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Creating Opportunity Worldwide

An MP (Member of Parliament) A Clinician A Solicitor A CEO (Chief Executive Officer) Emcee A Dr. (this person has a Doctorate /PhD) A Zoologist An Air steward An MD (Managing Director) A Caretaker

a person who has been elected into a the group of politicians or other people who make the laws for their country. Someone (such as a Doctor) who is very qualified in an area of health work A type of lawyer (British/Australian) who prepares legal cases and gives legal advice. the person with the most important position in a company a skilled rapper Doctor of Philosophy -A person with the highest level academic college or university degree. The person becomes a specialist in theory of the subject area. A person (scientist) who studies animals A person who provides services to people on planes. the person in charge of the way a company operates a person employed to take care of a large building, such as a school, and who deals with the cleaning, repairs, etc. US/ Scottish English name for a caretaker a person who makes certain that official events happen correctly, for example by introducing performers at the right time Someone who assists in daily business or personal tasks. For example, a businessman or businesswoman may have a personal assistant to help with time and daily management, scheduling of meetings, correspondence, and note taking. A person who provides help and support to people that are involved in crime

A Janitor An MC (Master of Ceremonies) A PA (Personal Assistant/Aide)

A Forensic Social worker

Contributed by Wale Ashawe


The British Council, 2008 The United Kingdoms international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations. We are registered in England as a charity.

Creating Opportunity Worldwide

A Psychotherapist Someone who gives people psychotherapy HR Manager

Merchant Banker Literary Agent Project Manager Airline Grounds Operator

(discussing problems, treating mental illness) Human resource Manager also known as HRM (Human resource management). Someone who is responsible for managing a company/organisations workers (employees). They oversee the selection of new workers, training, and assessments A person who works for a bank which does business with companies rather than with people someone who deals with a writer's business matters a person whose job is to organize and control a project or a series of projects A person who for a job involves the providing and overseeing goods or services for the airline/aircraft companies and airports. Their job may involve ensuring that aircraft cabins are maintained, a passenger service is in place in airport terminal such as check-in, gate arrival/departures, they communicate with Air traffic control, stewards ..pilots etc

Contributed by Wale Ashawe


The British Council, 2008 The United Kingdoms international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations. We are registered in England as a charity.

Creating Opportunity Worldwide

Making oral presentations


be concise, to the point Your voice - how you say it is as important as what you say Body language - a subject in its own right and something about which much has been written and said. In essence, your body movements express what your attitudes and thoughts really are. Never read from a script know most of what you want to say. If you dont prepare cue cards which have key words and phrases (and possibly sketches) on them Rehearse your presentation

Making the presentation


Greet the audience (for example, 'Good morning,evening? Hello/Hi), and tell them who you are. Good presentations then follow this formula: tell the audience what you are going to tell them, then tell them, at the end tell them what you have told them.

Keep to the time allowed. If you can, keep it short. It's better to under-run than overrun. At the end of your presentation ask if there are any questions - avoid being terse when you do this as the audience may find it intimidating

Delivery
Speak clearly. Don't shout or whisper - judge the acoustics of the room. Don't rush, or talk deliberately slowly. Be natural - although not conversational.

Contributed by Wale Ashawe


The British Council, 2008 The United Kingdoms international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations. We are registered in England as a charity.

Creating Opportunity Worldwide


Deliberately pause at key points - this has the effect of emphasising the importance of a particular point you are making. Avoid jokes - always disastrous unless you are a natural expert To make the presentation interesting, change your delivery, but not too obviously, eg: speed pitch of voice

Use your hands to emphasise points but don't indulge in to much hand waving. Ask colleagues occasionally what they think of your style. Look at the audience as much as possible, but don't fix on an individual - it can be intimidating. Pitch your presentation towards the back of the audience, especially in larger rooms.

Visual Aids
Visual aids significantly improve the interest of a presentation. However, they must be relevant to what you want to say Keep it simple though - a complex set of hardware can result in confusion for speaker and audience.

Finally ...,
Enjoy yourself. The audience will be on your side and want to hear what you have to say!

Contributed by Wale Ashawe


The British Council, 2008 The United Kingdoms international organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations. We are registered in England as a charity.