Mooney, Bernard. (2002). Hypnosis and counselling in the treatment of chronic illness. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 142 pp. Discusses the therapeutic properties of hypnosis in the treatment of life-threatening diseases. Included are a brief history of hypnosis and a series of case studies. This work examines (1) the science of hypnosis, (2) successful integration into the cancer treatment program, and (3) myths surrounding the subject of hypnosis in therapy. The book raises questions about the direction medicine has taken and considers future developments. The authors present arguments for offering hypnosis to cancer sufferers and provide insights into the body's healing abilities. Fredericks, Lillian E. (2001). The use of hypnosis in surgery and anesthesiology: Psychological preparation of the surgical patient. Springfield, IL, US: Charles C. Thomas Publisher. 240 pp. The purpose of this book is to stimulate physicians to explore the capabilities of the human mind, when it is working together with the body, and with the help of the unconscious, to accept hypnotic suggestions. The chapters written by Fredericks are a combination of her own experience of using hypnosis as an adjunct to her practice of anesthesiology, and the practice of other anesthesiologists, as well as many bibliographic references, using hypnosis not only for the control of pain, anxiety, stress, and apprehension but for many other problems. Hartland, J. (1971). Medical and Dental Hypnosis (Second Edition). London: Balliere Tindall. Hilgard, E. R., & Hilgard, J. R. (1983). Hypnosis in the Relief of Pain. Los Altos, CA: William Kaufmann. Hilgard, J. R., & LeBaron, S. (1984). Hypnotherapy of Pain in Children with Cancer. Los Altos, CA: William Kaufmann. Hornyak, Lynne M. (Ed); Green, Joseph P. (Ed). (2000). Healing from within: The use of hypnosis in women's health care. Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. 285 pp. Hypnosis and imagery are among the oldest mindbody methods. As today's health care providers become increasingly interested in understanding how psychosocial and medical factors affect health, they are finding hypnosis and imagery to be valuable components of treatment. This volume is the first comprehensive discussion of how hypnosis and imagery can be used to promote women's health. The contributors review the relevant scientific literature and describe numerous practical techniques, using vignettes and case studies. Ways to customize treatment and the patient's active role are emphasized throughout this volume. Hudson, Lynda. (2009). Scripts and strategies in hypnotherapy with children: For young people aged 5 to 15. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 239 pp. In addition to providing a collection of hypnotic scripts for children from five to fifteen, this book offers easy to follow, solution-focused ways to structure treatment sessions. It also contains advice and background information, including contraindications and possible pitfalls, on common and not so common childhood problems. Clear and easy to use, it will appeal to all levels of experience. It has a variety of tried and tested inductions and scripts for different ages and thinking styles using up-to-date metaphors such as computer programs and play stations as well as the more traditional balloons, gardens and magic hammocks. Issues include self-esteem, confidence, bedwetting, soiling, the effects of bullying, behaviour problems, school issues such as lack of organisational skills, study skills, exam strategies using accelerated learning skills, overcoming general anxiety, anxiety in relation to exams and school phobia. Johnson, Charlie; Webster, Denise. (2002). Recrafting a life: Solutions for chronic pain and illness. New York, NY, US: Brunner-Routledge. 322 pp. Chronic pain and illness can be overwhelming and present complex challenges for both patients and the clinicians who treat them. This book meets these challenges by presenting a new treatment approach that creatively incorporates powerful Ericksonian hypnosis interventions with effective solution-focused therapy techniques. Resource focused and rooted firmly in self-care theory, this integrative approach

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ enables the clinician to effectively reduce physical pain and suffering while successfully addressing the psychological issues associated with a chronic condition. The authors describe the five stages of recrafting a life through which patients pass in the journey to transcend their chronic condition. Marmer, , M.J. (1959). Hypnosis in Anesthesiology. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas. Patterson, David R. (2010). Clinical hypnosis for pain control. Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. 275 pp. Rossi, E. L., & Cheek, D. B. (1988). Mind-Body Therapy: Ideodynamic Healing in Hypnosis. New York: W. W. Norton. Torem, M. S. (1992). Hypnosis and its Clinical Applications in Psychiatry and Medicine, Volumes 1 & 2. Volumes of Psychiatric Medicine, 10(1,4). Waxman, D. (1989). Hartland's Medical & Dental Hypnosis. London: Bailliere Tindall. Zahourek, R. P. (Ed.) (1985). Clinical Hypnosis and Therapeutic Suggestion in Nursing. New York: Grune & Stratton.

Hypnosis and Children


Ambrose, G. (1961). Hypnotherapy with Children (Second Edition). London: Staples. Gardner, G.G. (1977). Hypnosis with infants and pre-school children. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 19, 158-162. Hudson, Lynda. (2009). Scripts and strategies in hypnotherapy with children: For young people aged 5 to 15. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 239 pp. In addition to providing a collection of hypnotic scripts for children from five to fifteen, this book offers easy to follow, solution-focused ways to structure treatment sessions. It also contains advice and background information, including contraindications and possible pitfalls, on common and not so common childhood problems. Clear and easy to use, it will appeal to all levels of experience. It has a variety of tried and tested inductions and scripts for different ages and thinking styles using up-to-date metaphors such as computer programs and play stations as well as the more traditional balloons, gardens and magic hammocks. Issues include self-esteem, confidence, bedwetting, soiling, the effects of bullying, behaviour problems, school issues such as lack of organisational skills, study skills, exam strategies using accelerated learning skills, overcoming general anxiety, anxiety in relation to exams and school phobia. London, P., & Cooper, L.M. (1969). Norms of hypnotic susceptibility in children. Developmental Psychology, 1, 113-124. Morgan, A.H., & Hilgard, J.R. (1979). The Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale for Children. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 21, 148-155. Olness, K., & Gardner, G.G. (1988). Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy with Children (Second Edition). Philadelphia: Grune & Stratton. Wester, W. C., & O'Grady, D. J. (1991). Clinical Hypnosis with Children. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Wester II, William C. (Ed); Sugarman, Laurence I. (Ed). (2007). Therapeutic hypnosis with children and adolescents. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 489 pp.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ In this comprehensive volume, the editors have gathered together contributors in the field of pediatric medicine to examine the wide-ranging applications and promise of the use of hypnosis with children and adolescents. In Part 1, the broad framework of hypnosis is presented. The concepts, developmental considerations, approaches to induction, hypnotic ability, hypnosis with families and ethical considerations are thoroughly reviewed. Parts 2 and 3 focus on key psychological and medical applications of hypnosis. The medical section describes the integration of hypnosis from acute care settings to the operating room. Throughout the book, clinical vignettes help the reader understand the hypnotic encounter while supportive evidence, strategies and caveats provide insights.

Regression to Prenatal and Birth Experiences


Chamberlain, David. Prenatal and perinatal hypnotherapy. In Leskowitz, Eric D. (Ed). (2000). Transpersonal hypnosis: Gateway to body, mind, and spirit. (pp. 121-130). Boca Raton, FL, US: CRC Press. 188 pp. The author discusses how he used hypnotherapy as a tool in his psychology practice in 1974, and how prenatal and perinatal memories were considered an impossible fear for infant brains and were labeled fantasies. This general view has not changed much in almost a quarter century of medicine and psychology. Then, as now, a minority of practitioners were fascinated by these early memories, struggled to understand them, and, even, if they couldn't accept them as"real," they put such material to constructive clinical use since it was important to their clients. Others turned to rejection and ridicule, setting aside evidence in favor of the prevailing dogma. The author further goes on to state that he attributes this scientific "failure to progress" to the resilience of an outdated paradigm of human nature which defines persons only as matterparticularly as brain matter. Transpersonal phenomena suggest a larger truth, not fully articulated, of mind and soul as consciousness. The author shows how uncovering the mind/soul of infants through hypnotherapy has been a gateway to understanding the larger issues of human consciousness. Chamberlain, D. (1986). Babies Remember Birth. Los Angeles, CA: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. Gabriel, M., & Gabriel, M. (1992). Voices from the Womb. Lower Lake, CA: Aslan Publishing. Lucas, W.B. (Ed.) (1993). Regression Therapy: A Handbook for Professionals. Volume II: Special Instances of Altered State Work. Crest Park, CA: Deep Forest Press. Watkins, H. (1986). Treating the Trauma of Abortion. The Journal of Pre- and Perinatal Psychology, Vol. 1, No. 2. New York: Human Sciences Press.

Experimental Hypnosis and Research


Baars, Bernard J. (Ed); Banks, William P. (Ed); Newman, James B. (Ed). (2003). Essential sources in the scientific study of consciousness. Cambridge, MA, US: MIT Press. 1192 pp. This book discusses topics on consciousness in vision and inner speech, immediate memory and attention, waking, dreaming, coma, the effects of brain damage, fringe consciousness, hypnosis, and dissociation. Underlying all the selections are the questions: What difference does consciousness make? What are its properties? What role does it play in the nervous system? How do conscious brain functions differ from unconscious ones? The focus of the book is on scientific evidence and theory. Barus, Imants. (2003). Alterations of consciousness: An empirical analysis for social scientists. Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association. 291 pp. Bowers, K. S. (1976). Hypnosis for the Seriously Curious. New York: W. W. Norton.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Cooper, Linn F.; Erickson, Milton H. (2002). Time distortion in hypnosis: An experimental and clinical investigation (2nd ed.). Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 206 pp. Experimental and clinical aspects of hypnotic time distortion are thoroughly examined in an original approach to the subject matter. In this reprint of the second edition, time distortion is defined as the difference between the real time of an incident and its non-therapeutic implications. Hypnotic time distortion is comprehensively discussed and evaluated in the first half of the book, while Part II pays special attention to the clinical aspects involved. Specific therapeutic applications and meaningful illustrative case material are also provided. Fass, M. L., & Brown, D. (Eds.) (1990). Creative Mastery in Hypnosis and Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum. Fromm, E., & Nash, M. R. (Eds.) (1992). Contemporary Hypnosis Research. New York: Guilford. Fromm, E., & Shor, R. E. (1979). Hypnosis: Research Developments and Perspectives. Chicago: Aldine-Atherton. Hull, Clark L. (2002). Hypnosis and suggestibility: An experimental approach. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 416 pp. The author describes the methods and techniques used to investigate hypnosis and hypnotic phenomena in laboratory research. The historical roots of hypnosis and various hypnotic phenomena are described, as is the distinction between hypnosis as described and characterized by laboratory researchers in the effort to be objective about hypnotic phenomena, and clinicians primarily concerned in applying hypnosis in a therapeutic setting. Jamieson, Graham A. (Ed). (2007). Hypnosis and conscious states: The cognitive neuroscience perspective. New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press. 321 pp. Trance states are a human universal. Individual and social manifestations of trance are found in all recorded human societies. Understanding them tells us about a fundamental human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience, informing basic questions on the structure and biological basis of conscious states. This book describes the most recent advances in understanding hypnosis and trance states by researchers working on the neuroscience of consciousness. It contains new and exciting contributions from the latest generation of hypnosis researchers, and provides a lively debate on methodological and theoretical issues central to the development of emerging research paradigms in the cognitive neuroscience of conscious states. Kokoszka, Andrzej. (2007). States of consciousness: Models for psychology and psychotherapy. New York, NY, US: Springer Science + Business Media. 261 pp. Consciousness has always been a particularly elusive concept and one vigorously argued in the scientific community. This new volume takes on the task of defining normal and altered consciousness in their most relevant clinical terms. In States of consciousness, Andrzej Kokoszka expands on the pioneering work of J. H. Jackson, offering contemporary models for studying consciousness as it applies to both pathology and normal altered states, e.g., relaxation, sleep, meditation, and hypnosis. He makes clear distinctions between the neuroscientific and psychiatric components of consciousness; at the same time, his theories are rooted firmly in the biopsychosocial approach. Highlights of the coverage: (a) historical overview of studies of consciousness and its altered states; (b) evolutionary/dynamic model of consciousness and information processing, based on the structure and principles of cell behavior; (c) comparison of altered states of consciousness in healthy persons and patients with schizophrenia; (d) new perspectives on the role of consciousness in pathology; (e) case illustration of altered states in a patient with posttraumatic stress

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ disorder, integrating neurobiological, cognitive-behavioral, and psychodynamic data; and (f) applications of the model in clinical practice. Ledochowski, Igor. (2003). The deep trance training manual, vol. 1. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 113 pp. This book is a training manual that presents core theoretical principles from all the major hypnotic perspectives and practical exercises designed to improve technique, supporting the development of elegant, individual style and language, and the mastery of powerful approaches. Rossi, Ernest L. (2002). The psychobiology of gene expression: Neuroscience and neurogenesis in hypnosis and the healing arts. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 557 pp. We now know how significant life experiences can turn on gene expression and neurogenesis to continually update the brain and body in ways that modulate our consciousness, memory, learning, and behavior in health and illness. The author generates hypotheses about the associations between novelty, gene expression, neurogenesis, and the numinosum--the experience of fascination, mystery, and tremendousness that motivates our lives. The book explores how we may creatively facilitate the psychodynamics of gene expression, neurogenesis, and healing in psychotherapy. The major mission of this book is to organize and present the facts of current neuroscience to generate new views of the role of consciousness and culture in human development and the healing arts so that they may be assessed by a new generation of therapists and researchers. Sheehan, P. W., & McConkey, K. M. (1982). Hypnosis and Experience: The Exploration of Phenomena and Process. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Hypnosis Theory and Research


Hammond, D.C. (Ed.) (1988). Learning Clinical Hypnosis: An Educational Resources Compendium. Des Plaines, IL: American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. Hilgard, E. R (1977). Divided Consciousness: Multiple Controls in Human Thought and Action. New York: Wiley-Interscience. Lynn, S. J., & Rhue, J. W. (Eds.) (1992). Theories of Hypnosis. New York: Guilford Press. Naish, P. L. N. (Ed.) (1986). What is Hypnosis? Current Theories and Research. Philadelphia: Open University Press. Nash, Michael R. (Ed); Barnier, Amanda J. (Ed). (2008). The Oxford handbook of hypnosis: Theory, research, and practice. New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press. 791 pp. The Oxford Handbook of Hypnosis is the successor to Fromm and Nash's Contemporary Hypnosis Research (Guilford Press), which has long been regarded as the field's authoritative scholarly reference for practitioners and researchers alike. With 31 original chapters this new book is a comprehensive treatment of where the field has been, where it stands today and its future directions. The world's leading scholars masterfully track the latest developments in theory and research. These chapters are thoughtful, lucid and provocative. Clinical chapters then comprehensively describe how hypnosis is best used with patients across a broad spectrum of disorders and applied settings. Authored by internationally renowned practitioners these contributions are richly illustrated with case examples and session transcripts. Unparalleled in breadth and quality, this book is the definitive reference for students, researchers, clinicians and anyone wanting to understand the science and practice of hypnosis. The only reference you'll need for years to come.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Spanos, N. P. (1986). Hypnotic behavior: A social-psychological interpretation of amnesia, analgesia, and "trance logic." Behavioral & Brain Sciences, 9, 449-502. This is associated with 22 commentaries by different authorities in the field. Spanos, N. P., & Chaves, J. F. (Eds.) (1989). Hypnosis: The Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective. Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Books.

Forensic Hypnosis, Memory, and Risks of Hypnosis


Briere, J., & Conte, J. (1993). Self-reported amnesia for abuse in adults molested as children. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 6(1), 33-42. Christianson, S. A. (Ed.) (1992). Handbook of Emotion and Memory. Hillsdale, N.J.: Laurence Erlbaum. Fromm, E. (1970). Age regression with unexpected reappearance of a repressed childhood language. International Journal of Clinical & Experimental Hypnosis, 18, 79-88. Gudjonsson, G. (1992). The Psychology of Interrogations, Confessions and Testimony. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Hambleton, Roger. (2002). Practising safe hypnosis: A risk management guide. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 209 pp. This book explores the damage that can be caused by the misapplication of hypnotic techniques in therapy, laboratory, and stage performance settings. The laws of assault and negligence are used to assess the hypnotist's criminal and personal injury liability in the English, American, and Australian courts. Relevant reading for hypnotherapists, hypnotists, and members of the legal and medical professions, the book brings together a wide range of recent research and legal case histories. Topics include civil and criminal assault, induction, informed consent, hypnotic coercion, pre-existing conditions, and termination. In addition, there is commentary on the history of hypnosis, induction scripts for use in conjunction with best practice, theoretical comparisons, and discussion on the nature of hypnosis including the controversial debate surrounding hypnosis as an altered state of consciousness. Herman, J. L., & Schatzow, E. (1987). Recovery and verification of memories of childhood sexual trauma. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 4, 1-14. Laurence, J. R., & Perry, C. (1988). Hypnosis, Will and Memory. New York: Guilford. Loftus, E. F. (1993). The reality of repressed memories. American Psychologist, 48(5), 518-537. MacHovec, F. J. (1986). Hypnosis Complications: Prevention and Risk Management. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. Nash, M. R. (1987). What, if anything, is regressed about hypnotic age regression? A review of the empirical literature. Psychological Bulletin, 102, 42-52. Pettinati, H. M. (1988). Hypnosis and Memory. New York: Guilford. Scheflin, A. W., & Shapiro, J. L. (1989). Trance on Trial. New York: Guilford. Scheflin, A. W., Brown, D. P., & Hammond, D. C. (1994). Repressed Memory, Hypnotherapy and the Law. Des Plaines, IL: American Society of Clinical Hypnosis Press.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Schumaker, J. F. (Ed.) (1991). Human Suggestibility: Advances in Theory, Research, and Application. New York: Routledge. Singer, J. L. (Ed.) (1990). Repression and Dissociation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Terr, L. (1988). What happens to early memories of trauma? A study of twenty children under age five at the time of documented traumatic events. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 27, 96-104. Terr, L. (1991). Childhood traumas: An outline and overview. American Journal of Psychiatry, 148(1), 10-20.

Spirit Releasement and Soul Retrieval


Baldwin, W. (1992). Regression Therapy: Spirit Releasement Therapy. Enterprise, FL: Bethel Publications. Chaplin, A. (1977). The Bright Light of Death. Marina Del Rey, CA: DeVorss and Co. Fiore, E. (1987). The Unquiet Dead. New York: Doubleday.

Ericksonian Hypnosis
Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1977). Patterns of the Hypnotic Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D., (Volume 1). Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Edelstein, M.G. (1981). Trauma, Trance, & Transformation: A Clinical Guide to Hypnotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Erickson, M.H. (1980). The Collected Papers of Milton H. Erickson on Hypnosis, Volume 1: The Nature of Hypnosis & Suggestion. Volume 2: The Hypnotic Alteration of Sensory, Perceptual & Psychophysical Processes. Volume 3: Hypnotic Investigation of Psychodynamic Processes. Volume 4: Innovative Hypnotherapy. Edited by E.L. Rossi. New York: Irvington. Erickson, M.H. (1983). Healing in Hypnosis: The Seminars, Workshops, & Lectures of Milton H. Erickson, Volume 1. Edited by E.L. Rossi, M.O. Ryan, & F.A. Sharp. New York: Irvington. Erickson, M.H. (1985). Mind-Body Communication in Hypnosis: The Seminars, Workshops, & Lectures of Milton H. Erickson, Volume 3. Edited by E.L. Rossi and M.O. Ryan. New York: Irvington. Erickson, M.H. (1986). Life Reframing in Hypnosis: The Seminars, Workshops, & Lectures of Milton H. Erickson, Volume 2. Edited by E.L. Rossi and M.O. Ryan. New York: Irvington. Erickson, M.H., & Rossi, E.L. (1976). Hypnotic Realities: The Induction of Clinical Hypnosis & Forms of Indirect Suggestion. New York: Irvington. Erickson, M.H., & Rossi, E.L. (1979). Hypnotherapy: An Exploratory Casebook. New York: Irvington. Gunnison, Hugh. (2004). Hypnocounseling: An eclectic bridge between Milton Erickson and Carl Rogers. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 208 pp. The definition of Hypnocounseling can set the chapter organization of the book. Hypnocounseling shall stand for the use of (1) Ericksonian hypnosuggestive language in conjunction with (2) Rogers' personcentered, highly facilitative therapeutic relationship. The author examines the utilization approach of Erickson and how it compares with the person-centered approach of Rogers, explores such issues as

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ eclecticism, counseling process, and facilitative, therapeutic relationships, and finally explores specific Hypnocounseling strategies. Haley, J. (1973). Uncommon Therapy: The Psychiatric Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. New York: W.W. Norton. Havens, Ronald A. (2003). The wisdom of Milton H. Erickson. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 380 pp. The material in this book was compiled in an attempt to clarify the concepts and attitudes necessary for an effective application of the Ericksonian forms of therapy and hypnosis. It is a collection of the observations and ideas that Milton Erickson himself presented in numerous publications and lectures in an effort to communicate the wisdom that guided his interventions. Lankton, S.R., & Langton, C.H. (1983). The Answer Within: A Clinical Framework of Ericksonian Hypnotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Lankton, S.R., & Langton, C.H. (1989). Tales of Enchantment. New York: Brunner/Mazel. O'Hanlon, Bill. (2009). A guide to trance land: A practical handbook of Ericksonian and solution-oriented hypnosis. New York, NY, US: W W Norton & Co. 106 pp. A guide to trance land is an inviting and reassuring brief guide to permissive, or solution-oriented, hypnosis by internationally known therapist, author, and speaker Bill O'Hanlon. With his characteristic charm and wit, O'Hanlon presents the basics of this results-driven approach to hypnosis, drawing on his training with renowned psychiatrist Milton H. Erickson. This concise guide provides therapists with the essential tools they need to effectively use solution-oriented hypnosis with their clients. An accessible, nononsense primer, A guide to trance land will help therapists use hypnosis to help their clients tap into and release their inner knowledge. Rosen, S. (1982). My Voice Will Go With You: The Teaching Tales of Milton H. Erickson. New York: W.W. Norton. Rossi, E.L. (1986). The Psychobiology of Mind-Body Healing: New Concepts of Therapeutic Hypnosis. New York: W.W. Norton. Zeig, J. (Ed.) (1980). A Teaching Seminar with Milton H. Erickson, M.D. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Zeig, J. (1982). Ericksonian Approaches to Hypnosis & Psychotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Zeig, J. (1985). Ericksonian Psychotherapy, Volume 1: Structures. Volume 2: Clinical Applications. New York: Brunner/Mazel.

NLP
Andreas, S., & Andreas, C. (1987). Change Your Mind & Keep the Change. Moab, UT: Real People Press. Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1975). Patterns of the Hypnotic Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. (Volume 1). Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1975). The Structure of Magic, Volume 1. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1976). The Structure of Magic, Volume 2. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books. Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1982). Reframing: NLP and the Transformation of Meaning. Moab, UT: Real People Press. Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1979). Frogs Into Princes: Neuro-Linguistic Programming. Moab, UT: Real People Press. Bandler, R., & DeLozier, J. (1977). Patterns of the Hypnotic Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D. (Volume 2). Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Bandler, R., Grinder, J., & Satir, V. (1976). Changing with Families: A Book About Further Education for Being Human. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books. Botsford, David. (2007). Hypnosis for smoking cessation: An NLP and hypnotherapy practitioner's manual. Norwalk, CT, US: Crown House Publishing Limited. 267 pp. This book examines the use of hypnosis for smoking cessation. The book provides the reader with an extensive overview of the whole process of helping someone to stop smoking. Not only is there great detail on how to approach the client during the actual therapeutic session but there is also excellent material which shows the therapist how s/he needs to prepare individually for every single client. Cameron-Bandler, L. (1985) Solutions: Practical & Effective Antidotes for Sexual & Relationship Problems. San Rafael, CA: FuturePace. Dilts, R. (1983). Applications of NLP. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Dilts,R., Cameron-Bandler, L., Bandler, R., Grinder, J., & DeLozier, J. (1980). Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Volume 1. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Farrelly, F., & Brandsma, J. (1978). Provocative Therapy. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Grinder, J., & Bandler, R. (1981). Trance-Formations: NLP & the Structure of Hypnosis. Moab, UT: Real People Press. Lankton, S. (1979).Practical Magic: The Clinical Applications of Neuro-Linguistic Programming. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications. Gordon, D. (1978). Therapeutic Metaphors: Helping Others Through the Looking Glass. Cupertino, CA: Meta Publications.

History of Hypnosis
Crabtree, A. (1993). From Mesmer to Freud: Magnetic Sleep and the Roots of Psychological Healing. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Edmonston, W. E. (1986). The Induction of Hypnosis. New York: Wiley. Ellenberger, H. F. (1970). The Discovery of the Unconscious. New York: Basic Books. Esdaile, J. (1846/1976). Mesmerism in India. New York: Arno Press.

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The Wellness Institute Hypnotherapy Certification training 800-326-4418 _________________________________________________________________________________________ Furst, Lilian R. (2008). Before Freud: Hysteria and hypnosis in later nineteenth-century psychiatric cases. Cranbury, NJ, US: Bucknell University Press. 207 pp. Before Freud is an anthology of psychiatric case histories published between 1869 and 1894 by five leading medical practitioners: George Beard, Richard Krafft-Ebing, Arthur Schnitzler, Jean-Martin Charcot, and Pierre Janet. Most of the cases here are translated from German or French for the first time. The purpose of this collection is to make accessible to English speakers important primary documents crucial not only for the history of psychology but also for an understanding of the literature of the period. A brief introduction outlines the evolution of psychiatry from the eighteenth-century "mad doctors'" belief in demons through the nineteenth-century search for visible bodily lesions in the wake of discoveries in physical medicine to the recognition of the centrality of invisible neuroses in the patient's mind. Current research in neuropsychiatry (e.g., Mark Solms et al.) revisits Freuds theories and legitimizes them in scientific terms. This volume widens our horizon, enabling us to appreciate the leap forward that Freud made. Gauld, A. (1992). A History of Hypnotism. New York: Cambridge University Press. Laurence, J.R. & Perry, C. (1988). Hypnosis, Will and Memory. New York: Guilford. Pattie, F.A. (1994). Mesmer and Animal Magnetism. Hamilton, NY: Edmonston Publishing. Pintar, Judith; Lynn, Steven Jay. (2008). Hypnosis: A brief history. Wiley-Blackwell. 221 pp. Throughout its long history, hypnosis has been employed not only as a medical and psychotherapeutic tool, but also as a spiritual practice and an enduring form of entertainment. Theories about hypnosis, as well as popular ideas about its nature, have been repeatedly championed, rejected, and revivedand in the process have continuously contradicted, influenced, and fed back into one another. Hypnosis: A Brief History examines the social and cultural contexts of the theories, development, and practice of hypnosis, weaving together three narratives: the story of hypnosis as an array of contradictory theories, a set of controversial techniques, and a jumble of colorful ideas unfolding in the popular imagination. Tinterow, M. M. (1970). Foundations of Hypnosis: From Mesmer to Freud. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. Waterfield, Robin. (2002). Hidden depths: The story of hypnosis. New York, NY, US: Brunner-Routledge. 464 pp. This book discusses hypnotism, its history, controversies, applications, and potentials. The author builds a comprehensive picture of hypnotism while raising other issues and reflecting on its presence in advertising, media and popular culture.

(Possible source for hard-to-find books: Sterns Book Service, Chicago, IL, 312-561-2121)

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