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Governor at Abbey

Scott Walker met with international


business leaders at the resort.
Page 1B
Award winner
Colton Andresen took
home the springs
top honor.
Page 1C
LG Paint-In
Pictures from the event.
Page 6B
Open for business
What new businesses are located in
Lake Genevas downtown?
Page 2A
To subscribe call
(262) 248-4444
2012 WNA GENERAL EXCELLENCE WINNER
141st year, No. 24
Thursday, June 13, 2013
Keeping you current since 1872
$1.25
INDEX
Editorial .....................1D
Police/Court ...............4C
TV listings ...............5-6C
Community .............3-6D
Letters ........................2D
Classieds ...............7-8B
Daniel W. Flitcroft, 78, Elkhorn
Edward S. Petersen, 91, Middleburg, Va.
Aubrey T. Richey, 80, Delavan
Robert J. Robinson, 75, Walworth and
Fontana
OBITUARIES 3D
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Chorus hosting fundraiser
The Four Seasons Chorus will host a
Songs from the Sixties concert Sun-
day, June 23, at 3 p.m. at First Congre-
gational UCC, 715 Wisconsin St., Lake
Geneva. Proceeds from the event will
benet the churchs food pantry.
Dairy breakfast at fairgrounds
The Walworth County Farm Bureau
has planned its annual dairy breakfast
for Saturday, June 15, 6 to 10:30 a.m.
This years event will be hosted by the
McClellan family.
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
SUMMER IS HERE in Lake Geneva. To see how the city prepares for summer, see page 3A.
Summer, where have you been?
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
MADDIE IS ONE of the horses that pull vistors around the
town in a carriage. One alderman wants to review how car-
riages operate on the streets of Lake Geneva before approv-
ing a new carriage license for this year.
Meiller
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Lake Geneva is looking longingly at something called
the premier resort area tax, a sales tax permitted to tourist
communities that either meet state guidelines or get spe-
cial permission from the state Legislature.
Its partly a matter of esteem and partly a matter of rev-
enues.
Although near the epicenter of the tourism business
that has Walworth County ranking sixth in the state in
generating tourism dollars, Lake Geneva doesnt qualify
for the tax under state law, and its local state lawmakers
seem reluctant to recommend the city to the state Legisla-
ture for consideration.
The tax is probably unknown to most state residents.
Thats because only six communities in Wisconsin are
allowed to collect the tax and only four of them do.
Mayor Jim Connors wrote a letter to Gov. Scott Walker
asking for his assistance in getting Lake Geneva on the pre-
mier resort tax list.
The premier resort sales tax is now either a half per-
cent, as it is in the cities of Bayeld and Eagle River, or
1 percent as in the village of Lake Delton and the city of
Wisconsin Dells.
Lake Delton and the Dells were allowed to increase
their resort sales taxes by special dispensation of the state
Legislature. A proposed amendment now being considered
would allow those two communities to bump the tax up to
1.25 percent, provided voters approve the increase.
The villages of Ephraim and Sister Bay may adopt the
tax, but have opted not to.
Created in the late 1990s to help tourist venues pay for
infrastructure and to maintain an appearance attractive to
tourist dollars, the sales tax applies to certain retail busi-
nesses that the state Department of Revenue has deter-
mined benet and benet from tourism.
City Administrator Dennis Jordan said the half-per-
cent sales tax could generate an additional $500,000 to
$600,000 for the city, while 1 percent might bring in $1
million or more. However, with only six communities cur-
rently qualifying for the premier resort tax, one might
assume its tough to get on the list. That assumption would
not be incorrect.
Lake Geneva wants premier resort tax
PLEASE SEE TAX PAGE 6A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
The horse-drawn carriages that transport passengers
around Lake Geneva on romantic excursions may be good
for tourism, picturesque and even good for the environ-
ment, in a low-carbon-footprint kind of way.
But they can wreck havoc with some drivers patience.
Alderman Sturg Taggart said he was once stuck behind
one of those carriages, which mosey along at about 3 mph.
For 18 years, carriage owners have offered the slow-
moving rides to tourists in Lake Geneva. Field Stone
Farms LLC, Burlington, now holds the license to provide
that service.
City Clerk Mike Hawes said Field Stone Farms pays
$3,650 a year for the license and to lease curb space on
Wrigley Drive in front of the Riviera, where the horses
rest, and carriages are hired for rides.
That license was up for renewal at Mondays Lake
Geneva City Council meeting.
In the end, the license request was continued. The car-
riage license expires June 30, and the council meets one
more time before then.
Taggart said he was stuck in a conga line of 12 cars fol-
lowing the slow meanderings of one carriage.
Its a pain in the groin, said Taggart, who added he
had nothing against horses.
Weve spent a lot of money improving the trafc ow
on Main Street, and it works, Taggart said. Unless you
come to a big white horse.
Carriages
not on
fast track
PLEASE SEE HORSE PAGE 7A
Former Big Brother volunteer,
who was accused of assault, dies
By John Halverson
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN It was to be a motion hearing Tuesday
for a former Big Brothers Big Sisters volunteer accused of
sexually assaulting two boys.
Instead it was an announcement that the accused man
had died.
Rodney J. Meiller, 52, of rural Elkhorn, who allegedly
assaulted the two boys, did not live long enough to stand
trial.
The Walworth Countys Coroners ofce told the
Regional News that Meiller had died of a self-inicted gun-
shot wound in a Whitewater park on June 5.
Within moments of Judge James Carlson making his
entrance into the courtroom Tuesday, the legal procedures
ended.
It was almost exactly a year after they had started.
Because of the defendants death, the charges against
Meiller were dropped by the court.
Walworth County Deputy District Attorney Joshua
Grube declined to comment further on
the case or the defendants death.
Meiller was accused of molesting a
boy, who was 11 at the time, in Meillers
home and in a shower at the Geneva
Lake Area YMCA.
Another boy, who was 14 when he
rst talked to law enforcement ofcials,
claimed Meiller had assaulted him at
Meillers home.
Meiller had been charged with
three counts of repeated sexual assault.
Two of the charges relate to the 11-year-
old boy, the other to the 14-year-old. Each count had a
maximum penalty of 60 years imprisonment, which can
include up to 40 years of initial connement and 20 years
of extended supervision.
Meiller was dismissed from the Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters organization prior to his arrest becoming public.
Meillers arrest was highly-publicized on Milwaukee
televison and in local print media.
2A The Regional News June 13, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
New season brings new stores to town
By John Halverson
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Downtown has opened for summer.
Some of the stores from last summer are gone, but
new ones have replaced them. Its a common cycle in Lake
Geneva. Those starting the season are either new or were
strong enough to have lasted through the winter shopping
doldrums. Either way, theres plenty available for the shop-
per in Lake Geneva.
The new stores include everything from wine bars to
boutiques to motorcycle accessories. Heres a tour.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
HARLEY-DAVIDSON, 704 Main St., is now open on the
corner of Center and Main streets. Inside are Harley-
Davidson apparel and accessories. The store is run by the
same people who own the Harley stores in Woodstock and
McHenry, Ill. From left are partners Doug Jackson, Arnie
Horwich and Tracy Lancaster.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
HAWKS VIEW GOLF and Boutique, 728 Main St., is man-
aged by Dave Nikolai. The store is next to Sopra, offering
gifts for golfers and an indoor golf simulator that features
17 of the worlds best and most famous courses. There are
options to golf for a half hour or an hour.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
GREEN EYED LADY Fragrance Co., 220 Cook St., located
below Bistro 220, is operated by Linsey Conell. Formerly
Scents and Sensibilities the store sells perfumes, soaps, mas-
sage oils, herbal teas and custom scenting. They also have
a West End Summer Porch Series that features local talent
talking about poetry, gardening, aromatherapy and tai chi.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
MAYS GIFTS, 738 W. Main St., features oriental gifts vary-
ing from bonsai trees to nunchukus to handmade jewelry
and dresses.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
BOB SCHMALING has opened the Backyard at 252 Center
St. Its a specialty store featuring Wilson Farm Meats. Plus
cheeses, beers and liquors. Customers can order what they
want and itll be prepared outside the shop.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
BARRIQUE WINE BAR and Cafe, 835 Wrigley Drive, Tom
Trilla is the proprietor. The cafe just opened in the corner
building next to Scuttlebutts that once housed Breadloaf
Bookstore. Featured on the menu are wine, atbread, dips,
veggies, desserts, and a kids menu.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
SEASONS OF LAKE, 757 W. Main St., is managed by Jim
Shore. Inside are gurines, Bearrington Baby Coats, candles,
spring and patriotic decor.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
LAKE GENEVA CANNERY, 120 Broad St., features fresh fruit
and vegetables from grandmas garden. All of the Lake
Geneva Cannery products are grown and processed locally.
Daily samples available on most of their products.
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 3A
Lake Geneva pretties up for warm weather
Chris Schultz
Cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Lake Geneva has put on her pretty
summer face.
Yes, the chamber of commerce has
worked hard to burnish the citys year-
around image, with Oktoberfest and Win-
terfest to pull in post-summer visitors.
But for as long as anyone can remem-
ber Lake Geneva is the place, summer has
been the time.
Her hotels ll with guests, her streets ll
with trafc, businesses ll with shoppers
and now her sidewalks ll with diners.
The city of 7,800 usually swells to
between 20,000 and 40,000 during the
warm weather holidays and weekends.
But before the rst summer visitor sets
foot on Broad Street, Lake Geneva needed
to spruce up.
Her 22 parks and green spaces were
mowed and trimmed, the beach sand was
groomed and her public places were spiffed
up.
First and foremost, the street sweepers
are out grooming the curbs, said Dan Win-
kler, director of public works.
For public safety, reserve police ofcers
were trained to handle everything from
loud music to troubled pedestrians. Ten new
reserve ofcers were sworn in this year.
For public enjoyment, streets, beaches
and parks are cleaned and readied for visi-
tors.
In early April, trash receptacles were
set out.
The public rest rooms at the library, the
chamber ofce, Flat Iron Park and Veterans
Park were repaired, cleaned and opened.
Beach sand doesnt just happen. It has
to be groomed.
The citys sand groomer, pulled by a
tractor, bites down into the winter-packed
sand and sifts out old cigarette butts, broken
glass and debris that might make the beach
unsightly and unsafe.
Things werent easy this year, Winkler
said.
A very wet spring and ooding in Donian
Park slowed preparation work.
A very cold Memorial Day weekend
seemed to put off the start of the summer
season, especially since memories of last
years gorgeous Memorial Day weekend are
still fresh.
This summer saw some new additions.
Three new kiosks were installed near
the entrance to the beach. Those kiosks will
sell only beach passes.
At least one part-time employee will be
available to help tourists and residents use
the electronic pass dispensers.
As a Tree City USA, Lake Geneva doesnt
rest on her laurels. New trees were planted
as old and dying trees were culled.
Flowers are in their beds at the Riviera
and city hall. The lower level of the Riviera
is ready for dockside business.
Earlier this spring, potholes were
patched. Leaves and brush were picked up
in the neighborhoods.
Picnic tables were placed.
Drinking fountains were turned on.
Piers are installed. Sand was vacuumed
out of storm drains.
Lake Geneva is up and summer-ready,
waiting for the weather to cooperate.
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
CALL IT PUPPY LOVE. A girl walks her puppy, or maybe a puppy is walking her girl, in a
Lake Geneva park. This is one of many sure signs of warmer weather.
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
YOU DONT EVEN need to be on the sand to enjoy the beach.
Swimming Lessons
Dates: June 21-Aug. 9
Twice per week lessons are just
$40 for the whole summer!
Once per week lessons are just
$30 for the whole summer!
Lesson locations: Lake Geneva
Beach, Fontana Beach,
Williams Bay Beach, Linn Pier,
Knollwood, L.G. Beach Assn.,
Buena Vista Assn.
Registration: Fri., June 14 thru Thurs. June 20
Please register in person at the Water Safety Patrol Headquarters between
the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon (Mon.-Sat.) OR 5:00 p.m. to 6:00
p.m. (M&W) Or 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Sun. Our address is 451
Outing St., Williams Bay. For directions or more info. please see our web
site at www.watersafetypatrol.org or call our office at 262-245-6577.
4A The Regional News June 13, 2013
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Linn supervisor moves out of town, is required to resign
Allis doesnt live here anymore
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
LINN The north shores only representative on the
town board has resigned.
On Monday, the board accepted the resignation of
Jeanne Allis, who now lives in Fontana. The board also
approved a motion to advertise the open position.
Allis sent an email to the board members and other
town ofcials May 17.
It is with great sadness I am announcing my request
to resign from the town of Linn board as I unfortunately
will no longer be a Linn resident and meet residency
requirements to be on the board, Allis said. My family
and I, however, are not moving far, as we will be residents
of Fontana.
Allis was rst elected town supervisor in 2008, suc-
cessfully challenging Christine Jones. She was re-elected
in an uncontested race in 2010, then won her bid for re-
election in 2012 against Allan Polyock.
Previously, she had been vocal about the north shores
desire to improve response times from emergency person-
nel.
Geneva Lake separates the north shore region from the
south shore, which is where emergency personnel are sta-
tioned.
In September 2012, Allis said there was confusion over
whether the north shore region was covered.
This was the issue that prompted me to run, she
said.
In her May 17 email, Allis mentioned the issue again,
as well as others.
I will continue to keep an interest in the things that we
supported together over the years, (such as) better cover-
age of services for all of Linn residents while supporting
more open space to keep (the town) the friendly and green
community that has made us a unique and close-knit com-
munity.
Allis thanked her fellow board members and said it
was her pleasure to work with them.
You represent town of Linns strongest asset, she said.
You are an extraordinary group of people and my life has
been enriched by knowing you.
On Tuesday, Linn Town Chairman Jim Weiss discussed
a few things he will miss about working with Allis.
She had a very strong focus, a dedication to the board,
as well as a great sense of humor, he said.
Weiss said Allis had strong ties to the north shore
region. She was dedicated to the town of Linn Nature Park
at the corner of Maple Ridge Road and South Lake Shore
Drive, he said. Weiss also credited Allis for being instru-
mental in securing grants to improve the park.
Allis was chairperson of the Harbor Commission and
Public Parks Committee in Linn. She also was co-chair of
the towns Plan Commission.
Whats next?
Weiss said the advertisement will be published next
week.
A few have expressed interest already, but we have a
standard form that people have to complete, he said.
Those who are interested can obtain the form from the
town clerk-treasurers ofce.
Weiss said the board will need to review forms and
conduct applications.
Considering regular meeting schedules and the Fourth
of July holiday, he said, a replacement may be appointed as
early as August.
You are an extraordinary group
of people and my life has been
enriched by knowing you.
Jeanne Allis, former town
of Linn supervisor, in an email to
her fellow board members
She had a very strong focus, a
dedication to the board, as well
as a great sense of humor.
Jim Weiss, town of Linn
chairman, about former town
supervisor Jeanne Allis
Group offers reward for information leading to an arrest
Turtle in critical
condition after beating
GENEVA Still unimaginable the extent of cruelty.
Thats what Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital posted
on Facebook Tuesday morning in an update on a snapping
turtle that was injured at Delbrook Golf Course, Delavan.
It is believed the turtle was beaten with a golf club
between 7:30 and 9:30 a.m. Monday, according to Jordan
W. Turner, of the Global Conservation Groups cruelty
investigation department.
There were reported to be about 35 players on the golf
course during the time of the beating, Turner said in an
email.
The group is offering a $1,000 reward for information
leading to an arrest and conviction of those responsible for
the crime.
Several people have commented on Fellow Mortals
Facebook page about the incident.
The turtle received a fractured skull and several holes
in its carapace.
It was transferred from Fellow Mortals to Pine View
Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Fredonia. As of 7 a.m. Tues-
day, the turtle was in critical condition.
Fellow Mortals posted pictures on Facebook of the
injured turtle, with a warning for the graphic nature of the
photos.
Fellow Mortals stated that Juan Gomez, a Wisconsin
Department of Natural Resources conservation warden,
rescued the turtle. According to Fellow Mortals, Gomez
responded to a call about an injured turtle on the golf
course.
Snapping turtles are the largest (turtles) in the United
States, Fellow Mortals stated. They are an endangered
species in Canada.
People with information can also call (800) TIP-
WDNR.
A new generation of online TV for the Lake Geneva area
Catch all the sneak previews
of where to dine, shop, stay & play
Currently playing on ReelLifeTV.net
Does your child
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Blood drive June 17
BLOOMFIELD People can donate blood Monday,
June 17, from 2 to 7 p.m. at Trinity Church, W775 Gera-
nium Drive.
Appointments are encouraged. To schedule one, apply
online at www.bcw.edu/trinitypl or contact Nancy Roth at
(262) 510-3314. Refreshments will be provided. For more
information, (262) 279-0352 or visit www.trinitychurch-
family.com.
WHATS HAPPENING?
Incorrect stat in column
John Halversons column in last weeks Regional News
had an incorrect statistic. It should have said that the city
of Lake Geneva would receive $1,500 in parking revenue
between May 9 and Oct. 24 by charging for parking during
the farmers market.
Fleming has one m
Kevin Flemings name was incorrectly spelled in infor-
mation accompanying a photo in last weeks Regional
News. The photo regarded the lming of a public television
show in Lake Geneva.
CORRECTIONS
We make every effort to be accurate. If you feel weve
made an error, please contact us at jhalverson@
lakegenevanews.net. Include your name and phone
number in case we need to get back to you.
9th Annual
RUMMAGE SALE
St. Francis de Sales Church - Lake Geneva
148 Main St. (enter through back parking lot)
JUNE 13 - Preview Day 5:00-7:00 p.m.
-- Early entrance fee $2 ($5 per family)
JUNE 14 - 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
JUNE 15 - 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. --
1/2 price and Special sales.
Lots of furniture, and other items too
numerous to mention
Published every Thursday
by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
315 Broad Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Mailing address: Post Office Box 937, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Phone: 262-248-4444 Fax: 262-248-4476
Periodicals postage paid at Lake Geneva, WI
ONE HUNDRED FORTY ONE YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY
Advertising Adjustment policy
The Lake Geneva Regional News takes
care to ensure your advertisement is
correct. However, we cannot be
responsible for errors in any advertise-
ment beyond the first publication of
that advertisement. In the case of
error, adjustment is limited to the cost
of that portion of the advertisement
wherein the error occurred.
Official Newspaper
City of Lake Geneva
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Badger High School District
Bloomfield, Geneva, Linn and Lyons Townships
Village of Genoa City
Brookwood School District
Traver School District
Woods School District
Williams Bay School District
Village of Williams Bay
Village of Fontana
Fontana School District
Walworth School District
Big Foot High School District
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TOWN OF GENEVA
Electronic Recycling Event
The Town of Geneva will hold a FREE
Electronic Recycling Collection at the Town
Hall, N3496 Como Road, on Saturday, June 15,
2013 from 8:00 a.m. until Noon. All residential
electronics banned from landfills by the State of
Wisconsin can be dropped off at the Town Hall
at the date and time specified above, free of
charge. We will recycle "anything with a cord"
for free thanks to John's Disposal.
Debra L. Kirch, Clerk/Treasurer
Town of Geneva
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 5A
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By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY Trafc calls and the occasional possum sighting.
Those are the kind of police situations Jason Schielke said he has
encountered while riding along with police ofcers in Genoa City.
The 22-year-old University of Wisconsin-Platteville student is the vil-
lage police departments rst intern.
He said he hopes to graduate in August with a degree in criminal jus-
tice, then nd a job as a police ofcer in Southeastern Wisconsin.
Im already enjoying being an intern here, he said. There are nice
people, its a great community. Driving around, people see you, they wave
to you.
For Schielke, becoming a police ofcer may be a natural t.
Growing up, with my friends, I was always the one who watched out
for them, he said. I guess I was the safe one of the group.
To obtain that degree and follow his cop dreams, Schielke has to com-
plete the eight-week internship program with the department.
Genoa City Police Chief Joe Balog said the program is part of his plan
to improve the department.
He said he worked at two law enforcement agencies where criminal
justice and social work students interned.
Being an intern in a police department offers students the chance to
gain real world experience, Balog said, as well as observe investigations,
learn about report writing and other investigative and tactical skills.
Schielke said about 50 percent of his 40-hour-a-week internship so far
has been ride-alongs with Balog and the other ofcers.
He said none of the calls he went on stood out as being strange or dan-
gerous.
Mostly, he would be inside the squad, running a motorists license plate
number on the laptop.
There have been a couple times when I have gotten out of the squad
and listened to what the person would say (to the police ofcer), just so I
can see how they would deal with the person they have stopped, Schielke
said.
And?
They all seemed pretty calm, Schielke said.
Then theres the other aspects of the job people may not readily associ-
ate with being a cop.
Balog said Schielke will help reorganize department manuals, conduct
inventory of department equipment so we can see exactly what is still
needed or usable and what they can trade or sell.
Which sounds like a far cry from the standoffs, high-speed chases and
other situations the term ride-along may conjure up.
But when asked why he wants to be a police ofcer, Schielke didnt
come off as a thrill seeker.
I like helping people, he said. Like, maybe its helping someone nd
their dog. If I lost my dog, Id want someone to help me. You wont always
get a thank-you for it, but at least youre there.
To Schielke, being a cop means interacting with the public, not just
writing tickets or driving around.
Its a small town, so a lot of the ofcers will see people out, theyll
wave, say hi, maybe have a short conversation with them, ask them how
their day is going, Schielke said.
Schielke said in Platteville, there is an emphasis on community polic-
ing, which means ofcers are out in public more, interacting with people
in the community, doing things not perceived as police actions, like going
down to the local school and playing basketball with the kids.
He started his Genoa City internship May 20.
Its an eight-week program, one which Schielke is doing while working
part-time at the Browns Lake Water Patrol.
In fact, his employment there may have helped open the door for him
in Genoa City.
One of his co-workers is Jeff Sperandeo, a Genoa City police ofcer.
He said they talked about him needing an internship after he wasnt
able to obtain one in Burlington Schielkes hometown.
Schielke said Sperandeo told him hed talk to Balog, and he thanked
Balog for allowing him the internship opportunity.
It seems like Balog is pleased with the program so far.
Eventually, we will forward requests to several educational institu-
tions and assist the staff with placing interns with our department, he
said.
As for Schielke, Balog offered more than just his opinion of the new
intern.
I see an eager young man ready to start his career, Balog said. Look-
ing back on my education, I wish I would have had the opportunity to par-
ticipate in an internship when I was in college. I think it gives a valuable
insight into the career you are pursuing.
Village police departments rst
intern is eager, says chief
Cop dreams in Genoa City
SUBMITTED
JASON SCHIELKE is the Genoa City Police Departments rst intern.
GENOA CITY NEWS
About Schielke
Born and raised in Burlington, Jason
Schielke, 22, said he expects to graduate
with a degree in criminal justice in August
from UW-Platteville.
He became Genoa City Police
Departments first intern May 20. Its an
eight-week program, and he works 40
hours a week Monday through Friday.
Schielke also works part-time as a
marine assistant for the Browns Lake
Water Patrol.
Despite living his whole life about 30
minutes away from Genoa City, he said
this is the first time hes ever been to the
village.
I had a friend in high school who was
from Genoa City, but I hadnt really been
here before, Schielke said.
So far, he said his favorite bit of advice
about being a police officer was some-
what unexpected.
Schielke said he was on a ride-along
with a Genoa City police officer during
the Click It or Ticket mobilization an
effort in which officers focus on finding
seat belt violations intended to promote
safety restraint use.
He said the officer enjoyed participat-
ing in the mobilization because he was
making people safe.
But the key factor there, Schielke said,
was enjoyment.
(The officer) told me to enjoy what I
do, Schielke said. I wasnt expecting to
hear that because you just kind of assume
it, that when youre doing a job, youre
enjoying it, but its kind of different hear-
ing that kind of advice.
What Schielkes most excited about
during his internship could be the busiest
time of year for the department.
Im looking forward to Country
Thunder, he said. I havent really worked
at a concert like that. It will be a different
experience.
Schielke said what hes enjoying most
so far is not just seeing what he has
learned in the classroom put into prac-
tice.
Everythings just new, he said. Its
exciting.
6A The Regional News June 13, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Ted Peters, director of the Geneva Lake
Environmental Agency, wants to put two
small holes in Donian Park to better track
how groundwater may be contributing to
the ow in the White River.
And the Lake Geneva Board of Park
Commissioners said its OK with them.
Donian Park is just south of Main
Street, between Center Street and South
Lake Shore Drive. The White River ows
through it.
Peters told the park board on May 5 that
he plans to install two monitoring wells in
Donian, one on either side of the White
River.
Peters said he came to the park board
for permission, and would go to the Lake
Geneva City Council for approval as well, if
he had to.
Theres no way Im putting holes in the
ground without telling people, he told the
park board.
The GLEA is a multi-
governmental agency
supported by the com-
munities on the lake,
and is charged with
monitoring Geneva Lake
and the White River, its
only outlet.
The project is to
better understand
groundwater and sur-
face water relationships
in the Donian wetlands
and the relationship between White River
levels and groundwater, Peters said.
The project is being run by both the
GLEA and George Williams College of
Aurora University, Williams Bay.
George Williams students would moni-
tor and maintain the wells. Richard Boniak,
assistant professor of general and environ-
mental science will be the projects lead
person at the college, Peters said.
According to Peters, past studies have
shown that in some areas of Geneva Lake
water is moving from the lake into the
groundwater and that some of that ground-
water is then resurfacing into the White
River.
We believe groundwater is contributing
to the White Rivers ow, Peters said. He
said previous measurements have shown
more water downstream than appears to be
owing into the river from the lake.
The water migration from lake to
groundwater appears to be seasonal, but
beyond that little is known.
Location will depend on soils. Peters
said he hopes to hand auger the wells.
The well locations will also be as unob-
trusive as possible.
Because the groundwater levels are
high at Donian, the wells will probably be
no more than 5 feet deep, Peters said. And
they may even be 4 feet or less.
The holes will be about 4 inches across.
The wells will have steel casings secured
to concrete footings and will be locked to
prevent tampering.
He said the wells are also waterproofed
to protect them from ooding, although
Peters said he believes that one of the rea-
sons the ooding that occurred in Donian
this past spring was the result of the parks
water table temporarily rising.
Each well will cost about $250 to install
and should, with reasonable maintenance,
last about 25 years, Peters said.
He said the GLEA will pay for the
wells.
The park board gave its permission for
Peters to proceed, with the condition that
Peters coordinate the well installation with
Public Works Director Dan Winkler.
Peters said similar wells were installed
in Kishwauketoe Nature Preserve, Williams
Bay, to monitor groundwater ow there.
Those were installed at the request of
the nature preserves board of directors, he
said.
The GLEA is also planning on approach-
ing Fontana for permission to install moni-
toring wells at the Fontana Fen, to moni-
tor groundwater ows there as well, Peters
said.
Park board OKs Donian monitoring wells
Peters
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In his letter to Walker, Connors
admits he and city council members
nd it frustrating that a city as tour-
isty as Lake Geneva doesnt qualify
for the premier resort tax outright.
By state law, 40 percent of a com-
munitys assessed valuation must be
in tourism-related retail businesses
for that community to immediately
qualify for the tax.
Only two communities have ever
qualied under state law. Lake Delton
and Wisconsin Dells, which both qual-
ied in 1998.
According to Connors, the closest
Lake Geneva came to qualifying was
in 2006, when a review of the citys
businesses found 34.6 percent of its
assessed valuation was involved in
tourism retail.
Increases in assessments, primar-
ily in residential, over the next two
years, dropped that percentage to 26
percent.
However, there is another way to
get on the premier resort tax list. A
local state representative or state sen-
ator may sponsor special legislation to
make that happen.
That process is how Bayeld, Eagle
River, Ephraim and Sister Bay also got
on the premier resort tax list.
However, according to the state
DOR website, before a community can
collect the tax, the communitys elec-
tors must approve the tax by referen-
dum.
Bayeld enacted the premier resort
tax in January 2003, and Eagle River
enacted its tax in October 2006.
If Lake Geneva were to be on the
list, it would have to put the issue up
to the voters in a special referendum.
By law, the voters have the nal say
on whether the tax will be enacted,
Jordan said.
However, State Rep. Tyler August
(R-Lake Geneva) and State Sen. Neal
Kedzie (R-LaGrange) are reluctant to
do so.
The city of Lake Geneva has con-
tacted our senate and house repre-
sentatives to sponsor such legislation
for our city, but they have declined
because they believe it is a tax, and
they do not want to be responsible for
raising a tax, Connors wrote in his
letter to the governor.
The mayor and I sat down with
Kedzie for 40 minutes last week,
Jordan said in a June 7 phone inter-
view. I havent heard anything, yet.
Because the tax can only be
enacted by the voters, Connors wrote,
he didnt see how approval of the new
sales tax would reect negatively on
the local legislators.
The tight economy and levy cap
placed on municipalities makes it dif-
cult for the city to make itself special
in comparison with other tourist des-
tinations.
Tax/LG Mayor wrote to Governor Walker
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
The premier resort tax
is imposed only on cer-
tain retailers within premier
resort areas.
The tax is imposed upon
the sale, license, lease, or
rental of a taxable product
or taxable service that takes
place within the premier
resort area.
Using classifications
established by the U.S.
Ofce of Management
and Budget, the state
Department of Revenue
has determined that the
premier resort tax applies
to the following businesses:
n Variety stores.
n General merchandise
stores, which sell apparel,
dry goods, hardware,
housewares, groceries, or
home furnishings on a cash-
and-carry basis in limited
amounts. Usually called
country general stores.
n Candy, nut, and con-
fectionary stores.
n Retail bakeries.
n Gasoline service sta-
tions, combined with other
activities, such as grocery
stores, convenience stores,
or car washes.
n Restaurants and
eating places.
n Drug stores, includ-
ing drug stores which also
operate a soda fountain or
lunch counter.
n Liquor stores.
n Sporting goods
stores and bicycle shops.
n Camera and photo-
graphic supply stores.
n Gift, novelty, and
souvenir shops.
n Hotels and motels.
n Sporting and rec-
reational camps, such as
boys and girls camps and
shing and hunting camps.
Recreational vehicle parks
and campsites.
n Horse and motor
racing tracks.
n Public golf courses.
n Coin-operated
amusement devices, (video
games, juke boxes, pinball
machines) either in arcades
or in other places of busi-
ness.
n Amusement parks.
n Recreation services,
not elsewhere classied,
which includes sports,
amusement, and recre-
ation services, bathing
beaches, swimming pools,
riding academies and
schools, carnival opera-
tion, exposition opera-
tion, horse shows, picnic
grounds operation, rental
of rowboats and canoes,
and shooting galleries.
Effective Sept. 1, 2005,
the following businesses
were added as businesses
subject to the premier
resort area tax:
n Department stores.
n Specialty food stores
primarily engaged in the
retail sale of specialized
foods, such as eggs, poul-
try, health foods, spices,
herbs, coffee, and tea.
n Mens and boys
clothing and accessory
stores.
n Womens clothing
stores.
n Womens accessory
and specialty stores.
n Childrens and
infants wear stores.
n Family clothing
stores.
n Shoe stores.
n Miscellaneous
apparel and accessory
stores.
n Bookstores.
n Stationery stores.
n Jewelry stores.
n Hobby, toy and
game shops.
n Luggage and leather
goods stores.
n Sewing, needlework,
and piece goods stores.
n Florists.
n Tobacco stores and
stands.
n News dealers and
newsstands.
n Retail stores which
engaged in the retail sale
of specialized lines of
merchandise, such as art-
ists supplies; orthopedic
and articial limbs; rubber
stamps; pets; religious
goods; and monuments
and tombstones, includ-
ing establishments selling a
general line of their own or
consigned merchandise at
retail on an auction basis.
n Theatrical producers
(except motion pictures) and
theatrical services engaged
in providing live theatrical
presentations, such as road
companies and summer
theaters. Also included are
producers of live and taped
radio programs and com-
mercials and producers of
live television programs.
n Bands, orchestras,
actors, and other enter-
tainers and entertainment
groups other than live the-
atrical presentations.
n Physical tness facili-
ties.
n Membership sports
and recreation clubs.
(Information from the
state DOR website.)
Retailers subject to resort tax
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 7A
28th Annual Benefit Ball
For more information on Aurora Health Care Foundation, please call 262-741-2600.
A special thanks to this years
Honorary Chairperson Douglas Batesky, MD
Humanitarian Award recipient Robert Jambor
Inaugural Kathleen Skowlund Scholarship recipient William Burrough
Your donations helped us raise a record-breaking $125,000, which will be used to purchase
a state-of-the-art cardiac monitoring matrix, as well as enhancements to our trauma room.
Aurora.org/BenetBall
X35322x (06/13) AHC
2013
Benefit Ball
Committee
Maureen Berkowitz**
Marianne Bonifacic**
Barb Habrel
Kathy Hartman
Irene Humphrey
Terri Jambor*
Jennifer Jones*
Susan Krinn
Vicki Lewis
Genna Monticello
Alice Morava
Cathy Slovick
Gwen Swanson
Michelle Weber
Wendy Weiner
Janice Zagorski
* Dinner Co-Chairs
** Chair Emeritus
We would like to thank the community for your support of the
The city cant control the speed of the horse, said
Alderman Al Kupsik, who is president of the council,
and was presiding in the absence of Mayor Jim Connors,
who is on vacation.
Taggart said the city should
impress on the carriage drivers that
they need to keep their vehicles as far
to the right as possible to allow traffic
to get around them.
The discussion over carriages
started as council members began
pulling things from the councils con-
sent agenda for further discussion.
The consent agenda allows the council
to vote on multiple items with just one
reading, providing the council mem-
bers consent to their approval.
Field Stone Farms license renewal
was on the consent agenda.
Perhaps if Field Stones horses moved at steeple chase
speeds, its license would have been approved without
comment.
Taggart, however, believed that the speed of the car-
riages was enough of an issue that it needed discussion.
And council members agreed that the carriages can
go really slow.
When given sufficient room, cars can pass the car-
riage to the left.
However, apparently not all drivers know they can
legally pass the carriages when conditions permit. They
doggedly follow along, causing other cars to pile up
behind.
I would agree with Mr. Taggart, said Alderwoman
Sarah Hill. Some drivers dont realize they can pass.
She suggested that the carriages have a sign on the
back that reads: Pass with caution, or pardon my
meandering.
Alderman William Mott said that despite the incon-
venience, the carriages lend an ambiance to the city that
makes it attractive to visitors. I think its a positive for
the city, he said.
Alderman Dennis Lyon said he wanted the city to
talk with the carriage owner first and try to work out a
solution.
Dont attempt to legislate a solution, Lyon said. If
we legislate, then we have an enforcement issue.
City Administrator Dennis Jordan said the horse-
and-carriage issue has been one thats been around even
before he became city administrator.
On a busy summer afternoon, traffic is packed
between parked cars on either side of the road and its
almost impossible for cars to get around the carriages,
Jordan said.
PHOTO COURTESY LAKE GENEVA POLICE DEPARTMENT
THE LAKE GENEVA POLICE are attempting to identify the man in this photo. He burglarized the BP gas station located
at Elkhorn Road and Grant Street on June 9. If somebody does recognize him the department would like them to contact
the police department at (262) 248-4455.
Police seek suspect
Horse/Is it too slow
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Taggart
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8A The Regional News June 13, 2013
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Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS Thursday, June 13, 2013
Sharon woman doesnt accept plea deal
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN A former Sharon woman
was set to accept a plea agreement in a
sexual assault case, but changed her mind
after learning of new evidence that she
believes might help her case.
Rachael McCormick, 38, has been
charged with two counts of sexual assault
of a child. She is accused of having sex with
two 15-year-old boys.
McCormicks attorney, Joshua Klaff,
said the state provided additional discov-
ery evidence last Friday that caused him
and his client to reconsider the plea agree-
ment.
It is certainly potentially exculpatory,
Klaff said. We cant abide by the settle-
ment and would like a jury trial.
Deputy District
Attorney Joshua Grube
said the discovery evi-
dence was a paragraph
written by the Victim
Witness Coordinator
that outlined a meet-
ing Grube had with one
of the alleged victims.
Grube met with the
child a few days before
the jury trial, which was
set for Monday.
I do not believe it is exculpatory,
Grube said. I dont see it as signicant.
Grube said he turned the paragraph
over to Klaff in an abundance of caution.
Im not even certain that this is some-
thing I needed to turn over, Grube said.
Judge Phillip Koss was obviously
unhappy with the case being further
delayed and court dates being tied up for a
jury trial that never occurred.
The plea agreement would have
required McCormick to plead guilty to a
felony charge of sexual assault, but the
state wouldnt recommend she be sent to
prison.
We are not going to be doing pleas the
day of trial anymore, Koss said.
Now the jury trial in the case is set for
Sept. 3 and 4. A nal pre-trial is scheduled
for Aug. 29, and Koss said he wont take
a plea agreement after that date. By July
26, both attorneys are required to le any
motions in the case.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Oct. 1, police spoke with a 15-year-
old boy, who is identied in the criminal
complaint as Victim 1. Victim 1 told police
that he went to McCormicks residence on
Sept. 29, where she gave him raspberry
vodka.
The boy told police that he got drunk
and had sex with McCormick.
On Oct. 9, police and Child Advo-
cacy Coordinator Paula Hocking met
with McCormick. McCormick admitted
to giving alcohol to Victim 1, but said she
was very intoxicated and didnt remember
having sex with him.
However, she said she remembered
having sex with another 15-year-old boy,
who is identied as Victim 2 in the crimi-
nal complaint. On Oct. 11, Victim 2 told
police that he had sex with McCormick on
Sept. 29.
Victim 2 also told police that Victim 1
asked McCormick if he could have sex with
her, and she agreed.
McCormick
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
WILLIAMS BAY In the middle of a
project to determine whether the commu-
nity will support a new elementary school,
Williams Bay School Board members are
now caught up in a search for a new super-
intendent and junior/senior high school
principal.
Still, Dianna Woss, school board presi-
dent, said she expects the board members
to follow through with a lot of hard work.
She said the search for two new admin-
istrators will not interfere with the boards
work on the elementary school.
The board plans to hire an interim
superintendent rst and then settle
on a junior/senior high school prin-
cipal, Woss said.
Board members Lynne Land-
graf and Cheryl Beinetti led the
search process for an interim
superintendent.
Board members Jim Pfeil and
Rebecca Boggs coordinated the
search for a new principal.
Appeals were sent out to dis-
trict residents for persons willing
to serve on the selection commit-
tees for the new administrators.
Woss said the district already has about
90 applicants for the principals position.
She said that she did not have a count for
the superintendents position.
The district is accepting applica-
tions only until Friday.
The board will review the
applications and select nalists.
She said the current sched-
ule calls for interviews of interim
superintendent candidates to
begin by June 27. The board
should have the new interim
superintendent on board by the
school districts annual meeting,
scheduled for July 22.
Interviews for the principals position
should start by July 2. Woss said the school
board plans to have the interim superinten-
dent assist in selecting the new principal.
Superintendent Vance Dalzin and Prin-
cipal Barry Butters both submitted their
resignations during the May 20 school
board meeting.
At the meeting, Dalzin announced that
he was selected by the Fox Point-Bayside
School Board as that districts new super-
intendent.
According to the Fox Point-Bayside
schools website, Dalzin was the unanimous
choice of the Fox Point-Bayside board at its
May 17 meeting.
The Fox Point-Bayside School District
serves about 950 students in 4K through
eighth grade in its two schools.
Bays staff search in high gear
Woss
PLEASE SEE BAY PAGE 3B
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
GOV. SCOTT WALKER attends the annual U.S.-Japan economic conference with executives
from Kikkoman at The Abbey Resort on Friday.
Kikkoman donates
$1 million to UWM
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA To maintain sustainable
freshwater, Kikkoman gave $1 million to
the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
School of Freshwater Sciences.
Mitsuo Someya, chief executive of-
cer of the business, announced the gift on
June 7, at The Abbey Resort, at the start
of the companys celebration for its 40th
anniversary of opening the Walworth pro-
duction plant.
The funds will build the Kikkoman
Healthy Waters Environmental Health
Laboratories.
Someya said sustainable and safe water
was vital for the company, which brews soy
sauce and related products, to continue to
grow.
Safe and sustainable water is of vital
importance in Wisconsin and around the
world, Someya said. The research being
conducted may help critical issues facing
us today.
Gov. Scott Walker, present for the anni-
versary celebration and the Wisconsin-
U.S.-Japan economic conference, said sus-
tainable water knows no party afliation.
PLEASE SEE KIKKOMAN PAGE 3B
District buys video
to promote school
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH A one-minute video
promoting Walworth Elementary School
cost the district $4,995.
The short video was lmed April 4,
and District Administrator Pam Knorr
intended to have it appear on the Wal-
worth Countys government website.
Knorr said she spoke with Greg Mee,
and he assured her that the video would
be put on the county website.
I have it from Greg Mee at
CGI Communications that it will
be on the county page, Knorr
said. It is one of the featured
videos. Yes, we have been assured
from CGI that our contract is a
valid contract.
However, County Administra-
tor Dave Bretl and Suzanne Har-
rington, administrative assistant
for the Walworth County Admin-
istrators Ofce, said the schools
video will not appear on the
county website.
According to an email from Har-
rington, only videos CGI produced for
Walworth County will be posted ... on the
countys website.
Bretl said CGI Communications made
seven free videos for the county.
They approved those videos at the
May executive committee meeting, he
said.
They sold advertising to those
videos.
Bretl said the county will post a link
to the free videos on the county website
sometime this summer, and ads from
businesses will be shown around the free
videos.
If you can picture this, someone is on
the county webpage and it says see videos
of Walworth County, Bretl said. That
link takes them to a page thats run by CGI
thats completely off of our webpage. It
has the different (county approved) videos
there. (CGI) sold advertising around the
border of the video.
Bretl said he knew of a few
businesses that had called his
ofce to know if it was a legiti-
mate contact.
The ads are how they get
reimbursed, if you will, for the
video, he said.
Knorr said the district did not
purchase an ad.
Missing link
The district contract with CGI
Communications and its subsid-
iary group e-LocalLink, doesnt
state where the video will appear.
The contract says, e-LocalLink will
provide the client a line of code, which
represents the content. This line of code
has an expiration date.
It does say e-LocalLink partnered with
the project stated above. The project listed
is Walworth County, WI.
The Regional News was not able to
reach Greg Mee at CGI Communications.
Knorr
PLEASE SEE VIDEO PAGE 3B
Have a subscription to the Regional News?
Read your paper online anytime!
The Lake Geneva Regional News launched a new feature on its website that
allows subscribers to read the paper online at www.lakegenevanews.net.
Subscribed readers can access all news stories and view a PDF version of the
newspaper on the site. Subscribers also have access to online archives, which
include a PDF version of every paper since March 3, 2011. The paper will continue
to add past issues to the digital archive in the future.
For more information contact managing editor Robert Ireland at
rireland@lakegenevanews.net or 262.248.4444.
2B The Regional News June 13, 2013
GENEVA LAKE WEST
Local schools bank on open enrollment
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA Students switching from
one public school to another can mean big
revenue for some districts.
According to the Department of Public
Instruction, during the 2011-12 school year
Fontana Elementary School accepted 53
students from outside its district bound-
aries, while 38 students left for other
schools.
The 15 additional students attending
the elementary school increased state aid
to the school by more than $80,000.
Another nearby district, Delavan-
Darien, lost a net 215 students to open
enrollment and $1.28 million in state aid
that same year.
The state public school open enrollment
application period ended April 30.
Parents wishing to send their children
to a district outside their residency had
to apply to both the district theyd like to
leave and the district theyd like to
enter.
Fontana District Administra-
tor Sara Norton said open enroll-
ment options hit small districts
the hardest.
We have a small district with
a small budget, she said. Stu-
dents leaving have a large impact
on our budget.
Norton said its nearly impos-
sible to predict how many stu-
dents will open enroll in and out
of a district.
The school board may approve an appli-
cation, and parents may commit to sending
a student to the school, but its never a nal
count, she said.
You never truly know if the students
will show, Norton said. And they dont
have to stay once theyre here. They can
always go back to their home district.
The money doesnt follow the student
immediately to a new school, either.
Fontana Elementary School
Business Manager Mary Coss said
state funding for open enrolled
students is sent to a school at the
end of a school year.
If a student only stays here for
part of the year, we only get part
of the funding, Coss said. The
state prorates the funds, divides it
by how many days the student was
at the school.
The school board then, faces
tough decisions, Norton said.
We have to decide if its worth it to
create a new section of a grade when we
receive enough open enrollment applica-
tions, she said.
If the school hires a new teacher but a
student leaves mid-year, the budget could
get really tight, Norton said.
An open enrolled student entering our
school can be the deciding factor in if we
hire that additional teacher or not, she
said.
Part of the budget remains steady,
though. School districts may tax based on
the residents in the district, not just on stu-
dents attending the school.
School boards set the number of seats
available for open enrollment during their
January meeting, according to DPI rules.
Fontana School Board has set a policy,
but Norton said they dont hold fast to it.
If we have room, we want students
to come here, she said. Were not selling
anything. We dont have to persuade par-
ents to send their children here. We want to
be the school they want to come to.
Norton said some schools try to adver-
tise to parents and gain more open enroll-
ment students. Fontana doesnt do that.
Parents arent required to give a reason
for the transfer when they leave or enter a
school, Norton said.
I do hear a lot of parents say they want
to send their children to the same school
they went to, even if they live outside the
community.
Norton
FEMA money will pay for gear, equipment, training
Fire department gets grant
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH The Walworth Fire Department will
have new personal protective gear thanks to a grant from
the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
Police Lt. and Fire Chief Andy Long said the depart-
ment applied for the grant last fall.
We found out last Friday (May 31) that we got the
grant, he said. We had to give an itemized list when we
applied for the grant, so they knew that we needed gear.
The grant we received is $104,000.
The grant will be split three ways $78,300 for per-
sonal gear, $22,700 for equipment and $3,000 for train-
ing.
Long said the current uniforms and protective gear
range in age, but much of it is 15 years old.
The old gear wasnt safe, he said. We should have all
the new gear within the month.
Typically, new gear and uniforms would be itemized in
the villages budget.
The village cant afford this type of
overhaul of gear, Long said. We had
been (replacing it piece by piece) before,
getting a few new items that the village
could budget for. Now well all have the
same items, the same uniform in the
same color.
Besides personal protective gear
and uniforms, the department will also
have a new hose and nozzles and ttings
for the trucks. The grant will also cover
training for team members.
Well be able to put 10 people through the reghter
two course, Long said.
The old gear will probably be disposed of. Long said it
was too worn out to be sold to another department.
The department received a grant about 10 years ago
for $89,000 that was used to purchase breathing appara-
tuses.
Long
Big Foot FFA scholarships
By Katy Vacula
Big Foot FFA Reporter
The Big Foot FFA Alumni awarded scholarships to
ve graduating FFA members on Saturday, June 1, at the
Senior Banquet and Awards Ceremony.
Scholarships recipients were Kyle Rambatt, $800,
Brent Kruizenga, Shelby Grinnell, and Michael Wicks
$1,200 each, and Brittany Rambatt, $1,400.
Kyle Rambatt plans on pursuing a career in the arts,
particularly welding, but is unsure about which school he
will be attending in the fall.
Kruizenga will attend the University of Wisconsin-
Rock County. Grinnell will attend UW-Platteville.
Wicks will attend UW-Rock County.
Brittany Rambatt is pursuing a career in agricultural
education and will attend UW-River Falls.
Wicks and Brittany Rambatt are also running for state
FFA ofces this year. Winners will be announced during
the State FFA convention later this month.
Scholarship recipients must have been active in the FFA
program while at Big Foot High School. Those students
planning on pursuing an agricultural major are likely to
receive a higher scholarship.
GENEVA LAKE WEST
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WESTENN
We really appreciate (Kikkomans)
commitment to the community and the
state, he said. When Kikkoman came
here, 40 years ago, it was not an obvious
decision to come to the United States
like it is now.
Walker said the U.S. marketplace
has helped Kikkoman grow, and that
has helped the local economy.
UWM Chancellor Mike Lovell called
it a great day for UWM and Wisconsin.
We are glad to be partners to share
a vision for global water safety, Lovell
said. The Kikkoman labs will advance stewardship.
Many journalists from Japan were present for the
announcement, along with local leaders.
Kikkoman
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
Walker
Dalzin said the Fox Point-Bayside
position was an opportunity he could
not ignore.
Taking the job at Fox Point-Bay-
side did not indicate any unhappiness
with Williams Bay, the schools, staff or
board, he said.
Butters resigned to take a position
outside of public education with Preci-
sion Plus Inc., Elkhorn.
Butters said he will establish educa-
tion and training procedures in manu-
facturing for Precision Plus employees.
He said he will be involved in recruitment, as well.
Butters also said he was leaving with some reluctance.
But he said that starting with Act 10, there are rules
and regulations coming down from the state that will make
it difcult for him to continue as prin-
cipal.
Their resignations take effect June
30, although Dalzin has promised to
stay on as a consultant with the district
for its on-going elementary school proj-
ect.
The board began setting criteria for
their replacements that same week.
Dalzin and Butters both started
in the Williams Bay district in August
2011. Butters took over for long-time
principal Dan Bice, who retired after
21 years as principal, and Dalzin replaced Superintendent
Fred Vorlop, who left after eight years.
Woss said both Dalzin and Butters had been open with
the board about their seeking positions elsewhere.
Dalzin Butters
Bay/School searching for replacements
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
School Board Vice President Jacob Ries said he was
happy with the video.
I think its a way to get our school out there, show the
positives and drive some more students to us, he said.
The county is trying to promote schools, businesses and
different recreational areas to be highlighted on the web-
site.
Ries said he and the board were assured that the video
would appear on the county website.
Thatd be news to all of us (if it wont be featured on
the website), he said. Thats the whole reason we got
involved with it to begin with. Theres a mix-up some-
where along the way.
Ries said that Knorr was approached by CGI Commu-
nications, and she brought the project idea to the board.
We as a board approved it based on being involved
with that whole (county website) project, Ries said. My
understanding is that CGI is working through the county
on the project.
Video production
The school board approved the funds to pay for the
video at its October meeting, as part of the use of leftover
money from the previous school years budget.
Along with the video, the board approved other pur-
chases including 125 iPads, new walkie-talkies and a scale
for the nurses room. The total used was $290,849.89,
according to documents the Regional News received from
an open records request.
A link to the video was posted to the schools website
June 5.
The video has a 10-second welcome from Knorr and
Principal Pam Larson, and then a voice-over narrates
video of different photos of the school.
Knorr said a CGI videographer came to the school to
produce the video.
They came and shot the video, Knorr said. It is a
video of photos. I did a script, and I told them exactly what
I wanted to do.
She said because of this script, the company decided
to use still photos instead of lming the building and
grounds.
They took pictures of the atrium behind us and the
band room and the choir room and all of everything,
Knorr said. I believe they did lm the outside of the
school.
She also choose who would do the voice-over.
They had about 20 different options for the narrator,
Knorr said.
Walworth Joint School District #1 providing (sic) an
educational experience that will resonate with each child
for a lifetime, the narrator says at the end of the video.
Video/Board member happy with video
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH Despite the cold and
wet weather, Keith Harms, development
director of Inspiration Ministries, a residen-
tial facility for the disabled, said the char-
ity raised more money during its Memorial
Day weekend auction than during previous
auctions.
We had a few days of good weather
right before the auction, so many people
were able to get their boats out of storage,
and we were able to pick them up, Harms
said. We had 40 people donate cars or
boats and 46 large items were donated.
Along with the boats and cars, dona-
tions of oatation devices, rafts, anchors
and skis helped ll the auction.
Inspiration Ministries is pretty well
known around here, so a lot of marinas
help us out by telling their customers about
us when theyre looking to get rid of a boat,
Harms said.
Volunteers help on the day of the auc-
tion to keep costs down for the charity.
People like helping out, Harms said.
We have a local man come for the live auc-
tion. Gary Finley has done every auction for
us since we started doing it.
Money raised from the auction will go
into the general fund for the residence.
Almost 100 percent stays here at Inspi-
ration Ministries, Harms said. The little
bit that doesnt stay here, goes into adver-
tising.
Though residents at Inspiration Minis-
tries are charged for housing, Harms said
they do everything they can to help them
stay in nancial difculties.
Since weve opened, weve never had to
ask anyone to leave for nancial reasons,
he said. We use whatever means necessary
to keep people here.
Inspiration Ministries holds auctions
twice a year, in May and October.
Though the auctions are the main fund
raisers for the charity, Inspiration Min-
istries is currently holding a fund raising
campaign to pay for an upgraded sprinkler
system in some of their residential build-
ings.
To donate a car or boat to the charity,
call (262) 374-9175.
Inspiration Ministries
prepares for next auction
WILLIAMS BAY Every dog has its
day.
And June 22 will be the fth annual
Dog Day in the Bay at Edgewater Park,
Williams Bay, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The day is sponsored by the Williams
Bay Business Association.
Same day registration begins at 10 a.m.
with a parade following at 11 a.m. Prizes
will be awarded at 1 p.m. in the following
categories:
n Best costume (adult and dog.)
n Best costume (child and dog.)
n Owner-pet look alike.
n Best dog trick.
n Peoples choice (new this year.)
Music, food and drinks, face painting,
exhibition tables, caricatures, balloon art
and the Williams Bay Civic League bake
sale will join the celebration of all things
canine.
Registration forms are now at WBBA
member businesses, the Williams Bay Rec-
reation Department, Elkhorn Vet Clinic or
Lakeland Animal Shelter. Proceeds to ben-
et the Lakeland Animal Shelter
Dogs get day in Bay
FILE PHOTO/REGIONAL NEWS
ON JUNE 22 Edgewater Park will be taken over by dogs for the annual Dog Day in the Bay.
Summer programs continue at Yerkes
Observatory.
n June 17, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Observe the moon and learn Spanish at
Yerkes. Join Yerkes bilingual friends for a
night of movies, crafts, games, and observ-
ing. Admission: $5 per person or $15 per
family.
n Walk the solar system.
June 29, starting at 9:30 a.m.
Kishwauktoe Nature Conservancy,
Williams Bay, is the universe, and hikers
can walk a scaled version of our solar
system to learn about the planets, comets
and asteroids that ll it.
Admission: $5 per person.
Yerkes summer programs
follow us
www.facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
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4B The Regional News June 13, 2013
GENEVA LAKE WEST
The Lake Geneva Fresh Air Association and Holiday
Home Camp ends its 125th year by looking toward the
future.
The observation and celebration of the camps rst cen-
tury and a quarter of service to disadvantaged youth will
be concluded at this years benet Club HHC - Painting a
Brighter Future.
This years gala will be at the Lake Geneva Country
Club on June 16.
The support and generosity of the local community is
so appreciated, Jon McLaren, the newly appointed exec-
utive director of Lake Geneva Fresh Air Association and
Holiday Home Camp, said in a press release. One of the
things Ive been most impressed with since starting here
is the connection the local community has with the camp,
McLaren said. And the gala is a way to both extend our
mission within the community and to celebrate all the
children that have come through the camp and beneted
from a fresh air, summer camp experience over the last 125
years.
McLaren and assistant director Jessica Brennan both
joined the camp within the last several months. The gates
open for the rst campers of the 2013 season on June 17.
The annual galas are themed.
Last year, the gala theme was A Step Back in Time, to
reect on the start of the Holiday Home Camp more than
a century ago.
This year, the theme will be a futuristic nightclub atmo-
sphere.
The gala evening will kick off with cocktails at 5:30
p.m. followed by a three course sit-down dinner prepared
by LGCC Executive Chef JD Walker.
Dessert will follow during the live auction.
Paintings by campers will be sold during the silent auc-
tion. Several campers will also be at the gala and share
their camp experiences with the guests.
This years festivities will also include an After Party
beginning at 9:30 p.m., when those interested can join the
event later in the evening. The late night option includes
cocktails and late night snacks.
For the anniversary nale, those in attendance will be
treated to a reworks show donated by Barry MacLean for
the second year in a row.
The annual party is the primary fundraiser for the
camp each year; over the last seven years, the gala has
raised about $125,000 annually.
This years gala is chaired by Elizabeth Ring, Lake
Geneva, who is a member of the board of directors.
Since opening its doors 125 years ago, the camp has
served more than 45,000 children in the Southeastern
Wisconsin and Chicago-land area.
The Lake Geneva Fresh Air Association was founded
in the summer of 1887 by a group of Chicago area fami-
lies who had summer homes on Geneva Lake. The group
wanted to expand upon the Fresh Air Movement that was
taking place on the East Coast.
Their initial contributions of $13,000 provided startup
capital to purchase lakefront acreage and begin construc-
tion of the retreat.
One year later, in July of 1888, the organization - and
its newly completed Founders Hall at Holiday Home Camp
welcomed the rst summer residents. By the end of that
summer, Holiday Home Camp had served 263 disadvan-
taged children.
Today, Holiday Home Camp is a member of the Ameri-
can Camping Association and is the oldest accredited
summer camp still operating in its original location.
Holiday Home sits on 26 acres along the Geneva Lake
shore in Williams Bay. Illinois and Wisconsin social ser-
vice organizations refer children to the camp.
The summer camp program consists of one- and two-
week sessions for children ages 7 to 16.
In addition to the summer camp, there is a year-round
Leadership Training Program for teens.
The camp realizes more than half of its annual operat-
ing budget through private donations, which pays for about
500 campers each summer.
It provides inner city kids with a taste of country life,
including swimming lessons, water games, boating and
shing.
The benet is sponsored by several local area busi-
nesses including, Dalco Metals, Gage Marine, ChinaWest
Jewelers, Engerman Contracting, MPC, as well as, Majic
Enterprises and Morgans & Co. Fine Picture Framing and
MacLean-Fogg Co. of Illinois.
Tickets for the gala are available online at www.holi-
dayhomecamp.org or by calling Amanda Tenut at Holiday
Home Camp Ofces, (262) 245-5161. Tickets for the full
evening are $195 per person. Tickets for the after party are
$50 per person.
Donations and gifts in kind to support camper scholar-
ships can be made to the Lake Geneva Fresh Air Associa-
tion and mailed c/o Holiday Home Camp, P.O. Box 10, Wil-
liams Bay, WI 53191.
Members of the camp board of directors are President
Molly Keller, Vice President Willis Herron, Secretary Leslie
Aranovitz, Treasurer Andy Sterkowitz and members Ulla
Brunk, John Engerman, Brigid Cashman, Jennifer Keefe,
Lucy Otzen, Jim Wilkin, Richard Paden,
Elisabeth Ring and Marie Kropp. Members emeritus
are Martha Craven, Dianna Colman, Kevin Conroy and
Jack Schwemm.
Gala closes Holiday Homes 125th anniversary
Villages look
at sharing
services
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH The Walworth Vil-
lage Board didnt readily welcome ideas
of mutual aid with Fontana.
Earlier this year, Fontana village
trustees requested emergency service
personnel solicit additional options for
response services within the village.
Part of that was meeting with emer-
gency service teams in Walworth.
This idea came from Fontana,
Police Chief Chris Severt said. Theyre
looking to get Linn, Williams Bay, Wal-
worth and Fontana to 24/7 coverage.
Williams Bay and Linn were not inter-
ested. Well see what happens. The 24/7
idea went away quickly.
Walworth Village President David
Rasmussen said the municipalities
should use baby steps to get cover-
age.
Its funny when they dont have any-
thing (full-time response), they want to
create something huge, he said. They
can never quite get the baby steps like
hiring one person during the day.
Rasmussen said that to benet all communities, the
villages should create overlapping coverage times.
Itd be really great if we had someone who was on 6
a.m. until 2 p.m. and the other municipality had someone
start at noon and go until 8 p.m., he said. And we need to
work with the town of Walworth, too.
Trustee electronic devices
The village is checking prices and usability of portable
tablets for trustee use.
Trustee Dennis Vanderbloemen said prices for similar
tablets range from $80 to $600.
I went to Best Buy and Ofce Depot, he said. All of
the devices seemed to be comparable. They both referred
me to their business section to get business prices. They all
assume that theyll have a better price buying in bulk.
Vanderbloemen will bring more information to future
board meetings.
Ripon releases deans list
Area students have been named to the Ripon College
deans list for the spring 2013 semester, recognizing aca-
demic excellence. Among them were JoHanna Burton,
Trevor Doetsch, Jacob Gahart, Kristina Oglesby and Alli-
son Schmidt, all of Elkhorn.
Jillian Cline, Lake Geneva, and Lani Siems, Genoa City,
were also named to the list.
Locals graduate from UW-Whitewater
More than 40 University of Wisconsin-Whitewater stu-
dents presented at the 27th annual National Conference
on Undergraduate Research held April 11 to 13 at UW-La
Crosse, designed to promoted high-quality student-faculty
collaborative research and scholarship.
Local students included Ron Chester, Williams Bay,
who presented Grizzly Bears of Yellowstones Northern
Range; Sarah Gruetzmacher, Walworth, who presented
The Effects of Facebook Use on Self-Esteem; and Sarah
Wyrick, Pell Lake, who presented the Effects of Pack Den-
sity on Territorial Responses to Intrusion in the Gray Wolf
(Canis Lupus).
Studies show that undergraduate research leads to
better job readiness and encompasses a broad range of
student talents, interests and skills across academic dis-
ciplines. Additionally, participation in undergraduate
research contributes to improved student retention and
graduation rates.
Local students graduate from UW-Stout
Local students graduated from UW-Stout at the May
commencement ceremony.
They are Rory Letteney, Lake Geneva, who received a
bachelors degree in applied social science; and Broderick
Walker, Elkhorn, who earned a bachelors degree in con-
struction.
UW-Stout, Wisconsins polytechnic university, has a
long-standing reputation of serving business, industry,
education and the helping professions through its special-
ized educational programs. Enrollment this year is 9,200.
Local students graduate from Marquette
The following local students have been named to the
deans list for the spring 2013 semester at Marquette Uni-
versity in Milwaukee.
Lake Geneva students are Kelly Meyerhofer, Claire Sch-
neider and Angelica Shanahan.
Those from Elkhorn are Taylor Kegley, Zachary Flitcroft,
Kathryn Handel and Gretchen Homan.
Marquette University is a Catholic, Jesuit university
that draws its more than 11,500 students from all 50 states
and more than 75 different countries.
Volunteer Connection gets donation
Volunteer Connection received a donation of products
for their new Quality of Life Project, making sure Walworth
County seniors and veterans have a safe and healthy place
to live.
The donation came with a glitch, however. They needed
to move three storage units full of items as soon as possible.
Trucks were needed as well as manpower in a short period
of time.
The graduating class for the Alternative High School
at Gateway Technical College stepped up and completed
the community service on Tuesday, May 22. They brought
trucks and a lot of manpower to take inventory and move
windows, doors, lights and miscellaneous.
Patti OBrien and Volunteer Connection want to thank
Gateways High School class of 2013, retired veteran Grant
McMillan, Larry Green from Habitat for Humanity and the
city of Delavan for their assistance.
Paul makes deans list
Eastern Connecticut State University named full-time
student Brittney Paul, Elkhorn, to its deans list for the
spring 2013 semester.
The university is the states public liberal arts university
and serves approximately 5,400 students each year at its
Willimantic, Conn., campus and satellite locations.
Wieseman named to deans list
Lanamarie Wieseman, Lake Geneva, been named to
the spring 2013 deans list at Beloit College.
Beloit College is a residential, liberal arts college offer-
ing 40 majors to its 1,250 students.
SCHOOL NOTES
Darien A Milton woman was killed Saturday night
after her vehicle struck a tree in the town of Darien.
Lisa K. Martin, 48, was driving her 1992 Chevy Blazer
south on County Highway M at around 8 p.m. when she
crossed the center line, left the roadway and struck a tree.
Flight for Life was called to the scene. However, Martin
succumbed to her injuries and wasnt own out.
The Walworth County Coroner pronounced Martin
dead and an autopsy will be performed this week to deter-
mine the exact cause of death, according to a press release
from the Walworth County Sheriffs Department.
Milton woman
killed in crash
Rasmussen
Vanderbloemen
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NOTICE
Lake Como Sanitary District No. 1
Between the dates of June 17, 2013 and July 12,
2013 the Lake Como Sanitary District will conduct its
annual hydrant flushing program. Over the next sever-
al weeks District employees will flush hydrants in order
to maintain a high level of water quality. Everyone is
encouraged to drive with caution when they notice
areas of wetness, standing or running water on the
roads. A schedule of locations and their individual
flushing dates is listed below, but is subject to change
depending upon weather conditions. Hydrant flushing
will take place on the following days between the hours
of 10:00 am and 2:00 pm. If you have any questions or
concerns, please contact our office at (262) 248-2077.
Thank you.
June 17-21: Between Iris Road and Quail Road
June 24-28: Between Robin Road and Dandelion Road
July 1-5: Between Hickory Road and Acacia Road
July 8-12: Between Walnut Road and Birch Road
GENEVA LAKE WEST
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 5B
SUBMITTED
MCCLELLAN FARMS, Delavan, is the host for the annual Walworth County Farm
Bureau Dairy Breakfast, Saturday, June 15, from 6 to 10:30 a.m. Farm representatives are
(from left), partner Wes Hopkins, Mia, the dog, partners June and Tom McClellan, John
McClellan, Marian McClellan, Emily McClellan and Erin McClellan. The breakfast will be
at the Walworth County Fairgrounds and free bus rides to the farm will be available.
Fair breakfast June 15
DELAVAN The Phoenix Park Bandshell season is in
full swing and will continue through Sept. 21.
n June 14, the rst annual Battle of the Bands, a lakes
area schools invitational competition, will grab center
stage. The winning band takes home $200 and will open
for a lead band this summer.
n June 15 is Rock Fest, featuring local popular bands
and headlined by Kings Highway.
n June 16, from 3 to 5 p.m., the Phoenix Park Band-
shell will present the Milwaukee areas own authentic New
Orleans Dixieland band the New South Rampart Street
Paraders. They are an in demand with several recordings
and have played cruises and jazz festivals all over the coun-
try, Mardi Gras celebrations, Milwaukee Brewer tailgate
parties, company parties, Kentucky Derby celebrations,
Milwaukees Circus Parade and the Circus Train, Jazz in
the Park at Cathedral Square and music in the park in sev-
eral communities.
The group consists of John Knurr, Bruce Yeo, Bob
Sturomski, Jimmie Christiaansen, Andy Schum and Pete
Wood.
n June 29 is Classics Night with a string duo, wood-
wind ensemble and a cheese/wine pairing demonstration.
Instead of dancing with the stars, you will be dancing
under them in this beautiful outdoor facility surrounded by
trees and plenty of room to put down your blanket and have
an impromptu picnic.
All performances are free to the public but are made
possible by corporate and individual sponsors, volunteers,
corporation in-kind contributions, and audience dona-
tions.
Bring your own chairs or blankets for seating and if
you forget your picnic basket-Delavan Downtown Deli and
other area restaurants will be there serving up delicious
menu choices.
n June 30 is Blues Fest, featuring Relatively Blue,
Hobbie & the Leftovers, Pistol Pete and Sweet Bev Per-
rone.
n July will feature Heritage Fest, celebrated by a
number of incredible music and dance groups Aug. 11 will
be the Crusin Car Show and will be a part of the nal day
of Delavan Daze, It will feature classic cars and music from
the 1950s and 60s.
n Sept 14 features Scarecrow Fest.
n Sept. 21 is Hispanic Heritage Fest.
Returning to the stage by popular request are Beato-
lution (formerly Stockwood), Martha Berner, Prevailing
Winds, soprano Michele Zampino, The Lake Geneva Sym-
phony, Glenn Davis with Westside Andy, Vela Brothers,
Wisconsin Plowboys, The Ladies Must Swing, Tim Castle
& Young Southern, Rob Tomoro, Sun Spot, Blue Olives,
Guppy Effect, the Dots, and Piper Road Spring Band.
New this season will be Country Gentlemen, The Jim-
mys, Passion Norteno, Randal Harrison Trio, Stateline
Country, Prestigio, the Cruise OMatics, The Now, The Joe
Varhula Trio and the Dang-Its.
In addition to Saturday night and Sunday afternoon
concerts, there will be a lineup of spiritual music every
Thursday evening.
Most evening shows begin at 7 p.m. and end at dark.
Sunday shows begin at 3 p.m. Start times for the special
events vary, so check the website at www.phoenixpark-
bandshell.com for more details.
Phoenix Bandshell season revs up
Gateway urges GED
seekers to take tests
by December
Gateway ofcials are
urging those seeking a GED
to complete all ve tests in
the program prior to a Dec.
31 deadline which will cause
all tests passed short of
completion to be deleted.
Those who pass all of
the ve required tests and
meet a minimum combined
score by the end of this year
will successfully earn their
GEDs. Students with any
tests passed short of those
ve prior to the deadline
will see those scores deleted,
with no exception. They will
then have to start over to
take and pass four content
areas, including literacy,
math, science and social
studies.
To give all those inter-
ested in obtaining a GED
the best possibility of doing
so, Gateway will boost its
course section numbers,
staff time and even offer an
intense, weeklong tailored
GED boot camp program.
Raiana Mearns, Gateway
dean of Developmental Edu-
cation, said those seeking
to take complete their GED
shouldnt delay, even though
the deadline is the end of the
year. It may take a while to
prepare for the test, Mearns
said. Especially if its been a
while between tests, or since
youve been in a classroom.
You shouldnt wait until the
last minute.
The new test beginning
in 2014 will be solely com-
puter based, although the
option to take the test by
computer currently exists in
Wisconsin. The new test is
also more costly and aligned
to national academic stan-
dards approved by 45 states.
The overhaul brings the
2014 test closer to the same
standards high school grad-
uates are expected to meet
in public schools.
Our department is
reaching out to the 3000-
plus students in Kenosha,
Racine, and Walworth
counties who have started
their GED but have not com-
pleted, Teresa La Macchia,
Gateway manager of Testing
Services said.
We are encouraging
them to nish before the
new 2014 computer-based
test takes effect so they
dont have to start over. To
help students complete their
tests, Testing Services has
added rotating monthly Sat-
urday GED test sessions and
has increased the number
of weekly GED test sessions
offered on all Gateway cam-
puses. Its not too late to
nish up the GED testing
which you may have started
several years ago.
By Wisconsin law, all
GED students or test-
takers must rst go
through an orientation ses-
sion. Sign up for those ses-
sions can be done by calling
the Elkhorn Campus (262)
741-8300. Students will be
directed to either take tests
directly or into courses.
For general informa-
tion on the GED, including
courses, call the Elkhorn
Campus (262) 741-8480.
EDUCATION NOTE
WHATS HAPPENING
Medicare workshop set
The Elderly and Disability Benet spe-
cialist with the Aging and Disability Resouce
Center of Walworth County will host work-
shops for those who will soon be eligible to
claim Medicare.
The workshops will cover information
about benets, options and insurance and
medication coverage.
The workshops will be Thursday, June
13, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. and from 6 to 7:30
p.m., in the auditorium at the Walworth
County Department of Health and Human
Services, W4051 County Highway NN, Elk-
horn. Attendees are encouraged to bring a
list of medications for the Medicare Part D
assessment. For information, call (262) 741-
3400.
LG piers installed for season
All of Lake Genevas west-end piers are
now installed for the season, according to
the city of Lake Geneva website.
Slip renters can put their boats in at any
time.
Buoy users are asked to conrm their
buoy number because number assignments
have changed.
One lagoon slip is still available for a
shing boat 14-feet long or less.
For more information, contact the har-
bormaster, Chuck Gray, at (262) 249-4086.
1 Year Subscription
Office Pickup - $45
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Illinois - $58.00
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Telephone:
SEND COUPON & CHECK TO: Lake Geneva Regional News, P.O. Box 937,
Lake Geneva, WI 53147, e-mail sue@lakegenevanews.net
or call with credit card (262) 248-4444 Monday-Friday 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Bloomfield-Genoa City Geneva-Linn Townships
Walworth, Fontana, Williams Bay
Lyons-Springfield County Report Sports
School Matters Obituaries
Society Editorial Community Matters
Subscribe today
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Every week, readers like you are connected because were
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REFINED RUSTIC
STUDIO & GALLERY
Finding creative and affordable ways to promote your business can
be a real challenge. But little did I know how much one call to the right
team, could help us market our message. From our initial visit, I was
impressed with their enthusiastic and professional approach. Phil and his
team from ReelLifeTV really took the time to understand not just what we
do, but why we do it. After grilling him on his understanding of video
production, he patiently answered all of my questions. and made me feel
totally at ease with the process.
We really didn't know what to think the day of the shoot. As you can
imagine, we were a bit nervous. But again, their confident and comfort-
able approach made all the difference in the world. It wasn't long before
we stopped thinking about the camera and just had fun delivering our
message.
Phil & Joy focused on both the obvious and under-appreciated angles
that helped us tell a complete story. And when they left, I remember
thinking that it seemed as though they had filmed quite bit of video, and
that the time had really flown by.
About a week later, the first edit was revealed to us, and I was
thrilled! I couldn't believe how wonderfully they captured the spirit and
authenticity of our business. Connecting with our customers is some-
thing we cherish, and ReelLifeTV helped us do just that. Our response has
been awesome. I can't thank them enough for the fantastic job they did
with our initial video.
For an independent business, busting through the advertising clutter,
and finding new ways to establish personal connections with potential
customers is a huge priority. They really understood that for the team at
Refined Rustic, business IS personal. So, if you're looking for an innova-
tive and creative way to promote your business, organization or event
look no further than the amazing team at ReellifeTV.net
~ Philip Sassano, Owner of Refined Rustic
755 W. Main St., (Lower Level)
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.249.0940 www.refinedrustic.com
6B The Regional News June 13, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICES
LOCATED IN SECTION 13, T2N, R15E,
CITY OF DELAVAN, WALWORTH COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN
Tax Key No.: XWP 00035
Property Address: 1105 Redwood Ct.,
Delavan, WI 53115-1500
Kimberly W. Hibbard
State Bar No. 1090800
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9711
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is
the creditors attorney and is attempting to
collect a debt on its behalf. Any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
June 13, 20, 27, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice Setting Time to Hear
Application and Deadline
for Filing Claims
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13-PR100
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
MARY A. PIERSON
D/O/D: 04/20/2013
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal
administration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
04/10/1922 and date of death 04/20/2013
was domiciled in Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin with a mailing address of 1010
Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
3. The application will be heard at
the Walworth County Judicial Center
Probate Office, N1800 Cty Rd NN
Wisconsin, Room 3021, before Honorable
Phillip A. Koss on July 10, 2013 at 8:15 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you
object. The application may be granted if
there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is (Date)
September 13, 2013
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Judicial Ctr - Probate
Office PO Box 1001, 1800 Cty Rd NN
Wisconsin, Room 2085
6. This publication is notice to any
persons whose names or address are
unknown.
The names or addresses of the fol-
lowing interested persons (if any) are not
known or reasonably ascertainable: any
living descendants of decedent
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-
7014 at least 10 working days prior to the
scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
Please check with person named
below for exact time and date.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 7, 2013
Daniel S Draper
PO Box 940, 716 Wisconsin Street
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-6636
Bar Number: 1031580
June 13, 20, 27, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 11 CV 147
Case Code No. 30404
KONDAUR CAPITAL CORPORATION
Plaintiff
Vs.
LESLIE L. JOHNSON; KITTY R. JOHN-
SON; MARKLEIN BUILDERS; UNITED
STATES; STATE OF WISCONSIN
Defendant
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue
of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July
26, 2011, in the amount of $139,411.67, the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: July 11, 2013 at 10:00 am
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to
pay balance due will result in forfeit of
deposit to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin
Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds
of the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHER-
IFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCE-
MENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD
NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description: LOT 35,
WHISPERING PINES, A SUBDIVISION
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL
NOTICES
For more information
or to place a listing
contact Sue
p: 262-248-4444
f: 262-248-4476
e: sue@lakegenevanews.net
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
DAVID BECKER, (left), from Ingeside, Illinois, demonstrates his painting skills during the Paint-In on Saturday. Roger
Mobeck, of Williams Bay, sketches during the Paint-In on Saturday
Scenes from the LG Paint-In
AROUND THE COMMUNITY
WHATS HAPPENING
Church hosting summer series
Immanuel Lutheran Church in Lake Geneva will host a
three-week summer series starting June 12.
Each week, the program will begin with a potluck
dinner at 5:30 p.m. Please bring a dish to pass.
Following dinner, the church will host an informal
worship service for all ages. At 7 p.m., the program will
split into small groups for children, teens and adults.
The weekly sessions will be based on Gifted Hands.
Session themes are June 12, Seeing beyond what you can
see, June 19, Youve got the book inside you, and June
26, We are all capable of performing miracles.
This is a series for the entire family to come together
around Gods word, share a meal and worship. For more
information or to sign up for the session, see the churchs
website, immanuellakegeneva.org, or call (262) 248-4211.
Realtors hosting workshop
The Lakes Area Realtors Association will present a
free workshop for city of Lake Geneva property owners
Tuesday, June 18, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hawks View
Golf Course, 7377 Krueger Road, Lake Geneva.
Recent changes to Lake Geneva ordinances affect all
property in the city. Homeowners, landlords and com-
mercial property owners face additional scrutiny in the
wake of an expanded nuisance ordinance.
Changes apply to all property within Lake Geneva
city limits, the Lakes Area Realtors Association wants to
ensure homeowners are educated about the changes. The
workshop will be interactive with questions taken. It will
start promptly at 5:30 p.m. and is planned for an hour.
For any additional information, call Royce DeBow at (262)
994-2231 or email royce@communiclear.com.
Services directory
Garbage & Rubbish Removal
Commercial-Industrial-Residential
608-752-8210
Serving Walworth County
WASTE MANAGEMENT
of
GENEVA LAKES
Got skills? Show them off here.
Call your
LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
ad representative today.
262.248.4444
GARBAGE REMOVAL
CLEANING
ROOFING
LAWNCARE ALTERATIONS
K&L FASHIONS, INC.
SEWING ALTERATIONS
252 Center St. Lake Geneva
262-248-1840
Kris Nish
Laura OHalleran
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 10-5
Wed. 10-3, Sat. 10-2
After Hrs. Appts. Available
& CUSTOM CLOTHIER
New Construction Carpet Cleaning Winter Watch Program
Windows & Gutters Power Washing Snow Removal
Stephanie Nicewarner
homecleaning@sbcglobal.net
www.home-cleaning-service.webs.com
References
Available
LAWNCARE
Spring Clean-Up Weed and Feed
Power Raking Core Aeration
Seeding Sod Mowing
Pruning Property Maintenance
GRADUATE HORTICULTURIST & TURFGRASS MGMT.
Specialty Lawncare Co.
262.248.4829
A. Jayne Roong
*Free Estimates*
All Types of Roong
36 Years Experience
5% OFF WITH THIS AD
815-334-8616 847-931-2433
BBB - Excellent O.C.F. Preferred Contractor Angies List Member
B.L.G. SERVICE
262-249-1455
Friendly, Dependable
LAWN SERVICE
SEASONAL CLEANUP
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
BRUSH & TREE CUTTING
Topsoil Manure Traffic Bond Sand Gravel Stone
MATERIAL DELIVERY-BOBCAT WORK
CONSTRUCTION
FREE
ESTIMATES
(262)
620-6170
Providing Quality Service and Craftsmanship for over 20 years
Bathrooms
Kitchens
Windows
Doors
Siding
Soffit & Fascia
Residential
Repairs
Home
Maintenance
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 7B
PUBLIC NOTICES
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
unless such place is licensed to sell and
serve alcohol beverages pursuant to the
provisions of chapter 6, or unless a
beer/wine consumption permit is obtained
for an event at the Duck Pond Recreation
Area Pavilion, the Park House, or the Porter
Court Plaza.
Section 2. Effective Date: This ordi-
nance shall be in full force and effect upon
its passage approval, and publication as
required by law.
Passed and Adopted by the Village
Board of the Village of Fontana on Geneva
Lake, Walworth County, WI this 3rd day of
June, 2013.
Village of Fontana on Geneva Lake
By: Arvid Petersen, President
Attest: Dennis L. Martin, Clerk
June 13, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
ORDINANCE 06-03-13-01
An Ordinance Amending
Section 42-7(a) of the Village of Fontana
Municipal Code Regarding Open
Intoxicants in Public Places
Prohibited.
The Board of Trustees for the Village
of Fontana on Geneva Lake, Walworth
County, Wisconsin, do ordain as follows:
Section 1. Section 42-7 (a) shall be
amended to read as follows:
Section 42-7. Open intoxicants in
public places prohibited.
(a) Possession of open intoxicants in
public places prohibited. No person shall
possess open containers of alcohol bever-
ages in or on any land or water either owned
or used generally by the public, including
but not limited to any road, street, alley,
park, school ground, parking lot, sidewalk,
beach, pier or commercial establishment
WILLIAMS BAY
PUBLIC NOTICES
CLASS A FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE LICENSE & INTOXICATING LIQUOR
CLASS A
35 W. Geneva Street, Williams Bay
By Tom Kaczmarek, Agent.
Trade Name: Frosty Moose
Seller Permit # 456-0000606999-03
CLASS A FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE & CLASS A LIQUOR
24 W. Geneva Street, Williams Bay
By Dawn Marie Manusco, Agent,
Trade Name: Green Grocer, LLC Seller
Permit # 456-1027004518-03
FERMENTED MALT BEVERAGES AND
INTOXICATING LIQUOR CLASS A
156 Elkhorn Road, Williams Bay
By Edward T. Kaczmarek, Agent.
Trade Name: Lakeside 66 - Williams Bay
Seller Permit #456-1027372576-05
CLASS B LIQUOR LICENSE & CLASS
B FERMENTED MALT BEVERAGE
LICENSE,
Lucke Enterprises, INC: 220 Elkhorn Road,
Williams Bay
By Laine Lucke, Agent.
Trade Name: Luckes Cantina
Seller Permit # 456-1020037616-03
FERMENTED MALT BEVERAGE CLASS
A & INTOXICATING LIQUOR CLASS A
66 W. Geneva Street, Williams Bay
By Deepak Gill, Agent
Trade Name Williams Bay Mobil Mart
Sellers Permit # 456-1026561179-03
CLASS B FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE & INTOXICATING LIQUOR CLASS
B:
Gage Marine, 4 Leichty Drive,
Williams Bay
By William Gage, Agent
Trade Name: Pier 290
Seller Permit# 004-0000299972-01
CLASS B FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE
Samezzz Pizza and Pasta dba
Sanfratellos Cucina and Pizza
659 E. Geneva St., Williams Bay
By Robert & Jacqueline Sanfratello
Trade Name: Sanfratellos Cucina & Pizza
CLASS B FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE & INTOXICATING LIQUOR CLASS
B:
Skips Ala Mode, 99 N. Walworth Avenue,
Williams Bay
By Bruno R. Pfenning, Agent.
Trade Name: Skips Ala Mode,
Seller Permit # 456-0000602204-03
CLASS B FERMENTED MALT BEVER-
AGE & INTOXICATIONG LIQUOR CLASS
B
Williams Bay Brew and Paddle Corporation
2 West Geneva Street, Williams Bay
By Stephanie Hatton, Agent
Trade Name: Lighthouse Seller
Permit# 456-1028127033-02
June 13, 2013
WNAXLP
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
following Original Class B Fermented Malt
Beverage license application to deal in fer-
mented malt beverages in accordance with
the provisions of Chapter 125.04 (3) (g) of
the Wisconsin Statutes for Class B licens-
es for the following firm has been filed with
the City of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.
Michael D. Hawes, City Clerk
Hawks View Golf Club LLC
Daniel R. Daniels, Agent
W2529 Krueger Rd.,
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
License to be located at:
Hawks View Boutique
728 Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
June 13, 2013
WNAXLP
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
following applications for Class A, Class
A, Class B, Class B, and Class C
licenses to deal in intoxicating liquors, fer-
mented malt beverages and wine in accor-
dance with the provisions of Chapter 12.04
(3) (g) of the Wisconsin Statutes for Class
A, Class A, Class B, Class B, and
Class C licenses for the following firms
have been filed with the City of Lake
Geneva, Wisconsin for the license year
commencing July 1, 2013 and ending June
30, 2014.
Michael D. Hawes, City Clerk
Class B/Class B Intoxicating Liquor &
Fermented Malt Beverage:
Popeyes Galley & Grog, Ltd
Michael Anagnos, Agent
415 Miller Ct.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
To be located at:
Popeyes Galley & Grog
811 Wrigley Dr.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Class B/Class C Fermented Malt
Beverage & Wine:
Nick Cimino, Agent
N1995 Sunnyside Avenue
Linn, Wisconsin 53147
To be located at:
Mama Ciminos
131 Wells Street
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147
Class A Liquor & Class A Fermented
Malt Beverage:
Midwest Fuel LLC
John Consolino, Agent
N6756 Tippecanoe
Elkhorn, WI 53121
To be located at:
Northside Mobil
501 Interchange North
Lake Geneva, WI
Kenru LLC
Kenneth H. Conell, Agent
222 Timber Lane
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
To be located at:
Village Gourmet & World Wine Shop
725 West Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage:
Lake Geneva Hospitality Group LLC
Sam Russo, Agent
1521 Wolf Dr.
West Bend, WI 53090
To be located at:
Comfort Suites
300 E. Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI
June 13, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
NOTICE OF CITIZEN APPOINTMENTS
The Walworth County Board of
Supervisors will be making citizen appoint-
ments to seats on the Walworth County
Transportation Coordinating Committee.
Interested citizens:
Walworth County residency desired.
May not hold any elective or appointive
public position or office of any sort in the
county government.
Must represent one of the following:
o Transportation providers (public,
private, or non-profit) (2)
o Advocate for elderly or disabled cit-
izens (1)
o Advocate for consumers (1)
o Health care providers in Walworth
County (2)
The ten-member Transportation
Coordinating Committee is responsible for
the monitoring of funds being expended on
transportation services for the elderly and
disabled In the service area, reviewing pas-
senger transportation plans for the service
area, reviewing and commenting on county
aid applications under Wis. Stats. 85.21,
reviewing and commenting upon capital
assistance applications under Wis. Stats.
85.22, acting as an informational resource
for local transportation providers regarding
the requirements of the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990, 42 USC 12101 et
seq., acting on requests by local public bod-
ies to be designated as coordinators of
transportation services for elderly and dis-
abled persons for the purpose of becoming
eligible for assistance under the federal sec.
5310 program, and review and comment on
federal transportation funding programs
including 53.10 Capital Assistance, 53.16
Employment, and 53.17 New Freedom.
Appointments are for staggered three-year
terms of service, and members serve with-
out reimbursement.
Interested applicants must complete and
return a Notice of Interest application form,
available by request from the Walworth
County Administrators Office, 100 W.
Walworth, Elkhorn, WI, 53121, telephone
(262) 741.4357 or by email request to
dbretl@co.walworth.wi.us. The Notice of
Interest application form should be returned
to the attention of David Bretl, County
Administrator by Friday, June 21, 2013.
Published this 10th day of June 2013.
June 13, 20, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice Setting Time to Hear
Application and Deadline for
Filing Claims
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13 PR 96
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
VALENTINA RICHEY
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
11/23/34 and date of death 8/25/95 was
domiciled in Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 200
Abbey Springs Dr., Fontana, WI 53125.
3. The application will be heard at the
Walworth County Probate, Judicial Center,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085, before Sheila T. Reiff, Probate
Registrar, on 07/02/2013 at 10:30 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you
object. The application may be granted if
there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is September
6, 2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
6. This publication is notice to any
persons whose names or address are
unknown.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7014
at least 10 working days prior to the sched-
uled court date. Please note that the court
does not provide transportation.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
May 31, 2013
Carol J. Hatch
Nowland & Mouat LLP
P.O. Box 8100
Janesville, WI 53547-8100
608-755-8100
Bar number: 1000287
June 13, 20, 27, 2013
WNAXLP
WILLIAMS BAY
PUBLIC NOTICES
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION
VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY
WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN
NOTICE OF APPLICATIONS FOR ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSES:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the following applications for licenses to
deal in intoxicating liquor and fermented
malt beverages have been filed with the
Village Clerk of the Village of Williams Bay,
Wisconsin:
CLASS B LIQUOR LICENSE:
Aurora University, 350 Constance Blvd.,
Williams Bay
By William Palladino, Agent.
Trade Name: Aurora University Seller
Permit # 456-1020047134-03
CLASS B LIQUOR LICENSE:
Big Bay, LLC, 10 E. Geneva Street,
Williams Bay
By Joshua G. LaCroix, Agent.
Trade Name: Caf Calamari/Harpoon
Willies
Sellers Permit # 456-0000069262-02
CLASS A FERMENTED MALT
BEVERAGE & CLASS A LIQUOR
LICENSE
Toor Brothers, LLC; 659 E. Geneva Street,
Williams Bay
By Gurvinder Singh, Agent.
Trade Name: Bells Store
Seller Permit # 456-1026797164-02
FERMENTED MALT BEVERAGE CLASS
B:
Daddy Maxwells Inc., 150 Elkhorn Road,
Williams Bay
By Janette A. Maxwell, Agent.
Trade Name: Daddy Maxwells
Seller Permit # 456-0000148463-04
PUBLIC
NOTICES
James L. Carlson at the Walworth Co.
Judicial Center, 1800 County Road NN,
Elkhorn, WI 53121 on July 3, 2013 at 11:00
AM.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED:
Notice of this hearing shall be given
by publication as a Class 3 notice for three
(3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the
hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News
a newspaper published in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7012
at least ten (10) working days prior to the
scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
BY THE COURT:
James L. Carlson
Circuit Court Judge
May 22, 2013
June 6, 13, 20, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 12 CV 00061
Case Code No. 30404
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE,
FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2006-2
Plaintiff
Vs.
STACY E. MCDERMOTT A/K/A STACEY E.
MCDERMOTT; JAMES D. MCDERMOTT;
STATE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT; VEN-
TURE INVESTMENT PARTNERS, LLP;
CAPITAL ONE BANK, N.A.; MIDLAND
FUNDING LLC; STATE OF WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
Defendants
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue
of a judgment of foreclosure entered on
September 25, 2012, in the amount of
$465,732.02, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: April 25, 2013 at 10:00 am
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to
pay balance due will result in forfeit of
deposit to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin
Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds
of the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHER-
IFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCE-
MENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD
NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description:
BEGIN AT THE NORTH 1/4 CORNER OF
SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE 4TH P.M. CITY
OF LAKE GENEVA. WALWORTH COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN; RUN THENCE SOUTH
ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1/4 SEC-
TION LINE 1192.62 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89
DEG. 48 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
42.40 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH
0 DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
439.25 FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT.
SAID STONE MONUMENT MARKS THE
PLACE OF BEGINNING OF PARCEL OF
LAND HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED. RUN
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25
SECONDS WEST 200.00 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 14 MIN-
UTES 35 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET TO
A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 45
MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 199.78
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0
DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
70.00 FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT
AND THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. SAID
PARCEL OF LAND IN LOCATED IN THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 AND THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1. TOGETHER
WITH AN EASEMENT IN COMMON WITH
OTHER USERS FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW, TO-
WIT; BEGIN AT THE NORTH 1/4 CORNER
OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE 4TH P.M., CITY
OF LAKE GENEVA, WALWORTH COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN. RUN THENCE SOUTH
ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1/4 SEC-
TION 1196.62 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG.
48 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 42.40
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 0
DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
349.25.FEET TO A POINT, SAID POINT
MARKS THE PLACE OF BEGINNING OF
EASEMENT HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED.
RUN THENCE NORTH 0 DEG. 03 MIN-
UTES 47 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET
TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 45
MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 531.68
FEET TO AN IRON STAKE; THENCE
SOUTH 88 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS WEST 138.80 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE ON AN ARC THE CHORD OF
WHICH IS NORTH 45 DEG. 37 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST 29.81 FEET (RADIUS
20.85 FEET) TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 69 DEG. 20 MINUTES 43 SEC-
ONDS WEST 64.11 FEET TO STONE
MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 11
MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.60
FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT, THENCE
NORTH 66 DEG. 25 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS WEST 235.25 FEET TO THE
SHORE LINE OF GENEVA LAKE; THENCE
SOUTH 31 DEG. 46 SECONDS WEST 8.24
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 66
DEG. 25 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST
233.90 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 0 DEG. 49 SECONDS EAST 15.37
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89
DEG. 11 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST
100.90 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
NORTH 88 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST 222.28 FEET TO A POINT;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING. SAID EASEMENT IS LOCAT-
ED IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4 AND THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWN-
SHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE
4TH P.M. CITY OR LAKE GENEVA, WAL-
WORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN.
Tax Key No.: ZYUP 00106A
Property Address: 968 S. LAKESHORE
DR., LAKE GENEVA, WISCONSIN 53147
Adam C. Lueck
State Bar No. 1081386
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe St., Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9710
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is
the creditors attorney and is attempting to
collect a debt on its behalf. Any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
June 13, 20, 27, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 12 CV 000686
Case Code No. 30404
BANK OF AMERICA N.A.
Plaintiff
Vs.
WILLIAM CORNELISON;
CINDY CORNELISON;
Defendants
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue
of a judgment of foreclosure entered on
November 6, 2012, in the amount of
$251,826.84, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: July 18, 2013 at 10:00 am
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to
pay balance due will result in forfeit of
deposit to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin
Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds
of the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHER-
IFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCE-
MENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD
NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description:
LOTS 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 26, 27, 28, 29 AND 30,
ALL IN BLOCK 33 OF THIRD MAP OF
INTERLAKEN SUBDIVISION, TOWN OF
SUGAR CREEK, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN ACCORDING TO THE
RECORDED PLAT THEREOF. ALSO:
LOTS 4, 5,11,12, AND 13 IN BLOCK 34, OF
THIRD MAP OF INTERLAKEN SUBDIVI-
SION, TOWN OF SUGAR CREEK, WAL-
WORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN, EXCEPT
THAT PART CONVEYED IN WARRANTY
DEED RECORDED ON FEBRUARY 23,
2006 AS DOCUMENT NO. 669076.
Tax Key No.: GI 00286B & GI 00293A1
Property Address: N6726 LAUREL RD.,
ELKHORN, WISCONSIN 53121
Christina M. Putman
State Bar No. 1075422
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe St., Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9710
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is
the creditors attorney and is attempting to
collect a debt on its behalf. Any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
June 13, 20, 27, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
KENOSHA COUNTY
PERSONAL INJURY - Auto
Case Code No.: 30101
Case No. 13-CV-0787
HEATHER L. AXTON
27763 W. Grass Lake Road
Antioch, IL 60002
Plaintiff,
BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD
OF ILLINOIS, A DIVISION OF HEALTH
CARE SERVICE CORPORATION, A
MUTUAL LEGAL RESERVE COMPANY
300 E. Randolph Street
Chicago, IL 60601,
Involuntary Plaintiff,
-v-
JESSICA L. YANG
412 Patricia Street
Elkhorn, WI 53121
and
PROGRESSIVE UNIVERSAL
INSURANCE COMPANY
P.O. Box 89490
Cleveland, OH 44101,
Defendants.
SUMMONS
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN:
To each person named above as a
Defendant:
You are hereby notified that the
Plaintiff named above, by and through her
attorney, John V. OConnor, has filed a law-
suit or other legal action against you. The
Complaint, which is attached, states the
nature and basis of the legal action.
Within forty-five (45) days of receiving
this Summons, you must respond with a
written answer, as that term is used in
Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to
the Complaint. The Court may reject or dis-
regard an answer that does not follow the
requirements of the Statutes. The answer
must be sent or delivered to the court locat-
ed at 912 - 56th Street, Kenosha, Wisconsin
53140, and to THE LAW OFFICES OF
JOHN V. OCONNOR, LLC, plaintiffs attor-
neys, whose address is 600 - 52nd Street,
Suite 120, Kenosha, Wisconsin, 53140. You
may have an attorney help or represent you.
If you do not provide a proper answer
within forty-five days, the Court may grant
judgment against you for the award of
money or other legal action requested in the
Complaint, and you may lose your right to
object to anything that is or may be incorrect
in the Complaint. A judgment may be
enforced as provided by law. A judgment
awarding money may become a lien against
any real estate you own now or in the future,
and may also be enforced by garnishment
or seizure of property.
Dated at Kenosha, Wisconsin this 10
day of May, 2013.
THE LAW OFFICES OF
JOHN V. OCONNOR, LLC
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Heather L. Axton
By John V. OConnor
State Bar No. 1014548
MAILING ADDRESS:
600 - 52nd Street, Ste. 120
Kenosha, WI 53140
(262) 605-8400
(262) 605-8403 (Fax)
June 6, 13, 20, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice and Order for
Name Change Hearing
Case No. 13CV00522
In the matter of the name change of:
Erin Lynn Andreas by
Petitioner Erin Lynn Andreas
NOTICE IS GIVEN:
A petition was filed asking to change
the name of the person listed above from
Erin Lynn Andreas to Erin Lynn Kennedy.
Birth Certificate: Erin Lynn Kennedy
IT IS ORDERED:
This petition will be heard in the
Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin before the Honorable Judge
Shopkeeper looking for assistant
to help prepare store for customers
This job includes all aspects of entertaining for a crowd, from the preparation
to the implementation. Looking for an individual who enjoys the arena of hos-
pitality. Successful candidate must pay attention to detail and have the skills to
create a warm and inviting atmosphere. Experience in entertaining large crowds
is a necessary skill for this job.
Duties include preparing food samples for customers throughout the day, assist-
ing in the wine and cheese departments, creating and preparing value added
food items, stocking, packaging, inventory, light housekeeping and other daily
assignments. Catering experience a plus. Hours are Monday through Friday,
9:00 a.m.3:00 p.m. with a day off during the week and Saturdays.
Please send a cover letter explaining your qualications specically for this job
along with your previous work history and resume. This is a position for people
who enjoy working with the public and strive to keep the customer satised.
P.O. BOX 00
C/O LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
P.0. BOX 931
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147
NOTICE OF SALE
OF ABANDONED MERCHANDISE
Jan Milburn #1601
Furniture, couch, beds,
computer, toys & misc.
personal property
Linsey Conell #302
Furniture, couch, wooden
chest, clothing and misc.
personal property
Owners of record are:
Sale at 9 a.m. at Townline Road location,
followed immediately by Sale at Host Drive location
June 29, 2013
POTTERS SELF STORAGE, LLC
W2285 Townline Rd. Lake Geneva 351 E. Host Dr. Lake Geneva
Owners of record are:
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right
candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business oppor-
tunity today.
SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training
class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call
(262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.
HELP WANTED
Geneva Lakes YMCA POSITION
Job Title: Maintenance Director
POSITION SUMMARY:
Oversees all daily mechanical repairs to the YMCA facility and grounds.
Recruits, hires, trains and manages all janitors. Responsible for the overall
cleanliness and good repair of the facility as it pertains to member perception
and membership and program growth and retention.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Technical degree in related field or equivalent preferred.
Certification or licensing in related fields a plus.
5-8 years experience in related field.
Minimum age of 21 years.
CPR/First Aid certification required.
Ability to relate effectively to diverse groups of people from all social
and economic segments of the community.
PHYSICAL DEMANDS
Must be able to lift minimum of 75 pounds, climb ladders, use lawn mower,
snowblower, and various floor cleaning machines. Ability to attend to
the facility needs at all times of the day.
COMPENSATION
25-30 hours per week
Salary: $24,000 to $34,000 Annually
Vacation and medical according to company handbook.
Eligible for 12% YMCA paid retirement contribution after two
years of meeting requirements.
Apply by email to Mike Kramp, mike.kramp@glymca.com
Send Cover letter, resume, and 3 professional references.
Application deadline: June 20, 2013
8B The Regional News June 13, 2013
Residential
Rentals
84
Residential
Rentals
84
G& S PROPERTIES Office 694-3077
Call Today to Schedule an Appointment!
7919 60th Ave. #103
998963
24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping
RENTALS STARTING AT
$
640 per month
2 Bedroom/2 bath
all appliances, full size washer/
dryer, private patio, balcony,
private entry, attached garage
2 Bedroom/1 bath
all appliances, on site laundry,
private patio, balcony,
secured entry, garages available
Quiet
Residential Living
MMW Mapartments
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W*WW
Mon.-lr|. -5 Sat. 10-+ Sun. by /ppt.
9
9
8
9
8
9
Wood Creek
Kenoshas best in apartment living!
1 Beds from $560
2 Beds from $670
552-8365
Residential
Rentals
84
SHARON, WI Modern 1 and 2 BD apts.
Country living in Historic Sharon. 20 minutes
from Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan. 10 from
Walworth. Located on Hwy 67. 262-736-
2300
SHERIDAN RD., 1455-65 Kenosha, WI
BAYSIDE APARTMENTS
Phone: 262-551-8362 Large 2 BR,
$675.00 Monthly. Includes: Heat &
appliances. No pets. Escrow.
Subsidized Housing welcomed.
SHERIDAN RD., 6111 - Large 1 BR, washing
facilities, offstreet parking, all utilites and
heat furnished for $650 a mo. Ph. 262-220-
1410/847-872-0034
TREVOR/CAMP LAKE-Gorgeous 3 bdrm, 1 ba
ranch on a crawl space. All new interior!
Fireplace, hardwood flrs, all appliances, 2.5
det garage on huge lot. $1145 mo. Land
Management Properties 815-678-4771
WINTHROP HARBOR
1 bedroom, secluded, first floor, no pets,
$625 per month, utilities included.
Ph. 262-654-4116
ZION TOWNHOUSE Nicely updated 3BR,
end unit, 1.5BA, full heated basement w/
washer/dryer hookups. Living room has nice
view of huge front yard, private driveway,
Tenant pays all utilities. Close to shopping
restaurants, transportation.224-419-5552
ZIONhouse for rent, 1st floor, 2BR, $890 per
month, all utilities included. English: 224-554-
9838, Spanish: 708-285-3668
Garage/Storage
for Rent
92
WINTHROP HARBOR26 ft.x36 ft. building,
with 11 ft. door, on 1 acre, ideal for landscap-
ing company. Ph. 847-366-5988
Residential
For Sale
98
BURLINGTON WI 5 ACRE HOBBY
FARM.5 br,3.5 ba, garage + 4 blgs.
4212 328th Ave.,262-492-1530 SEE
WWW.FORSALEBYOWNER.COM
WISCONSIN DELLS Mobile home with 2
story garage. Ph. 262-654-7501.
Lots & Acreage 106
SALEM Exclusive Falcon Heights, 1 acre lot
w/ sewer, abuts pond. Close to Salem Grade
School. $52,500. Prudential Premier
Properties, 262-605-1500 or George Schau
262-358-0379
Manufactured
Home Sale/Rent
112
BEACH PARKVERY ATTRACTIVE MOBILE
HOME. 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, very large cedar
deck with wheelchair ramp, patio, aluminum
awning with carport, separate shed. Beach
Park schools. Must sell. $12,000 or best
offer. Ph. 847-502-8862
Automobiles 120
04 MERCURY MARQUIS 62 K, new tires, bat-
tery, leather. Remote start. Grandma kept.
$6800. 262-215-6634
CHEVROLET CAMERO 1995 $1000 OBO - 2
DR, many new parts, runs well. Ph 262-498-
2888
GMC JIMMY 1996, 4X4, 2 door, good condi-
tion. $1,500. Ph. 262-220-6944
Pets, Supplies
& Services
62
PUPPIES Chihuahua, mom on site, very
cute, very small, $400 - $450 obo. 262-515-
3710
PUPPIES Yellow Lab/Golden puppies. First
shots & vet checked. 1 female $300, 3 Males
$200. DOB 2-28-13. 262-498-7296.
Residential
Rentals
84
1 & 2 BRs STARTING AT $675
www.professionalrealty.biz
262-942-8399 Pet Friendly
2 BR -$695
CAMBRIDGE ON THE LAKE
614 15th PL. Kenosha
Spacious! Includes appliances,
A/C, heat & water.
Private Beach. NO PETS.
262-308-8656
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
2524 - 18TH STREET
$660 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED!
262-551-7255
CALL FOR SPRING SPECIAL
Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail
1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT
1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140
www.petrettiapartments.com
1 BEDROOM from $560
2 BEDROOM from $670
GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING
AND HOT WATER INCLUDED
262-552-8365
WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS
Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt.
http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek
10 NAZ MOTEL
Effeciency apartment, Free HBO & WI-FI,
Kitchenettes, Low Weekly & Daily Rates
847-746-1400
1004 HARBOR MOTEL
Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet,
phone, refrigerator & microwave,
Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly
rates.
847-872-5400
1128 ABODE MOTEL
Sleeping rooms, Kitchenettes,
Free wi-fi, Cable TV. Low Daily/Weekly Rates
847-872-3476
50TH AVE., 6023 3BR house in Kenosha
$1,200/mo + security deposit. Ph. Dan 847-
903-2765.
60TH ST., 1615
FREE MICROWAVE
FREE HEAT & HOT WATER!
COMPLETELY REMODELED.
T1 BR, $629
2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground
parking, locked lobby, close to shopping
& bus line. No smoking building.
Ask for Everett, 262-617-1104
CAMP LAKE 9723 276th Ave. Lakefront
House. 2BR, 1BA, appliances, washer/dryer
No pets. Large waterfron lot, available now.
$900 per mo. Call 262-909-1749
LAKE GENEVA 695 Wells St. Large 1 BD first
floor APT. Utilities included. $750 mo. 262-
539-2436
LAKE GENEVAKitchenettes and sleeping
rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988.
NEW MUNSTER AREA Small 3 BD house with
nice yard one block from park. No Pets. $750
mo + sec. dep. 262-903-6172
Service
Directory
26
ROOFING/GUTTERS 25 years experience,
bonded & insured, many references. Reroofs
& new construction. Nick 262-620-0582
Farm Animals
& Supplies
42
HORSE 9 year old paint mare. $400 Call
262-818-7062.
Rummage,
Estate, Moving
49
65TH PL., 8311
Leonas Rolling Meadows
Annual Neighborhood Sale!
Over 25+ Homes
Fri.& Sat., 9AM-3PM
E. off I-94/hwy 50, N. on CTY H
also access via 60th St/84th Ave,
W. of Green Bay Rd.
#1642
6TH ANNUAL ALLENDALE
NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE
Saturday Only June 15th, 8 to 2
Over 50 Homes & Businesses
7214 - 2nd Ave. (Rain Date 6/22)
Allendale from 60th St. to 79th St.
and 7th Ave. to the Lake
#1619
WINTHROP HARBORGarage Sale, June 13,
14 & 15, 9am-6pm, boys and girls clothes,
many never worn. 542 English Lane.
ZIONGarage sale, June 14, 15, 16, 8am-
6pm, contarctors carpentry tools, fishing rods
& reels, much more. 2805 Elizabeth
ZIONHuge garage sale, Multi-family, 1213
Carmel, off Sheridan Rd. between 31st &
33rd. June 14, 15, 16, 9am-5pm.
Miscellaneous 50
GUN SHOW June 14, 15, 16. Waukesha
Expo Forum. 1000 Northview Rd. Waukesha,
WI. Fri 3 p.m-8 p, Sat 9-5, Sun, 9-3. Admission
$7. Buy/sell/Trade. 608-752-6677
www.bobandrocco.com
MATTRESSES Full $65. Queen $75. King
$95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave.
Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750.
MIXER Kitchen-aide, juicer, apt size refrig,
microwave, Noritake and Jewel-T dishes, 2
dressers, 2 hutchs, misc tools, 262-945-
0631.
RING, DIAMOND AND SAPPHIRE Custom
made. 14K White Gold. European Shank.
Excellent ratings from E.G.L. Original papers.
Mint condition. Call 262-515-1374 for further
details. Serious inquiries only please.
WANTED TO BUY BUYING Gold & Silver -
coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches
- knifes - swords & military items & more!
262-497-6688 Joe
Music Sales
& Service
51
1974 STEINWAY BABY GRAND PIANO model L.
Walnut finish. Must see to appreciate. Price
negotiable. 262-279-3226
Recreation,
Exercise & Sports
52
PIER SLIPS, in and out service on Delavan
Lake, motor/drive repairs, custom boat cov-
ers and upholstering. Since 1963.
americanmarinedelavan.com
TRAVEL TRAILER - 2013, 25 ft., Zinger By
Crossroads, like brand new, many extras.
$15,500. Ph. 262-914-5300 for details.
Pets, Supplies
& Services
62
PET CREMATION SERVICES
Pets are family too! Cremation
services for your pets. Kenosha
Funeral Services & Crematory.
Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.
Help Wanted 20
SOCIAL WORKER, (BSW)
A prominent skilled nursing facility is seeking
a social worker with at least 3-5 years
experience working with geriatric population
in a skilled care facility or long term care
setting. The ideal candidate should be
familiar with the MDS 3.0 , RUGS, electronic
charting, preferably ECS, familiar with the
standard documentation required for social
services by state and federal regulations and
assist residents and families with discharge
planning/transition to the community or other
senior living arrangements as
appropriate.
Please send resume
with Salary Requirements to:
Box 129, 5800 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
Job Site ID#1002082
SPRING MAKER
A leading Chicago manufacturer of metal
springs, wire forms and stampings seeks
set up technicians with experience in the fol-
lowing spring machines: Itayas, Simcos,
Simplex and Mechanicals for its West of
Elgin based facility. The primary purpose of
this position is to set up and operate produc-
tion machines to bend, form, stretch, notch,
punch or straighten metal as specified by
work orders, drawings, blueprints or layout.
The position is responsible for making nec-
essary adjustments to machinery to effi-
ciently produce product that conforms to
Quality specifications. We are looking for set
up technicians who can be trained to set up
various spring machines. Successful candi-
date must be mechanically inclined and have
a minimum of 3 years experience. We offer
excellent compensation and full benefits and
the ability to grow with an aggressive organ-
ization that will reward your talents.
Please send resume and salary require-
ments to:
HR9145@hotmail.com
Fax: 773-379-0230
Stop-N-Go is hiring! Our store in Lake Geneva
is currently hiring full- and part-time cashiers
for 2nd and 3rd shift. Premium pay for
overnights and weekends! We offer increases
after 90-days, flexible schedules, a fun work
environment and we promote from within!
Applications are available at the store located
at 896 Wells Street or you can apply online at
www.stop-n-go.com and click on the Careers
tab. No phone calls, please.
AA/EOE
SUMMER HELP. COMPANION for elderly lady.
Flexible hours, par t time. On lakeshore
w/pool; $8 hr to start. 239-223-0660
TEACHER AND ASSISTANT
Now taking applications for immediate
Full or Part-Time positions Mon - Fri.
We are looking for someone reliable,
trustworthy, creative and who truly enjoys
working with children and their families.
Requirements include CPR/1st Aide and
Registry certified. If you are that person,
please apply at Kiddie Kare Akademie, 9244
39th Ave., ask for Holly or Cory or email: kid-
diekare@wi.rr.com
Job Site ID#1001175
WAREHOUSE / DISTRIBUTION CENTER
1st & 2nd Shifts Racine
Pick-Pack-General Labor $7.25 / hour
Forklift Drivers To $10.25 / hour
Andrews Staffing 262-605-0900
dreysi.g@andrews-staffing.com
Job Site ID#1000895
Information
Services
23
IF YOU OR A LOVED ONE USED THE TYPE 2
DIABETES DRUGS BYETTA OR JANUVIA
between 2005 and the present, and have
been diagnosed with or died due to pancreatic
cancer, you may be entitled to compensation.
Call Attorney Charles H.Johnson 1-800-535-
5727
OWNER OF JACKIES BARBER SHOPis now
working at Exquiste Touch Ph. 224-475-2055
Service
Directory
26
FENCING Alex Fence. We beat any price.
Top quality work. 25% off any written estimate.
We do repairs. Free estimates. Call Alex, 262-
344-6736
FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring
installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-245-
6168
HANDYMAN Experienced Renovator/remod-
eler. Free estimates. No job to big or small.
Meticulous, Call Frank 262-620-0439
PAINTING AND DRYWALL
Fully insured. 10% off after $1,000 bid.
262-705-4594.
ROOFING J&R Roofing. All types of roofing
and exterior work done. Low prices and Senior
discounts. Free estimates. Ph. 262-455-
5937.
Help Wanted 20
MAINTENANCE PERSON
Birchwood Foods has an immediate opening
for a skilled maintenance person on 2nd
shift. Strong electrical and mechanical skills
are required. Previous experience in a
production environment is also necessary.
Overtime is required.
We offer an excellent benefit package
including health/dental/vision, 401(k),
pension plan, paid vacation and holidays. If
interested in this opportunity, please send
resume with salary history to:
Attn: Human Resources Manager MP
Birchwood Foods
P.O. Box 639
Kenosha, WI 53141
Fax: 262-859-2594
E-mail: thagerman@bwfoods.com
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1002135
Piggly Wiggly Midwest is looking for an
experienced Store Manager in the
Kenosha/Racine area due to Company
growth!
In this position, you will supervise, direct and
manage all phases of store operations in a
manner designed to obtain maximum sales
and margins; control labor, utility and other
operation expenses; and ensure that the
store meets targeted projections and goals
through the effective utilization of personnel
and resources available.
Candidates should have at least five years
experience in the supermarket industry, with
successful participation in a management
training program; or equivalent combination
of education and experience.
Qualified candidates should send cover letter
and resume to: jobs@shopthepig.com or
Piggly Wiggly Midwest, 2215 Union Avenue,
Sheboygan, WI 53081
Job Site ID#1001233
SALES ASSOCIATE
THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COMPANY is seek-
ing a part-time Sales Associate to assist our
wholesale and D.I.Y. customers in the selec-
tion of paint and related home decorating
products. Other responsibilities include
preparing orders, tinting paint, stocking mer-
chandise and various other duties. Flexible
schedule and competitive wages offered.
Call or visit our Store Manager at:
3810 52nd Street
Kenosha, WI 53140
262-656-0033
EOE/M/F/H/V
Job Site ID#1001432
SALES
News Crew Promotions is expanding its
sales team into the Kenosha area!
We are looking for people to join our
door-to-door Independent Contractor
sales team securing subscriptions for
the Kenosha News.
Earn $40.00 to $200.00 per week!
Hours are 4pm to 8:30pm-
Transportation will be provided.
Limited positions available Flexible
scheduling for the school year.
CALL TODAY
START TOMORROW!
262-515-2739
An Independent Contractor for
KENOSHA NEWS
E.O.E.
Job Site ID#961636
SEAMSTRESSLaSposa Bridal, Kenosha.
Experienced seamstress wanted.
Ph. 262-694-7537
SOCIAL SERVICE
YOUTH CARE WORKER aka
MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST
Allendale Association a Child Welfare, Mental
Health and Special Education facility
currently has full time rotating second shift
positions for Youth Care Workers aka Mental
Health Specialists at our Allendale-Daisys
North Chicago location and our Main
Campus in Lake Villa to work actively with
high end at risk children & adolescents
ages 8 to 18 years of age within our
Residential Units. Ideal candidate will have a
Bachelors Degree in Psychology, Sociology,
Social Work, or related Human Service field,
or 5 years of related equivalent social
service experience, Per DCFS regulations,
must have valid drivers license with good
driving record and be at least 21 years of
age. We offer a competitive salary, excellent
benefits and a generous education
assistance program. Please visit
www.allendale4kids.org to download
application and send with a copy of
your resume to:
ALLENDALE ASSOCIATION
Attn: HR Dept.
P. O. Box 1088
Lake Villa, IL 60046
FAX: 847-356-0290
www.allendale4kids.org
AA/EEO
Job Site ID#1001573
Classified
SPECIALS
2
AS A KENOSHA NEWS
SUBSCRIBER YOU HAVE ACCESS
TO ALL ONLINE CONTENT AT
KENOSHANEWS.COM FOR FREE!
Call the Kenosha News Today!
Customer Care Center
262-657-1500 and well be glad
to help you get registered.
Ask about our Members Program
for a few cents more
you can receive your paper
plus local retail offers and more!!
Help Wanted 20
100 WORKERS NEEDED - Assemble crafts,
wood items. Materials provided, To $480+ wk.
Free Information pkg. 24 hr.
801-264-4992
ASSISTANT
FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR
Aviands, a progressive food and services
management company is seeking a highly
motivated, confident Assistant Food Service
Director to assist with maintaining systems
and procedures within the food service oper-
ation at the Lake County Jail located in
Waukegan, IL. We offer a competitive start-
ing wage and benefits package, which
includes a generous 401(k) Plan and tuition
reimbursement. Apply online today at:
www.passion4foodservice.com or by calling
toll free: 1-855-436-6373 (Hiring Code 101)
EOE/AA/VET/M/F
Job Site ID#1001220
BOOM TRUCK DRIVER /
OPERATOR
Tithof Tile & Marble, INC. of Kenosha, WI is
looking to hire an individual as a Boom Truck
Driver/Operator.
Qualifications include but not limited to:
Clean Driving Record
Load and unload truck as required
CDL preferred
Prior experience necessary
Able to lift heavy objects
Please email Resume and References to:
jobs@tithoftile.com.
Job Site ID#1002054
DRIVERS LOCAL TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED. Full time positions available.
23+ years old. Knowledge of Milwaukee
and Chicago a plus. Hourly pay. Apply
at: 6523 46th St., Kenosha, WI
Job Site ID#1001281
DRIVERS REGIONAL & LOCAL. CDL Class A
required. Only flat bed. Sat./Sun.s home.
Up to 50 cents per mile. For info, call Steve
at OMG Enterprise, 262-344-2189 or email:
omgents@yahoo.com
Job Site ID#1002011
Drivers: Sign-On Bonus, Great Pay. Benefits,
Vacation, Holidays & More! OTR. 10-14 days
out. CDL-A. Kurtis: 877-412-7209 x3
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
FOR ASSISTED LIVING
Meadowmere Southport in Kenosha, WI
seeking executive director to oversee
beautiful community. Responsibilities
include overall management, leader-
ship, growth and profitability.
Qualifications: Bachelors Degree,
knowledge of regulations, prior experi-
ence, proven marketing success and
strong written and verbal communica-
tion skills. Competitive salary and ben-
efits. Please apply at www.5sqc.com or
fax resume to: 617-454-3610.
Job Site ID#1001339
HANDYMEN, PAINTERS, AND
LABORERSNew company wanting to
hire, serious inquiries only, call 224-730-
9274 or 224-200-6134
HOUSEKEEPER - Live-out position Male orfe-
male for the vacation home of family of three
in Lake Geneva, WI. This is a permanent, year-
round, Live-out position, five-day work week,
most holidays off. No cooking or child care.
Only cleaning, laundr y and maintenance.
Family is in residence only 4 to 6 weeks in
Summer and they require the employee to go
with them for another 4 weeks to their home
in Marthas Vineyard. Employee must be able
to pass a complete background check and
have recent excellent verifiable references.
Must have at least 3 years of experience as a
housekeeper in an upscale household. Salary
is $ 55000 to $ 58000 per year + benefits
and end of year bonus. To apply for this posi-
tion please send your resume by fax or e-mail.
AlMartinoAgency@aim.com
www.martinodom.com
Fax: 212-867-1917
Tel. 212-867-1910
MAINTENANCE On Site. For rental proper-
ty in Kenosha, WI. Duties include painting,
carpentry, electrical, plumbing, route sewer
lines, pool. Personal tools required. Free rent
plus wages. Fax resume to 262-605-0890 or
Email resume to: property58@hotmail.com
Job Site ID#1002084
Maintenance Assistant
We are looking for an experienced
Maintenance Assistant to work 35 hours
per week, including every other
weekend / holiday.
LICENSE TRADE PREFERRED.
Kindly apply in person!
St. Josephs Home and
Rehabilitation Center
9244 29th Ave., Kenosha, WI 53143
EOE
Job Site ID#1002195
Sports
C
Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, June 13, 2013
Best of the west
Rock Valley, Trailways all-confer-
ence honorees.
2C
Ramczyk: First LGRN all-area
baseball team. 2C
More awards
Best
of the
spring
Last weeks season-ending loss from the
Badger baseball team marked the nal game
of the 2013 high school spring sports season.
While the memories and excitement may
be over, its important to take one last oppor-
tunity to honor the best of the best from the
last two months.
It was a
historic run for
Badger baseball.
The Big Foot/Wil-
liams Bay girls
soccer pulled off
its best record in
school history.
And the Badger
and Big Foot track
teams along with
the Big Foot golf
squad enjoyed
conference glory. The list could go on and on
for head-turning plays, epic performances
and emotional success stories.
But only two athletes, male and female,
one team and one coach can lay claim to the
Best of the Spring. These select few had
seasons to remember, exhibiting superior
talent, a desire to win and the unique ability
to make those around them better.
Heres a look at this springs winners:
Male Athlete of the Spring
Colton Andresen, Badger baseball
Ever since second grade, Genoa City
native Andresen had envisioned a big senior
year with a core group of teammates who
have been there with him through thick and
thin.
Andresen, a Viterbo University recruit
(NAIA), saw his dreams become a real-
ity this season. The Badgers won their rst
conference title since 2005 and advanced to
their rst sectional since 2008.
Andresen recognized the historic signi-
cance of the season after the game.
Since my freshman year, we always
knew senior year was going to be big,
Andresen said. We have a lot to hang our
hats on.
Andresen was the areas best pitcher and
Badgers go-to guy all season.
The southpaw recovered from arm prob-
lems during his junior year to have a career
season in 2013. He was 7-2 with a 1.77 ERA.
Andresen struck out 54 batters in 59 1/3
innings.
In Southern Lakes Conference play,
Andresen was even better, going 6-1 with a
1.24 ERA.
Andresen was a rst team all-SLC selec-
tion at pitcher.
When the Badgers needed him most,
Andresen was at his best. He went the
distance in Badgers 3-2 playoff victory over
Burlington and allowed only one earned run.
Then, in a sectional loss against Bradford,
Andresen held a potent offense to three runs
and struck out ve.
Andresen beat conference co-champion
Union Grove, and on May 21, he gave up one
hit in 2 2/3 innings of relief to pick up the
win and help Badger clinch a share of the
conference title.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
COLTON ANDRESEN was at his best in big
games this season.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS CHECK PAGE 3C
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
LUKE BOURNEUF had a huge season for Big Foot golf.
Fontana native leads Chiefs in postseason, shines at state
A phenom in the making
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA Its not easy for a fresh-
man to make the varsity squad in any
sport, let alone advance all the way to
state.
Especially when that
freshman has never been on
a golf team and has to com-
pete with his established,
talented teammates.
Fontana native and Big
Foot freshman Luke Bourneuf
made it look like a piece of cake on this
years Big Foot varsity boys golf team.
On June 3 and 4, Bourneuf, a lefty,
held his own on the states biggest stage,
the WIAA state golf meet at University
Ridge in Madison. He shot a 79 his rst
day and followed that up with an impres-
sive 74 on day two. Bourneuf tied for 10th
overall in Division II.
This spring, Bourneuf was a pleasant
surprise for a Chiefs squad that already
featured strong players like Craig Halma,
Kyle Shoger and Dylan Freytag. Big Foot
won the Rock Valley South champion-
ship and was only nine strokes away from
advancing to team state.
Bourneufs clutch play helped Big Foot
advance to sectionals as a team.
His 83 led the way at regionals,
and his 78 was a team low at
sectionals.
Bourneuf started playing
the game before the age of 3
and was competing by age 9.
He focuses on improvement every day he
steps on the course, and its the challenge
of the sport that draws him in.
The Regional News caught up with
Bourneuf recently to discuss his stellar
rookie campaign and to get to know the
guy behind the clubs.
Regional News: Take me through
your state experience. Why were
you so effective?
Luke Bourneuf: I had a fantastic
experience at state. It is an amazing course
that challenges all parts of your game. I
got to play a practice round on Sunday
and walk through a round with my coach,
Bob Sullivan. Then, during Mondays rst
round, I hit the ball really well, but didnt
read the speed of the greens well. They
were a little slower than I had judged. I
was more effective on day two because I
continued to strike the ball well but made
a lot more putts.
RN: Were you nervous at state?
LB: I was really nervous. Even in
mini-meets (during the conference
season) I would get nervous because my
score affected my teammates. State was
even more intense because the crowd was
much bigger than I am used to playing in
front of.
PLEASE SEE BOURNEUF PAGE 3C
Southern Lakes Conference
Baseball
First team Colton Andresen, P, sr., Lake Geneva
Badger. Ben Miller, P, jr., Union Grove. Peter Krien, C,
sr., LGB. Adam Filz, IF, sr., UG. Tanner Hunsucker,
IF, sr., Waterford. Scott Litwin, IF, sr., Wilmot. Isiah
Ramos, IF, soph., Delavan-Darien. Chaz Schmidt,
OF, sr., WIL. Derek Denecke, OF, jr., LGB. Justin
Barney, OF, jr., Westosha Central. Athlete of the
year Krien.
Second team Brendan Huber, P, sr., DD. Tom
Dugandzic, C, sr., WAT. Nick Bartlett, IF, sr., Burl-
ington. Mitch Jensen, IF, sr., LGB. Josh Oglesby,
IF, jr., Elkhorn. Bart Bohat, IF, sr., UG. Ryan Maier,
OF, sr., UG. Trace Hunsucker, OF, soph., WAT. Nate
Fischer, OF, sr., BUR.
Honorable mention Travis Stahulak, P,
sr., LGB. Chandler Meseberg, C, jr., BUR. Dane Helnore,
IF, soph., BUR. Isaac Ramos, IF, soph., DD. Scott Buhler, OF,
sr., DD. Matt Ambelang, OF, soph., ELK. Mason Rodriguez,
OF, soph., UG. Jesse Bouffiou, IF, sr., WAT. Greg Kuhfuss, IF,
soph., WC. Corey Crowder, IF, sr., WIL.
Softball
First team Sarah Fonk, P, sr., WC. Kayla Konwent,
IF, fr., WC. Annie McClellan, IF, sr., UG. Brittney Blazich, IF,
sr., WC. Taylor Bergles, OF, jr., WC. Larkin Langston, IF, jr.,
WC. Alyssa Helwig, OF, sr., WAT. Megan Jensen, IF, sr., WAT.
Jennah Speth, IF, sr., DD. Sara Terrian, IF, sr., WAT. Athlete
of the year Fonk.
Second team Cassidy Kortendick, IF, soph.,
UG. Alicia Barbian, IF, sr., WAT. Brooke Repta, IF,
sr., UG. Abbey Zortman, OF, sr., WAT. Maddie Sza-
lewski, P, jr., WAT. Liz Fonk, C, jr., WC. Maggie
McMullin, IF, sr., WC. Chyanne Onstad, OF, fr., BUR.
Sarah Petrovic, OF, sr., UG. Taylor Kontaxis, C, sr.,
WIL.
Honorable mention Jamie Mikrut, C,
sr., LGB. Danielle Koenen, P, fr., BUR. Cindy Craw-
ford, IF, soph., DD. Morgan Rudolf, IF/P, fr., ELK.
Claire Ryan, IF, fr., UG. Jenna Bouffiou, IF, soph.,
WAT. Hailey Jester, IF, jr., WC. Sawyer Wightman,
IF, fr., WIL.
Girls soccer
First team Merin Mundt, F, fr., BUR. Ally Doerr, F, jr.,
DD. Megan Skoczylas, F, fr., ELK. Emma Scaro, MF, sr., ELK.
Theresa Felchuk, MF, jr., WC. Riley Mayer, MF, sr., UG. Anna
Rees, D, sr., UG. Allyssa Merlo, D, sr., WAT. Traci Mulligan,
D, sr., LGB. Tanya Schilling, G, sr., BUR. Cameron Wienke,
at-large player, jr., WC. Athlete of the year Rees.
SOUTHERN LAKES SPRING SPORTS ALL-CONFERENCE
Krien
PLEASE SEE SOUTHERN LAKES PAGE 3C
2C The Regional News June 13, 2013
SPORTS
Rock Valley Conference
South Division
Baseball
First team P: Jameson Lavery, sr.,
Parkview. Austin Hoey, jr., Big Foot.
C: Trevor Aasen, sr., PARK. Evan Metzger,
sr., Beloit Turner. IF: Carter Hehr, sr.,
BF. Riley Pearson, sr., PARK. Clayton
Stenulson, sr., BT.
Alex Hauri, sr., PARK.
OF: JC Hughes, soph.,
BT. Alex Landers,
soph., BF. Brendan
Neal, sr., PARK. Util-
ity: Cody Risseeuw, sr.,
Clinton. Player of the
year Lavery. Coach
of the year Troy
Aasen, PARK.
Second team
P: Bo Hutchinson,
sr., BT. Nolan Strzok, soph., PARK. C:
Matt Preuss, sr., Palmyra-Eagle. IF: Zach
Virgin, soph., BT. Trevor Wiley, sr., CLIN.
Brett Morris, soph., BF. Lucas Houk,
sr., PE. OF: Brian Wolski, jr., BF.
Elliott Olsen, sr., PARK. Charlie Thole,
sr., PARK. Utility: Brandan Noack, sr.,
BT. Andy Laine, sr., PE.
Honorable mention Nick Hen-
ning, jr., PARK. Jarrett Warden, sr.,
PARK. Gene Wright, soph., BT. Marshall
Strenger, jr., BF. Zak Greco, fr., BF.
Eugene Sweno, sr., PE. Ty Poulson, fr.,
PE. Zach Finnegan, sr., Clinton. Marc
Eliszewski, soph., CLIN. Trent Gerlach,
sr., Brodhead. Matt Trotter, sr., BROD.
Softball
First team P: Kelsie Packard,
soph., BT. Amanda Pickel, sr., BROD. C:
Holly Koch, sr., PARK. IF: Taurie Burns,
sr., BROD. Tessa Mikkelson, soph., BT.
Brooke Balk, jr., PE. Kayla Washburn,
jr., BT. Madi Melms, fr., PARK. Kristina
Bordner, sr., BT. Megan Lantz, jr., CLIN.
OF: Emily Harnack, sr., PARK. Player of
the year Packard.
Second team P: Rachel Heffer,
jr., PARK. Jennifer Petkoff, sr., BF. C:
Kristen Glade, jr., BF. IF: Shelby Davies,
soph., BT. Morgan Stalker, fr., BF.
Taylor Douglas, sr., BROD. Tabby Har-
nack, sr., BROD. Brittany Schoen-
beck, jr., BF. OF: Katrina Crall, soph.,
BT. Erin Kloepping, soph., BROD. Util-
ity: Sam Wells, soph., PARK.
Honorable mention BF: Dani-
elle Young, sr. Kayla Crump, jr.
BROD: Peyton Wright, soph. Erica
Baxter, sr. CLIN: Savannah Waller, sr.
Carli Pope, sr. PARK: Katlyn Beighley, jr.
Mykenie Larsen, sr. PE: Alexa Roscize-
wski, sr. McKayla Mehring, sr. BT: Kelli
Dailey, sr. Cooki Casey, sr.
Rock Valley Conference
Girls soccer
First team Morgan Courier, F,
fr., BF. Schyler Isham, MF, jr., BF.
Maggie Kivlin, MF, sr., BF. Molly
Kovarik, D, sr., BF. Kathryn Colby,
D, soph., BF. Monica Zoellner, MF,
soph., East Troy. Dani Stemper, D, sr.,
ET. Anna Hurtley, MF, soph., Evansville.
Jordan Kroneman, D, sr., McFarland.
Kristine Watts, F, sr., PE. Emily Byal, G,
sr., PE. Alyson Quass, F, soph., Whitewa-
ter. Player of the year Byal.
Second team Mari Hubanks,
F, soph., BF. Natalie Boldger, G, jr.,
BF. Brianna Casper, F, soph., ET. Bri-
anna Probst, MF, fr., ET. Emma Olson, D,
sr., EVAN. Betty Rodriguez, MF, jr., Jef-
ferson. Brianna Nelson, UTIL, jr., JEF.
Naomi Holland, MF, soph., McFarland.
Sydney Weinreich, D, sr., PE. DaNae
Giese, MF, sr., PE. Emma Peters, D, sr.,
WW. Abigail Ramirez, D, soph., WW.
Honorable mention BF: Ally
Mazur, soph. Alisa Freytag, fr.
CLIN: McKayla Timp, jr. Jessica Bennett,
jr. Edgerton: Hannah DelGuercio, jr. ET:
Natalie Probst, jr. Olivia Healy, soph.
EVAN: Kealie Gransee, sr. Alexis Hill,
soph. JEF: Isachmary Carrizelles, jr.
Molly Balliet, soph. McFarland: Meghan
Smits, soph. Annie Paulson, fr. PE: Savan-
nah Legan, jr. Alondra Cardenas, jr. WW:
Morgan Nathan, sr. Savana Sun, sr.
Trailways Conference
South Division
Baseball
First team P: Cole Erickson, jr.,
Deerfield. Austin Neis, sr., Hustisford/
Dodgeland. Dylan Roe, sr., Johnson
Creek. Jason Coy, sr., Fall River. C: Zach
Gross, sr., DF. John Kupsche, sr., JC. IF:
Brandon Ehrke, sr., DF. Clayton Usel-
man, jr., JC. Aaron Bischoff, sr., Horicon.
Jimmy Neu, sr., H/D. OF: Sean Erickson,
sr., DF. Tyler Joseph, sr., JC. Mike Eidem,
jr., HOR. Jon Fude,
sr., H/D. Utility: Bren-
nan Kearney, sr., Rio.
Player of the year
Erickson.
Second team
P: Jake Sutter,
sr., Williams Bay. C:
Dustin Hoefs, sr., HOR.
Eathen Bruhn, jr., H/
D. Justin Figol, jr., FR.
IF: Ben Hildebrandt,
sr., DF. Nick Halsema,
sr., HOR. Michael Guss, fr., Williams
Bay. OF: Austin Hoefs, sr., HOR. Adam
Lechelt, jr., WB. Zach Zeidler, soph.,
Rio. Utility: Dustin Brooks, jr., HOR.
Softball
First team Taylor Bjork, jr., HOR.
Sam Storms, sr., WB. Riley Kruel, sr.,
HOR. Sadie Nelson, jr., DF. Kim Jablon-
ski, sr., JC. Megan Tillema, soph., HOR.
Taylor Scott, fr., WB. Brooke Woo-
lever, sr., DF. Allysa Zoller, jr., JC. Gwen
Uselman, soph., JC. Rachel Staveness,
sr., Rio. Shelby Genzmer, jr., HOR. Clau-
dia Wautlet, sr., WB. Player of the year
Bjork.
Second team Sara Spern, sr.,
Dodgeland. Cheyenne Czerwinski, soph.,
HOR. Megan Waterworth, soph., FR.
Taylor Emrath, soph., JC. Jessica Corn-
ing, jr., Rio. Hannah Spern, soph., DOD.
Quinn Kruel, soph., HOR. Miranda
Monson, jr., DF. Alyssa Layton, soph.,
JC. Emmalyn Meyers, soph., WB.
Liz Soter, fr., FR. Jessica Rynearson, sr.,
Hustisford.
ROCK VALLEY, TRAILWAYS ALL-CONFERENCE
Hehr
Sutter
Spring isnt over, yet ...
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
BADGERS SHARMAINE VILLARELLO, left, heads the ball in heavy trafc in a June 1 loss to Racine Horlick.
MIKE RAMCZYK/
REGIONAL NEWS
BIG FOOTS
RACHEL
HEIDENRICH, left,
gets physical against
a Milwaukee Pius
defender June 1.
LAKE GENEVA YMCA FRIDAY NIGHT MENS SOFTBALL
June 7 scores
Vaughn Hammers 14, Stinebrinks 4
Stahulak Concrete 17, Mt. Zion 7
Fat Cats 14, Team Nurnburg 13
Fat Cats 22, Mecum Auction 4
Advocare 22, Mecum Auction 4
Mama Ciminos 7, Nameless 6
Rumours 10, Peck & Weis 0
Standings
Mama Ciminos 4 0
Stahulak Concrete 4 0
Vaughn Hammers 3 1
Rumours 3 1
Team Nurnburg 2 2
Stinebrinks 2 2
Advocare 2 2
Fat Cats 2 2
Mt. Zion 1 3
Peck & Weis 1 3
Mecum Auction 0 4
Nameless 0 4
YMCA BASEBALL/SOFTBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
LG Chiropractic def. Kokodynski Ortho
Casting Solutions def. Autoworks Plus
Casting Solutions def. Peck & Weis
LG Chiropractic def. Next Door Pub
Kokodynski Ortho def. Autoworks Plus
Standings
Casting Solutions 2 0
LG Chiropractic 2 0
Kokodynski Ortho 1 1
Peck & Weis 0 1
Next Door Pub 0 1
Autoworks Plus 0 2
COLT LEAGUE BASEBALL
LG Dairy Queen def. Baker House
Culvers of Lake Geneva and Edward Jones tied
Edward Jones def. LG Dairy Queen
Baker House def. Culvers of Lake Geneva
Standings
Edward Jones 1 0 1
Lake Geneva Dairy Queen 1 1
Baker House 1 1
Culvers of Lake Geneva 0 1 1
SENIOR LEAGUE SOFTBALL
Central Vending def. Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly
Central Vending and PFI Screenprint tied
Kokodynski Ortho def. Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly
Standings
Central Vending 1- 0 1
Kokodynski Ortho 1 0
PFI Screenprinting 0 0 1
Stinebrinks 0 2
U12 TRAVEL BASEBALL
Lake Geneva Chiropractic 6 0
Upper Crust Pizza 4 1
U14 BASEBALL
Lake Geneva Red 0 3
U14 SOFTBALL
Lake Geneva Blue 0 3
SPORTS
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 3C
At the plate, Andresen
was no slouch. He hit .316
and had a .458 on-base per-
centage. Also, he totaled 10
RBIs.
Badger coach Aaron
Zweifel said any college
team would be lucky to have
Andresen on the mound
next season. Andresen cant
wait to keep playing the
game he loves, but he will
never forget Badger.
Its been special. Im
proud of them, and Im
glad I got to be a part of it,
Andresen said.
Female Athlete of the
Spring
Sam Storms, Williams Bay
softball
Having signed her
national letter of intent
to play Division I college
softball before the season,
Bay senior Sam Storms
couldve slacked during her
senior year with the Lady
Bulldogs.
Thanks to her club
team and private lessons,
she probably didnt even
have to play at all.
But Storms wanted to
have fun this spring, and
she wanted to win with her
teammates.
A leader both on and off
the eld who wasnt afraid
to display tough love to a
teammate, Storms helped
lead the Lady Bulldogs to a
14-3 record and a second-
place nish in the Trail-
ways South behind state
power Horicon.
Storms, a power pitcher
who has been striking
out batters with ease ever
since her freshman year,
was undoubtedly the best
softball player in the area
this spring.
A rst team all-Trail-
ways Conference pick,
Storms went 12-3 on the
mound with a 1.69 ERA.
She struck out 121 batters
in 95 innings and walked
only 21. She tossed two
one-hitters this season and
struck out 10 or more bat-
ters ve times.
At the plate, Storms
raked at an impressive .564
clip, totaling 26 RBIs and
18 extra-base hits.
For her career, Storms
put up staggering numbers:
130 hits, 41 doubles, nine
triples, nine home runs, 97
RBIs, a .533 batting aver-
age, 42 wins pitching and
620 strikeouts.
Storms will take her tal-
ents to Division I St. Peters
in New Jersey this fall.
Team of the Spring
Big Foot/Williams Bay girls
soccer
Week after week, oppo-
nents gave it their best
shot against the Lady Chief
Dogs.
And week after week,
they fell at the feet of Wal-
worths nest.
The Big Foot/Williams
Bay girls soccer pulled off
something only the Faith
Christian boys basketball
team has in recent years
an undefeated regular
season.
Forget school size, divi-
sion or the sport. Being
pretty much perfect for an
entire season is an amaz-
ing accomplishment at any
level.
Though Big Foot did
have a tie to start the
season, they proceeded to
reel off 15 straight victo-
ries and nish the regu-
lar season 15-0-1, easily
capturing the Rock Valley
Conference title in the pro-
cess.
Going undefeated takes
talent, but a consistent
focus and determination
to win must also be pres-
ent. Big Foot displayed all
of these attributes despite
losing their leading scorer,
the conference player of
the year and starting goalie
to graduation the previous
year.
The Lady Chief Dogs
did it with youth, as there
were only three seniors
and many of the key con-
tributors were freshmen
and sophomores.
The team featured a
plethora of all-conference
players, with Morgan Cou-
rier, Schyler Isham, Maggie
Kivlin, Molly Kovarik
and Kathryn Colby on the
rs team; Mari Hubanks
and Natalie Boldger on
the second team and Ally
Mazur and Alisa Freytag
earning honorable men-
tion.
The good news is that
seven of those nine all-con-
ference girls will be back
for next season, so expect
the success to continue in
2014.
Coach Annie Isham
joked after her teams play-
off loss that the soccer
team is now up there with
the Chiefs football team.
With this developing crop
of young talent, she may
not be too far off.
Coach of the Spring
AJ Curtis, Badger boys
track
Oh, what a difference a
year made for the Badger
boys track team this
season.
After nishing in
fourth place in conference
last season and having no
state qualiers, the boys
came out of nowhere to win
conference this season and
have a solid state presence.
AJ Curtis, in only
his third season, turned
things around from last
year. Along with a confer-
ence title, the Badger boys
won the conference relays
meet.
It was an incredible
season, Curtis said. I am
extremely proud of the
strides we made this year
and how far our team has
come.
At conference, it was
the teams depth that led to
a narrow victory. Of the 32
events, 31 scored. Badger
only had two conference
champions, Alex Martinez
in the 3,200 run and Sam
Lasch in the long jump.
At state, Martinez
broke the school record in
the 3,200 run.
The teams other state
qualier was the 400 relay
team of Connor Kotula,
Mike Mann, Andrew Allen
and Nick Hall.
RN: What changes did you make
from day one to day two at state?
LB: I played so well on Monday that I
didnt make any changes except being more
aggressive with my putting.
RN: Why were you able to be suc-
cessful this season individually and
as a team?
LB: This was my rst experience play-
ing on a golf team. It was so fun, and my
teammates are great guys. We all got along
well, encouraged each other and never put
too much pressure on ourselves. This really
allowed me to improve at my own pace. I
was really proud that we were only 10 shots
short of going to state as a team.
RN: When did you start playing
golf?
LB: I used to go to the driving range
with my dad when I was really little, and
we would putt around for fun. Then one
winter when I was 3, my mom took me to an
indoor driving range and I starting hitting
with real clubs. I played in my rst compe-
tition when I was 9 at the par-3 course at
Hawks View.
RN: What is your favorite course
to play on, and what is your all-time
lowest score on 9 holes and 18 holes?
LB: The Player and the Palmer courses
at Geneva National are tied for my favorite
places to play. My lowest 9-hole score is 35,
and I have shot 74 a number of times for my
lowest 18.
RN: Why do you think your game
is so effective?
LB: I think the best part of my game is
that Im steady and consistent without any
big weaknesses.
RN: Why do you love golf so
much?
LB: I love golf because it is so difcult. I
really like doing things that are a challenge
and require lots of skill and practice.
RN: Who has been your biggest
inuence on the golf course?
LB: My dad and my uncles.
RN: What do you plan to work on
this summer for next season?
LB: The next thing on my mind now
are the summer tournaments that I will be
playing in, and then in the winter Ill start
focusing on next season.
RN: What do you like to do in your
spare time when your not golng?
LB: Watching sports on TV, wakeboard-
ing, snow skiing, snowboarding, hanging
out with friends.
Second team
Hayley Aranda, F,
soph., LGB. Lexi Ket-
terhagen, F, fr., WAT. Ella
Hunsucker, F, fr., WAT.
Alli Zeman, MF, jr., BUR.
Jocelyn Etten, MF, sr.,
ELK. Alex Swarthout,
MF, jr., LGB. Sydney
McCourt, D, soph., BUR.
Jessica Hauser, D, sr.,
ELK. Tori Einhorn, D, sr.,
WC. Autumn Mikrut,
G, jr., LGB.
Honorable mention
Lena Aspebakken,
jr., LGB. Maddy Harry,
jr., BUR. Kylie Bliss, sr.,
DD. Ellen Schutt, jr., DD.
Kaylee Rowland, sr., DD.
Carmen Diaz, sr., ELK.
Holly Grajera, soph., UG.
Erica Wirsching, sr., WAT.
Emily Richter, fr., WC. Andi
Wenck, fr., WAT. Michelle
Overman, sr., WIL.
Boys golf
First team Zach
Nash, jr., WAT. Brian
Dankle, soph., BUR. Gar-
rett Buri, jr., WAT. Adam
Dewane, soph., WAT. Mark
LaMeer, sr., WC. Athlete
of the year Nash.
Second team Grant
Beck, jr., WAT. Joe Scherer,
sr., DD. Luke Millhouse, sr.,
WC. Josh Christensen, soph.,
WIL. Tony Stang, sr., BUR.
Honorable mention
Alec Jacobsen, fr., LGB.
Scott Vyhanek, sr., BUR.
Landon Schramski, jr., DD.
Zach Utesch, sr., ELK. Ben
Maier, fr., UG. David Zahn,
jr., WAT. Tom Lourigan, sr.,
WC. Trey Turner, jr., WIL.
Boys tennis
First team No. 1
singles: Conor Schultz, jr.,
BUR. No. 2 singles: Kyle
Hetterman, jr., WIL. No.
3 singles: Hunter Hermes,
soph., WC. No. 4 singles:
Fred Sturmer, sr., UG. No.
1 doubles: Adam Skoczylas/
Brandon Riese, srs., ELK.
No. 2 doubles: Connor
Schaid, jr./Michael
Cordes, sr., LGB. No. 3
doubles: Josh Bakken,
fr./Alex Kulik, soph.,
LGB. Athletes of the
year Skoczylas/Riese.
Second team 1:
David Lefer, jr., UG. 2:
Marshall Amann, sr., ELK.
3: Adel Khan, sr., ELK. 4:
Trenten Wilkinson, sr.,
WIL. 1: Max Gilbert-
son, sr./Riley Nocek,
jr., LGB. 2: Aaron Wales,
soph./Grant Saari, jr., ELK.
3: Keaton Bormann/Gavin
Lanser, srs., ELK. Honor-
able mention Liam
Bailey, soph., LGB. Kyle
Crayton, soph., BUR. Zach
Gesteland, sr., BUR. Peter
Meylick, sr., ELK. Andrew
Skalecki, jr., UG. Nathaniel
Brockmann, jr., WAT. Luke
Andrekus, fr., WC. Jordan
Andersen, jr., WIL.
Mens track
Athlete of the year
Jesse Koenig, sr., WC.
Honorable mention
Sam Lasch, soph.,
LGB. Mickael Pauly, sr.,
BUR. Zach Phillips, sr.,
ELK. J.K. Witkofski, jr., UG.
Brandon Miller, sr., WAT.
Grant MacKinnon, sr., WC.
Austin Haag, soph., WIL.

Womens track
Athlete of the year
Cassy Goodrick, jr., UG.
Honorable mention
Allison Paleka, jr.,
LGB. Audra Weis, sr., BUR.
Erika Sesing, jr., ELK. Alex
Goodrich, fr., UG. Jenny
Gilbreath, sr., WAT. Corey
Peroa, sr., WC. Haylee
Martin, soph., WIL.
Meet Luke Bourneuf
Golf is: fun and tough
I made state because: I kept improving
throughout the season.
Favorite movie: Argo
Favorite Song: Run, by Kill It Kid
Food ritual before a meet: My parents forcing
me to eat something because Im too nervous
and dont want to eat.
If you could have dinner with one person
dead or alive, who would it be and why?
Rory McIlroy, because he is someone I look
up to, and someone who possesses so much
talent for such a young player. I love his
swing, hes good at every part of the game
and he seems like a really nice guy.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
SAM STORMS was dominant on the mound this spring.
Sports Check/Storms set school records, Big Foot, Badger overachieved
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Bourneuf/Freshman played at age 3
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Southern Lakes/Badger represents
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
MIKE RAMCZYK/
REGIONAL NEWS
BADGER
SENIOR
MITCH
JENSEN,
shown here
connecting
for the game-
winning hit in
Badgers play-
off win over
Burlington,
led the area in
RBIs with 19.
2013 Regional News All-Area Baseball Team
P: Colton Andresen, sr., Badger. 7-2, 1.77 ERA
C: Peter Krien, sr., Badger, .391 BA, .456 OBP
1B: Jonah Zeinert, sr., Badger, .271 BA, 14 RBIs
2B: Carter Hehr, sr., Big Foot, .465, 33 H, 2 HR, 18 RBIs, 16 SB
3B: Mitch Jensen, sr., Badger, .343, 19 RBIs
SS: Eric Skipper, sr., Badger, .339, 6 SB
OF: Alex Landers, soph., Big Foot, .373, 18 RBIs, 2 HR, 10 SB
OF: Travis Stahulak, sr., Badger, 4-2, 0.81 ERA, 64 K, 34 2/3 IP
OF: Derek Denecke, jr., Badger, .409 BA, .458 OBP
Player of the year: Andresen
HONORABLE MENTION
Jake Sutter, sr., Williams Bay, 3-2, 3.76 ERA
Michael Guss, fr., Williams Bay, .314 BA
Ian Weber, sr., Badger, .267
Trent Bobula, sr., Badger, .264
Brian Wolski, jr., Big Foot, .286, 22 H
Zak Greco, fr., Big Foot, .292, .541 OBP
Austin Hoey, jr., Big Foot, 7-4, 1.92 ERA, .275 BA
4C The Regional News June 13, 2013
WALWORTH COUNTY COURT
Man gets prison for
drunken driving
ELKHORN A Walworth
man was sentenced June 3 to
7 1/2 years in prison after he
pleaded guilty to two separate
felony charges of seventh-offense
drunken driving.
Michael B. Thomas, 51, W6066
Water Tower Place, was arrested
Aug. 25 and Nov. 19 for drunken
driving. Before the two most
recent convictions, Thomas had
six prior drunken-driving convic-
tions.
Thomas also was sentenced to 10 years
of extended supervision, and was ordered
to pay $5,000 in nes.
After his Aug. 25 arrest, Thomas posted
bail and was arrested again on Nov. 19. A
condition of his bond was that he not con-
sume alcohol.
Because he violated the condition of
his bond, Thomas also pleaded guilty to
a felony bail jumping charge, and he was
ned an additional $500 for that
violation.
According to the criminal
complaint on the Nov. 19 arrest:
At 12:30 a.m., village of Wal-
worth police stopped Thomas
vehicle on Kenosha Street.
The ofcer reported that
Thomas had red and glassy eyes,
smelled of alcohol and was unable
to articulate his location.
According to the criminal
complaint on Aug. 25 arrest:
A Fontana police ofcer stopped
Thomas vehicle at 1:32 a.m. on Valley View
Drive at South Main Street for operating
left of center. The ofcer could smell intox-
icants on Thomas breath, and observed
that he had glassy and bloodshot eyes.
Thomas has six previous convictions
for drunken driving on May 17, 1992; Aug.
21, 1992; Dec. 24, 1993; May 31, 1996; Aug.
4, 2001 and Nov. 16, 2001.
Thomas
A 35-year-old man was sen-
tenced June 7 to two years of pro-
bation after pleading guilty to a
felony charge of burglary.
Corey W. Shumak, now of
Watertown and formerly of Wal-
worth, also was sentenced to four
months in jail with work-release
privileges.
A felony bail jumping charge
and a misdemeanor charge of
resisting an ofcer was dismissed
but read into the record.
According to the criminal complaint on
the burglary:
On Oct. 14, 2012, at about 1:33 p.m.,
police were dispatched to Town Hall Road,
town of Walworth, for a burglary in which
the suspect had just run from the owners
barn.
The caller followed the suspects vehi-
cle and told dispatch that it was parked in a
parking lot on Wisconsin Street in the vil-
lage of Walworth. Walworth Police Lt. Andy
Long responded to the call. Long reported
the driver was Shumak.
Long reported that Shumak was breath-
ing heavily and wasnt wearing a shirt.
Shumak told police he parked
his car because he got into an
argument with his girlfriend and
needed to cool off.
Long told Shumak to remain
seated while Long talked to the
witness.
When Long was talking to the
witness, Shumak ed.
During the chase, an employee
of a nearby business tackled
Shumak.
A Walworth County sheriffs
deputy spoke to the homeowner, who said
that he returned to his home and saw a
vehicle parked at the edge of a nearby corn-
eld. As he pulled into his driveway, he saw
a man holding a black bag and a tool box
running from his barn.
The homeowners neighbor also saw
the man running and followed the mans
vehicle until it was stopped by police.
Shumak told police that he entered the
barn without permission for tools to x
his vehicle. He said he ran from the hom-
eowner because he was scared, and he
later ran from police because he possessed
marijuana.
Shumak
Burglar gets probation
Cook arrested after
stabbing
A cook is accused of
stabbing another man after
an apparent argument over
food preparation.
Fidel Ortiz-Carrilo,
44, of Delavan, has been
charged with injury by neg-
ligent use of a dangerous
weapon.
If convicted, Ortiz-Car-
rilo, faces up to 3 1/2 years
imprisonment and $10,000
in nes.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
On May 17 a man came
into the Delavan police sta-
tion holding his left leg.
The ofcer reported that
when the man moved his
hand he saw a signicant
amount of blood that had
soaked through the mans
pants, and the man was
wincing, limping and said
ouch, ouch.
Emergency workers
arrived at the police station
and began to treat a 3/4
inch laceration.
The victim told a Wal-
worth County Sheriffs
deputy that he had been
drinking at a friends home,
and at this house he began
to argue with Ortiz-Carrilo
over Ortiz-Carrilos cook-
ing.
When the victim
attempted to leave, Ortiz-
Carrilo stabbed him in the
leg with a medium-sized
kitchen knife.
Police went to Ortiz-
Carrilos apartment to
question him. Police report
that Ortiz-Carrilo said I
didnt do anything.
He also told police he
tried to protect himself
from the victim.
Linn man faces
marijuana charges
A 29-year-old Linn man
faces three felony charges
for delivering marijuana.
If convicted, Ryan M.
Foley, N2516 Bublitz Road,
faces up to 10 1/2 years
imprisonment and $30,000
in nes.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
Foley allegedly sold
marijuana to a police infor-
mant on March 22, April 9
and 18.
Sharon man faces
drunken driving
A 26-year-old Sharon
man was arrested with two
children in his car on May
26 for drunken driving as a
fth-offense.
If convicted, Joshua R.
Walther, N561 Bollinger
Road, faces up to 12 years
in prison and a $20,000
ne. The felony charge also
carries a minimum sen-
tence of one year in jail and
$1,200 in nes.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
At 3:23 p.m. police
stopped Walthers vehicle
on West School Street. A 12-
year-old and a 16-year-old
were in the vehicle at the
time of Walthers arrest.
Walther has previous
drunken driving convic-
tions from offenses that
occurred on Dec. 25, 2006;
July 6, 2007; July 22, 2007;
and Sept. 7, 2008.
Lake Geneva man
faces felonies
A 49-year-old Lake
Geneva man faces a felony
charge after he allegedly
became belligerent with
police in the city of Dela-
van.
Joseph M. Solus, 1060
Wells St., has been charged
with felony bail jumping. In
a separate case, Solus was
charged with sixth-offense
drunken driving.
If convicted of both
counts, Solus faces up to
12 years imprisonment
and $20,000 in nes. The
drunken driving charge
also carries a minimum
penalty of six months in jail
and a $600 ne.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint on the bail
jumping charge:
Police were dispatched
to a Delavan bar at about
7:12 p.m on May 14. When
police went into the bar,
they asked a man to step
outside to talk about his
outstanding cab fare.
Before leaving, police
watched as the man con-
sumed a beer. Inside of the
bar, the man argued with
police. When police asked
for the mans name, he said
he was Bill J. Smith.
However, that name
didnt come back on le,
and police asked the man
for his real name. Eventu-
ally, Solus told police his
real name.
Ofcers report that
outside of the bar Solus was
acting belligerent and was
swearing.
The bartender told
police that Solus bought
and consumed one beer. A
cab driver said he received
a call to take a man from
the Vegas Gentlemens Club
to Lake Geneva.
The cab driver said he
stopped at a gas station to
get the man change, and
the man went ballistic,
became verbally abusive
and threatened the cab
driver with physical vio-
lence. Another cab driver
provided police with a writ-
ten statement that stated
he was called to a Delavan
bar to drive a man to Lake
Geneva. At the bar, he saw
Solus acting disorderly,
belligerent and swearing at
police.
According to the crim-
inal complaint on the
drunken driving charge:
On Feb. 13, in Geneva
Township, Solus vehicle
was stopped on County
Highway H and Queen
Road.
At around 11:25 p.m. a
Walworth County sheriffs
deputy saw a car that was
partially in the ditch. Lake
Geneva police found the
suspected driver about a
1/2 mile from the accident
scene.
Solus denied knowledge
of the accident but had the
keys to the vehicle in his
pocket. Field sobriety tests
were performed on Solus,
which he failed.
He has ve prior
drunken driving convic-
tions for offenses that
occurred on Dec. 4, 2011,
April 2, 2006, March 29,
2006, April 25, 2005 and
Sept. 27, 1998.
Pell Lake man gets
probation
A 21-year-old Pell Lake
man was sentenced June 5
to two years of probation
after he pleaded guilty to
possession of marijuana
with intent to deliver.
Ivan C. Purnell II, N941
Daisey Drive, pleaded
guilty to the felony charge
on May 1. According to the
criminal complaint:
On April 16 the Wal-
worth County Drug Unit
executed a search warrant
on Purnells residence.
Purnell admitted to
police that he kept a large
amount of marijuana in a
safe. Inside of the safe, the
police found several thou-
sand dollars.
Genoa City teen
faces felony
An 18-year-old Genoa
City man faces a felony and
two misdemeanor charges
after he allegedly attacked
a fellow student at Badger
High School.
Jeremy R. Fischer, 1015
Hunters Ridge Drive, has
been charged with felony
substantial battery, misde-
meanor battery and disor-
derly conduct.
If convicted of the
felony, Fischer faces up to
3 1/2 years imprisonment
and $10,000 in nes.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
On May 20, at about
3:30 p.m. a Lake Geneva
detective met with a man
who had been in a physical
altercation with Fischer.
The alleged victim said
Fischer punched him in
the back of the head when
he was walking into the
weight room. This knocked
the man into the wrestling
room doors and then to the
oor.
On the oor, the victim
was punched several more
times in the face by Fischer.
Another man attempted to
separate the two, and was
hit in the face by Fischer.
The man Fischer alleg-
edly punched in the back
of the head was taken to
Aurora Lakeland Medical
Center. He was diagnosed
with a mild concussion, a
contusion over his eye, a
split lip and torn ligaments
in his hand.
In an interview with
police, Fisher admitted
to hitting the man as he
walked by the weight room.
Fischer said he didnt want
to hit the second victim.
COURT REPORTS
A 44-year-old Genoa City man faces a
felony charge of possession of child por-
nography.
If convicted, Dale R. Curtis, 693 Blue-
bill Lane, faces up to 25 years imprison-
ment and $100,000 in nes.
The charge also carries a minimum
sentence of three years of initial conne-
ment.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Feb. 21, Curtis wife called police
and said she found images of very young
girls on the computer. She said she and
Dale Curtis resided together in the past
week.
A computer analysis showed that sev-
eral search terms were entered into Google
that are consistent with searches for child
pornography.
A detective with the Walworth County
Sheriffs Department identied about 400
images of suspected child pornography
with the majority of the images accessed
between Feb. 16 and Feb. 19, 2013.
Man faces child porn charge
315 Broad St. Lake Geneva, WI
262.248.4444
pbonyata@lakegenevanews.net
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June 13, 2013 The Regional News 5C
REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, June 13th, 2013
through Wednesday, June 20th, 2013
TV
L i s t i n g s
6C The Regional News June 13, 2013
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LODGING
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Mill Creek Hotel Grand Geneva Resort
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Also playing:
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UNDERGROUND LAKE GENEVA
with host Philip Sassano
Current Episodes:
Winterfest 2013
The Baker House
AMSOIL Snocross Championship
Currently playing on
Times change. And so do
the keepers of Lake Genevas
unique history. In the 19th
Century, the keeper of Lake
Genevas history was James
Simmons, but he passed away
as the century was ending.
We are fortunate that his
superb, unsurpassed history of
Lake Geneva in the 19th Cen-
tury, Annals of Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin, 1835-1897, sur-
vived and was reissued in a new format by the Geneva Lake
Museum last year. Simmons successors as keepers of Lake
Genevas history,
Eva Seymour Lundahl and Alice Denison Hackett, are also
gone. Eva Seymour Lundahl was the granddaughter of Moses
Seymour, who came to Geneva from Vermont with James Sim-
mons in 1843. Alice Denison Hackett was the daughter of E. D
Denison, for whom the Central-Denison School is named, and
was the granddaughter of John Burton, one of Lake Genevas
most well-known 19th-Century businessmen.
Any way you look at it,
there will be changes at the
Geneva Lake Area Chamber
of Commerce.
A few weeks ago the
chamber board announced
that George Hennerley had
retired as its head after 33
years.
A nationwide search is
under way for a replace-
ment.
But this is more than a search for
Hennerleys successor. The chambers
leadership has more ambitious goals.
Theyre rethinking the whole idea of the
chamber, broadening its scope, rening
its goals, reinventing itself.
That will impact Lake Geneva and the
Geneva Lake area. Tourism is our eco-
nomic engine. There are some who wish
they could enjoy the areas beauty without
sharing it with anyone. Places as beautiful
as Lake Geneva just dont remain secrets.
So lets make the best of this wonderful
natural resource.
And from my experience, the chamber
isnt a bunch of suits.
I think those people on city govern-
ment and the chamber who navigate our
destiny, know what they have
here and dont want to kill
the golden goose. They want
a classy, properly-scaled
retail district, not Wiscon-
sin Dells. No one wants our
environment ruined, either.
And I think theres a
movement within the cham-
ber to take on larger issues:
creating new jobs, helping
those unemployed return
to work, becoming a voice for residents
and visitors as well as businesses. Thats
a more holistic approach that would be
refreshing and potentially very positive
for the community.
Here are some of my opinions as to
what the chamber might tackle:
1. Help make Lake Geneva a winter
destination.
Even the best of our tourist-oriented
businesses struggle between Christmas
and Memorial Day. Every year we have a
handful of empty storefronts downtown.
In a way, thats OK. The strong survive
and we have new businesses to attract vis-
itors every summer. On the other hand, it
would be a boost for the entire community
if we could eliminate the view that Lake
Geneva is closed for winter. Winterfest is
a big draw, but thats just one weekend.
There is talk of expanding it to a week or
longer. Thats a start.
2. Bring the locals back to the down-
town.
The business people would love it
if locals became more vibrant custom-
ers. This disconnect is complicated and
decades old, but people have to recognize
that Lake Geneva is a tourist community.
Some working class residents of the city
see the downtown as the enemy. Some
well-heeled summer residents dont fully
involve themselves in the community
either. This doesnt have to be.

3. Leverage new media.
As much as traditional newspapers
have suffered by the move to various elec-
tronic media, we all know how important
new media is. Getting fresh leadership at
the chamber who are new media savvy
would be a big help. I might add that I
think the Regional News and our Reel-
LifeTV offshoot, can serve a purpose, too.
In the past at least, I think weve been
seen as just a nice little local paper. Id like
to believe were more than that. We can be
partners of the business community and
still keep our integrity as a source of news.
Is that comment self serving? Sure.
4. Do something to improve the
parking and trafc issues.
One member of the business commu-
nity has noted that we only have a park-
ing problem if there are too many empty
stalls. Hes right, and the trafc and
parking issues will never go away com-
pletely. There may not be a silver bullet.
A parking structure, for instance, would
be nancially challenged because it would
remain dormant in the off season (unless
we developed that winter business). That
said, I think the recent parking study done
by the city may create some tweaks like
a shuttle or better utilization of current
off-street parking.
5. Expand the downtown farther
down Broad Street.
Some visitors are disappointed that the
Lake Geneva shopping district appears to
be only a few blocks long. It doesnt have
to be.
This week is our 10 year
anniversary of sharing the
charitable works of The Time Is
Now to Help. Together we have
changed the lives of many.
Hunger, homelessness,
living without utilities, toilet-
ries and household necessi-
ties, lack of transportation and
many other pains of poverty
have been removed. The chil-
dren we assisted 10 years ago
are now hopefully grown and
healthy thanks to our caring
and sharing. Some of the senior citizens we assisted are no
longer here with us, but their last years were spent knowing
someone cared enough about them to make sure they had food
to eat, a place to call home and people in their life that cared.
Together, we assisted in removing pains of poverty through
our faith, our driven conscious to do good, a pride to do what
is morally right, following a path led by God, our love for our
fellow creations.
Our purpose continues to stand strong; we will not sit back
and ignore our fellow creations suffering in poverty. The emo-
tional pain of witnessing rsthand the pains of poverty takes a
toll on our existence. The only way to ease the pains of witness-
ing povertys injustices is to bring compassionate relief as fast
as we encounter the afiction of poverty. My dear friends in
God, these last years have been much more rewarding and less
painful knowing you were there beside us, knowing together
we accomplish so much more.
In 10 years time we have provided assistance to over 5,000
of our fellow Americans in desperate need. When you realize
this is all due to one mans dream 25 years ago to found a char-
ity that did not spend its donations on overhead and salaries, it
is an amazing journey.
My longing to provide assistance when and where it was
needed most, to the most overlooked fellow creations, the
homeless, the struggling women and children, the senior citi-
zens living cold and hungry, the handicapped without access
to basic necessities, the tears my own dear mother shed while
she was enduring the pains of poverty, were the motivation to
found The Time Is Now to Help.
As more and more of you heard the stories of those we
helped, through the newspapers, People magazine, Readers
Digest, the Associated Press, the Hallmark Channel and many
other news outlets, the more you wanted to help.
We realized the news media was the way to spread the
word of real poverty in our own home towns throughout our
great country. This was poverty you could see, feel and grasp,
not in other countries but right in the homes you drive past
each day on your way to work. Children you see in schools or
the elderly invisible to us suffering behind closed doors.
That was the beginnings of our column called The Time Is
Now to Help. Since then our story has spread to WGN, CNN,
CBS and Fox news. How it spread from there continues to
amaze all of us here every day.
The truth is you want to know the facts, what is happening
and who is hurting. You want to know how we help. You want
to be part of removing the suffering of poverty and providing
relief. Removing the terrible feeling of true hunger, providing
utilities for those living without light, heat, water ... Our com-
munities have much less homelessness due to all of us prevent-
ing the fear and shame of living without shelter.
Together, we have lifted the lives of many by providing
what we all treasure, a place to call home.
Whenever we conclude a matching grant we provide a
complete breakdown in how every penny of every donation
was spent to provide poverty assistance.
Together, we helped over 5,000 in desperate need who
would have gone without. Together, we provided rent, utili-
ties, food, auto assistance, household necessities and toiletries.
We also provided assistance with wheelchairs, home repairs,
clothing, beds, school supplies, medical assistance, dental care,
veterinary care, furniture, special education needs, emergency
shelter and much, much more. Together, we have opened food
pantries. We helped other organizations that provide true
assistance to the poverty stricken.
Does it make a difference to you or I that all these people
were helped? Absolutely. We are in a war against poverty, the
evil that inicts mental and physical pain, causing great suf-
fering to our fellow creations. I can still hear the crying and
sobbing of those suffering as I pray for God to show us the way
to help over and over again. I also feel the relief we, all of us
together, have provided over the years. Sometimes the pain is
not as obvious as the elderly woman that fell in front of me.
Resorter Editor/
Special Projects Coordinator
Jessica Franzene
Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters
Thursday, June 13, 2013
Community & Commentary
D Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
CONTACT
Newsroom
(262) 248-8096
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Advertising
(262) 248-4444
ads@lakegenevanews.net
Fax (262) 248-4476
General Manager/Editor
John Halverson
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Manager
Sue Hinske
Customer Service/Office
Glenda Hill
Jacki Larisch
EDITORIAL STAFF
Managing Editor/New Media
Rob Ireland
Sports Editor
Mike Ramczyk
Reporters
Jade Bolack
Chris Schultz
Steve Targo
ADVERTISING STAFF
Advertising Representatives
Duane Hove
Mike Coolidge
Phil Bonyata
ReelLifeTV/Videographer
Joy Kowald
Graphic Arts Director/
Advertising Sales
Michael Reinsissel
Asst. Graphic Arts Director
Sarah Schauf
PLEASE SEE HALVERSON PAGE 2D
PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 6D
PRODUCTION STAFF
The Lake Geneva Regional News Serving the area for more than 140 years Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
10 years of sharing, 25 years of helping
Reinventing the chamber of commerce
An appeal on
behalf of Lake
Geneva history
PLEASE SEE QUINN PAGE 2D
2D The Regional News June 13, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Time ies
FROM THE FILES
June 10, 1993
Third District Alderman Robert
Meyerhofer resigned from his ofce fol-
lowing the council meeting last Monday.
A Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling bans
aldermen from working as part time city
employees. Meyerhofer had a reserve
police ofcer for 30 years.
Northwestern Military and Naval
Academy held its 105th commencement
Sunday, June 6, with 20 graduates.
Geneva Lake Womens Association
new members of the year were Pamela
Johnson and Denise Mancini.
Committee members for the annual
Holiday Home Camp fundraiser, to be
held at the Belfrey Theatre, included Lucy
Otzen, Peggy Everhart, Ethel Blomquist
and Nancy Zeller.
Brookwood School graduates who
received special recognition were Nick
Boroweic, Scholastic Award; Deborah
Wisniewski, Citizenship Award; Jessica
McCoy, Genoa City Education Award;
Heather Holden, United Church of Christ
Award; and Jarrett Cooper, Masonic
Lodge Award.
June 12, 2003
Lyons Township resident Tony Las-
kowski found a morel mushroom weigh-
ing 12.25 ounces under a bush on his
lawn.
Denison School fourth-grade stu-
dents Kayla Hawkins, Holly Schmidt
and Clayton Morris won rst place in the
recent Joint 1 Battle of the Books.
Brookwood School had 71 eighth-
grade graduates at the June 1 ceremony.
Bagpipe players Jeri Spangler and
Alex McGilvray performed at a Memo-
rial Day ceremony at Dunbar Cemetery,
Geneva Township.
Mart and Brett Stinebrink, owners
of Stinebrinks Pick n Save, donated
$20,000 to the Lake Geneva Police
Department for the purchase of a 2003
Harley Davidson motorcycle.
LETTERS
Looking for voices
To the Editor
The Four Seasons Chorus was formed about five years ago
to offer all singers an opportunity to perform a variety of musi-
cal concerts throughout the year and raise local awareness and
much needed funds for the hungry in our county and beyond.
Rachel West (then Bergerson) and Barb Mitchell joined
forces, having met helping with an after school chorus at Cen-
tral School years ago and being music leaders at their respective
churches.
Beginning at First Congregational UCC in Lake Geneva for
the first few seasons, we eventually spread over to faith. We
now spend equal time in both places, making it more balanced
for everyone.
As a volunteer group, we meet for about 10 to 12 weeks before
shows to prepare. We usually have two concerts each time, at
each church, and do two themed shows per year. We love to take
our songs on the road to share the joy at many care facilities.
No auditions are required, only a love of music and some
ability to carry a tune. We have done a wide variety of music
during our many themed concerts. So far, weve performed
show tunes, a Beatles concert, love songs, songs from the 21st
century, Christmas songs, autumn songs and now were prepar-
ing a whole concert of 60s music.
Since the beginning, weve never charged admission, but
have asked for donations (monetary or non-perishable items)
for the local food pantries. We even sang before the CROP Walk
for hunger last fall.
We are always looking for more voices to add to our group and
new ways to help those less fortunate than ourselves. Hunger is
a year-round thing, as is our chorus, and we are dedicated to
doing our best to help out at different times during the year.
Your next chance to help us help others is by coming to one of
our Songs from the Sixties concerts at the end of this month.
The first concert is on Sunday, June 23, at 3pm, at First Con-
gregational UCC, 715 Wisconsin St., Lake Geneva. One of the
food pantries is located on site and all proceeds will go to this
non-profit organization.
The second concert is on Wednesday, June 26, at 7 p.m, at
Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church, 420 Read St., Walworth. All
donations will go to the Walworth Food Pantry.
Our concerts are full of memorable tunes, solos, ensembles
and sing along songs. With the expert guidance of Tom Piano-
man Stanfield at the piano, the chorus will take you on a musi-
cal journey through the 60s, a decade full of changes and chal-
lenges, and great songs! Come along with us, enjoy the ride!
For more info. contact Rachel West at rachelrita22@gmail.
com or call 262-812-3786. See you there.
Rachel West
Lake Geneva
A practical parking
solution
To the Editor
It is time! It is time for Lake Geneva to settle our parking
problem with a practical solution!
During the summer months, parking is almost impossible
for everyone, tourists, local residents and employees of Lake
Geneva shops. The five hours parking time is not working as
it ties up parking spaces for far too long. One could even go
sailing for four hours and return, without even patronizing one
shop. Therefore, shops that rely on the summer tourist season
are penalized.
The City of Lake Geneva has discussed building a parking
area about six or seven blocks from town proper. This is an idea
that will not work. Will the city provide a shuttle service for the
handicapped and elderly? Think of the cost!
Here is a better idea. Convert the U.S. Post Office building
now located on prime city property into a public multi-level
parking lot. Its location in the proximity of shops will encour-
age people to frequent Lake Geneva, knowing that parking will
no longer be a problem.
A new U.S. Post Office could be built at Geneva Square, with
a drive-by mail-box which will be greatly appreciated by every-
one! Not to mention the ability to actually park and enter the
post office!
Patricia Wales
Lake Geneva
Halverson/Reinventing the chamber of commerce
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
Quinn/An appeal on behalf of Lake Geneva history
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
A walking man
reects on 40 years of
determined practice
Walking is good for you.
The human body evolved
not only to stand upright but to
employ legs to move about.
After 40-plus years of deter-
mined practice I can declare
unequivocally, walking is a good
thing to do. It is not strenuous
exercise, and I have to admit there
were times when I wondered
whether it did much good. But it
is one of those long-term invest-
ments that rewards perseverance.
After 40 years and nearly
27,000 miles, there can be little
doubt about its benets.
The initial impulse for this
four-decade campaign occurred
on a sunny Sunday afternoon
in late August 1970, when three
of my children and I decided to
walk from my wifes home farm in
Grant County to my parents home
in Fennimore, 7.5 miles away. The
effort proved something, espe-
cially since 30 percent of the trek
was upgrade.
What followed was resolve
to walk with regularity. It was
sporadic activity for the next few
years, but I was certain walking
was a good thing to do.
Then in the fall of 1975 a deci-
sion was forced that made walk-
ing an essential part of my life.
The car pool to which I belonged
was breaking up, and I faced a
choice: buy a second vehicle or
walk the 2.3 miles to Badger High
everyday. With some reluctance
I began the daily 4.6-mile round
trips.
I did that for 11 years. Two
conclusions can quickly be con-
rmed. I was thoroughly awake
and alert upon arrival in my class-
room, and thoroughly and pleas-
antly relaxed upon reaching home
in the late afternoon.
I walked in all conditions,
and of course there were always
obstacles. Rain, snow, trafc,
dogs, wind, ice, heat, cold, and
the occasional wise guys remarks
from comfortable drivers seats.
Naturally when one does that
much walking, unusual and chal-
lenging opportunities present
themselves. Among these were
the 11-mile walking day at Get-
tysburg while chaperoning a high
school trip, the two treks across
the Golden Gate bridge (1983
and 1990) and the annual four-
to six-mile Friday homecoming
photo excursions requiring a lot of
moving about.
When I left teaching in 1986,
I continued walking, though with
less frequency and distance. One
of the quirks of my ambulating
habit is that the activity must
have an objective. My morning
constitutional for the daily paper
is an example. Walking just to be
walking always seemed pointless.
Recently a problem arose when
the cost of my Tribune jumped
from $1.25 to $1.99. Have it deliv-
ered and it wont cost nearly so
much. But then I lose my reason
for walking.
Ive been fortunate with good
health, but by the middle of the
ninth decade you expect things
to happen. Like the plantar fas-
ciitis and the trick knee and the
reawakening of an old lower back
problem. So it doesnt get any
easier. I am still at it in ways com-
mensurate with my age. Walking
is worthwhile and benecial, and
I dont like the idea of cutting back
any more than I like the idea of
aging.
And the best for last: I would
end this fanciful foray with the
most enjoyable walking of all,
memorable countryside wander-
ings during Wisconsins four sea-
sons. Well save that for another
time.
Johnson is a retired Badger
High School teacher.
Recently Lake Geneva has lost several more keepers
of its history, including Gretchen Allen, Wilma Habacker
Bailey Jacobson, Sam Gonzalez, Ken Schneider, Larry
Magee, and John Fedorovich. It also lost the owner of the
Breadloaf Bookstore, Kevin Vail, who was very interested
in Lake Genevas history.
With the passing of these and other individuals, Lake
Genevas collective historical memory has been greatly
diminished. Fortunately we still have Ken Etten, Ginny
Hall, John Halverson, Bruce Johnson, Vern Magee, Burly
Brellenthin, and Doug Elliot, among others, as well as the
many volunteers, who, under the leadership of Karen Walsh
and James Gee, sustain the Geneva Lake Museum.
But as times change and the keepers of Lake Genevas
history pass away, we who remain, as well as future gen-
erations of Lake Geneva residents, will necessarily have to
rely even more on the published and unpublished historical
documentary records of Lake Genevas history held by the
Lake Geneva Public Library, the Geneva Lake Museum,
the Wisconsin Historical Society, and the Area Research
Center at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Library.
Among the most useful documentary historical sources
held by the Lake Geneva Public Library are the microlmed
copies of Lake Genevas newspapers and the yearbooks of
the Lake Geneva High School and Badger High School.
But sadly, many LGHS and BHS yearbooks are missing
from the collections of Lake Geneva Public Library and the
Geneva Lake Museum.
I am therefore appealing to readers of the Lake Geneva
Regional News to rectify this lamentable situation by
donating old LGHS and BHS yearbooks in their possession
to the Lake Geneva Public Library and the Geneva Lake
Museum in order to ll the gaps in their invaluable collec-
tions of Lake Geneva High School and Badger High School
yearbooks.
Another excellent source for Lake Genevas history
would be the compilation of oral histories of Lake Geneva
based upon the memories of longtime Lake Geneva resi-
dents. Perhaps Bruce Johnson could be persuaded to con-
duct oral history interviews with such longtime Lake Gene-
vans as Burly Brellenthin, Sturg Taggert, Muriel Malsch,
Buzz Braden,Vern Magee, Doug Gerber, and Clyde Boutelle,
just to mention a few people with superb memories of Lake
Genevas history.
Copies of these oral histories could be deposited at the
Lake Geneva Public Library and the Geneva Lake Museum,
where future residents of the city would nd them to be
invaluable historical resources.
But lling the gaps in Lake Geneva High school and
Badger High School yearbooks held by the Lake Geneva
Public Library and the Geneva Lake Museum is the most
urgent priority if we wish to preserve Lake Genevas history
for future generations. The Lake Geneva Public Library is
missing Badger High School yearbooks for the years 1970,
1976, 1977, 1982, 1984, 2011, and 2012.
The situation with Lake Geneva High School yearbooks
is even more egregious. Rather than listing all of the miss-
ing LGHS yearbooks, sufce it to say that the Lake Geneva
Public Library would greatly appreciate the donation of any
LGHS yearbooks between 1958 and the date that the rst
LGHS yearbook was published, which was around 1911.
The LGPL will offer any duplicate yearbooks it receives to
the Geneva Lake Museum.
I really do hope that the readers of the Lake Geneva
Regional News will respond to this appeal and donate
LGHS and BHS yearbooks to the Lake Geneva Public
Library. I issue this appeal not only on behalf of the Lake
Geneva Public Library (and the Geneva Lake Museum),
but on behalf of Lake Genevas history and the records that
document it.
Patrick Quinn is a Lake Geneva native who is Univer-
sity Archivist Emeritus at Northwestern University.
The only non-land locked area for expansion is
down Broad Street. Simple has shown itself to be
an attraction on the north side; so was Roses Fresh
Market before it closed. The problem is that visitors
stop when they reach the dilapidated Traver Hotel.

6. Marry the needs of the downtown and the
greater chamber.
Is the goal of the tourist arm of the chamber to
bring people to the community or to properly direct
them once they get here? I think the answer is: Both.
Its not a secret that sometimes merchants have dis-
agreed on this mission. As a result, sometimes tal-
ented people have had those talents diminished by
internal debates. I interviewed several people for this
column. No one wanted to be on the record. Thats
not what I wanted, but theres a good side. Everyone
hopes new leadership will bring with it a new team
atmosphere and no one wants to undermine that with
a careless comment to the media.
I think a re-invention, a refreshing, at the cham-
ber could impact the entire community in a positive
way.
The new person will have a lot of raw material
to work with both in terms of talent and the citys
obvious charms.
Theyll have big shoes to ll, too. While some
people disagreed with Hennerley, he was universally
liked and three decades of longevity meant some-
thing.
But with new blood comes new ideas.
Itll be interesting to see how it all shakes down.
Halverson is editor and general manager of the
Regional News.
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 3D
DEATH NOTICES
Daniel W. Flitcroft, 78, of Elkhorn, passed
away Sunday, June 9, 2013, at Lakeland Health Care Center
in Elkhorn. He was born March 4, 1935, the son of Benjamin
and Clara (Blumenstein) Flitcroft. Funeral services will be
held at Sugar Creek Lutheran Church in Sugar Creek Town-
ship, on Thursday, June 13, at 11:30 a.m. with Rev. Jane Roth-
man ofciating. Visitation will be held at Monroe Funeral
Home in Delavan, on Wednesday, June 12, from 4 p.m. to
7 p.m. Interment will follow funeral services at Sugar Creek
Lutheran Church Cemetery. Monroe Funeral Home, in Dela-
van, is assiting the family. See monroefh.com.
Robert J. Robinson, 75, Walworth and
Fontana, passed away Sunday June 9, 2013 at Mercy Wal-
worth Hospital and Medical Center. Memorial services will
be held at 11 a.m. Saturday June 15, 2013, at Toynton Wal-
worth Funeral Home with visitation one hour prior to the
service. Memorials may be made to VNA Hospice.
Edward Schmidt Petersen, 91, M.D.,
passed away at his home in Middleburg, Va., on June 3, 2013,
after a fall and subsequent hospitalization. A memorial ser-
vice will be held at Black Point, Lake Geneva, in mid-July. In
lieu of owers, contributions can be made to The Newbury
Library, Chicago. Please send condolences to www.colonial-
funeralhome.com.
Aubrey T. Richey Jr., 80, died on June
10, 2013, at Willoweld Nursing Home in Delavan. A celebra-
tion of his life will be held later this week at the Abby Springs
Golf Course 1 Country Club Dr., Fontana-on-Geneva Lake.
Please refer to our webpage later this week for service times to
be posted on the haaselockwoodfhs.com. The Haase-Lock-
wood & Associates Funeral Home and Crematory of Elkhorn
is assisting the family.
Robert J. Robinson
March 13, 1938 - June 9, 2013
Robert J. Robinson, 75, Walworth and Fontana, passed
away Sunday June 9, 2013 at Mercy Walworth Hospital and
Medical Center.
He was born March 13, 1938, in Harvard, Ill. the son of
Merle & Margaret (Miller) Robinson. Bob served two years
in the Army stationed in Germany. He worked on highway
maintenance for Walworth County for over 30 years and was a
member of the Harvard Moose Lodge for 53 years.
He is survived by a sister Marilyn (Arthur) Anderson of
Walworth, Wis., and a brother Dave Robinson of Wonder Lake,
Ill.; two nieces and six nephews, Jim and Mary Anderson,
Brian, Steve, Tim, Christi, Jeff and Todd Robinson. He was
preceded by a brother Arthur and a nephew Jesse Robinson.
Memorial services for Robert will be held at 11 a.m. Satur-
day June 15, 2013, at Toynton Walworth Funeral Home with
visitation one hour prior to the service. Memorials may be
made to VNA Hospice.
Edward Schmidt Petersen
Nov. 19, 1921 - June 3, 2013
Daniel W. Flitcroft
Nov. 19, 1935 - June 9, 2013
Daniel W. Flitcroft, 78, of Elkhorn, passed away Sunday,
June 9, 2013, at Lakeland Health Care Center in Elkhorn. He
was born March 4, 1935, the son of Benjamin and Clara (Blu-
menstein) Flitcroft.
Daniel graduated from Delavan High School and served
four years in the United States Air Force. On Nov. 19, 1955,
Daniel married Carolyn Damm in Ingleside, Ill. He was a
Master Plumber and owned Flitcroft Plumbing, until his retire-
ment. Since 1964, Daniel has been a member of Sugar Creek
Lutheran Church.
He was loved and will be sadly missed by his family, includ-
ing his wife of 57 years, Carolyn; his ve children, Susan (Gary)
Wallem, Elkhorn, Warren (Kris) Flitcroft, Lake Geneva, David
(Sharon) Flitcroft, Elkhorn, Tony (Kim) Flitcroft, Elkhorn,
and Mary (Jon) Cucchi, Elkhorn, his 15 grandchildren, Claire,
Lindsey, Zachary, Madelyn, Anthony, Daniel, Paul, Jacob,
Kyle, Jack, Cole, Kate, Mark, Luke and Matthew; his two sis-
ters, Joyce Thompson, Lancaster, Calif., and Charlotte Keyzer,
Elkhorn, and one brother, Lawrence Flitcroft, Delavan. He was
further preceded in death by his
brother Donald Flitcroft.
Funeral services will be
held at Sugar Creek Lutheran
Church in Sugar Creek Town-
ship, on Thursday, June 13, at
11:30 a.m. with the Rev. Jane
Rothman ofciating. Visita-
tion will be held at Monroe
Funeral Home in Delavan, on
Wednesday, June 12, from
4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Interment
will follow funeral services at
Sugar Creek Lutheran Church
Cemetery. Monroe Funeral
Home, in Delavan, is assisting
the family. See monroefh.com.
OBITUARIES
Edward Schmidt Petersen, M.D., 91, passed away at his
home in Middleburg, Va., on June 3, 2013, after a fall and sub-
sequent hospitalization.
Dr. Petersen was born on Nov. 19, 1921, in Chicago, Ill. He
was educated at the Chicago Latin School (1939), Harvard Col-
lege (1942) and Harvard Medical School (1945). He served in
the U.S. Army in the Medical Corps from 1946 to 1948, and
the U.S. Public Health Services from 1948 to 1981. After a brief
period in private practice and two years as Assistant Director of
Professional Services at the Veterans Administration Research
Hospital in Chicago, he received an appointment to the North-
western University Medical School in 1954 as the Director of
Clinics. He later became Assistant Dean and then Associate
Dean of the Medical School.
In 1972 he joined the American Medical Association in
Chicago as the Assistant Director and then Director of the
Department of Undergraduate Medical Education. He concur-
rently served, starting in 1976, as the Secretary of the Liaison
Committee on Medical Education. He retired from the AMA
in 1988.
Dr. Petersen was particularly interested in medical history
and the history of the American West. He won the University of
Pacic Philip A. Danielson award for historical writing in 1972
for his article The Military Surgeon in the West, and he wrote
more than 30 articles on various medical and western history
subjects over his career. He also had a lifelong interest in geol-
ogy, classical archeology and European history.
He was active in The Westerners, Chicago Corral, and sev-
eral medical societies, including the American College of Phy-
sicians, the American Diabetes Association, the Association
of American Medical Colleges and the American Association
for the History of Medicine. He was also on the Committee on
Hospitals and Clinics, the Illinois Department of Public Aid
and was a Director of Hull House in Chicago as well as being
on the Board of the Civic Association of Lake Geneva. During
his retirement, Dr. Petersen volunteered for many years at both
the Newbury Library in Chicago and the Sporting Library in
Middleburg, Va.
Dr. Petersen spent nearly every summer of his life at his
family home at Black Point, Lake Geneva. He loved sailing and
at the time of his death was the longest serving member of the
Lake Geneva Yacht Club. He was also a long time member of
the Lake Geneva Country Club and Racquet Club of Chicago.
Nothing made him happier than spending time with family
and friends and his attendance record at graduations, wed-
dings, reunions and other celebrations large and small was
near perfect.
He is survived by his wife of 69 years, Zoe Bakeeff Petersen,
his daughter, Catherine P. Mack of The Plains, Va., his son,
Edward B. Petersen of Washington, D.C., eight grandchildren
and nine great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held at Black Point, Lake Geneva,
in mid-July. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to the
Newbury Library, Chicago. Please send condolences to www.
colonialfuneralhome.com.
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SALE DATES: JUNE 13-19, 2013
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CHIVAS REGAL SCOTCH................................750 mL $21.99
CHRISTIAN BROS. BRANDY......................... 1.75 L $15.99
CROWN ROYAL OR JAMESON IRISH WHISKEY
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DEWARS WHITE LABEL SCOTCH.............. 1.75 L $29.99
FRIS OR SOBIESKI VODKA............................. 1.75 L $17.99
PATRON XO CAFE...............................................750 mL $19.99
SKYY VODKA .......................................................... 1.75 L $22.99
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Craft Beer
of the Week
Aubrey T. Richey Jr.
Jan. 1, 1933 - June 10, 2013
Aubrey T. Richey Jr., 80, died on June 10, 2013, at Willow-
eld Nursing Home in Delavan. Tal was born on Jan. 1, 1933, in
Braxton, MS, the son of Aubrey and Clyde (Ammons) Richey.
Tal served his country in the United States Army. He was
an active member of the Barrington, Ill. and Fontana writers
group and a published poet. He was a political advocate for
ACLU, president of Chicago Tax Club and a board member for
the Abbey Springs Community in Wisconsin.
Beloved father of Lis Price of Fontana and Tania (Gerry)
Haskett of Mundelein, Ill., dear grandfather of Jason Jacobs,
Tiffany Selby, Adam Haskett, Nicholas Richey, Gerrick Richey
and Vallen DeBaere. Brother of Francis Ellis, Hursty Clyde
Richey. Sister-in-law of Jeanne and Dr. Paul Price.
Tal was preceded in death by his wife, Valentina; son,
Gregory Richey; sister, Eleanor Holcomb; and sister-in-law,
Dorothy Turner.
A celebration of his life will be held later this week at the
Abby Springs Golf Course 1 Country Club Dr., Fontana-on-
Geneva Lake. Please refer to our webpage later this week for
service times to be posted on the haaselockwoodfhs.com. The
Haase-Lockwood & Associates Funeral Home and Crematory
of Elkhorn is assisting the family.
More Obituaries
on page D6
800 Park Drive Lake Geneva, WI, 53147
262.248.2031
www.derrickfuneralhome.com
500 Commercial Court, Suite 100
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-8252
Steven J Lois
Financial Advisor
114 E. Geneva Square
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-4058
Sheila M Broderick
Financial Advisor
302 Third Avenue
Fontana, WI 53125
262-275-0314
Daniel E Maus
Financial Advisor
302 Third Avenue
Fontana, WI 53125
262-275-0314
Sam Asani
Financial Advisor
The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its readers
to submit photos of charitable events, personal mile-
stones and school activities for publication. We also
accept unique photos of wildlife and nature.
Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution. The
photos must be in focus and have a natural color
distribution. The Regional News may alter the color
on photos and crop them. We use editorial discre-
tion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pic-
tures must be identied. Submitted pictures may also
appear online at www.facebook.com/LakeGenevaRe-
gionalNews.
Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ire-
land at rireland@lakegenevanews.net. Readers can
also bring pictures to the Regional News Ofce, 315
Broad St. Lake Geneva, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
4D The Regional News June 13, 2013
SUBMITTED
STUDENTS RACHEL BOYLE AND SONYA PEREZ were
recognized with Achievement Awards for excellent effort
in the Running Start Program by Lake Geneva Schools
Superintendent James Gottinger and teacher Ann Joly, far
right. Rachel read 250 books, and Sonya read 243.
SUBMITTED
ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS were given to Academic Bowl win-
ners Kylin McHugh, Charley Geise, Nathan Dyer and Connor
Duggan by school board member Barb Dinan, left, and Lake
Geneva Middle School Principal Anne Heck, far right.
SUBMITTED
ACADEMIC GROWTH and surpassing their goals earned
students, from left, Owen Knopp, Jack Norton, Tyler Gill
and Barulio Palos Achievement awards, presented by
school board vice president Bea Dale and their teacher,
Demetra Condos, far right.
SUBMITTED
STATE CULINARY COMPETITION second-place winners were (front, from left), board member Niki Ceisel, with team
members Danielle Neumann, Dakota Carmer and Ashley Sanew, and (back), culinary teacher Russ Tronsen, chef David
Ross and school board member Patricia Wolter.
SUBMITTED
THE FIRST PLACE national culinary management team was from Badger High School. Shown are (front, from left),
Badger School Board member Niki Ceisel, Copies & Prints owner Helen Owens, culinary team members Victoria
Bouras, and Tyler Lininger, who received Achievement Plus Awards, and (back), culinary arts teacher Russ Tronsen, chef
David Ross, school board member Patricia Wolter and Marie Collins.
SUBMITTED
THE CENTRAL-DENISON SCHOOL Talent Show was
dedicated to retiring music teacher Deanna Karlsen, who
was very surprised to be so honored. She has been teach-
ing in Lake Geneva for 34 years.
SUBMITTED
INVOLVEMENT PLUS AWARDS were presented to Helen
Owens, of Copies & Prints, and Patricia Gelderman for their
help with the 2nd annual Burger Throwdown by school
board members Niki Ceisel, far left, and Patricia Wolter,
second from right. Also pictured is Russ Tronsen, culinary
instructor at Badger High School.
A new generation of online TV for the Lake Geneva area
Catch all the sneak previews
of where to dine, shop, stay & play
Currently playing on ReelLifeTV.net
June 13, 2013 The Regional News 5D
SUBMITTED
THE ANNUAL CHILDRENS ART SHOW, sponsored by the Geneva Lake Womens Association,
was held Saturday, May 11, at the Geneva Lake Museum. Artists from 16 area elementary and
middle schools had their artwork on display for two weeks prior to the event. Schools participating
in the event were Brookwood Elementary, Brookwood Middle School, Central Denison, Eastview,
Faith Christian, Fontana Elementary, Lake Geneva Middle School, Lakeland, Reek, St. Francis, Star
Center, Traver, Williams Bay Elementary, Williams Bay Junior High, Wisconsin School for the Deaf
and Woods Elementary. Students in the 10:30 a.m. group were, (front, from left), Allyson Ramirez,
Keegan Dettmer, Jocelyn Monzon, Kiera Bays, McKenna Kubly, Alana Perez, Lexi Schmidt, Arthur
Raysby, Ben Olson, Araya Johnson and Lilly Schuldt; second row (from left), Rachael Warren,
Jazmine Kruzel, Gracie Hall, Ian Taddeo, Grace Osnacz, Grace Kraus, Sarah Seeberg, Michael
Schroeder,and Jude Reusch; third row (from left), Zarin Pirzada, Nathan Pedraza, Bret Bierman,
Kayli Willett, Jacob Jordan and Carly Baaken. Alex Mathison was not in the photo.
SUBMITTED
SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENTS from Fontana, Reek, Sharon,
and Walworth Elementary Schools went to see Oklahoma!
at the Lyric Opera House on May 7, on a trip funded through
a donation from the Lake Geneva Chapter of the Lyric Opera.
The greatest thing I have ever seen in my life! I cant get the
show tunes out of my head! These are a few of the exclamations
used by more than 130 students from the Big Foot Area Schools
Consortium to describe their experience. While scenery and
costumes were a spectacle, for most students this was the rst
time they had ever heard a professional orchestra. The trip was
organized by Regan Schmidt, band teacher at Sharon School and
a Lake Geneva Chapter Board Member.
SUBMITTED
BADGER HIGH SCHOOL advanced metals concepts students
(from second from left), Brandon Doerner, Jacob Hetz, Max
Tornow, and Josh Harmon, became the rst in Badgers his-
tory to take the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council industry
assessment in safety as part of their high school curriculum. Their
instructor, Clint Geissler, is at their far left. They passed the assess-
ment and will be awarded an MSSC Safety Certicate, evidence
of core skills and knowledge needed by the nations front-line
production and material handling workers.
SUBMITTED
THE ST. FRANCIS DE SALES eighth-grade class recently returned from a trip to Washington, D.C., where they met and talked with
U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, center, representing Wisconsins 1st Congressional District. They also visited many shrines, monuments and
museums. Ryan is the current chairman of the House Budget Committee and was the Republican Party nominee for Vice President
of the United States in the 2012 election. Ryan posted a picture of the students meeting with him on his Facebook account.
SUBMITTED
THE UNITED WAY OF WALWORTH COUNTY announced it has reached its 2012-13 fund goal
of $285,000. Board members of United Way are (from left), chairman Joe Peyer, Shane Grifn,
Greg Wescott, Alan Larsen, Jon Chamberlain, Debra Alder, Mary Green and Dennis Carnes.
SUBMITTED
RESIDENTS AT VINTAGE ON THE PONDS, an assisted living
facility near Delavan, expressed their concern for the people of
Oklahoma after the tornado destruction. The Resident Council
decided to send $100 to the American Red Cross. To raise the
money they made homemade dog biscuits and sold them as a
fundraiser. Shown with a symbolic check are Florette Engel, left,
resident council president, and Anne Marcello, resident council
treasurer.
SUBMITTED
VICKI LEWIS, right, president of Aurora Lakeland
Medical Center and Aurora Memorial Hospital
of Burlington, with 2013 Benet Ball Honorary
Chairperson Douglas Batesky, MD, held at Geneva
National May 18.
SUBMITTED
MEMBERS OF THE BENEFIT BALL COMMITTEE helped to raise a record-
breaking $125,000 to purchase a state-of-the-art cardiac network monitoring
matrix and enhancements for the trauma room at Aurora Lakeland Medical
Center through the 28th annual event, held May 18 at Geneva National.
SUBMITTED
WILLIAM BURROUGH,
left, became the rst
person to receive the
Kathleen Skowlund
Scholarship, awarded at
the 28th annual Benet
Ball. Kathy recently retired
as Aurora Health Care
executive vice president
in the south market. The
$5,000 scholarship was
available to students who
are pursuing a graduate
or doctorate degree in the
health care eld and live
in Walworth County.
6D The Regional News June 13, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Time Is Now/10 years of sharing, 25 years of helping
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
Father of the Year Contest 2013
Contest Rules
Any Lake Geneva
area father is eligible
to be nominated in the
contest.
Any child enrolled in
any school not exceed-
ing the eighth grade
may enter their father.
Entries must be mailed
or dropped off to the
Lake Geneva Regional
News, P.O. Box 937, 315
Broad St., Lake Geneva,
WI 53147 no later than
Friday, June 14, 2013
by 5 p.m.
The winning father
will receive a $50 gift.
Winner will be notified
by phone and presented
with a certificate at the
Regional News office.
Winners name and
photograph will be pub-
lished in an upcoming
issue of the Regional
News.
Employees of the
Regional News or the
advertisers on this con-
test are ineligible to
participate.
ENTRY FORM
My Dad is the greatest because:
(100 words or less, attach separate sheet if necessary)
Name:
Age:
Father:
Phone:
Email:
Subscribe
Today
Call 262.248.4444
My instinct was to run to her
and compassionately help.
Unfortunately others did not
have that instinct and chose
to walk around the woman
lying in distress. Thank God
we together have the instinct
to help, to lift up the suffering.
We may not always see the
suffering behind closed doors.
The working poor families that
just make enough to get by day
to day, until an emergency
causes them to fall behind. At
that point their survival stops.
That is when God leads us to
give a hand up.
Did we make a differ-
ence to the 5,000 fellow cre-
ations we helped? You better
believe it. We receive some of
the most heartfelt thank yous.
We would like to share a few
of them so you too can feel the
impact of what we do. Many
feel the good in their heart
when they realize the impact
The Time Is Now to Help has
had on another persons life.
I want to thank everyone
at The Time Is Now to Help
for helping my husband and I.
We never thought in a million
years that we would get help.
But God works in mysterious
ways and sent you to us. Once
again thank you so much and
when we are ahead in our life
we will donate food, clothes
etc. whatever we can do to help
other families or individuals
like us.
Dear The Time Is Now to
Help, I just wanted to let you
know that you are an angel on
Earth. With the help you sent
my daughter she was able to
get the medicine she needed
and we found a secondhand
motorized scooter for her.
She cried that after two
years she is able to get out of
the house on her own for the
rst time. The rst thing she
did was go to church. You are
all in our prayers. You put
such a smile on her face she
beamed. Thank you again and
God bless.
I used to cry myself to
sleep knowing what little food
I had given my children, pray-
ing they would be able to fall
asleep while still hungry. I
kept losing weight not having
enough to eat myself. Thank
you to God for leading us
to your help. Our lives have
changed so much for the
better. We have food, I have a
job and we are nally able to
survive. God Bless The Time
Is Now to Help.
I may be too old to do
much but I can express my
thankfulness. As you know,
since you helped me celebrate,
I am 82 years old. I remem-
ber crying all the time, know-
ing I was alone, sitting in the
dark with my electricity off.
I felt like an empty shell with
no love or purpose. I just felt
poor. I remember laying down
to sleep crying because no one
cared. Then you knocked on
my door. I just stayed in bed
not acknowledging the noise.
Who would knock on my door?
I tried to ignore it but you kept
knocking. I opened the door
and you were there. I asked
who would care about an old
woman and you said, We
do. The Time Is Now to Help
cares. I am living more now at
82 than I have in years. Thank
you for renewing my life with
love and care.
The last 10 years of us
growing together is so much
more rewarding than my rst
15 years without all of you.
Thank you for being there
with me.
Many stories and faces
remain in our memories of
bringing caring and sharing
to our fellow creations. We
love to read notes and emails
from people we helped in the
past that are now doing great.
When they remember the
helping hand we gave so many
years ago we know our impact
was felt. That impact would
have not been possible without
all of you helping us for the last
ten years. Heres to another 10
years of caring and sharing for
our fellow creations.
Thank you for reading our
column and sharing the mes-
sage of hope. Please network,
share our message of love with
all your family, friends and
business associates. Please
visit our website at www.timei-
snowtohelp.org and like us on
our Facebook page at www.
facebook.com/thetimeisnow-
tohelp. The more who hear
about our mission, the more
pain and suffering we can
relieve. God Bless everyone.
Health and happiness,
God bless everyone,
W.C./Sal
Please Help
There are many living in
the fear of poverty, struggling
daily to provide food, shelter,
toiletries, gas, electric, etc.
These are our fellow creations.
Please help me to share our
compassion and remove the
pains of poverty. Presently the
Fox Charities have stepped up
to offer a $25,000 Matching
Grant. Every dollar you donate
will be matched by another,
doubling your help to those
in desperate need, removing
their pains of poverty. Please
help our fellow creations.
New Mailing Address
Make checks payable to:
The Time Is Now to Help
P.O. Box 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
The Time Is Now to Help
is a federally recognized
501(c)3 charitable organiza-
tion licensed in the states of
Wisconsin and Illinois. You
will receive a tax deductible,
itemized thank you receipt
showing how your donation
provided assistance for the
poverty stricken.
A Very Special Thank
You
Fox Charities, Pentair
Foundation, The Summertime
Foundation, Dick and Jean
Honeyager, Mark and Nata-
lie Reno, Paul Ziegler/Ziegler
Charitable Trust, Lake Geneva
Area Realty, Petco Founda-
tion, Gregory Swanson, James
and Marilynn Dyer, Walter
and Florence Strumpf, John
Poiron, Douglas and Gwendo-
lyn Gerber, Stephanie Riley,
Phyllis Kutz, Alexandra Gand,
Don Jager, William and Jean
Isaacson, Louise and Clifford
Morris, Patricia Jankowski,
Albert and Ellen Burnell,
Robert and Patricia Host,
Anthony and Mary Hauet,
W.C. Family Resource Center/
Food Pantry volunteers, and
all the God loving volunteers
of all our caring food pantries,
all of you who support The
Time Is Now to Help donation
boxes, and the businesses that
allow our donation boxes.
Anyone who would like
a Time Is Now donation box
in your business, please call
(262) 249-7000.
Memorials
John and Susan Holmes
in memory of Jean Wattsano.
Ronald and Patricia Sarna in
memory of their dear friends
Mrs. Dorothy Cardiff and Mr.
Robert Zukowski.
Upcoming Event
Please join us Tuesday,
July 2, 2013, at 5 p.m. as we
celebrate Lake Geneva School
of Cookings fth year in Lake
Geneva. We will be enjoy-
ing champagne, appetizers
and delightful grilled bites
from Chef Johns Demonstra-
tion Table while listening to
the musical talents of Dave
Sarkis.
The event will be $50 per
person with half of all sales
going to The Time Is Now
to Help. We hope to see you
there. For more information
please visit www.lakegene-
vaschoolofcooking.com or call
262-248-3933.
Chris Anns Resale Shop
I will continue to ask Chris
Anns Resale shop for furni-
ture and household neces-
sities to help our poverty
stricken fellow Americans. If
you have anything you would
like to donate please call (262)
348-9088. They are located at
406 Highway 120 North, Lake
Geneva, in the old Floor Store
building across from the Next
Door Pub. Look for the Ameri-
can ags.
We desperately need
cars
Please donate a used car to
help our fellow Americans get
to work and other daily neces-
sities.
Please visit
www.timeisnowtohelp.
org.
OBITUARY
Kathleen L. Dalin
Sept. 2, 1949 June 10, 2013
Kathleen L. (nee Higgins) Dalin, 63,
passed away on Monday, June 10.
Born in Rhinelander Sept. 2, 1949, to
the late Donald and Marion (nee Louis) Hig-
gins.
Survived by son, Kevin Richard Dalin;
grandchildren, Sebastien, Brayden, and
Isabelle; siblings, Peggy Weiss, Ronald Hig-
gins, and Jeanne Kuttnauer; her loving com-
panion, Walter Milbrath; and sister-in-law,
MaryAnn Rappley. Preceded in death by her
brother, Robert Rappley.
Visitation will be held at Phillip Funeral
Home of West Bend (1420 W Paradise Drive)
on Saturday, June 15 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
A Moose Lodge walk-through will take place
promptly at 11 a.m. with the
memorial Service to follow
with Rev. Mark Moller-
Gunderson ofciating.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial donations would be
appreciated to Moose Chari-
ties, 155 N International
Drive, Mooseheart, IL 60539-
1100 or www.moosecharities.
org.
The Phillip Funeral Home
of West Bend is assisting the
family. www.phillipfuneral-
home.com.
OPEN Monday-Saturday
8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Sundays:* 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
*Closed Sundays in June, July & August
N1445 S. Hwy. 120 Lake Geneva, WI
(262) 248-9876
See our website for specials
www.woodhillfarmsnursery.com
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WHOLESALE PRICES
SAND BOX BUCKET SALE
BRING YOUR 5 GALLON BUCKET & FILL IT UP
$1.00/BUCKET
NOW AVAILABLE:
Mushroom Compost $35.00/yd.
White Flagstone $0.15/lb.
Colored Flagstone Only $0.20/lb.
Red, Brown, Beige or Tan
Blue Stone Now Only $0.23/lb.
Great Values For Your Spring Projects
WISCONSIN GRANITE BOULDERS
(Good for Building Retaining Walls)
Any Size: $100/ton or $0.06/lb.
EMERALD ARBOR VITAE . .5-7 - $50.00
DWARF LILACS $22.00
ANY & ALL PERRENIALS ONLY $7.00 (ALL SIZES)
Path Chips
$15.00/yd.
Now Digging 6 to 7
Arbor Vitae $75.00
Happy Anniversary!
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony & Pauline
Bartnick will celebrate their 65th
wedding anniversary on June, 19,
2013. They were married in 1948
at St. Alphonsus Catholic Church
in Burlington, Wisconsin.
Anthony, born and raised in
Chicago, is a retired tool and die
maker. Pauline (Robers), grew
up on a farm in Burlington,
Wisconsin. They met at The
Wonder Bar in Twin Lakes, WI.
Once married they spent time in
Arizona and on a Wisconsin farm before settling in Park Ridge, IL, where
they lived for 30+ years. In 1989, they built a new home and retired to
Williams Bay, Wisconsin. Mr. & Mrs. Bartnick enjoy staying active with daily
walks and spending time with their daughter, Penny, who is married and
resides in Batavia, IL.
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 1 June 13, 2013
Real Estate Professionals
Walworth, WI 53184
(262) 275-2185
www.wyntreeconstruction.com
CELEBRATING 25 YEARS
262-248-8580
Bill Binn, President
A new generation of online TV for the Lake Geneva area
Catch all the sneak previews
of where to dine, shop, stay & play
Currently playing on ReelLifeTV.net
CELEBRATE
SUMMER
Inside: the areas best of the season:
Recreation Events
Shopping Dining
Downtown Lake Geneva map
and business guide
2
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BROASTED CHICKEN
SERVED NIGHTLY for just ... $12.95
Having a Party? Call Crandalls!
Private party rooms available.
Catering and carry-outs.
PLUS .... OUR FABULOUS FRIDAY NIGHT FISH
FRYICELANDIC COD......................................$11.95
SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIALS WITH OUR FULL
MENU (STEAKS, SEAFOOD, etc.)
WORLD FAMOUS
for over 40 years
OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER
AT 11:45 TUESDAY - SATURDAY
OPEN AT 10:00 A.M. ON SUNDAY
10441 Rt. 47 Hebron, IL (815) 648-2609
Go South 10 Minutes from Lake Geneva on WI 120
SUNDAY BRUNCH 10 a.m.
SUNDAY DINNER 1:30 p.m.
SUNDAY BOUNTIFUL BRUNCH~Adults $15.95
Breakfast & Dinner Items 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
DINNER MENU W/CHICKEN 1:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m
~ Served from 11:45 a.m. ~
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 3 June 13, 2013
resorter notes
of Wine & Cheese
HGHWAY 12, RCHMOND, L (815) 678-2500
SALE DATES: JUNE 13-19, 2013
We reserve the right to liimit quantities and correct printed errors.
Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Fri. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
AMERICAN CAF
Now open for Dinner 3 p.m.Close
MondaySaturday
CANADIAN CLUB WHISKEY.......................... 1.75 L $17.99
CAPTAIN MORGAN SPICED RUM............750 mL $14.99
CHI CHIS COCKTAILS....................................... 1.75 L $7.99
CHIVAS REGAL SCOTCH................................750 mL $21.99
CHRISTIAN BROS. BRANDY......................... 1.75 L $15.99
CROWN ROYAL OR JAMESON IRISH WHISKEY
..........................................................................................750 mL $19.99
DEWARS WHITE LABEL SCOTCH.............. 1.75 L $29.99
FRIS OR SOBIESKI VODKA............................. 1.75 L $17.99
PATRON XO CAFE...............................................750 mL $19.99
SKYY VODKA .......................................................... 1.75 L $22.99
TANQUERAY GIN OR JIM BEAM STAG... 1.75 L $29.99
TWO OLIVES VODKAAssorted Types.............750 mL $14.99
Vofed by Chicago 7ribune as one of fhe "7o 20 Wine Sfores" in Chicago/andl
BUDWEISER OR COORS BEER...........18 pk bottles $12.99
HIGH LIFE OR BUSCH BEER...................30 pk cans $13.99
LEINENKUGEL BEER................................ 12 pk bottles $12.99
MILLER LITE OR MGD BEER .................24 pk cans $14.99
SAMADAMSORBLUEMOONBEER.12 pk bottles $12.99
*NEW* BEL ARBOR WINES
Chardonnay Malbec Moscato Pinot Grigio ..................3 L box $12.99
BERINGER CALIFORNIA WINES
Cabernet Chardonnay White Zin &More .............................1.5 L $8.99
FETZER WINES Assorted Types....................................1.5 L $8.99
FRANZIA WINES
Chillable Red Sunset Blush Sangria &More .......................5 L box $9.99
RUFFINOLUMINAPINOTGRIGIO2011 750 mL $6.99
VIDEO
GAMING
IS HERE!
Over $400,000 won in last
3 months!
Daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
ASK ABOUT OUR SENIOR
GAMBLING CLUB
TUES. &THURS. 8 A.M.11:30 A.M.
Bacardi Rum
Silver or Gold
Malibu Rum
Smirnoff Vodka
$18
.99
Revolution Brewery
Beers
IPA - Porter - Seasonal
$9
.99
1.75 L
6 pk cans
Pall Mall
Cigarettes
$47.99 Carton
$1 DOMESTC BOTTLES
$2 WELL DRNKS
Hamburger w/ fries................................................ $2.99
Hot Dog w/ fries................................................... $1.99
Tacos .........................................3 for $2.99
Pulled Pork Sandwich w/fries ............$3.99
Homemade Lasagna..........................................$4.99
D
I
N
N
E
R
S
P
E
C
I
A
L
S
Craft Beer
of the Week
Mars Resort anniversary celebration set
On Saturday, June 15, the staff at Mars Resort will host a celebration of owner Don
Woelkys 25th year of owning Mars Resort, andof the 90 years Mars has been open.The fun-
lled day will include entertainment, a pig roast, drink specials and more. The celebration
will begin at 2 p.m.
Mars is located at W4098 South Shore Dr., on the shores of Lake Como. For additional
information, call (262) 245-5689.
Grand Geneva Resort & Spa has opened the exclusive Geneva Club. The concierge
lounge is the latest offering from the resort, currently celebrating the 45th anniversary of
the property. Located on the main level of the hotel, the Geneva Club will be staffed by a
dedicated Club Concierge attendant to assist travelers and create a new level of luxury
service for Grand Genevas esteemed guests.
The opening of the Geneva Club signies the next chapter of the resorts long history
of providing superior service and hospitality to our guests, said Chris Anderson, Senior
Vice President Sales, Marketing and Brand Development for Marcus Hotels & Resorts.
With this latest addition to the Grand Genevas wealth of amenities, travelers have a new
way to enjoy their stay, whether visiting for business or leisure.
The Clubs dcor is reminiscent of a stately library, anchored by a replace and stacked
book shelves, with comfortable seating areas for lounge-goers to unwind.
For business travelers, the Geneva Club features workstations for individuals and
small groups, Wi-Fi Internet access, printers, and televisions for any and all viewing
needs. Families and kids looking for some recreational fun can choose from a selection of
complimentary board games for a lively game night. As a special treat, resort guests who
utilize the Club will be able to enjoy a complimentary mid-day tea service, complete with an
education session and an array of nger sandwiches, scones and cookies.
Additional complimentary food items will be offered throughout the day, including
breakfast in the morning, snacks during the afternoon, and hors doeuvres in the evening.
Beverages, including coffee, espresso and soft drinks will be served throughout the day
with additional bar offerings in the evening. The Geneva Club will be opened daily from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m.
Offered as an upgraded experience for any hotel guest at the Grand Geneva Resort &
Spa, Geneva Club access is available at a starting rate of $20 for adults and $10 for children
12 years and younger, and includes all-inclusive access to the lounges luxe services.
For more information or to reserve accommodations at the Grand Geneva Resort &
Spa, call (800) 558-3417 or visit www.GrandGeneva.com.
Grand Geneva opens the Geneva Club
IN
LYONS
Closed Mon. and Tues.
Open Wed. thru Sat. at 4:00 p.m.
Sundays 11:30 a.m. all day & night
HWY 36 - Halfway between Lake Geneva & Burlington, From Hwy. 50 turn on South Rd.-3 miles
763-2701 FOR RESERVATIONS
CARRYOUTS AVAILABLE
4
3
r
d
Y
e
a
r
Surf & Turf
Available
Wednesday
thru
Sunday
$34.95
Join Us On
FATHERS DAY
SUN., JUNE 16th
for
Live Entertainment
by
AL WHITE
from 4:00-8:00 p.m.
SUN., JUNE 16th
SPECIALS:
Pork or
Turkey Dinner -
$9.95
Tenderloin Tips
w/Noodles - $12.95
Plus Regular Menu
Fathers Day
Brunch Buffet
$18.00
Eggs, French Toast, Bacon, Sausage,
Cheesy Hash Browns, Quiche,
Danishes, Muffins, Salad, Pizza,
Chicken Parmesan, Prime Rib,
Ham, Lasagna, Smashed Potatoes,
Vegetable, Beef Strogranoff &Much More!
Start off with the best Bloody
Mary in Lake Geneva or one of
our Cranberry Mimosas!
Bistro 220 & Olive Martinis
220 Cook Street ~ Downtown Lake Geneva
262-248-4-220 ~ www.bistro220.com
(262) 249-1230
905 Marshall St. Lake Geneva, WI
Sore Muscles
From A New
Fitness Program?
CALL US!
Massage Therapy
Helps Muscles
Recover From
Overuse and Can
Relieve Chronic Pain.
4
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
dining out
SEE DINING PAGE 9
THE ABBEY
RESORT
269 Fontana Blvd., Fontana,
(800) 772-1000 or (262) 275-
9000. We welcome all guests
and area residents to celebrate
the Abbey Resorts 50th An-
niversary with us! We invite you
to enjoy several great dining
options located within the resort.
The Fontana Grill, overlooking
the resorts marina and seasonal
ice skating rink, features steaks,
chops, seafood, a Saturday night
prime rib buffet and their signature
Sunday Champagne Brunch. The
Waterfront Restaurant and Bar
offers casual dining, seasonal
outdoor dining harbor side, a Fri-
day night sh fry and Whitefords
BBQd ribs, chicken and pork, year
round. The Abbey also features the
Helm, an intimate cocktail lounge,
and Caf Latte, brewing Starbucks
products.
B. J. WENTKER'S
230 Milwaukee Ave., Burling-
ton, (262) 767-1514. Contempo-
rary cuisine by Chef Eric Peterson
is served in a uniquely historic
atmosphere. Authentic turn-of-the-
century details enhance the dining
experience; the menu includes
an array of appetizers, entrees
and desserts, complemented by
a variety of beer and fine wines.
B.J. Wentkers is open for lunch
Monday through Friday from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Happy hour drink
specials Monday through Friday
from 2 to 5 p.m. Dinner 5 to 9
p.m. Monday through Thursday,
and 5 to 10 p.m. Friday and Satur-
day.
THE BAKER
HOUSE
327 Wrigley Drive, Downtown Lake
Geneva, (262) 248-4700, Baker-
House1885.com.
The most spectacularly decorated
historic mansion on the lake sets
the scene for an amazing night on
the town. 13 replaces, live music,
decadent menu and more than 200
vintage hast for guest to enjoy. Offer-
ing hearty "small plate" dinners, chef
entrees and vintage cocktails, guests
informally dine throughout the historic
mansion on wing-back chairs, reside
couches and on the enclosed wrap-
around veranda. Wildly good times
nightly, full bar and hotel suites. Live
music Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday. Decadent dining Tuesday
through Saturday, 5 to 10 p.m. Sunday
Victorian Brunch buffet, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. and Sunday dinner, 5 to 9 p.m.
Closed Mondays. Open for private
events always. Reservations welcome.
BIG FOOT INN
Two miles south of Walworth
just across the Illinois/Wisconsin
border off Highway 14. (815) 943-
4740. Run by Lee and Eugenia
Archos since 1977. Open six days
a week, closed Mondays. Offering
fresh seafood, chops, steaks and
much more, including Friday night
sh fry with Icelandic cod, Sat-
urday night prime rib (regular or
special cuts available), and Sunday
champagne brunch from 9:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. A banquet room is
available for all special occasions
as well as live piano entertainment
on Friday and Saturday evenings.
Visit www.bigfootinn.com.
BISTRO 220
220 Cook St., downtown
Lake Geneva (262) 248-4220. A
unique atmosphere with the illu-
sion of outdoor seating indoors.
Dine under the starry indoor sky
in the most unique and intimate
restaurant in the area. Dining is
also available on the covered bal-
cony overlooking downtown Lake
Geneva with views of the lake.
Enjoy drinks and appetizers in the
picturesque landscape of the out-
door courtyard. On cool days dine
next to one of our replaces while
enjoying one of our many fresh
seafood items, black angus steaks
or pasta dishes. The Bistro also
has prime rib every Saturday and
a tilapia Friday sh fry in the fall
and winter. A bountiful Holiday
Brunch Buffet is also available on
Easter, Mother's Day & Father's
Day. Join us for happy hour at
the Olive Martini Lounge inside
Bistro 220 where martinis are
$2 off and beer, wine & specialty
mixed drinks are a dollar off. A
complimentary appetizer will also
be provided during happy hour.
The Bistro is open from 4 p.m.
until close Wednesday - Sunday
and seasonally open Mondays 4
p.m. until close. Weekend lunches
seasonally. Visit our website at
bistro220.com.
CAFE CALAMARI
Highway 67 and Geneva
Street, Williams Bay, 262-245-
9665. Traditional Italian and
Continental cuisine with a air,
including favorites such as brus-
chetta, Sicilian let, Chilean sea
bass and fettuccine Alfredo. Other
Cafe Calamari favorites include
veal portabella, marsala and
picatta dishes. Overlooking Scenic
Williams Bay Cafe Calamari offers
a private room accommodating
up to seventy guests providing a
complete full service bar. Reser-
vations are accepted. Open seven
days a week at 5 p.m.
CHAMPS SPORTS
BAR & GRILL
747 Main St., Lake Geneva,
(262) 248-6008.Great food at
Champs includes charbroiled,
vegetarian and deli sandwiches,
chicken, fresh homemade soups,
chili, and an extensive appetizer
menu. Soup and sandwich spe-
cials are offered Monday through
Friday and specials are featured
seven days a week. Friday's fish
fry specials include Icelandic cod,
lake perch and walleye. Fantail and
coconut shrimp also are featured.
Fish fry is available from 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. The kitchen is open
until midnight seven days a week.
Handicapped accessible. Carryouts
are available for lunch and dinner
menus. Champs has earned Best
of Lake Geneva Voters' Choice
awards for live entertainment, bar/
tavern, spirits and sports bar.
CORLEONE
A SICILIAN
RESTAURANT
N2062 South Lake Shore
Drive, Lake Geneva. (262)
248-0685. On the scenic east
side of the lake, neighboring
Bigfoot Beach State Park,
lies the new Corleone Sicilian
restaurant, boasting breath-
taking views of the beautiful
Geneva waters. After enter-
ing the doors of this newly
remolded restaurant, you will
be immersed in a cultural and
culinary experience you are
sure to remember for a lifetime.
With a casual atmosphere and
affordable prices, you will be
awe-inspired while receiving
the excellence of an upscale
style of service. The authentic
cuisine of house made recipes
is only the beginning. In addi-
tion, Corleone offers a full bar
with a wine and cocktail menu
as formal and exciting as the
cuisine itself. Open daily at 11
a.m. corleonesicilianrestau-
rant.com.
CRANDALLS
RESTAURANT
Route 47, Hebron, Ill., (815)
648-2609. Since 1969, Crandalls
Restaurant has been known for its
world famous broasted chicken.
Due to popular demand, this
chicken is served every night as an
all-you-can-eat special. The Friday
fish fry features fresh Icelandic
cod and also can be combined
with chicken. Sunday brunch is
served from 10 a.m. until 1:30
p.m., followed by dinner service
until 8 p.m. Tastefully remodeled
inside and out, Crandalls offers
lunch and dinner from 11:45
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ON THE
DECK EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 5 June 13, 2013
6
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
calendar of events
JUNE
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12
Open mic night, 8 to 11 p.m. ~ The Abbey Resort, Fontana
Boulevard, Fontana.
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
Live entertainment from Tom Staneld, 6 to 9 p.m. at the
Fontana Grill and 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. at The Helm; and
Big Al, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., the Waterfront. ~ The Abbey
Resort, Fontana Boulevard, Fontana.
Live entertainment from Matt Meyer. ~ Hemingways,
N3270 Highway H, Lake Geneva.
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
37th Annual Walworth County Farm Bureau Dairy Break-
fast. Meal served from 6 to 10:30 a.m. with activities hosted
until noon. ~ Walworth County Fairgrounds, Elkhorn.
Live entertainment from Tom Staneld, 6 to 9 p.m. at the
Fontana Grill and 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. at The Helm; and
Big Al, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., the Waterfront. ~ The Abbey
Resort, Fontana Boulevard, Fontana.
Live entertainment from Blue Olives ~ Hemingways,
N3270 Highway H, Lake Geneva.
SUNDAY, JUNE 16
Live entertainment from Tom Staneld at brunch, 9:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. at the Fontana Grill and Big Al at Burnin Down
the Docks, noon to 5 p.m. at the Waterfron Patio. ~ The Ab-
bey Resort, Fontana Boulevard, Fontana.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
Open mic night, 8 to 11 p.m. ~ The Abbey Resort, Fontana
Boulevard, Fontana.
FRIDAY, JUNE 21
Live entertainment from Pirates Over 40. ~ Hemingways,
N3270 Highway H, Lake Geneva.
Live entertainment from Tom Staneld, 6 to 9 p.m. at the
Fontana Grill and 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. at The Helm; and
Triple D, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., the Waterfront. ~ The Ab-
bey Resort, Fontana Boulevard, Fontana.
SATURDAY, JUNE 22
Sock hop event. ~ Margots Restaurant, 4009 S. Shore
Drive, Delavan.
Anniversary weekend celebration, with live entertainment
from South of Disorder and Pirates over 40. ~ Hemingways,
N3270 Highway H, Lake Geneva.
Live entertainment from Tom Staneld, 6 to 9 p.m. at the
Fontana Grill and 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. at The Helm; and
Hobie, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., the Waterfront. ~ The Abbey
Resort, Fontana Boulevard, Fontana.
SATURDAY, JUNE 29
Gordon Goodwins Big Phat Band with special guest Ann
Hampton Calloway, 7:30 p.m. ~ Music by the Lake at The
Ferro Pavilion, George Williams College campus, Williams
Bay.
JULY
THURSDAYS IN JULY AND
AUGUST (EXCEPT AUG. 15)
Free Chamber of Commerce Concerts at the Park series, 7
p.m. ~ Flatiron Park, Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva.
SATURDAY, JULY 6
Lee Greenwood performance, 7:30 p.m. ~ Music by the
Lake at The Ferro Pavilion, George Williams College cam-
pus, Williams Bay.
SATURDAY, JULY 13
Gala of Stars: the Reunion, 7:30 p.m. ~ Music by the Lake
at The Ferro Pavilion, George Williams College campus,
Williams Bay.
AUGUST
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY,
AUG. 10 AND 11
Geneva Lake Art Associations Art in the Park, a juried ne
arts fair with more than 80 artists from all over the nation.
Silent auction, food and beverages and childrens activities.
~ Flatiron Park, Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva.
WEDNESDAY TO SUNDAY,
AUG. 14 TO 18
Lake Geneva Jaycees Venetian Festival featuring a
carnival with games and rides, live entertainment, beer tent,
a craft fair, waterski show and a Sunday night lighted boat
parade followed by a reworks display. ~ Flatiron Park,
Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva.
THURSDAY TO SUNDAY,
AUG. 23 TO 25
Maxwell Street Days. ~ Downtown Lake Geneva.
262-763-4333
262-728-8844
262-877-4328
262-743-2665
262-275-3150 www.peckandweis.com
Plumbing & Electrical
Water Heaters
Sump Pumps
Water Softeners
Iron Filters
Drinking Water Systems
Water & Drain Lines
Gas Lines
Faucets
Tubs/Showers
Toilets, Sinks, Disposals
& More
Whole House Generators
Indirect/Under Counter Lighting
Dimmer/Motion Sensor Switches
Walkway Lighting
Service Arrestors
CO Detectors
Timer Switches
Energy Saving & Lighting Solutions
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL
and FARM ...
SPRING A/C CLEAN & SERVICE
SPECIAL -
Some restrictions apply. Extra parts & labor excluded. Not valid with other discount or offers.
Call for details. Expires 7/31/13
$
94
79
(plus tax)
Reg. - $145.00
Voted the #1 Heating &
Cooling Dealer in Walworth
County for 3 years running
*$
2500.00
(*Based on 2.0 Ton/24,000 BTU, 13 SEER air
conditioner, coil, 25 lineset & basic
installation. Some restrictions apply. Call for a
FREE estimate today! Offer expires 7/31/13.)
Stay cool this summer simply by adding a Bryant air conditioning system to
your home or business or by replacing that old inefficient system with a new
energy efficient environmentally friendly Bryant air conditioning system.
AIR CONDITIONING SALE!!!
AIR CONDITIONING SALE!!!
Hwy. 120 North 2506 Crest Dr.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-6836
2013
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 7 June 13, 2013
out and about
THE BAKER HOUSE
327 Wrigley Drive, Down-
town Lake Geneva, Baker-
House1885.com, (262) 248-4700.
Celebrate the season in a house
like no other. Listed on the Na-
tional Register of Historic Places.
Enjoy 13 replaces, live music,
decadent dining, Gilded Age his-
tory and unpretentious fun. Chef
Maura creates new entrees and
appetizers to tantalize your taste
buds featuring the freshest sea-
sonal ingredients paired with her
amazing epicurean talents. Come
see what's cooking! Tuesday: live
music performed by Lake Geneva
legend Tom Staneld; Wednesday:
dinner 5 to 9 p.m.; Thursday: live
music performed by Lake Geneva
legend Tom Staneld, and dinner
5 to 10 p.m.; Friday: live music
and decadent dining in our reside
parlor. Dinner 5 to 10 p.m.;
Saturday: dinner 5 to10 p.m.;
and Sunday: Victorian brunch.
An all-you-can-eat brunch buffet
($25) includes gourmet breakfast
and signature lunch items such
as our famous lump crabcakes
and Emily Baker's chicken and
dumpling soup. Sunday dinner
5 to 9 p.m. Reservations sug-
gested. For information, visit
BakerHouse1885.com or call after
5 p.m. (262) 248-4700. Restau-
rant reservations can be booked
online at Opentable.com. Open 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Reservations sug-
gested. For additional information,
BakerHouse1885.com or call after
5 p.m. (262) 248-4700 or book
online at Opentable.com.
BELLA PELLE
MEDISPA & LASER
CLINIC
647 W. Main Street, Suite
600, Lake Geneva. (262) 206-5149
www.lakegenevaskincare.com.
Bella Pelle is a team of individuals
who are passionate about Medical
Aesthetics, committed to our cli-
ents in providing customized care
treatments. Plastic and Recon-
structive Certied Nurse Injector,
Gabrielle Kochell-Nunez, brings
over 30 years medical experi-
ence, educating and administering
aesthetic medical techniques to
patients and medical professionals
throughout the nation. Kochell-
Nunez has dedicated her practice
in offering: noninvasive, state of
the art, cutting edge, FDA-ap-
proved medical technologies
accessible to all clients. You dont
need to have a celebritys budget
to afford celebrity skin. In a private
and relaxed setting, patients are
treated with a level of gentleness,
encouragement, and grace you'd
be hard-pressed to nd elsewhere.
This gold standard customer serv-
ice is what Bella Pelle prides itself
in sharing with our clientele, cre-
ating timeless beauty, both inside
and out. Open Tuesday through
Saturday. Call today to set up an
appointment for a complimentary
skin-care consultation.
BELLA VISTA
SUITES
335 Wrigley Drive, Lake
Geneva. (262) 248-2100. Enjoy
live entertainment on weekends as
you take in the lakefront views and
upscale atmosphere at the On the
Waterfront Piano Bar. Weekday
specials include game night on
Mondays, Hospitality Industry
Nights on Tuesdays, Happy Hour
on Wednesdays and Martini Mad-
ness on Thursdays. Drink specials
and an outdoor veranda add to the
appeal of the Mediterranean-style
hotels, which offers 39 suites, a
variety of amenities and the newly
opened Bliss Spa. Bella Vista is
located a block from downtown
Lake Geneva, across from the
lakeshore. Boat docking is avail-
able. Visit www.bellavistasuites.
com for more information.
BEST BARGAINS,
INC.
6515 - 352nd St., New Munster,
(262) 537-2639.
Best Bargains features Wholesale
Food Service, Bar and Restaurant
Distribution, Best Bargains also
features a large selection of fresh
meats and an extensive deli.
Full-line grocery that specializes in
graduation parties, holiday festivi-
ties, fundraisers and meat rafes.
Customized meat cutting. Buy
more...spend less. Your own big
box store in a small town. Located
eight miles east of Lake Geneva in
New Munster, WI. www.bestbar-
gainsinc.com.
BLOOMFIELD
PRESERVE
HUNT CLUB
N1083 County Road U,
Genoa City, (262) 279-6877 and
cell (262) 379-0027. Located off
Highway 12 and Pell Lake Drive,
ve minutes from Illinois-Wis-
consin border. Wisconsins elite
private club, with 500 acres and a
4,000 square-foot clubhouse. The
hunt club is owned and operated
by Earl and Sylvia Zimmerman.
SEE OUT PAGE 8
1 C k l O

5 8 l u 5 c 8 l 1 C l
N 5 l 5 u l C w
Outstanding Cuisine and a Spectacular Grandview
Nestled on the shores of beautiful Geneva Lake
Be
Lakeside!
- June 14 Beer Dinner - Father's Day Weekend
- LIVE Music Friday & Saturday Nights & Sunday Brunch
- Lakeside Patio Open For Lunch & Dinner!
- Half-Priced Appetizers Every ursday 4-6pm
- Now Featuring New Lunch & Dinner Menus
Grab Your CHANTILLYLace, Your BLUE SUEDE
SHOES And SOCK HOP On Over To Margots
Authentic German Cuisine & American Fare
(The t is silent)
Margots
Reservations Required Call for Details
4009 South Shore Drive Delavan, WI
(262) 740-9039
Saturday, June 22nd ONE NIGHT ONLY!
SIGMUND SNOPEK and MIKE WOODS
GROOVIE Dinner Show
features the hits of the 50s, 60s & 70s
Our Special Menu (needs to be pre-ordered!)
includes Baby Back Ribs, Veal, Prime Rib, Lamb Shank &More!
No need to spike the punch We serve all your favorite cocktails.
Reservations are a must, so gather your senior classmates
and reserve your table today!
watsonswildwestmuseum.com
WATSONS
WILD WEST
ELKHORN
(262)
723-7505
8
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
CONT. FROM PAGE 7
out and about
SEE OUT PAGE 10
hunt club is owned and
operated by Earl and Sylvia Zim-
merman. All pheasants, quail and
chuckars are raised on the farm
so you are assured the best-ying,
the biggest and the best tasting
birds available. Call for a tour.
Individual and corporate mem-
berships are available. Special
events year-round. Visit www.
bloomeldhuntclub.com for more
information.
CARVETTI'S OF
LAKE GENEVA
642 W. Main St., Lake
Geneva, (262)-248-9752. Voted
by Lake Geneva People's Choice
as the Best Bar and Best Outdoor
patio in Walworth county. Lake
Geneva's only award-winning and
largest outdoor patios featuring
a sand volleyball court, basket
ball hoops and baggo courts, two
outdoor bars with four HD TVs,
live music and entertainment and
the areas top DJs with dancing
every Friday and Saturday night
until 2 a.m., along with al fresco
dining for up to 250 people make
this one of the most popular spots
in Lake Geneva for family fun and
adult nightlife. Weekday Happy
Hour includes 2 for 1 cocktails
and half priced appetizers Monday
through Thursday, 3 to 6 p.m.
Friday 3 to 5 p.m. Happy Hour
includes 25-cent wings and $2
Miller draft beer at the bar. Come
in and view the 14 TVs with all
Chicago sports teams including
the Stanley Cup Champion Black-
hawks. The Riverside patio is the
perfect place to hold a reunion,
rehearsal dinner, birthday bash or
any kind of party you can imagine.
Visit their Web site at www.carvet-
tis.com for food and drink menu
as well as upcoming events and
discount coupons.

CHAMPS SPORTS
BAR & GRILL
747 Main St., Lake Geneva.
(262) 248-6008. Plenty of sports
memorabilia, large HD plasma
TVs, dancing, cocktails, regulation
basketball hoops inside and out
and a beer garden make Champs
a fun, casual place for everyone,
especially sports fans. Champs
features live music every Friday
from 8 p.m. and every Sunday
from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the beer
garden, and a live DJ every Sat-
urday night from 8 p.m. There is
never a cover charge. Champs
has earned Best of Lake Geneva
Voters' Choice awards for live
entertainment, bar/tavern, spirits
and sports bar.
CLEAR WATERS
SALON & DAY SPA
18 Geneva St. Williams
Bay. (262)245-2444. Walworth
County's only full service Medi-
cal Day Spa. Experience Botox,
Restylane or a Photofacial with
Dr. Nicholas Veith. Take in the
breathtaking views of Geneva Lake
while experiencing their signature
Clear Waters pedicure. Receive a
therapeutic hot stone massage,
or relax while one of the skilled
Estheticans give you a skin repair-
ing facial or chemical peel. Utilize
the talent of the highly educated
hair design team to revive your
color, enhance your current style
and leave with your ideal look.
Relax your mind, rejuvenate your
WORLD CLASS GENTLEMANS CLUB
hWYS. 11, 14 & 89 Darien, WI (262) 724-3289 www.vegas-gentlemans-club.com
For General Information Call: Vegas Gentlemans Club (262) 724-3289
One Complimentary Admission
& Drink To Each Vehicle
Entry In Car Show
Sponsored by:
Vegas Gentlemans Club
RAIN OR SHINE!
$10 ENTRY FEE
Per Car
TALLY-HO
ANNUAL CAR SHOW JULY 27, 2013
Car Registration 9:00 a.m.12:00 p.m.
FIRST 100 ENTRIES
RECEIVE A DASH PLAQUE!
Participant-Judged Show
Best In Show is top vote-receiver
Also awarded are non-judged
Unique Trophies and Owner
Restored Division
CAR SHOWOPEN FOR
PUBLIC VIEWING
from
9:00 a.m.6:00 p.m.
Food provided by
Vegas Gentlemans Club
Breakfast available at 7:30 a.m.
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 9 June 13, 2013
CONT. FROM PAGE 4
dining out
SEE DINING PAGE 12
features homemade pies, desserts
and fresh-baked sticky-cinnamon
buns. Crandalls is located two
miles south of the state line and
10 minutes south of downtown
Lake Geneva on Highway 120.
THE END ZONE
SPORTS BAR
AND GRILL
4128 Blue Gill Road, Delavan,
(262) 728-2420. Burgers, Steaks,
Shrimp, Fried Chicken, and ap-
petizers. Cookouts every other
Sunday from Memorial Day week-
end thru Labor Day Weekend. The
kitchen serves the regular menu
until last call.
GENEVA
CHOPHOUSE AT
GRAND GENEVA
Highway 50 East, Lake
Geneva, (262) 249-4788. Selected
as one of the Top 10 Restaurants
in Wisconsin, the Geneva Chop-
House at Grand Geneva Resort
& Spa features hand selected
steaks from local suppliers, fresh
seafood own in from the coast,
and an extensive domestic and
international wine list. Sunday
brunch offers fresh baked pastries,
artisan cheeses, carving stations
and made-to-order omelets. And
when the weathers warm, you
can savor cocktails and desserts
reside at Embers Terrace and
take in the beautiful scenic views.
It is a culinary experience you will
always remember. Reservations
are recommended.
GRANDVIEW
RESTAURANT
N2009 S. Lake Shore Drive, Lake
Geneva, (262) 248-5690. Located
in The Geneva Inn on the shores of
Geneva Lake. Featuring American
contemporary cuisine and fantastic
fresh sh specialties. Open every day
of the week for Breakfast, Lunch and
Dinner. Breakfast is served Monday
through Sunday from 7:30 a.m. to 10
a.m. Lunch is served Monday through
Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Dinner is served Monday through
Saturday starting at 5 p.m. and from
4 p.m. on Sunday. Sunday Brunch is
served every Sunday from 10:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Half-priced appetizers are
available in The Grandview Lounge
on Thursdays from 4 to 6 p.m. Live
music featuring Diane Lewis Friday and
Saturdays from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., and
Carolyn Wehner during Sunday Brunch
from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Located in
The Geneva Inn, directly on the shores
of Geneva Lake. Visit www.genevainn.
com for more details.
GRAND CAF AT
GRAND GENEVA
Highway 50 East, Lake Ge-
neva, (262) 249-4788. Visit Grand
Caf at Grand Geneva Resort &
Spa for a casual dining option,
featuring American fare with a
French, Spanish or Italian twist.
Open from breakfast through
dinner, guests enjoy everything
from healthy dining options to
rich, decadent desserts. The wide
variety of options is sure to please
everyone in your group. Plus, the
weekend gets even better with our
premium buffets, featuring our
succulent Friday night seafood
buffet and indulgent Saturday
night prime rib buffet.
GREEN GROCER
24 W. Geneva St., Williams
Bay. (262) 245-9077. Every Sat-
urday from 1 to 4 p.m., the Green
Grocer offers a complimentary
boutique wine and handcrafted
beer tasting, paired with delectable
bites. Create your six-pack of beer
or case of wine and receive a 10-
percent discount. Shop organic,
local and grass-fed products
seven days a week. Visit their Web
site at www.greengrocergeneval-
ake.com.
HARPOON
WILLIE'S
Highway 67 and Geneva
Street, Williams Bay, (262) 245-
6906. Featuring homemade spe-
cialty pizzas and Friday specials on
the screened-in patio. The Friday
fish fry includes beer-battered
walleye, served with homemade
potato pancakes, coleslaw and
applesauce. Another popular spe-
cial is the Sicilian-encrusted, slow-
roasted prime rib, served with
roasted potatoes and coleslaw.
HAWK'S VIEW
BAR & GRILL
7377 Krueger Road, Lake
Geneva, (262) 348-9900. A
casual, fun, place to meet friends,
with panoramic views of the golf
courses. Patio seating is available
in season. Hawks View offers
great appetizers, homemade
soups and salads, mouthwatering
sandwiches and a full bar. Friday
fish fry is offered all year. Watch
your favorite sporting event on
one of the plasma TVs. Carryouts
are available. Hawks View Bar and
Grille is open seasonally, serving
lunch beginning at 11 a.m. Retire-
ment, birthday and social parties
are always welcome, and available
year round. Hawks View is located
three miles north of downtown
Lake Geneva, off Highway 120.
HEMINGWAY'S
N3270 County Highway H, Lake
Geneva, (262) 348-1200. Escape
reality at this unique Lake Geneva
establishment, where a laid-back,
tropical atmosphere awaits. The
menu reects the island theme
and casual attitude, with family-
friendly services and prices. Favor-
ites include fresh seafood, chops,
steaks, island specialties, Friday
253 Center St.
Lake Geneva, WI
262.203.5550
yogeeze.com
Thank You,
ReelLifeTV!
We LOVE the videos
of Yogeeze and
Dog n Suds,
Great Work!!
Thanks Again,
Kurt and Jan,
Owners
10
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
body and refresh your spirit. Visit
www.clearwaterssalonanddayspa.
com.
THE ELEGANT
FARMER
1545 Main St., Mukwonago,
(262) 363-6770. A wonderful
shopping experience, The Elegant
Farmer offers award-winning spe-
cialties in its Farm Kitchen Bakery,
Deli and Market, including its
famed apple pie baked in a paper
bag, cider baked ham, homemade
applesauce, jumbo muffins and
cookies and seasonal fruits and
vegetables. Home of the Smiling
Barn, the Elegant Farmer offers
seasonal special events, such
as its Autumn Harvest Festival,
December Holiday Market, East
Troy Electric Railroad trolley rides
and much more., is open daily
May to August 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
and September to April 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Closed Easter, Thanksgiving,
Christmas and New Year's Day.
For more information, visit their
Web site www.elegantfarmer.com.
THE END ZONE
SPORTS BAR &
GRILL
4112 Blue Gill Road, Delavan,
(262) 728-2420. Friday enter-
tainment alternates between
karaoke/disc jockey. A disc jockey
entertains every Saturday, with
theme parties throughout the
year. There is an outdoor patio
and a private room for parties.
Pool, darts, dancing and sports
are offered. Free pool is offered
on Thursdays and free darts on
Tuesdays. On Fridays, a pint of
tap beer is $1.50 from 3 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke is scheduled for Fridays.
Food specials are available Mon-
day through Friday. Food is served
until closing time. Happy Hour
from 3 to 6 p.m. Also, buy a drink,
get a ticket during Happy Hour for
a chance to win a free patio party
(beer and pizza). Drawing every
Friday at 6 p.m. The End Zone's
Dugout hotdog cart is now open
at Delavan's Community Park on
the lake. Offering Vienna hot dogs,
brats, chips and soda.
FIT FOR A QUEEN
Geneva Square Shopping
Center, highways 120 and 12,
Lake Geneva. (262) 248-7888.
Featuring dress and casual ap-
parel for women in sizes 14 to
32. The shop also offers an array
of accessories for all occasions,
including jewelry and handbags.
FRENCH COUNTRY
INN
Plan a getaway at The French
Country Inn on beautiful Lake
Como. Historic, lakeside bed and
breakfast with 33 lovely appointed
rooms. Spend time just relaxing
and enjoying the surroundings.
Hwy 50, just west of downtown
Lake Geneva. Call (262) 245-5220
or check out our website at www.
frenchcountryinn.com.
GENEVA LAKE
MUSEUM
255 Mill St., Lake Geneva,
(262)248-6060. Walking along
the museum's "Main Street" you
can not only peek into historic
stores, homes, a school room
and other places, but you can
actually go into them for a close
up look at furniture, clothing,
tools, machines, merchandise,
photos and other artifacts of daily
living from the Geneva Lake area
circa 1870-1930. Open March,
April, November, and December,
Friday-Saturday 10-4 and Sunday
12-3 and May through October,
Monday, Thursday-Saturday 10-4
and Sunday 12-3. For more infor-
mation, visit www.genevalakemu-
seum.org.
GENEVA LAKES
YMCA
203 Wells St., Lake Geneva,
(262) 248-6211. A family facility
offering activities for all ages, in-
cluding swimming lessons, team
sports, a variety of preschool and
youth classes, personal tness
and both land and water tness
classes. Amenities include a Well-
ness Center, two gymnasiums,
a 25-meter swimming pool, a
large therapy pool, saunas, steam
rooms, racquetball courts and
cycling equipment. Membership
options include individual, family,
youth and senior citizen. Visit their
Web site at www.lakegenevaymca.
com.
GENEVA NATION-
AL
Highway 50, Lake Geneva,
(262) 245-7010. Four miles west
of Lake Geneva, Geneva Na-
tional Golf Club features 45 holes
designed by legendary golfers.
The courses, designed by Arnold
Palmer, Lee Trevino and Gary
Player offer golfers a first-class
experience. The 60,000-square-
foot clubhouse overlooks Lake
Como and the Palmer golf course,
and features a full-service pro
shop and the Grill Room. Special
spring and fall packages are avail-
able.
GENEVA RIDGE
RESORT
Highway 50 West, Lake
Geneva. (800) 225-5558. The
Lakeview Lounge at Geneva Ridge
Resort is the perfect place for
guests to kick back and enjoy a
wide variety of drinks and enter-
tainment. The Lounge features
daily food and drink specials,
a full-service beautiful oak bar,
touchscreen internet jukebox and
ve large atscreen TVs. During
the weekends, the Lounge plays
host to live entertainment from
karaoke to local and regional
bands, the Lakeview Lounge is
sure to satisfy. Happy Hour (2 for
1 Drinks Monday thru Thursday
4-6pm); Wing Wednesdays (40
Wings, $6 Domestic Pitchers);
and College Gameday Specials
(Every Saturday 11am-6pm -
$1.50 Domestic Drafts, $6 Jumbo
Nachos). NFL Gridiron Specials
(Every NFL Game - $2 Domestics,
$6 Jumbo Nachos). At the Spa at
Geneva Ridge, the goal is to de-
liver superior customer care while
providing cutting edge techniques
and design trends in hair, skin,
body treatments, diet consulta-
tion and exercise physiology. The
spa offers a serene environment
where you can relax, rejuvenate
and refresh your body, mind and
spirit.R&R Special (Therapeutic
Mineral Bath, 50 Minute Swedish
Massage, and an Eye Treatment
- $129). Call (262) 249-3860 for
the spa.
GRAND GENEVA
RESORT
Highway 50 East, (262)
248-8811. Grand Geneva offers a
variety of entertainment options.
Live entertainment is featured
in the Lobby Lounge and Evolve
Nightclub and Lounge. The
Resort's seasonal offerings range
from two 18-hole championship-
level golf courses to an 18-run
ski and snowboard facility and
cross-country trails. The Dan
Patch stables offer trail riding
through Grand Genevas scenic
1,300 acres; sleigh rides, bonfires
and hayrides are featured as well.
Grand Geneva offers full-service
out and about
CONT. FROM PAGE 8
SEE OUT PAGE 23
FINE IRISH IMPORTS
Vera Bradley
711 Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI
800-553-2779
www.flemingsltd.com
Phil and crew
were great to
work with and
made the whole
experience very
relaxing and fun.
We are very
happy with the
video and the
reaction has been
very positive.
Kevin J Fleming, Owner
Flemings, Ltd.
SPORTS BAR & GRILL
on the South Shore of Delavan Lake
A Great Place To Have Your Party
(262) 728-2420
The
End Zone
Outside Deck OPEN
Smoking Allowed
COME I N & WATCH THE NHL GAMES
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
th
KARAOKE
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
th
DJ & DANCINGW/ HEAVY D
SUNDAY, JUNE 16
th
JOIN US FOR NASCAR ACTION
Get your chance to win the Yellow Flag
& Drink FREE between cautions
Come Watch All The Playoff Games!
Book Your Summer Parties!
Outdoor Patio Is Now Open!
Buy a drink, get a ticket during
Happy Hour for a chance to win a
free Patio Party (Beer & Pizza)
Drawing every Friday at 6 p.m.
HAPPY HOUR TAPPERS
$1.50 FROM 3-6 P.M.
FOOD SPECIALS
TUES: FREE DARTS
THURS: FREE POOL & Pitcher
of Beer & Pizza - $9.00
FRI: FISH BASKET SPECIAL
2 Piece: $6 3 Piece: $7
Plus $1.50 Tappers 3-6 p.m.
SEE US ON FACEBOOK
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 11 June 13, 2013
2400 EAST GENEVA STREET DELAVAN, WISCONSIN | LAKELAWNRESORT.COM | 800.338.5253
FATHERS DAY
PATIO GRILLE &
BEER BRUNCH
Sunday, June 16th
9:00AM - 3:00PM
Grilled St. Louis Ribs,
Beer Marinated Beef Tri-Tip,
Italian Sausage, Salads, Waffle &
Omelete Stations, Pastries
and more!
Complimentary commemorative
Capital Brewery Pint Glass!
$27.95 Adults
$12.95 Children (4-12)
(3 and younger complimentary)
For reservations call
262-725-9155
Expires 7/31/13. Excludes tobacco products,
paper products and food or beverage.
Minnetonka Moccasins
Bridal Gifts
Seasonal Holiday
Decorations
Clothing
Childrens Games,
Books and Toys
Call 262.725.9144 for information.
LAKE LAWN MARINA, WATER SPORTS AND BOAT RENTALS
Daily, weekly and seasonal boat slips with an easy access public launch.
Gas, ice, and snacks available in the full service marina.
Boat and water sport rentals include pontoons, tritoons, wave runners
and a wide variety of performance tubes and water toys for rent.
FOR INFORMATION OR RESERVATION CALL 262.725.9207
12
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
CONT. FROM PAGE 9
dining out
sh fry and Saturday apple wood
smoked baby back ribs, specialty
drinks and live entertainment. free
parking. Available for banquets
and parties. Outdoor patio is avail-
able along with the tiki bar in sea-
son. www.hemingwaysportofcall.
com.
HUNT CLUB
STEAKHOUSE
Geneva National Resort is
proud to present the acclaimed
Hunt Club Steakhouse. Inside this
unique historical building is an
upbeat and lively atmosphere for
drinks, appetizers or a delicious
steak dinner The menu offers an
expansive variety of delicious
homemade food including our
signature 25-ounce Tomahawk
Chop and several other cuts of
mouthwatering steaks. Renowned
chef John Havlis dishes up great
selections of seafood items and
other meats, as well as unique
sandwiches, small plates and
salads. Great libations and an
award winning wine list make the
Hunt Club Steakhouse the perfect
place to unwind with friends after
a busy day or to enjoy an intimate
night out with someone special.
Private dining is also available in
the Crane Room featuring a com-
munity table with seating for 8 to
14 guests.
IN THE DRINK
W3860 Lake Shore Drive,
Lake Como North, (262) 248-
8855. In the Drink serves sand-
wiches, burgers, appetizers and
Friday fish specials, as well as
daily specials. Shuffleboard, a
dartboard and pool table are avail-
able for patrons' enjoyment. Open
daily at 11 a.m. Kitchen hours are
Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m.
to 8 p.m., and Friday and Satur-
day, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
LAKE LAWN
RESORT
2400 East Geneva Street,
Delavan, (262) 728-7950. Two
lakefront restaurants at Lake Lawn
Resort boast award-winning din-
ing fare by local legend Executive
Chef Ross. Frontier Restaurant
offers American-heartland style
cuisine in a ne-dining atmo-
sphere with entrees and delicacies
ranging from ame-grilled steak
to broiled Boston cod. Weekend
specials include a Sunday lakeside
Champagne brunch and a Friday
night seafood buffet or Satur-
day night prime rib buffet. Ideal
for game-day or cocktail hour,
the Lookout Bar and Eatery is
equipped with eleven televisions,
the NFL ticket, seasonal outdoor
seating and regular bar food and
drink specials. New! Isle of Capri
Cafe: a taste of Italy comes home,
featuring fresh-baked stone re
pizzas, gelato, espresso, cappuc-
cino, and bakery goods, plus more
Italian-inspired items. For more
information visit www.lakelawnre-
sort.com.
LAKEVIEW
GRILLE AT
GENEVA RIDGE
RESORT
Highway 50 West, Lake Geneva
800-225-5558. Guests of the
resort can nd delicious resort
dining in The Lakeview Grille,
featuring superb steaks, choice
chops, fresh sh and a breakfast
menu that would get anyone out
of bed early. Experience all our
delectable creations while looking
out wall-to-wall picture windows
that frame the wooded slopes and
shores of Lake Como. Enjoy some
of the best dining Lake Geneva
has to offer when you order one
of our hand-carved rib-eyes,
lets, and succulent prime ribs to
be matched with award winning
wines from all over the world. You
will be delighted by our nightly
specials, the best Friday Fish Fry
around, and legendary service that
is sure to satisfy any guest. Friday
Night Fish Fry a Wisconsin
Tradition only $12.95. www.
GenevaRidge.com.
MARGOT'S
4009 South Shore Drive,
Delavan, (262) 740-9039 Authen-
tic German dishes and American
favorites at "wunderbar" prices.
Sauerbraten, weiner schnitzel,
liver dumpling soup, fresh-roasted
pork shanks, herring salad, kassler
ripchen and more German dishes
are featured, as well as fish and
seafood. German wines, spaten
and hacker pschorr are avail-
able. Daily specials and monthly
wine tastings are offered, and the
restaurant has a fireplace and an
outdoor deck for dining.
MARS
RESTAURANT
& RESORT ON
LAKE COMO
W4098 S. Shore Drive, Lake
Geneva, (262) 245-5689. Lake
Geneva's best kept secret on the
South Shore of beautiful Lake
Como. Casual sit- down dining
with a breathtaking view. Featuring
lunch and dinner seven days a
week. Indoor and outdoor lakeside
dining. Award-winning Premium
Babyback BBQ Ribs. Piano Bar
Thursday through Sunday from 6
p.m. until midnight. Spectacular
sunsets. Mars, where the locals
eat! Just two miles west of Lake
Geneva on Highway 50 --turn right
at Pesche's.
MEDUSA GRILL
AND BISTRO
501 Broad St., Lake
Geneva, (262) 249-8644. Enjoy
the authentic menu prepared by
Chef Greg. Enjoy dinners in the
restaurant or relax in the lounge
with your favorite drinks and
appetizers. Now open for dinner
Tuesday through Saturday 5:30
p.m. to close. Private parties are
available in the lounge. Lounge is
open Wednesday through Sunday
5 p.m. to close. You can also
make reservations online at www.
medusagrillandbistro.
PIER 290
1 Liechty Drive, Williams Bay,
(262) 245-2100. Located at Gage
Marine. Uniquely American res-
taurant focused on clean avors,
fresh ingredients, and attentive
service. Our progressive menu
features a variety of options which
highlight the seasons best local
ingredients ranging from grilled
elk patties and falling off the bone
beef short ribs to a bountiful sand-
wich menu. Whether you are en-
joying your meal inside by one of
our re places, or outside on our
heated covered decks, the cozy
environment and beautiful views
of Lake Geneva will make your
experience at Pier 290 memorable.
Open daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. For
more information, visit our web-
site, www.pier290.com and check
us out on Facebook.
POPEYE'S
RESTAURANT
811 Wrigley Drive, Lake
Geneva, (262) 248-4381. Located
across the street from the Riviera
Docks on beautiful Geneva Lake.
Known for its outstanding selec-
tion of appetizers, salads, entrees
and homemade desserts, Popeyes
extensive menu offers many
choices. A complete selection of
beers, wines, specialty drinks and
hot drinks is available. Full menu
is available for carryout. Barbecue
to-go menu also available for your
at-home parties. Popeye's is a
nonsmoking restaurant.
THE RED
GERANIUM
393 Edwards Blvd., Lake
Geneva,(262)248-3637. Quiet,
comfortable dining and American/
Continental cuisine is the setting
for this charming home, turned
restaurant. Seafood, specialty
meats and poultry from the open
hearth grill are just some of
the restaurant specialties. Also,
"lighter fare" such as salads and
sandwiches are available. The res-
SEE DINING PAGE 21
(262) 248-1034
Check out our website www.owl-tavern.com for upcoming summer events and drink specials
HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS
MONDAY-FRIDAY 4:30-6:30 P.M.
NIGHTLY FREE APPETIZERS
SUMMER IS
FINALLY HERE!
LETS CELEBRATE WITH
FAMILY, FRIENDS AND
COLD BEER
Featuring a wide selection of
beers including New Glarus
favorites Spotted Cow, Moon
Man & Totally Naked
NEW SUMMER DRINK
SPECIALS EACH WEEK!
4120 Southland Rd.
Lake Geneva, WI
(follow South Lakeshore Dr. to Maple Ridge
Rd. at Reek School, turn right and follow to
the Owl Tavern, where it dead ends)
Now Accepting Visa and Mastercard.
Big Foot Inn
Serving Area Diners Continuously Since 1946
Bring Your Father To The Big Foot Inn For Our
Serving 9:00 a.m.2:00 p.m.
815-943-4740
5 MILES NORTH OF HARVARD ON HWY. 14
2 MILES SOUTH OF WALWORTH ON HWY. 14
$
15
95
Adults:
$
9
95
Children under 10:
Under 3 Eat Free
We serve a large variety of breakfast items, salad bar,
casserole & pasta dishes, roast beef, ham, barbecue ribs,
broasted chicken, fruit table, dessert table, unlimited
champagne, coffee, ice tea and many more items!
We will also be serving our regular menu
after 2 p.m. til close
Reservations Highly Suggested
Fathers Day Brunch
Sunday, June 16th
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 13 June 13, 2013
Lake Geneva
Downtown
S
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THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
Downtown
I
n 1873, the Lake Geneva Herald
had some big stories. There was the
kidnapping of the Linn Reek familys
children, Lillie and Alfred. (They were recov-
eredanother big story.) The Rev. C.A. Williams
chopped off his thumb. (No word on whether it
was recovered.) Civil War General Philip Sheri-
dan and President Grant visited the city, and the
Lady of the Lake was launched for the summer.
But no matter how big the news week was, the
Whiting House construction progress was often
given a mention in the Herald. The hotel was
being built in the heart of downtown, and Lake
Genevans were keenly interested in the progress
of the luxury lodging.
In the aftermath of the Chicago Fire in 1871,
and with the advent of railway service to Lake
Geneva, more families were spending time in
their summer cottages on the lakeshore. With
the increasing popularity of Lake Geneva as a
summer destination, those who didnt have per-
manent digs in the city were always on the look-
out for a good hotel and the Whiting House
was one of the best. Good enough for dignitaries
and for the average summer wanderer, as the
Herald called its guests.
We all want to hurry our new hotel, for the
visitors are overowing the other hotels, and
some are staying away who would come if they
were certain hotel accommodations would be
had, the Herald editor wrote. The building is
moving, having reached its fourth story. It is to
have still another story, we are told, which will
be a large dance hall. Upon this will be a cupola
and railing around, to allow guests the pleasure
of a magnicent lakeview. The fth story did
not emerge, but the building was topped with a
cupola that provided that magnicent view.
David T. Whiting laid the cornerstone of the
wooden structure on April 22, 1873, the same
day that President Grant visited. The hotel, which
stood at the corner of Broad Street and Wrig-
ley Drive, where the Geneva Towers is presently
located, was nished in 1874. According to the
Annals of Lake Geneva Wisconsin by James
Simmons, it relieved the pressure to some
extent as far as lodging scarcity; the Whiting
House could accommodate 200 to 300 guests.
And by all accounts, they were accommodated.
The Herald skews poetic in its 1885 writeup
of the scene from any of the Whitings veran-
das: Innumberable fairy-like rowboats, which
dart hither and thither over the placid waters.
Music oats from shore to shore and one real-
izes deeply the pleasures of summer resorting.
Guests returned year after year to take in the
citys summer regattas as well as the hotels
legendary cuisine (No effort spared to provide
all the luxuries that the markets and seasons
afford).
Open 7 Days a Week from 3 p.m.
Outdoor Seating Now Available
DOWNTOWN LAKE GENEVA
724 MAIN STREET
262-249-0800 www.soprabistro.com
18
www.lakegenevahorsecarriage.com
Like us on to enter monthly drawing
to win a $50 gift certificate for a 30 min. ride.
Reservations
and Info.
262.539.3620
Enjoy Beautiful & Historic Lake Geneva by Horse & Carriage
Carriage stand
located on lakefront
at the corner of
Wrigley Dr. & Broad
St. in Lake Geneva
3
Bring in this Ad to Receive a
FREE APPETIZER with purchase of 2
adult lunch or dinner entrees.
Home of the GianormousBurger and
Daily Fish Fry. Salads & Sandwiches
also available. Kids Menu available.
Valid thru 9/8/13 Sun.Thurs. Only
COUPON
642 W. Main St. Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-9572
HOURS: Daily Noon till 2 a.m.
www.carvettis.com FREE WI-FI
LAKE GENEVAS LARGEST PATIOS WITH
3 OUTDOOR BARS and 14 HD TVS
OUTDOOR FIREPLACE
2
FROM LAKE GENEVA IN VINTAGE POSTCARDS
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 15 June 13, 2013
Lake Geneva
WHERE THE LOCALS
MEET TO EAT!
Open Mon.-Sat. 6:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.,
Sun. 7:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
522 Broad Street - Lake Geneva, WI
(262) 249-0301
Breakfast
Served All
Day!
Daily
Specials
5
Wine Tastings . Wine Lounge
Wine & Beer by the Glass
Gourmet Cheese & Sausage
Wine Accessories . Art Gallery
LIVE MUSIC
Mon, Wed-Fri, Sun 11-6, Sat 11-9, Closed Tues
401 Sheridan Springs Road, Lake Geneva, WI
262-348-9100 . www.StudioWinery.com
Studio Winery
Saturday
June 15th
4-8 p.m.
Sunday
June 16th
4-6 p.m.
Tim Merkel
Acoustic Guitar
Red Belt
Pop Rock
19
728 W. Main St. Lake Geneva, WI
www.hawksviewgolf.com
(262) 248-0670 - Open daily at 10
GOLF and BOUTIQUE
Golf Simulator - 17 world renowned courses
Only $15 for 30 minutes of golf
Bring a foursome or play yourself
Clubs are available
Golf & Casual Apparel
Monterey, Adidas, Antiqua, EP Pro
Brewer & Cubs Apparel
Ask about Family Fun on Barn Hollow
7
Amenities listed in the Heralds writeup take
a more prosaic view of a stay at the Whiting;
much like todays hotels boasting of free wire-
less in every room, the Whiting could brag
about its onsite telephone and telegraph ofces.
The hotel also featured a bar, billiards room and
barbershop in the basement, and retained its
status as the largest hotel in the city through
its existence.
General Sheridan was among its summer
guests. The Lake Geneva Yacht Club notes that
Sheridans visits were so anticipated that in
1874, his friends arranged a sailing race in his
honor. The idea was to make it an annual event,
so funds were raised to commission a perpetual
trophy. The race date was set for the end of
August and Sheridan was invited to take in the
action from the judges boat.
The race began at the Whiting House pier.
Two years later, the founders of the Lake Geneva
Yacht Club gathered at the hotel to form their
organization, and the Sheridan Race was there-
after run by the club. That year, Sheridan pre-
sented the trophy, a silver model of the sloop
Nettie, winner of the inaugural race.
PHIL BONYATA/THE RESORTER
STORY CONTINUED ON PAGE 18
16 June 13, 2013 THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 17 THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE
June 13, 2013
R
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ra
B
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a
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Riviera
Shore Path
Shore Path
Library
Chamber of
Commerce
Central-Denison
School
Railroad
Historical Marker
Skate Park
First House
Historical Marker
Geneva Lake
Museum
Water
Commission
Eastview
Elementary
School
City
Hall
3 17
9
13 1
22
5
20
8
14
6
12
7
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10
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15
11
Main - Hwy 50
Geneva Lake
Library Park
Flatiron
Park
Seminary
Park
Donian
Nature
Preserve
Maple
Park
Dunn Field
Wisconsin
Geneva
Dodge
North North
Pioneer
Cemetery
Ann
Marshall
Henry
Elkhorn
Water
Cass
Baker
Campbell
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Downtown
Lake Geneva
19
N
Celebrating 34 Years in Business
Notvalid with any other offer. Valid with this coupon only atThe Back Yard. Expires 6/23/13
1
22
4
21
8
MR.
SCOOPS
ICE CREAM & DELI
101 Broad Street - Lake Geneva, WI
262-203-5193
CHOCOLATE SHOPPE ICE CREAM
1ST PLACE ICE CREAMRETAILER S ASSN.
APERFECT 10 FOR FLAVOR &SEAL OF
EXCELLENCE 20 YEARS RUNNING
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ICE CREAM - SHAKES - SUNDAES
40 FLAVORS
CAPPUCCINO-SMOOTHIES-LEMONADE
- INSIDE & OUTSIDE -
SEATINGAVAILABLE
17
4
18
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
Downtown
131 Wells St. Lake Geneva, WI (262) 348-9077
Across the street from McDonalds on Wells Street
HOURS:
Mon./Wed./Thurs./Sun. 2 p.m.11 p.m. Tues. 4 p.m.11 p.m. Fri. 11
a.m.3 a.m. Sat. 2 p.m.3 a.m.
SUMMER SPECIALS
Extra Large
One-Topping Pizza
Dine In or Take Out
ONLY
$12.00
24 Hurricane
42 Slices
Two-Topping Pizza &
Two Liters of Soda
$26.99
COUPON COUPON
12
14
Newest and cutest shop in Lake Geneva
ONLY 8 BLOCKS
NORTH
OF DOWNTOWN
Open Wed.-Sun. 10-5
830 Williams St.
Too see more, check
us out on Facebook
20
By 1885, the Whitings proprietor was E.H.
Caskey. The Herald announced he was the rst
Lake Geneva hotel owner to open the doors for the
upcoming summer, and detailed how he had spent
the off-season improving the amenities at the Whit-
ing. Caskey had renovated the structure from top
to bottom.
Less than 10 years later, a re raced through the
structure from bottom to top, undoing Caskeys work
and nearly killing some of the Whitings guests. The
local paper, by then The Lake Geneva News, ran a
front-page story on the catastrophe in its July 12,
1894 edition.
It was the largest re to date, in a time when res
by the dozen were listed in year-end recaps of the
news.
The re started in the kitchen or laundry and ran
up through the four stories as though they were made
of tinder, a comparison that in a hot, dry summer
was not all that hyperbolic. The Whiting, after all,
was a wooden building.
The Whiting was only sheltering 20 to 40 guests
at the time of the blaze. Among them were Alonzo
Hatch and his wife, Chicago residents who were on
the second story, directly over the res origin. The
News reported they were nearly suffocated with
smoke upon awaking.
Mr. Hatch only waited to put on part of his
clothing, took his wife and what he could carry, and
reached the street in safety, well satised to lose
nearly all their clothing.
Hatch sang tenor for the Ford Opera Company,
which had just given performances of The Mikado
the previous weekend. Soprano Kittie Marcellus was
still in Lake Geneva as well, and escaped the third
oor of the Whiting after being awakened by screams
and smoke.
She coolly dressed herself and escaped, leaving
her trunk, containing all she possessed. A reman
afterward climbed to the room on a ladder and threw
the trunk from one porch to another until it reached
the ground, battered and broken, but contents safe,
according to the News.
The paper also reported that the re boys
had responded promptly and soon had three hoses
directed at the ames, but the hotel was obviously
a loss. Fireman Larry Watson was seriously injured
by a falling ladder, and during the chaos one of
the hoses was accidentally? turned on the crowd
of onlookers. They got wet and away, the story
summed up. (The question mark after accidentally
really did run in the original story. And the following
week, the paper mentioned that the boys of the re
company were satised with the pressure of the
water at the re.)
After the re, the Whiting House property remained
empty for years. The Lake Geneva News reported
now and then on the prospects of the land, support-
ing one of the owners idea of 20 residents purchas-
ing the property and starting up another hotel.
Another news brief took a hopeful tone as a great
hotel man arrived from the east coast to consider
the possibilities. Nothing came of the visit, though,
STORY FROM PAGE 15
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 19 June 13, 2013
Lake Geneva
THE ORIGINAL
C O M P A N Y
150 Center St. Lake Geneva, WI 53147
W
e also serve
Chicago D
ogs!
14
704 Main St.
Lake Geneva
262.249.0220
www.sazas.us
See Us At
Our New
Location!
16
18
and in 1911 the prime real
estate became the site for
Frank Lloyd Wrights vision
of what a summer wanderer
would want in a Lake Geneva
hotel.
Wrights hotel didnt suc-
cumb to re, as the Whiting
did, but to the march of time.
It was torn down in 1970
and replaced by the Geneva
Towers, which as its name
implies, rises taller than the
Whiting Houses cupola did
the better to enjoy the
lake views and breeze.
The Towers has had its
share of detractors, as did
the Wright-designed hotel,
but the historical record
shows that the Whiting
House was a welcome addi-
tion to the Lake Geneva sky-
line, and its eventual loss
lamented by those who in
1873 had felt new pride
in the building as it slowly
but grandly looms up on the
shore.
Story by Jessica Franzene
FROM LAKE GENEVA IN VINTAGE POSTCARDS
SARAH SCHAUF/THE RESORTER
20
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
WANT MORE ON ALL THE
LOCAL FUN THIS SEASON?
Tune into
www.ReelLifeTV.net
and catch our latest episodes on
where to shop, stay and play
in the Lake Geneva area.
WANT MORE ON ALL THE
LOCAL FUN THIS SEASON?
Tune into
www.ReelLifeTV.net
and catch our latest episodes on
where to shop, stay and play
in the Lake Geneva area.
If you lived here,
youd be home by now.
If you lived here,
youd be home by now.
Find your Lake Geneva dream home
in Welcome Home magazine.
On newsstands now.
Find your Lake Geneva dream home
in Welcome Home magazine.
On newsstands now.
The Resorter & Welcome Home www.lakegenevanews.net The Resorter & Welcome Home www.lakegenevanews.net
The shops, restaurants and businesses of
downtown Lake Geneva offer an amazing
variety of goods and services yet the city
retains its small-town atmosphere.
Whether youre running errands, day-tripping
or enjoying a long weekend, there is plenty
to do and see downtown.
In addition to the dozens of boutiques, eat-
eries and specialty businesses, visitors and
locals alike can enjoy the beautiful land-
scape of Geneva Lake. Historical architec-
ture, quaint neighborhoods and a variety of
parks add to this small citys charm.
Downtown Lake Geneva
Businesses
1. The Backyard 252 Center St.
2. Carvettis Bar & Grill 642 Main St.
3. Field Stone Carriage & Pony 800 Wrigley Dr.
4. Fit For A Queen 130 E. Geneva Square
5. Grandma Vickies Cafe 522 Broad St.
6. Harbor Shores 300 Wrigley Dr.
7. Hawks View Golf & Boutique 728 Main St.
8. Kismet Handcrafted Gifts 152 Center St.
9. Lake Geneva Cannery 120 Broad St.
10. Lake Geneva Harley-Davidson 704 Main St.
11. Leather Lips Water Sports 151 Wrigley Dr.
12. Mama Ciminos Little Italy 131 Wells St.
13. Oh My Gauze 227 Broad St.
14. Original Chicago Pizza Company 150 Center St.
15. Revive Gallery 721 Geneva St.
16. Sazas Accessories 704 Main St.
17. Scoops Ice Cream & Deli 101 Broad St.
18. Sopra Bistro 724 Main St.
19. Studio Winery 401 Sheridan Springs Rd.
20. Tattered Buttery 830 Williams St.
21. Village Gourmet 725 Main St.
22. Wisconsin Precious Metals 253 Center St.
See map on page 16.
Downtown
Lake Geneva
227 Broad Street
(across from the theatre)
Lake Geneva, WI
(262)248-2827
Also Visit
us In ...
St. Armands
Circle, Fla.
Sarasota, Fla.
&
Naples, Fla.
13
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18
10
All Your Watersports Fun at ONE LOCATION
Free Instruction & Gas Drivers License and Deposit Required
33 Years
In Business
151 Wrigley Drive Lake Geneva, WI
(Across from the Chamber of Commerce)
262-248-4142
www.genevawatersports.com
OPEN 9 A.M.-6 P.M. 7 DAYS A WEEK
22
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 21 June 13, 2013
CONT. FROM PAGE 12
dining out
taurant also features "all-inclusive pricing" that includes in the menu price
salad or soup, vegetable and starch for most of its menu selections. A
quiet, cozy cocktail lounge greets guests for your favorite beverage, along
with an extensive wine list. Hours are Monday through Saturday for lunch
from 11:30 a.m. until the final seating at 3 p.m. Dinner is served Monday
through Saturday beginning at 4:30 p.m. On Sundays, a plated brunch
and light lunch are offered from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., and Sunday dinner
begins at 4 p.m. A children's menu is always available, with plenty of free
off-street parking. "Smart" casual attire is requested, and reservations
are recommended. The Red Geranium is open year-round, seven days a
week.
RISTORANTE BRISSAGO
AT GRAND GENEVA
Highway 50 East, Lake Geneva, (262) 249-4788. The critically
acclaimed Ristorant Brissago at Grand Geneva Resort & Spa features
authentic Italian cuisine, with ingredients such as cheeses and pastas
being own in weekly from Italy and prepared with purity and tradition.
Enjoy spectacular views of the countryside as you sip a glass from the
hand-chosen, region-specic wine list. Reservations are recommended.
SCUTTLEBUTT'S RESTAURANT
831 Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva, (262) 248-1111.
Scuttlebutts features Lake Genevas original gourmet burgers along
with chicken and vegetarian burgers, barbecued ribs, homemade soups,
salads, sandwiches and authentic Swedish entrees. Breakfast featuring
authentic Swedish pancakes is offered. There also is an excellent Friday
fish fry. Cocktails are available.
SKIP'S ALA MODE
99 N. Walworth Ave., Williams Bay, (262) 245-1330. The best
Chicago-style pizza, Italian beef, gyros, charbroiled burgers, broaster
recipe chicken, hot dogs and more can be enjoyed with wine or tap beer
in this family-friendly restaurant with a unique indoor and outdoor dining
atmosphere. Try our new wraps, steak, grilled chicken or deli meats,
great for parties. Home of the famous "widgets" and other ice cream
treats. Carryout, delivery to the Williams Bay municipal pier, packaged
beer and ice also are available. Open every day, 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Major credit cards accepted.
SOPRA BISTRO
724 Main St., Lake Geneva, (262) 249-0800, www.soprabistro.com.
Dinner, smoke-free, handicap accessible, reservations accepted, walk-ins
welcome, vegetarian dishes. Sopra, an American Bistro, the premier
Lake Geneva dining experience. Ingredient-driven chef-owner, Simon
Cumming, designs American bistro classics with a fresh, farm-to-table
approach. Using the nest seasonal ingredients, you'll be treated to a ne
dining experience, in a casual, friendly and relaxed atmosphere. In addi-
tion to the thoughtfully selected wine list, Sopra also boasts an extensive
selection of micro-brew beers and a full selection of spirits, including
specialty house martinis.
YE OLDE HOTEL
6070 N. Railroad St., Lyons, (262) 763-2701. The most flamboy-
ant example of rustic nostalgia we found is Ye Olde Hotel in Lyons,
according to William Rice, Chicago food and wine columnist. Daily and
nightly specials at the historic restaurant are featured in addition to the
regular menu, which includes steak, seafood, prime rib, chicken, chops
and spaghetti among the dinner options. There is a Friday night fish fry.
Closed Monday and Tuesday. Reservations recommended. Take Highway
120 North to Springfield then Highway 36 to Lyons.
Find more dining information on
DINE ON THE WATERFRONT
LIVEENTERTAINMENT&OUTDOORSEATING
FRIDAYFISHFRY-THEWATERFRONT
All-you-can-eat sh fry beginning at am and
live entertainment by Big Al from pm - close
SATURDAYPRIMERIBBUFFET
pm - pm in Fontana Grill with Tom Staneld on piano
SUNDAYBRUNCH
am - pm in Fontana Grill with Tom Staneld on piano
BURNINDOWNTHEDOCKS!
Enjoy blues, brews and BBQ with live music
from some of Chicagolands best blues artists!
Sundays on The Waterfront Patio from
pm -pm
| theabbeyresort.com
Fontana Blvd, Fontana, WI
Managed by Hostmark
Hospitality Group
22
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
The Delavan and Delavan Lake area is one of the most popular resort locations in Wisconsin with
exciting water sports, golf, horseback riding, and winter activities.
Thecity s park system contains more than 100 acres of natural preserves, parks, picnic areas, and
playgrounds. Included in Delavan s beautiful park system can be found a swimming pond, ice-
skating and hockey rinks, sledding hills and a Memorial Arboretum.
Over two miles of winding waterways are within the city; Lake Comus is a favorite spot for children.
Along the north shore of Lake Comus, beyond the arboretum, is the Dibble Nature Trail where
many varieties of trees, shrubs, marsh grass, birds and small animal wildlife can be observed in their
naturalhabitat.
The new Rotary Gardens on the east end of the city highlights a seven-rock fountain representing
the seven continents.
The city owns and operates the 27-hole Delbrook Golf Course rated as one of the finest public
courses in the area. It includes a man-made lake, a modern irrigation system, and modern
clubhouse. Agolf pro is available to help with all your golfing needs.
DELAVAN
Weve Got You Covered
The Areas Most Reliable Flooring Retailer For Quality Service
Free In-Home Sample Showing & Design Services
438 S. Wright St. Delavan (262) 728-6200
Monday - Friday 9-5, Sat. 9-3 or by appt.
Serving the Lakes Area For Over 20 Years!
DESIGNER ON STAFF
Carpet Ceramic Wood
Vinyl Natural Stone
Glass Laminate
5532 Highway 50 Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: 262-728-8755
We Carry Oreck, Simplicity &
Cirrus Vacuums as well as Sewing
Machines and Sergers.
* Kirby Supplies & Bags
* Air Cleaners
* Cleaning Supplies
Southern Lakes Vacuum & Sewing Center
SPRING IS HERE!!
Its Time To Take Care of All Those Spring
Cleaning Projects as Well as those Repairs &
Alterations such as .... special
sewing projects, zipper
replacements, alterations &
repairing & servicing your vacuum
cleaners & sewing machines.
Healthy Options for Dogs & Cats
HOURS: SUN. & MON. Closed TUES.THURS. 9 a.m.6 p.m.
FRI. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. SAT. 8 a.m.3 p.m.
5540 STATE ROAD 50 DELAVAN, WI 262.728.7877
GROOMING PET DOG TRAINING QUALITY SUPPLIES FOR YOUR DOGS & CATS
Follow Us On:
www.thebarkmarketllc.com
Call 262.728.3017 to register for Full Dance Classes
1013 Ann Street Delavan, WI
www.dancefactory.com
Dance Factory on official
Angelina, Ballerina Dance
Academy. Register today!
Classes for All Ages featuring Ballet,
Jazz, Lyrical, Hip Hop Modern and Tap
Also featuring Voice/Piano/Drum
Also offering classes at our studio in Harvard, IL
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 23 June 13, 2013
CONT. FROM PAGE 10
out and about
child care.
GRANDVIEW
RESTAURANT
N2009 S. Lake Shore Drive,
Lake Geneva, (262) 248-5690.
Located in The Geneva Inn on
the shores of Geneva Lake. Open
every day of the week for Break-
fast, Lunch and Dinner. Break-
fast is served Monday through
Sunday from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Lunch is served Monday through
Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. Dinner is served Monday
through Saturday starting at 5:00
p.m. and from 4 p.m. on Sunday.
Sunday Brunch is served every
Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Half-priced appetizers available in
The Grandview Lounge on Thurs-
days from 4 to 6 p.m. Live music
featuring Diane Lewis Friday and
Saturdays from 6:30 p.m. to 10
p.m.
HAWK'S VIEW
GOLF CLUB
7377 Krueger Road, Lake
Geneva, (262) 348-9900. Hawks
View features 36 holes of great
golfing, with the 18-hole cham-
pionship level course and the 18-
hole executive par-three course.
Golf events and outings are hosted
all season. The clubhouse is open
with a full restaurant and bar, pro
shop and banquet facilities. Patio
seating is available in season and
Friday fish fry is offered all year.
Weddings are a specialty and can
be booked all year. Hawks View
hosts an array of special events
throughout the year. Check www.
hawksviewgolfclub.com. Located
three miles north of downtown
Lake Geneva off Highway 120
HEMINGWAY'S
N3270 County Highway H,
Lake Geneva, (262) 348-1200.
Lake Geneva's headquarters for all
things laid-back and Key Westerly,
live entertainment, two volleyball
courts and huge patio with tiki bar.
Twelve areas of activities makes
Hemingways a popular destina-
tion for locals, tourists, bike runs,
fundraisers, parties and concerts.
Check the website for upcoming
events. www.hemingwaysportof-
call.com.
KULLBERG
JEWELERS
15 S. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn.
(262) 723-2246. In business
since 1945, the shop features fine
jewelry for men and women in
classic and contemporary styles.
The shop also offers service for
repair and custom designs.
LAKE GENEVA
CRUISE LINE
Riviera Docks, Wrigley Drive,
Lake Geneva, (262) 248-6206 or
(800) 558-5911.
Offering daily cruises seven days
a week with a fleet of eight boats,
which are also available for private
charter. Tours of Geneva Bay and
the entire lake are scheduled, as
well as special cruises. For more
information, visit their Web site at
www.gageboats.com.
LAKE GENEVA
FARMERS MARKET
Horticultural Hall, 330 Broad
St., Lake Geneva. Homegrown
produce and home-crafted items
are featured on Thursdays through
October, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Both indoor and outdoor space is
utilized for the market.
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC LIBRARY
918 Main St., Lake Geneva,
(262) 249-5299. Located on the
shores of Geneva Lake, the library
has been a community resource
and meeting place since 1898. The
current building, designed in 1954
by Prairie School architect James
Dresser, takes full advantage of
its picturesque surroundings. In
addition to housing a wide array
of reading material for all ages,
audio-visual collections and sev-
eral computer stations, the library
hosts a variety of discussion
groups and events which are open
to the public. A meeting room is
available for groups and organiza-
tions. Currently, the library is open
Monday through Saturday. Wi-Fi
is available. Visit their Web site at
www.lakegenevalib.wi.us.
LAKE GENEVA
MASSAGE THERA-
PY
905 Marshall St., Lake
Geneva, (262) 249-1230. In busi-
ness since 1991 and conven-
iently located six blocks north
of downtown with plenty of free
parking, Lake Geneva Massage
Therapy offers relaxation (Swed-
ish), therapeutic, couples and hot
stone massage in a relaxed and
comfortable setting. Owners Barb
and Mark Mitchell have 26 years
of experience each, are nationally
certified in Therapeutic Massage
and Bodywork, are members of
AMTA and licensed by the State of
Wisconsin, #570-046 and #571-
046. Appointments are available
Tuesday through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; and Saturdays
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gift
certificates are available. Call for
more information, gift certificates
or appointments.
LAKE GENEVA
SCHOOL OF
COOKING
727 Geneva St., Lake Geneva,
(262) 248-3933, www.lakege-
nevaschoolofcooking.com. The
Lake Geneva School of Cook-
ing offers entertaining, culinary
classes for the cooking enthusiast,
whether novice or gourmet. As
owner and award-winning chef,
John Bogan emphasizes culinary
essentials and provides hands-
on learning experiences in the
school's Wood Mode, custom
kitchen, featuring Wolf and Sub-
Zero appliances. In addition to
daily classes and demonstrations,
the school offers catering, cor-
porate team-building events and
hosts private parties. The school
is located in the historic Geneva
Village Shops, just four blocks
from beautiful Geneva Lake, and
is open year-round for both after-
noon and evening classes.
LAKE LAWN RE-
SORT
2400 East Geneva Street,
Delavan, (262) 728-7950. Located
on more than 275 wooded acres
alongside Delavan Lake, Lake
Lawn Resort offers endless
seasonal entertainment including
cookouts, live music, baseball
weekends and more. The resorts
lakefront Lookout Bar and Eatery
has weekend entertainment
including Friday Karaoke, Live
Music on Saturdays, and Sunday
Game Day with the NFL Ticket and
11 televisions. Onsite activities
and amenities include a marina,
an 18-hole Championship golf
course, an arcade, indoor/outdoor
pools and sports ranging from
tennis or volleyball to biking or
snowshoeing. Lake Lawn Resort
has an assortment of year-round
overnight specials and packages
available. For more information
visit www.lakelawnresort.com.
MARGOT'S
4009 S. Shore Drive, Dela-
van. (262) 740-9039. Authentic
German and American fare in
a casual country atmosphere.
Imported German beers and wine
full bar available. Margot's
hosts several special events and
"festivities," including May Fest,
SEE OUT PAGE 24
COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES
365 POTAWATOMI DRIVE FONTANA, WI
262.275.3705
www.countryclubestatesgolf.com
Fathers Day Sale!
Titleist Pro V1
REG: $54 NOW: $45
Come see why were called the Little Jewel of the area!
Call 262-275-3705 for Tee Times
ALL OTHER BALLS ARE 25% OFF
DADS PLAY FREE ON FATHERS DAY WITH PAID ADULT
(CART NOT INCLUDED)
Comments Heard:
Best Greens In The Area
Youre In Better Shape Than (Blank) Golf Course
Recycled Pro V1
ONLY $12/DOZEN
Come And Play Either
Como Crossings our 18 hole
Championship Golf Course from $35
or
Our Family Friendly Barn Hollow
Par 3 Course from $15
7377 Krueger Rd. Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 348-9900 (877) 429-5788
www.hawksviewgolfclub.com
MAKE IT A BRISTOL OAKS DAY
See some of the beautiful weddings held at Bristol Oaks at
Facebook.com/bristoloakscc or call or stop in for more information.
Plan your special event in our Best of Kenosha 2011 Banquet Center
Enjoy stunning views in an elegant setting
Save 10% when you book a Sunday Wedding
Great 18 hole golf course and (lighted driving range on grass $6)
24
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
fest, Christmas in Germany, and Winterfest, featuring special menus and live entertainment. Call
for reservations and festival dates. Hours vary according to season; call for details.
OLIVE MARTINIS
220 Cook St. Lake Geneva (262) 248-4-220. Inside Bistro 220- Lake Geneva's only Sake
Martini Lounge. Enjoy all of your favorite martinis a new way. Delicious!!! Happy hour Wednes-
day - Friday 4 to 6 p.m. Complimentary appetizers and drink specials! Enjoy drinks on the balcony, outside
courtyard or in the lounge overlooking downtown Lake Geneva. Piano Lounge coming this fall! Visit www.
bistro220.com.
RED GERANIUM RESTAURANT
393 N. Edwards Blvd., Lake Geneva, (262) 248-3637. Sunday night through Thursday night
has two for $28 features. Enjoy one appetizer, two entrees and two desserts, along with a won-
derful daily dinner menu. For Friday lunch and dinner, enjoy their authentic Wisconsin fish fry
starting at just $12.50, along with the daily lunch and dinner menu. Visit their Web site at www.
redgeraniumrestaurant.com for new promotions and more information.
ST. FRANCIS DE SALES PARISH AND SCHOOL BINGO
148 W. Main St., Lake Geneva. First and third Wednesdays of the month. More than $1,000 in
cash prizes including progressive Jackpot and pull-tabs. Doors and concessions open at 5:30
p.m. Bingo starts at 7p.m. Visit sfdslg.wordpress.com/event/bingo for more information.
SONOMA CELLARS
1807 E. Geneva St., Delavan, 262-740-2200. Visit Sonoma Cellars for the best wine, beer
and liquor selection in the area. Fabulous gift items and accessories will make your shopping
experience memorable. Wine tasting daily.
STUDIO WINERY
401 Sheridan Springs Road, Lake Geneva, (262) 348-9100. Lake Genevas Only Winery! Stu-
dio is an urban winery. We are one part art gallery, one part recording studio, and 100 percent deli-
cious! We put our hearts & souls into creating the best wines. Visit us and taste for yourself. Try a
wine tasting of our wines, sit and relax while sipping a glass of our wine or a local beer, or stop in for
a bottle or two of wine to take home for dinner. Featuring a piano lounge, art gallery, outdoor seating,
live music, easy access and ample parking. Live Music every Saturday from 4-8. For more informa-
tion visit www.StudioWinery.com.
WATSONS WILD WEST
W4865 Potter Road, Elkhorn (262) 723-7505. One of the fine attractions in Walworth County,
located 10 minutes north of Lake Geneva. The general public is welcome to enjoy ongoing daily
entertaining tours, gold panning at the Tumbleweed mine, tall tales, cowboy poetry, wrangling up
on vintage old west saddles, catching a sarsparilla slid down the bar, and the wonderful ambience
of this one-of-a-kind museum. Call ahead to check facility's availability, as private parties, bus
tours, school field trips, camp outings and gruop meetings are also welcome. Lunch or dinner
for groups of 25 or more, with optional entertainment, are offered. Select from the "Six Guns of
Entertainment" options on the website, www.watsonswildwestmuseum.com. Take Highway 12
West toward Madison, stay on 12 'til the very end, at the merger of 12 and 67. Don't take any
other exits prior to this merger. At the merger of 12 and 67, turn right and go half a mile to the
traffic light at Potter Road. Turn right and look for the covered wagons, the Lone Saguaro Mine,
and teepees. Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. www.
watsonswildwestmuseum.com.
YOGEEZE FROZEN YOGURT
253 Center St., Lake Geneva, (262) 203-5550. Yogeeze is a self-serve frozen yogurt shop,
where you design and build your own creation, using our 15 changing yogurt and twist flavors,
with more than 40 different toppings. Our toppings include fresh fruits, candy pieces, granola,
nuts, cereals, mochi and boba balls. Yogeeze offers healthy alternatives to your sweet cravings,
with non-fat and low-fat yogurts, non-dairy sorbet and no-sugar added choices as well. Located
four doors north of Starbucks. www.yogeeze.com. Watch our commercial on www.ReelLifeTV.net.
Want more on fun in the Lake Geneva area?
Check out our video episodes on
CONT. FROM PAGE 23
out and about
signs of summer on the shorepath
One of the
highlights of
the shorepath
walk is the
Carolyn Gable
property. Her
fence has been
painted with
inspirational
quotes. The
Gable property
is located east
of downtown
Lake Geneva
on the
shorepath;
from the
Riviera, head
toward Stone
Manor, on
your left.
Sources differ on the
mileage of the Geneva Lake
shorepath. But everyone
agrees the walk is worth it.
The path, which is open to
the public, circles the entire lake
and affords hikers the chance to
experience panoramic views --
both of Geneva Lake and the
estates that dot its shoreline.
From its origins as a trail
connecting Native American set-
tlements to its present-day usage
as a public hiking attraction, the
shore path has timeless appeal.
At more than 20 miles, the
length can seem intimidating, but
there are a number of ways to break the walk up into segments.
Access is available at Lake Geneva, Williams Bay and Fontana
parks, where hikers can find public parking.
Shorepath conditions range from easy, level sidewalks to
rougher terrain.
Estimated walking time for the entire circuit is between
eight and nine hours, depending on pace and weather condi-
tions.
Points of interest include Stone Manor, the largest
lakeshore home; the Wrigley estate, a home built in the style of
Frank Lloyd Wrights Falling Waters; and the historic Lake
Geneva Yacht Club.
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 25 June 13, 2013
As the Walworth County
seat, the city of Elkhorn
has grown leaps and
bounds since it was
founded in 1838.
Strong community roots
and an active industrial
base have made the city a
proud contributor to the
regions legacy.
As the site for the
Walworth County Fair, and
as the Christmas Card
Town, Elkhorn
welcomes
thousands of
visitors from all over
Wisconsin and beyond
each year.
Discover Elkhorn for
yourself.
ELKHORN
At the center of it all.
For a complete list of events and businesses awaiting
you in Elkhorn please visit us at www.elkhornchamber.com
203 E. Walworth Street 262-723-5788
Antique Flea Markets
Summer Concerts in Sunset Park
Star Spangled Celebration
Festival of Summer
Walworth County Fair
Oktoberfest
Christmas Card Town Parade
603 E. Geneva Street
Elkhorn, WI 53121
(262) 723-8444
Fax (262) 723-8760
Featuring Natural & Organic Products from Earth
Friendly, Seventh Generation, Nordic Naturals, Carlson,
Enzymatic Therapy, New Chapter and much more.
26
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
5576 Highway 50
(Dairy Queen Plaza), Delavan
262.740.1500
www.thedishdealer.com
7036 Grand Geneva Way, Lake Geneva
262.248.8811 www.grandgeneva.com
17 S. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn
262.723.2610
www.jrobertsmenswear.com
253 Center St., Suite 300, Lake Geneva
262.203.5550 www.yogeeze.com
11015 U.S.
Highway 12
Richmond, IL
815.678.7011
398 Mill St., Fontana
262.275.5700
www.genevalakeconservancy.org
www.richmonddognsuds.com
A new generation of TV
for the Lake Geneva area.
Catch sneak previews on
where to dine, shop,
stay & play:
941 Milwaukee Ave., Burlington
6515 352nd Ave., New Munster, WI
262.537.4407
www.bestbargainsinc.com
1230 Legion Dr., Twin Lakes, WI
262.877.2500 www.tlccgolf.com
755 W. Main St., Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.249.0940 www.refinedrustic.com
Refined Rustic
Design Outpost
W3407 Linton Rd., Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.249.8582
philipsassanodesign.com
123 Center St., Lake Geneva
(877) 624-5494 www.millcreekhotel.com
6810 Barnard Mill Road Ringwood, Ill.
(815) 728-0559
www.aldenskennels.com
Olive Black Martini &
Wine Lounge
5607 Broadway
Richmond, IL
815.678.7370
oliveblacklounge.com
REFINED RUSTIC
STUDIO & GALLERY
Paper Dolls Home Furnishings
138 E Geneva Square
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.248.6268
http://www.paperdollsinteriors.com
711 West Main St., Lake Geneva
262.248.4637 flemingsltd.com
5907 State Road 50
Lake Geneva
262.248.3339
lakegenevacountrymeats.com
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 27 June 13, 2013
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Marketing Lifestyles & Property Since 1943
7
CONVENIENT
LOCATIONS
Abbey Springs
Fontana
Downtown
Lake Geneva
Elkhorn
(262) 743-1770
Geneva National
(262) 245-2380
Lake Geneva
(262) 248-4492
Burlington
(262) 763-5454
Delavan
(262) 728-8757
More listings, maps, lake info. & more at www.KeefeRealEstate.com
MLS#1309876-GENEVA: Two good income producing
homes on adjacent wooded lots located on the north side
of Lake Como. Kitchen appliances are included with both
homes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $154,800.
MLS#1309372-TWIN LAKES: Beautiful 3BR, 2.5BA home
perfectly situated on an oversized lot. Bright & open
kitchen, hardwood floors, large basement and fenced yard.
Lake Elizabeth lake rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $189,900.
MLS#1308934-GENEVA: Enjoy incredible views from this
turn key fully furnished Glenwood Springs 3BR, 2BA home.
Wonderful sundrenched deck overlooking yard. Walking dis-
tance to Lake Geneva. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $645,000.
MLS#1308966-KENOSHA: 3 bedroom, 1 bath bungalow
with enclosed front porch. Large living room and fenced in
yard. New water heater as well. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900.
MLS#1309248-GENEVA: Lakefront home! Almost, only 1
house from Geneva Lake. Views throughout this 5BR, 3BA
home w/pier & Assoc. lake rights. Tastefully furnished, very
well presented. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750,000.
MLS#1309511-RACINE: Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath with
den/office. Large bedrooms, deck from back door, and
fenced in yard. Freshly painted and new carpet & vinyl
flooring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,000.
MLS#1309705-FONTANA: You'll like the sensible features
of this 3 bedroom, 2 bath Bi-level. Amenities include 2FP,
enclosed porch, finished basement, extra large garage and
wooded lot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $269,000.
MLS#1309862-LAKE GENEVA: 5BR, 4BA r anch,
f i ni shed wal k-out l ower l evel . Gr ani t e count er s,
hear t h r oom, gas f i r epl ace, deck, scr eened
por ch, f enced back yar d and l ush gar dens. . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $269, 000.
MLS#1309921-LYONS: Custom built log home is nestled
on over 6 wooded acres. The home features a full walk-out
LL, gourmet kitchen, master suite in the loft. 3+ car
garage/shop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $349,900.
MLS#1308958-LYONS: This 3 bed, 3.5 bath masterpiece
will wow you. It's one of a kind detail is surely a show stop-
per. Marble & hrdwd flring accents the contemporary
design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $424,500.
MLS#1309609-LAKEGENEVA: Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bath
ranch style condo with gas fireplace, spacious deck, cathedral
ceilings and 2 car garage. Move in condition. Call today! . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,900.
MLS#1308804-PLEASANT PRAI RE: 3 bedr oom, 1 bat h
r anch home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59, 900.
Live chat
available at
KeefeRealEstate.com
@KeefeRealEstate www.facebook.com/LakeGenevaRealEstate to become a fan
Connect with us Socially
28
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 29 June 13, 2013
30
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
There are one million
acres of lawn across the
country.
Many homeowners as-
pire to having a lush, green
lawn as the showcase of
their properties. The front
lawn can make a state-
ment and indicate to pass-
ersby the property owners
personalities and design
preferences.
Lawn care takes some
dedication and hard work,
but there are certain ways
to cut down on the amount
of effort required to main-
tain a landscape. By em-
ploying a few different
shortcuts, you can have a
healthy, lush lawn without
spending all of your free
time cutting the grass or
pruning the trees.
Stop weeds at the start.
Weeding is one of the most
time-consuming parts of
maintaining a lawn. Weeds
can proliferate throughout
the lawn if not addressed
in a timely manner. Once
weeds take root they can
become a nuisance, so its
best to treat weeds before
they even have a chance to
sprout. Apply a preemer-
gent weed control prod-
uct as soon as possible in
the spring and then reap-
ply it about three months
later to ensure weeds are
eradicated. That equates
to much less tedious lawn
maintenance during the
season.
Plant a urine-resis-
tant grass. Having a dog
and maintaining a lush
lawn has always been a
particular conundrum for
homeowners.
Dog urine is high in
nitrogen. While nitrogen,
when applied in the correct
ratio, can be a lawn-growth
stimulant, in the large con-
centration that occurs in
pet urine, it causes the
grass to dry up and burn,
resulting in bare spots. Re-
planting with urine-resis-
tant grasses can help cut
down on the level of dam-
age to the lawn from your
own pet or pets that hap-
pen to make potty stops on
your property. The grasses
most resistant to urine
tend to be perennial rye-
grasses and fescues.
Wake up and water.
Watering in the early morn-
ings saves time and energy
in the long run by fostering
a tougher, more drought-
resistant lawn. If you wa-
ter early in the day, less
water will be lost to evapo-
ration. Limit watering to
a few times per week, and
less if you have had ade-
quate rain. Avoid watering
at night, which can expose
the lawn to bacteria and
attract insects.
Mow when the lawn is
dry. Its not adviseable to
mow the lawn when it is
wet.
Slippery conditions
can not only make it more
dangerous to push a mow-
er, but also slow down the
time it can take to tackle
the chore. The mower
blades can become clogged
and coated with wet grass
clippings, necessitating
stopping and starting the
task.
Another thing to
consider is lawn dis-
eases spread more read-
ily through wet clippings.
Stick to mowing when the
lawn is completely dry.
Let clippings y. Mulch-
ing mowers, or those that
just distribute clippings
on the lawn as you go, can
be healthier for the grass.
They will serve as fertilizer
and redistribute nutrients
to the lawn as they break-
down into the soil. Accord-
ing to The Organic Lawn
Care Manual, leaving clip-
pings on the lawn will ful-
ll about 25 percent of fer-
tilizer requirements. Plus,
you save time bagging up
clippings.
Mow less often. Raise
the mowers blade so that
the grass is longer in be-
tween cuttings. The taller
grass will shade the soil
and block weeds from
germinating. It also helps
improve soils moisture re-
tention.
Dont cut corners. Ad-
justing a landscape design
to have arches and curves
can reduce the time it
takes to mow and edge a
property. Hard corners in
a landscape will require
more time to keep straight
and pristine.
Check your tools. Edg-
ing can be done by using
a gas-powered edger or a
string trimmer. Before you
begin to edge, inspect these
tools to ensure theyre ca-
pable of handling the task
at hand. Inspect the blades
on a gas-powered edger
to make sure they havent
dulled since their most re-
cent use. If they are dull,
sharpen them before you
start to edge. When using a
string trimmer, make sure
you have enough string on
hand to complete the proj-
ect. String trimmers use a
particular kind of string,
so visit your local lawn
care or hardware store if
you dont feel like you have
enough.
Position your edger
properly. Once you have
given your tools the green
light, its time to start edg-
ing. When you begin, make
sure the edger is between
the sidewalk or driveway
and the edge of the lawn,
placing the wheel of the
edger on the sidewalk or
driveway and then push-
ing and pulling the edger
until you have created a
clear edge. If you have nev-
er edged before, you may
want to practice on small-
er, more isolated areas un-
til you become comfortable
operating the edger.
Cut down on mowing and lawn maintenance
DALE HIBBARD
Office:262-248-4492
dhibbard@
keeferealestate.com
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, June 15th - 12-2:30 p.m.
MLS#1281469-6186 KILDEER CT, LYONS: From every angle you will find
this quality built ranch home fascinating. Amenities include: vaulted ceilings,
enclosed porch, basement rec room, oversized 2 car garage. . . . . . .$219,000.
Directions: From Lake Geneva go North on Hwy 120 to Hwy. 36. Exit on
Hwy 36 to Lyons. Turn South on Church St to Overlook Circle. Go West on
Overlook, turn south on Woodridge to Kildeer.
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE 31 June 13, 2013
The Resorter
Real Estate Guide
P.O. Box 937
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-4444
Residential rentals,
apt's. houses
LAKE GENEVA 695 Wells St.
Large 1 BD first floor APT. Utili-
ties included. $750 mo. 262-539-
2436
LAKE GENEVAKitchenettes
and sleeping rooms. Affordable.
262-248-4988.
NEW MUNSTER AREA Small 3
BD house with nice yard one block
from park. No Pets. $750 mo +
sec. dep. 262-903-6172
SHARON, WI Modern 1 and 2
BD apts. Country living in His-
toric Sharon. 20 minutes from
Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan.
10 from Walworth. Located on
Hwy 67. 262-736-2300
TREVOR/ CAMPLAKE-Gor-
geous 3 bdrm, 1 ba ranch on a
crawl space. All new interior! Fire-
place, hardwood flrs, all appli-
ances, 2.5 det garage on huge lot.
$1145 mo. Land Management
Properties 815-678-4771
Automobiles
04 MERCURY MARQUIS 62 K,
new tires, battery, leather. Remote
start. Grandma kept. $6800. 262-
215-6634
Help Wanted
100 WORKERS NEEDED -
Assemble crafts, wood items.
Materials provided, To $480+wk.
Free Information pkg. 24 hr.
801-264-4992
Drivers: Sign-On Bonus, Great
Pay. Benefits, Vacation, Holidays
& More! OTR. 10-14 days out.
CDL-A. Kurtis: 877-412-7209 x3
SUMMER HELP. COMPANION
for elderly lady. Flexible hours,
part time. On lakeshore w/pool; $8
hr to start. 239-223-0660
Service Directory
FLOORING INSTALLATION
Baumbach Flooring installs your
carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-245-
6168
Music Sales &
Service
1974 STEINWAY BABY GRAND
PIANO model L. Walnut finish.
Must see to appreciate. Price nego-
tiable. 262-279-3226
Recreation,
Exercise & Sports
PIER SLIPS, in and out service on
Delavan Lake, motor/drive repairs,
custom boat covers and upholster-
ing. Since 1963.
americanmarinedelavan.com
Help Wanted
Stop-N-Go is hiring! Our store in
Lake Geneva is currently hiring
full- and part-time cashiers for 2nd
and 3rd shift. Premium pay for
overnights and weekends! We
offer increases after 90-days, flex-
ible schedules, a fun work environ-
ment and we promote from within!
Applications are available at the
store located at 896 Wells Street or
you can apply online at www.stop-
n-go.com and click on the
Careers tab. No phone calls,
please.
AA/EOE
Help Wanted
SPRING MAKER
A leading Chicago manufacturer
of metal springs, wire forms and
stampings seeks set up techni-
cians with experience in the fol-
lowing spring machines: Itayas,
Simcos, Simplex and Mechani-
cals for its West of Elgin based
facility. The primary purpose of
this position is to set up and oper-
ate production machines to bend,
form, stretch, notch, punch or
straighten metal as specified by
work orders, drawings, blueprints
or layout. The position is respon-
sible for making necessary
adjustments to machinery to effi-
ciently produce product that con-
forms to Quality specifications.
We are looking for set up techni-
cians who can be trained to set up
various spring machines. Suc-
cessful candidate must be
mechanically inclined and have a
minimum of 3 years experience.
We offer excellent compensation
and full benefits and the ability to
grow with an aggressive organi-
zation that will reward your tal-
ents.
Please send resume
and salary requirements to:
HR9145@hotmail.com
Fax: 773-379-0230
Help Wanted
HOUSEKEEPER - Live-out posi-
tion Male orfemale for the vaca-
tion home of family of three in
Lake Geneva, WI. This is a perma-
nent, year-round, Live-out posi-
tion, five-day work week, most
holidays off. No cooking or child
care. Only cleaning, laundry and
maintenance. Family is in resi-
dence only 4 to 6 weeks in Sum-
mer and they require the employee
to go with them for another 4
weeks to their home in Marthas
Vineyard. Employee must be able
to pass a complete background
check and have recent excellent
verifiable references. Must have at
least 3 years of experience as a
housekeeper in an upscale house-
hold. Salary is $ 55000 to $ 58000
per year + benefits and end of year
bonus. To apply for this position
please send your resume by fax or
e-mail.
AlMartinoAgency@aim.com
www.martinodom.com
Fax: 212-867-1917
Tel. 212-867-1910
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
MUST BE PLACED
BY 11 A.M. FRIDAY
FOR THE FOLLOWING
WEEKS NEWSPAPER
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
to place an advertisement
or for more information
LEGAL NOTICE
12 P.M. MONDAY
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
DEADLINE
dining
channel
shopping
channel
events
channel
lodging
channel
play-per-view
channel
golf &
adventure
channel
A new generation of online TV for the Lake Geneva area
Catch sneak previews
of where to dine, shop,
stay & play
currently playing on
32
THE RESORTER & REAL ESTATE GUIDE June 13, 2013
ENJOY A NEW MASSAGE EXPERIENCE
GIVE DAD THE GIFT OF GOLF
Give Dad a round of golf to celebrate Fathers Day. All fathers can play The
Brute or The Highlands for only $89 Fathers Day weekend. They can also
enjoy special replay rates, when they fit a second round in later that day!
June 15 and 16
$89 on either course
All fathers receive a special gift from Grand Geneva.
FOR TEE TIMES
CALL 262 2482556.
Enjoy a truly authentic Italian meal at Ristorant Brissago.
Fresh ingredients, such as regionally made pastas, cheese,
prosciutto and olive oils, are flown in weekly from Italy. Savor a
delicious meal in a beautiful setting at one of the Top Ten Best
Overall Restaurants in Wisconsin.
Reservations are recommended.
A TASTE OF ITALY
RESERVATIONS,
CALL (262) 249-4788
Join us June 28 as the Grand Geneva Summer Concert Series presents the
Eddie Butts Band. For a second year, the Eddie Butts Band will blend jazz,
pop and R&B into one fantastic show. Lawn seating is available outside the
ski chalet and doors open at 7 pm.
June 28, 7:30 pm 10:30 pm
$10 admission for non-resort guests.
Cash bar and concessions available for purchase.
THE SOUNDS OF SUMMER
Enjoy a soothing massage with a breathtaking and relaxing lake view.
Surrounded by beautiful greens, your Water Front Massage will
refresh your senses and sooth your body. Included in this service is the
choice of a beverage, fresh fruit and cheese tray.
50 min- $165
80 min- $235
Book a single, duo, or trio massage!
FOR RESERVATIONS
CALL 262 2494750
Grand Geneva Resort & Spa | 7036 Grand Geneva Way | Lake Geneva, WI 53147 | (800) 558-3417 | GrandGeneva.com
THE MIDWESTS PREMIER VACATION DESTINATION