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PHOEBE A.

HEARST

MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY

U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , B E R K E L E Y

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VOLUME 5, NUMBER 2 WINTER/SPRING 2005

T
he Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is proud to present an exhibit of
Recent Acquisitions in the display cases of the museum's lobby. The exhibit
opens in January 2005 with the spring semester. All of the objects on
C A

view were generously donated to the museum, which is the primary


means by which we are able to continue to build the collections.
B E R K E L E Y ,

Visitors will see selections from the Bernard-Murray Collection made in


pre-World War II Tibet; Yoruba items from the William and Berta
Bascom African Collection; and Taiwanese hand puppets from the
Seuzan Hsu Collection. Other artifacts include Eskimo material from
Robert Shore; Japanese octopi traps from Professor Harumi Befu;

Navajo rugs from Dot and Ray Wilson; Latin American textiles
from Fifi White; and Oceanic artifacts from Dorothy Mark.
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Before any object is accessioned, the museum must ensure that it can
properly store and care for the acquisition for years to come. When
H A L L

possible, the museum does accept gifts of well-documented


collections that fill gaps in its existing holdings and further the
museum's education and research missions.
K R O E B E R

The Recent Acquisition exhibit series, which was


inaugurated in June 2003, is one way the Hearst Museum
can share its most recent additions with the public and
encourage further study by scholars and researchers.
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TAIWANESE PUPPET DONATED BY


SUEZAN HSU 9-22331
FROM THE DIRECTOR

F
or the past year, you have We are pleased that through our exhibits and programs we
heard me describe our plans are able to serve diverse local communities with intelligent,
for Diversity—Cultural engaging presentations.
Arts—Antiquities, an initiative to
expand the public reach of the Our plan to re-orient the museum's entrance toward the
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of local community by creating a main entrance on Bancroft
Anthropology. I am delighted to Way has received preliminary approval by the Executive
report that the time and energy Campus Planning Committee. Facing the museum toward
devoted to this endeavor by the dedicated museum staff the community is the logical next step that should be taken
and faculty curators have been paying off in measurable to facilitate current education and outreach initiatives. In
ways. The program of rotating exhibits has helped us the not–too–distant future we will be launching a discreet
reach our goals of developing new audiences and campaign to design and build the new entrance.
encouraging repeat visitors, and I am proud to report that
we have experienced a doubling of our onsite attendance As we gradually work toward a more user–friendly
over last year as well as a dramatic increase in Web site orientation, I hope you will take notice of the recent
usage. cosmetic improvements made to our rotating exhibit
galleries and to the museum's lobby. We hope these
In addition to the progress discussed above, reorganization changes will enhance your experience with the objects on
of the Collections Division has allowed our collections display. Let us know what you think the next time you
managers to serve a record number of students enrolled in visit the Hearst Museum.
Anthropology, Near Eastern Studies, and Classics courses.
Sincerely,
The multiyear grant from The William Randolph Hearst
Foundation that we received in 2004 has not only allowed
us to present new interpretations of our holdings as we are
currently with Tesoros Escondidos: Hidden Treasures from
the Mexican Collections, but it has also helped us launch Douglas Sharon, Ph.D.
new initiatives such as the Cultural Arts and Activities Director
program of monthly performances and hands-on activities
for families.

LOCATION PHOEBE A. HEARST


The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is located in Kroeber MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Hall on the corner of Bancroft Way and College Avenue on the UC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
Berkeley Campus.
Douglas Sharon, Director
HOURS/ADMISSION
Margaret R. Pico, Newsletter Editor
The museum is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wednesday
through Saturday and 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday. Closed on Contributors: Marilyn Barulich, Harriet Goldman,
University and Federal holidays. Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for Ira Jacknis, Nicole Mullen, Anne Olney,
seniors, $1 for students age 13 and above; admission is free to museum
Douglas Sharon
members, UCB students, faculty, staff, children 12 and under; free to
all on Thursdays. The museum is wheelchair accessible. ThØrŁse Babineau, Photographer

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING M.R. Kimmins, Design


Campus is served by the following AC Transit bus routes: 7, 40, 51,
52, 64. The museum is a 15-minute walk east from the Berkeley BART The newsletter is published twice yearly.

station. Metered parking is available on streets near the museum. Paid Copyright ' UC Regents
public parking is available at Berkeley Public Parking, 2420 Durant http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu
Avenue (west of Telegraph), and after 5 p.m. and on weekends in the
parking structure adjacent to the museum.

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2003 - 2004 ANNUAL REPORT
The museum is pleased to report that it ended the 2004 fiscal year with an operating surplus despite mandated university-wide budget cuts.
The Diversity—Cultural Arts—Antiquities initiative of public programs was launched and two multiyear collections projects were
completed: implementation of the collection database to include a public access component and re-location of the North American baskets
and worldwide textile collections.

F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T:
July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004

REVENUES
University 2,037,867 57%
Grants & contracts 1,058,788 30%
Private gifts 226,167 6%
Interest income 124,730 3%
Service fees & sales 155,568 4%
Total Revenue $3,603,120 100%
REVENUES
EXPENSES
Collections stewardship 1,228,183 43%
Public programs 297,868 11%
Research 575,027 20%
Support services
General administration 484,829 17%
Information technology 151,546 5%
Community relations 119,155 4%
Total Expenses $2,856,608 100%

Surplus / (deficit) $ 746,512


EXPENSES
Endowments, at market June 30, 2004: $2,793,700

A COLLECTOR OF TREASURES: KATHARINE JENKINS


By Ira Jacknis, research anthropologist
One of the most important and fascinating of the collectors These collections were an important supplement to the existing
represented in the current exhibit Tesoros Escondidos: Hidden collections made by the UC anthropologists. Unlike those scholars,
Treasures from the Mexican Collections was Katharine Drew Jenkins who collected primarily among Indians in the countryside, Jenkins
(1906-82). Of the approximately 250 objects on view, she collected acquired many interesting objects—especially miniatures, toys, and
about 80 of them, more than any other collector. In particular, Day of the Dead artifacts—in urban centers such as Mexico City.
Jenkins acquired almost all of the Mexican miniatures that the
museum owns. All of these objects were thoroughly documented, in extensive notes
which were transferred to the Bancroft Library, and in a rich
Katharine Jenkins first became intrigued by the crafts of Mexico in collection of 4,500 color slides. Taken principally between 1949 and
1949, when she accompanied her husband, a UC Berkeley professor 1959, the slides consist of striking and well-labeled field photographs
of genetics, on his research trips to study the genetics of the tomato, as well as records of the principal collections of Mexican folk art.
domesticated in ancient Mesoamerica. As a student in the university's This collection has been recently inventoried and rehoused. In the
department of Decorative Art, she earned a master's degree in 1951 coming months, we intend to prepare a formal finding guide, and, if
for her thesis on the museum's collection of Saltillo sarapes. funds can be identified, to digitize the images for better preservation
Although never published, this work has been cited by many scholars and access. If you are interested in supporting this project, please
since. In later years, Jenkins became widely known for her detailed contact the development department of the museum.
research on lacquer.
In the spring semester, we will be rotating some objects in the
The Hearst Museum obtained many important objects from Jenkins. Tesoros exhibit for conservation purposes, so you can look forward
In 1959, the museum purchased the complete Huichol man's costume to seeing additional pieces of lacquerware and folk art collected by
included in the Tesoros Escondidos exhibit, and in 1972, it bought Katharine Jenkins.
her comprehensive collection of 65 lacquered objects. After her
death, her personal collection of 375 pieces of Mexican folk art was
donated to the museum.

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PUBLIC PROGRAMS ATTRACT NEW AUDIENCES
By Harriet Goldman, coordinator of museum education

e are striving to create public awareness of the Maria Norall, one of our new docents, notes that among

W museum's vast and broad collections as well as


to provide engaging experiences for visitors that
enhance understanding of the objects on exhibit.
the highlights of her docent experience at the Hearst is the
opportunity to learn so much through presentations,
discussions, and the required readings on diverse topics
including pre- and post- Conquest Mexican history, folk
SPRING LECTURES AND EVENTS art traditions, and origins of chocolate. She enjoys the
Marion Oettinger, senior curator and interim director of camaraderie of our docent team.
the San Antonio Museum of Art, presents in February. He
is an expert on the Nelson A. Rockefeller Collection, a Regular docent tours are now available In addition to
portion of which is housed locally at The Mexican pre-booked tours for student and adult groups, docents are
Museum. Oettinger's book on the world-famous collection now conducting drop-in tours the first week of the month,
on Thursday at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm and Sunday at 1:00
helped cultivate interest in traditional and contemporary
pm. These tours are free with museum admission and are
artisans and the Mexican marketplace.
on a space-available basis. This is a wonderful way to
learn more about the collections and stories behind the
March 2005 speaker Laura E. Perez, is an associate objects on exhbit. Docent tours for adult and student
professor in the department of ethnic studies at UC groups are also available by appointment at least two
Berkeley. She served as Director of the Beatrice M. Bain weeks in advance.
Research Group on Gender from 2002–2004. Her research
and teaching explore
various facets of
Latina arts and
gender issues,
including religious
and cultural fusion,
especially among
Latina literary and
visual artists.
FAMILY DAY 2005 IS A PROGRAM FOR ALL AGES TO
EXPLORE THE DIVERSITY AMONGST ASIAN CULTURES
M.C. Alejandro de
FROM ANCIENT TO MODERN CULTURES, OUR DOCENTS CONNECT VISITORS
THROUGH THE ARTS. FEATURED HERE IS Avila Blomberg, TO THE ARTIFACTS ON EXHIBIT. PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: JOHN
ROBERT KIKUCHI-YNGOJO FROM ETH-NOH-TEC. director of the RODRIGUEZ, EDUCATION COORDINATOR HARRIET GOLDMAN,
Jardín MARIA NORALL, MARIETTE MALESSY, AND MARGARET PILLSBURY
Ethnobotánico in Oaxaca, Mexico, presents in April. De
Avila, who served as a consultant to the Tesoros
Escondidos exhibit, will discuss the museum's Mexican If you are interested in serving as a docent for the Hearst
Museum, we will be recruiting new docents for another
textiles and expand on the historical and social context of
round of training this spring. To find out more about the
the pieces, including personal stories of the people who
application process and training requirements, please
collected them.
contact the Education Department at 510.643.7649.
In response to feedback from museum visitors, all spring UNIVERSITY OUTREACH
programs will be held on Thursday evenings and Sunday Education Specialist Nicole Mullen is working with the
afternoons. To enhance the experience and give visitors an Anthropology Undergraduate Association (AUA) to help
opportunity to enjoy the museum, coffee receptions will be them design their own museum program in May entitled:
held in conjunction with these programs. Across Oceans of Sound: Ethnomusicology of the African
Diaspora in the Americas. A panel discussion will explore
DOCENT PROGRAM influences on African musical expressions and how it, in
The museum is fortunate to have a corps of exceptionally turn, helped shape American music. Presenters will address
dedicated and capable docents this year. Each brings a how music from Africa reflects many aspects of the
wealth of professional experience, enthusiasm, and foreign African-American experience: resistance to slavery,
language skills. Since this summer, they have participated religious transcendence, political movements, popular
in an extensive training program to prepare them to dance, and cultural identity. Music from the African
conduct tours of the museum for adults and students. Diaspora will be presented in the museum's courtyard by
various groups following the panel.

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PAHMA EVENTS
Unless noted, all programs take place at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Programs are included with
museum admission. The museum is free to members, UCB faculty, staff, and students, children 12 and under.
Free to all every Thursday.

January 2005 April 2005


MUSEUM RE-OPENS AFTER WINTER BREAK
A MIRROR OF THREADS:WEAVING AND SELF IN MEXICO
Thursday, April 7, 5 pm
Wednesday, January 19 Alejandro de Avila, director of del Jardín Ethnobotánico de Oaxaca,
Centro Cultural Santo Domingo, Mexico will discuss historical and
CELEBRATING THE CHINESE NEW YEAR social contexts of selected textiles from the exhibit Tesoros Escondidos.
CULTURAL ARTS AND ACTIVITIES SERIES A coffee reception precedes the lecture at 4:30 pm
Sunday, January 23, 1-3 pm
Families will have the chance to make Chinese paper cuts followed FAMILY DAY
by a a folk dance performance by UC Berkeley's Chinese Dance
THE WORLD IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD: CELEBRATING THE DIVERSITY
OF ASIAN CULTURES.
Theater at 2 pm.
Sunday, April 10 1–4 pm.
1 pm UC Berkeley Korean Drumming group
February 2005 2 pm Eth-Noh-Tec (Pan-Asian story-telling)
3 pm Chinese Brush Painting workshop with Stephen Wong
DIDJERIDUS: AN ANCIENT ABORIGINAL TRADITION
CULTURAL ARTS AND ACTIVITIES SERIES SOILS , ECOSYSTEMS , AND SOCIETY: HOW ANCIENT HAWAII HELPS
Sunday, February 6, 1 pm US TO THINK ABOUT LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY
The Australian aboriginal didjeridu, is a long hollowed tube instru- DIRECTOR'S ANNUAL LECTURE AND RECEPTION
ment made from a tree trunk. Stephen Kent will lead a workshop Sunday, April 24
in didjeridu-making and teach participants some basic playing tech- Director Douglas Sharon hosts Patrick Kirch, class of 1954 pro-
niques including circular breathing and some animal sounds. fessor of anthropology and Hearst Museum curator of Oceania.
This event is by invitation only. For information please call
510.642-3683.
STALKING THE FOLK ART OF MEXICO:
OBJECTS IN CULTURAL CONTEXT
May 2005
Sunday, February 27, 2 pm
Marion Oettinger, Jr., PhD, senior curator and curator of Latin ACROSS OCEANS OF SOUND: ETHNOMUSICOLOGY OF THE
American Art, San Antonio Museum of Art, will draw from 25 AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE AMERICAS
years of fieldwork in Mexico and other parts of Latin America. CO-SPONSORED WITH THE ANTHROPOLOGY UNDERGRADUATE ASSOCIATION
He is the author of Folk Treasures of Mexico: the Nelson A. Rockefeller AND THE MUSEUM OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA.
Collection. A coffee reception follows the lecture. Sunday, May 1, 2-5 pm; Panel at 2 pm; Music at 3:30 pm
A panel discussion will explore how African music has been
shaped and has shaped music in various parts of the Americas.
March 2005 Participants include C.K Ladzekpo, director of the African music
program at UC Berkeley; percussionist and Latin music expert
FOLK AND THE TALES THEY TELL Michael Spiro; Thomas Simpson, founder and executive director
CULTURAL ARTS AND ACTIVITIES SERIES of the Afro Solo Theatre and Performing Arts Company in San
Francisco; and Rebecca Bodenheimer, graduate student in
Story-telling with Karen McKie Ethnomusicology. Musical performances will follow the panel dis-
Sunday March 6, 2-3 pm cussion.
African-American artist and storyteller Karen McKie will exhibit
her handmade dolls and tell their stories, exploring with the WISE FOOL PUPPETRY ARTS
audience the way in which personal stories, literature, and CULTURAL ARTS AND ACTIVITIES SERIES
folklore inform history. Sunday, May 15, 2-3 pm
Public art, processional theatre, and puppetry come together
through Wise Fool's giant puppets and stilt images. During this
THE PRE-COLUMBIAN IN CONTEMPORARY U.S. LATINA ART hour-long presentation the puppets will come to life through skits
Thursday, March 17, 5 pm and audience participation.
Professor Laura E. Perez, associate professor in the department of
ethnic studies at Berkeley, will discuss the influence of the June 2005
indigenous, the folkloric, and the spiritual on contemporary POLISH FOLK CULTURE THROUGH SONG AND DANCE
Chicana artists. A coffee reception precedes the lecture at 4:30 pm. CULTURAL ARTS AND ACTIVITIES SERIES
Sunday, June 12, 2 pm
Lowiczanie Polish Folk Dance and Music presents a lively per-
formance exploring the folk traditions and costumes of Poland.

103 KROEBER HALL BERKELEY, CA 94720–3712 ◆ 510.643.7648 http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu 5


PAHMA NOTES

DEPUTY DIRECTOR RETIRES OTHER STAFF CHANGES


We interviewed Cynthia Clearwater a few weeks from her We welcome Jessica Hupp, who joins the museum as an
retirement to ask about her life at the University of assistant registrar working with our online collections
California, Berkeley and particularly here at the Hearst database, and Jane Williams, who fills a newly created
Museum of Anthropology. full-time position in the
Conservation Department
Cyndee started working for Cal 30 years ago as a student and made possible by the Hearst
then spent 18 years with the College of Letters and Science. Foundation Conservation
She first served as an advisor to students then worked her Endowment. Jane will be
way to Assistant Director of Advising. working with Head
Conservator Madeleine Fang
She left Letters and Science to become the Assistant Dean of on projects related to the
the College of Environmental Design (CED) working with preservation and interpreta-
Dean Fraker and the faculty. While working fulltime at CED, tion of the Hearst collections.
Cyndee completed a masters degree in Museum Studies at We say a fond farewell to
John F. Kennedy University. When the position for Deputy Midge Fox who has served as
Director of the Hearst Museum appeared she was thrilled to an archival researcher and JANE WILLIAMS AND JESSICA HUPP
discover that she could take over the job with a lateral assistant registrar within the
transfer. It was a "dream come true." Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act
(NAGPRA) unit since 1999. Midge recently accepted the
When she started at the position of Deputy Director of the Academic Council within
museum then–director the University of California Office of the President.
Patrick V. Kirch had just
reorganized it into divi- REPATRIATION TO SANTA ROSA RANCHERIA
sions so Cyndee came at The NAGPRA staff was involved in four repatriations
a time of great change during fall 2004 and is expecting more in 2005.
which was "exhilarating Representatives of eight different American Indian/Alaska
and challenging." Her Native tribes have visited with the NAGPRA staff this year.
most memorable Thank you to Santa Rosa Rancheria for permission to use
moments during her five- these photos.
year tenure were those
spent working directly
with the staff and getting
CYNDEE CLEARWATER
to do hands-on work. Never
"just an administrator," she assisted in the store's jewelry
sales, making mounts for exhibits, and moving Native
American baskets to the new Basket and Textile Center.

Asked what she liked the most about working on campus,


Cyndee mentioned that it was the opportunity to work with
deans and directors who have vision and the energy to realize (LEFT TO RIGHT) LALO FRANCO, CHAIRMAN CLARENCE ATWELL, JR.,
their vision. She also appreciated working with the "fabulous BUTCH DENNY, JEANETTE ICHO ATWELL, KIMBERLEY BROWN, AND STEVEN
and dedicated staff."She added that Berkeley is a good THOMAS, JR. OF THE SANTA ROSA RANCHERIA TACHI YOKUT TRIBE AT THE
REPATRIATION IN AUGUST 2004.
employer because it cares about the quality of life of its staff.
Also, she is able to retire young because of the benefits UC
Berkeley has to offer.

Cyndee plans to pursue her passion of jewelry making and


volunteering at the local Food Bank and Planned Parenthood.
She feels that she had a wonderful career and is satisfied with
the contribution she gave to Cal as well as what she received
back. She is thrilled to have been able to work with the
dedicated people and the world-class collections of the Hearst
Museum.
REPATRIATION REBURIAL AT THE SANTA ROSA RANCHERIA TRIBAL CEMETARY.

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JUST THOUGHT WE WOULD ASK… F OR E DUCATION P ROGRAMS :
New or gently used laptop computer
Here are a few of the items on the museum's wish list for 2005. If New Sony writeable CDRs
you would like to donate something on the list, please contact 6 to 10 lightweight folding tables, 6 ft. long
Margaret Pico at 510.642.2683 or mpico@berkeley.edu. We appreci- 3 ft. diameter round table, preferably with extension leaf
ate your support of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. 6 to 10 padded folding chairs
2 four-drawer filing cabinets
F OR C OLLECTIONS C ARE : 1 three-shelf 11" deep bookshelf
2005 Ford Econoline van 6 ft. tall storage cabinet with doors
10 new Sears Kenmore upright freezers with 20.6 cu. ft. capacity
Niton Portable XRF Analyzer F OR E XHIBITS :
Dell high-capacity storage unit and/or server for digital images New multi-media system for window presentation Pentium 4 with
DVD -ROM drive, 120 gig HD

MEMBERSHIP

T
he Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology serves the com-
Name
munity through exhibitions, educational programs, and
research opportunities that promote understanding of the his- Name on second card (if applicable)
tory and diversity of human cultures. Membership is a great way to
get involved and provides a valuable source of unrestricted operating Address

funds to sustain our programs. Join, renew, or give a gift of member-


City State Zip
ship and enjoy the benefits below. Call 510-642-3683 or email
mpico@uclink.berkeley.edu. Phone E-mail

Please make check payable to UC Regents or charge as follows:


M EMBERS
■ Visa ■ Mastercard ■ Discover
Annual Membership benefits include:
■ Free admission to the Museum
Card Number
■ 10% discount on most items in the Museum store
■ Free admittance to public programs and lectures Card Expiration Date
■ Subscription to semi-annual PAHMA News
■ Advance notice of all Museum events and activities Signature

M EMBERSHIP CATEGORIES gift giver information


■ $30.00 STUDENT/SENIOR/DISABLED
■ $40.00 INDIVIDUAL Your Name (s)
■ $40.00 DUAL SENIOR (two cards provided)
■ $50.00 FAMILY (two cards provided) Address

City State Zip


- Valid Student ID requested
- Senior is age 55 and above Phone E-mail

M USEUM A SSOCIATES message to include with gift membership

Enjoy all the benefits of membership plus invitations to Director's


special events. Two cards provided for all Associates.
PLEASE I N D I C AT E A R E A S O F S P E C I A L I N T E R E S T :
■ Associate Gifts of $100 – $499
■ Patron Gifts of $500 – $999
■ Africa ■ Oceania/Australia
C IRCLE OF F RIENDS ■ Ancient Egypt/Near East ■ Textiles
■ ■ Media Collections
■ Fellow Gifts of $1,000 – $4,999 Asia
■ Central and South America (Photography/Film/Sound)
■ Director’s Circle Gifts of $5,000 or more ■ Classical Archaeology ■ Other
■ Native North America
Your membership gift at any level is fully tax deductible.
Thank you!
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ON VIEW
Tesoros Escondidos: Hidden Treasures from the Mexican Collections,
the first public exhibit of artifacts from the 17th to the
20th century.

Beginnings: The Phoebe Hearst Era (1901–1920),


the founding collections of the museum, including Egypt, Peru,
Ancient Mediterranean, and Native Alaska.

Native Californian Cultures Gallery, a visual storage exhibit of


California Indian artifacts from throughout the state.

Recent Acquisitions, a selection of recent donations to the


museum’s collection. Ongoing in the Lobby Case.

STEPHEN KENT WITH A DIDJERIDU

PHOEBE A. HEARST
Nonprofit Org
US Postage
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY PAID
University
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY of
California
1 0 3 K R O E B E R H A L L # 3 7 1 2 ◆ B E R K E L E Y, C A 9 4 7 2 0 - 3 7 1 2