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THE STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF TALL AND SPECIAL BUILDINGS Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build.

16, 205230 (2007) Published online in Wiley Interscience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI:10.1002/tal.311

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS FOR TALL BUILDINGS: CHARACTERISTICS AND METHODOLOGY FOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN
KYOUNG-SUN MOON1,2*, JEROME J. CONNOR2 AND JOHN E. FERNANDEZ3
2 1 Department of Architecture, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Illinois, USA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA 3 Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

SUMMARY Diagrid structural systems are emerging as structurally efcient as well as architecturally signicant assemblies for tall buildings. This paper presents a simple methodology for determining preliminary member sizes. The methodology is applied to a set of building heights ranging from 20 to 60 stories, and parameters for the optimal values of the grid geometry are generated for representative design loadings. These values are shown to be useful for architects and engineers as guidelines for preliminary design. Associated architectural and constructability issues of diagrid structures are also discussed here. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

1. INTRODUCTION In the late 19th century early designs of tall buildings recognized the effectiveness of diagonal bracing members in resisting lateral forces. Most of the structural systems deployed for early tall buildings were steel frames with diagonal bracings of various congurations such as X, K, and eccentric. However, while the structural importance of diagonals was well recognized, their aesthetic potential was not explicitly appreciated. Thus, diagonals were generally embedded within the building cores which were usually located in the interior of the building. A major departure from this design approach occurred when braced tubular structures were introduced in the late 1960s. For the 100-story tall John Hancock Building in Chicago, the diagonals were located along the entire exterior perimeter surfaces of the building in order to maximize their structural effectiveness and capitalize on the aesthetic innovation. This strategy is much more effective than conning diagonals to narrower building cores. Clearly a symbiosis between structural action and esthetic intent, such as demonstrated by the Hancock Tower, is an example of highly integrated design and engineering. Recently the use of perimeter diagonalshence the term diagridfor structural effectiveness and esthetics has generated renewed interest from architectural and structural designers of tall buildings (Figure 1). The difference between conventional exterior-braced frame structures and current diagrid structures is that, for diagrid structures, almost all the conventional vertical columns are eliminated. This is possible because the diagonal members in diagrid structural systems can carry gravity loads as well as

* Correspondence to: Kyoung-Sun Moon, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room S-418, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 62139-4307, USA. E-mail: ksmoon@mit.edu

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Braced Tube

Diagrid

Figure 1. Braced tube vs. diagrid structure

lateral forces owing to their triangulated conguration, whereas the diagonals in conventional braced frame structures carry only lateral loads. Compared with conventional framed tubular structures without diagonals, diagrid structures are much more effective in minimizing shear deformation because they carry shear by axial action of the diagonal members, while conventional framed tubular structures carry shear by the bending of the vertical columns. Another prevalent structural system for todays tall buildings is outrigger structures with either reinforced concrete cores or steel-braced cores. Properly designed, an outrigger structure is effective in reducing the moment and drift of the building below outriggers. However, the system does not provide shear rigidity, whereas the diagrid structure provides both bending and shear rigidity. Thus, tall buildings which employ outrigger systems require cores having signicant shear rigidity. Diagrid structures do not need high shear rigidity cores because shear can be carried by the diagrids located on the perimeter. The lateral stiffness of diagrid structures is desirable not only for static loads but also for dynamic loads which generate responses in both the windward and across-wind directions. In most cases, the lateral motion in the across-wind direction due to vortex shedding is much greater than the motion in the windward direction. Stiffer structures have a lower probability of the vortex frequency locking on a modal frequency (i.e., a lock-in condition) because, as a structures fundamental frequency increases, the wind velocity required to cause a lock-in condition also increases. Thus, owing to their greater lateral stiffness, diagrid structures are less prone to a lock-in condition. An early example of the diagrid structure is the IBM Building (Figure 2) in Pittsburgh built in the early 1960s. With its 13-story building height, this building was not given much attention by architects and engineers. In the early 1980s Humana Headquarters competition, a diagrid structure was proposed by Sir Norman Foster (Figure 3). However, the winning entry at that time was a historicist building of the post-modern style designed by Michael Graves. Only recently have notable diagrid tall buildings been commissioned. Examples are designs by Sir Norman Foster: the Swiss Re Building (Figure 4) in London and the Hearst Headquarters (under construction, Figure 5) in New York. Another ongoing design is the new World Trade Center (Figure 6) in New York by SOM.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 2. IBM Building, Pittsburgh

The geometry of a diagrid structure is generally customized in order to satisfy building-specic requirements. The purpose of this paper is to provide preliminary design guidelines for a typical range of diagrid structures. First, the structurally optimal range of angles of diagonal members is investigated for typical 60-, 42- and 20-story buildings, using a conventional iterative design approach. Then, a simple methodology for determining preliminary diagrid member sizes is introduced and applied to the previous set of buildings. Lastly, the design parameters generated with this procedure are veried and compared with the previous set. The proposed methodology was found to produce good estimates of the design variables with minimal effort. 2. OPTIMAL ANGLES OF DIAGRIDS FOR 60-STORY STRUCTURES 2.1 Economic building heights The most economical building height is the one which produces the maximum percentage of net return. As Carol Willis (1995) noted, at some point in the construction of every skyscraper, the law of diminishing returns sets in, and rents for the additional stories do not cover costs. This problem arises because the cost of the building systems such as the structural system increases nonlinearly with height. In addition, the spatial demand by these systems also increases, resulting in a reduction in the available space and therefore the rental income. At a certain height, which depends on the location, the incremental building systems cost is greater than the incremental rental income, and it is no longer economical to increase building height. According to Clark and Kingstons study of several different height schemes in 1930, 63 stories was identied as being the most economical choice for a Manhattan skyscraper. Today, among the 200 tallest buildings in the world, 76% are within the range of 5070 stories, showing that this range is still the most economical choice (Figure 7). Based on these facts, 60-story structures are investigated rst, then 42- and 20-story structures.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 3. Humana Headquarters competition entry by Sir Norman Foster

2.2 Optimal angle of diagonal members for maximum shear rigidity Considering only shear rigidity, the optimal angle for diagonal members can be estimated using the simple braced frame model shown in Figure 8. The key assumption is that the members carry only axial forces. The cross-section shear force is related to the diagonal member forces by

V = 2 Fd cos q

(1)

Assuming linear elastic behavior, the member forces are also related to the diagonal extensional strain, ed, by

Fd = Ads d = Ad Ed e d
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(2)
Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 4. Swiss Re Building, London (Photo courtesy of John E. Fernandez)

Figure 5. Hearst Headquarters (under construction), New York


Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 6. Freedom Tower, New World Trade Center (under design), New York
20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 1 9 17 25 33 41 49 57 65 73 81 89 97 105 113 Number of Stories Number of Skyscr apers (Among 200 Tallest in the World)

Figure 7. Number of stories for 200 tallest buildings in the world (graph was generated based on building data taken from www.emporis.com)
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 8. Brace frame model

The extensional strain due to the relative lateral motion between adjacent nodes is a function of Dh and q.

ed =

ed D h cos q D h cos q sin q = = Ld h h sin q

(3)

Neglecting the extensional strain in the diagonal due to rotation, Db, and approximating transverse shearing strain, g , as

Dh h

(4)

we obtain the following approximation for the total extensional strain:

e d g cos q sin q

g sin 2q 2

(5)

Combining the above equations results in the following expression for this shear force:

V = ( Ad Ed sin 2q cos q )g
By denition, the transverse shear rigidity relates the shear force and shear strain:

(6)

V = DT g
It follows that

(7)

DT = Ad Ed sin 2q cos q

(8)

The plot of sin 2q cos q is shown in Figure 9, indicating that the optimal angle for maximum shear rigidity of the system is about 35. In typical braced frames, the bending moment is carried by the
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 9. sin 2q cos q

axial forces in the vertical columns. However, for diagrid structures which do not have vertical columns, bending is carried by the axial forces in the diagonals. Since the optimal angle of the columns for maximum bending rigidity is 90 and that of the diagonals for maximum shear rigidity is about 35, it is expected that the optimal angle of the diagonal members of diagrid structures will fall between these angles. Short buildings of low aspect ratio (height/width) behave like shear beams, and tall buildings of high aspect ratio tend to behave like bending beams. Thus, it is expected that as the building height increases the optimal angle also increases. In order to verify these assumptions and also to nd the actual range of optimal angles, a set of 60-story buildings having various diagrid angles are designed and analyzed using SAP2000. The study is repeated for 42- and 20-story buildings. Details are presented in the following sections. 2.3 Design studies: 60-story structures Figure 10 shows 3D and 2D plan views of a typical candidate building. Geometric parameters for the buildings are listed in Table 1. Core bracings are congured to generate different fundamental periods in the x and y directions, while diagrids are congured symmetrically in both directions. For the diagrid members, custom-made grade 50 steel pipes of varying diameters from 33 inches to 15 inches are used. Their thickness varies from 3 inches for the 33-inch diameter pipes to 15 inches for the 15-inch diameter pipes. Box-shape grade 50 steel built-up sections of varying dimensions are used for the core columns. Grade 36 W16 sections are selected for the beams, and W18 sections for the core bracings. The document SEI/ASCE 7-02 (Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures) (ASCE, 1996) is used to establish the wind load. The buildings are assumed to be in Boston and within category III, which implies that there is a substantial hazard to human life in the event of failure. Based on the code, the basic wind speed is 110 mph. Lastly, 1% damping is assumed for the calculation of the gust effect factor. Two different diagrid structural schemes are examined. Scheme 1 includes four vertical corner columns; scheme 2 has no vertical corner columns. The same set of seven different diagrid angles (Figure 11) is considered for both schemes, resulting in 14 different building structures. Scheme 2 requires slightly larger members and uses about 10% more steel than scheme 1. For instance, for
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 10. 3D and 2D plan view of the diagrid structure model

Table 1. Geometric parameters for the 60-story diagrid structure

Description Height Width Ext. wall to core wall distance Core area Story height Beam span Beam spacing Floor slab Floor live load

Value 240 m 36 m (square plan) 9 m typical 25% of oor area 4 m typical 9 m typical 3 m typical 12 cm concrete (w/WWF) on metal decking 50 psf

scheme 2, the diagrid members at the ground level are 33-inch diameter pipes, while only 27-inch diameter pipes are required for scheme 1. Member sizes were generated for the building with a diagrid angle of 63 by iterating on the sizes until the deection constraint for the top oor:

u( H )

H = 0.48 m 500

was satised. This design process is based on the assumption that motion constraints rather than strength constraints control the design of tall buildings. The design was checked for strength using the LRFD code and found to be acceptable. A value of 63 was taken since our preliminary study indicated that it was close to optimal. These member sizes were also used as an initial estimate for the
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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34

53

63

69

76

82

Figure 11. 60-story structures with various diagonal angles

2.00 1.80 1.60 1.40 meter 1.20 1.00 0.80 0.60 0.40 0.20 0.00 34 53 63 69 degree 76 82 90

Horiz. Displ. @ Top (m)

Figure 12. Scheme 1 (60-story diagrid structures with corner columns)

other six diagrid systems corresponding to different diagrid angles. Calculations indicated that the lateral stiffness is not too sensitive to angle in the region of 63. Thus, the member sizes were slightly increased so that structures with angles of 53, 69 and 76 also satised the maximum displacement requirement. Strength checks were also made on these structures. Figure 12 shows a plot of the lateral displacements for the scheme 1 structures. The results indicate that angles between 53 and 76 are reasonable choices. A similar process was used to select member sizes for the scheme 2 structures. Member sizes were generated to satisfy the maximum displacement requirement for the structures with angles of 63, 69 and 76 in this case. Displacement results for the scheme 2 structures are plotted in Figure 13. Since all the vertical columns which provided some of the bending rigidity have been removed, the diagrids need now to provide not only all the shear rigidity but also all the bending rigidity. Thus, the angle range is shifted upward, and centered on about 70.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS


2.50

215

2.00

1.50 meter

Horiz. Displ. @ Top (m)


1.00

0.50

0.00

34

53

63

69

76

82

90

degree

Figure 13. Scheme 2 (60-story diagrid structures without corner columns)

Table 2. Scheme 1 (60-story diagrid structures with corner columns) Diagrid angle (degrees)

Mode 1 period (s) 453 384 366 371 410 545 795

Horizontal displacement @ top (m)

Vertical displacement @ top (m)

34 53 63 69 76 82 90

063 047 042 043 050 087 188

017 009 007 006 006 005 005

Results are summarized in Tables 2 and 3. Comparing Table 2 and 3, one observes that for diagrid structures with small angles the vertical displacement is higher than for conventional structures with vertical columns. However, this problem is not so signicant. 2.4 Stiffness distribution between diagrids and braced core In order to estimate the respective contributions of the perimeter diagrids and the braced core to the lateral stiffness, each scheme 2 structure is divided into two separate structures: a braced core and a diagrid (Figure 14). Then, each structure is loaded with the same wind forces applied previously, and the displacement at the top of each structure is measured. As can be seen from the relative stiffness plot (Figure 15), the relative stiffness of the diagrids with optimal angles is about ve times that of the braced core. The braced core generally has much greater relative stiffness in conventional structures. It follows that in a diagrid/core structure diagrids provide most of the lateral stiffness, and bracings in the core might not be necessary. In that case, the core can be designed to carry only gravity loads without any bracings. Based on these results, core bracings are eliminated and lateral stiffness is provided only by the diagrids for the 42- and 20-story structures presented later in this paper.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Figure 14. Anatomical models of diagrid structure for relative stiffness assessment

Table 3. Scheme 2 (60-story diagrid structures without corner columns) Diagrid angle (degrees)

Mode 1 period (s) 744 455 386 373 396 518 821

Horizontal displacement @ top (m)

Vertical displacement @ top (m)

34 53 63 69 76 82 90

167 066 047 044 048 079 200

040 012 008 006 005 005 005

2.5 Architectural consideration of schemes 1 and 2 Slightly different behavioral characteristics were observed between scheme 1 (diagrid structure with corner columns) and scheme 2 (diagrid structure without corner columns) structures (Figure 16). Both schemes can create very effective structures for tall buildings. However, scheme 2 is a more interesting aesthetic choice. Scheme 2 creates valuable columnless corner spaces, which provide better views as well as higher rents. Also, it is expected that scheme 2 will be preferred by architects. Thus, for the 42- and 20-story structures, only scheme 2 is considered. 3. OPTIMAL ANGLES OF DIAGRIDS FOR 42- AND 20-STORY STRUCTURES The process described earlier for the set of 60-story diagrid structures was also used to investigate the sensitivity of the lateral stiffness with diagonal angle for 42- and 20-story structures with no corner columns or core bracings. The maximum deection requirement at the top is still taken as H/500. The
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS


6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 34 53 63 69 76 82 90 degree

217

Relative Stiffness K

relative stiffness K

Diagrids K

Braced Core K

Figure 15. Relative stiffness of diagrids and braced core

Figure 16. Scheme 1 (with corners columns) and scheme 2 ( without corner columns) models

member sizes were selected such that the structures with angles of 53, 63 and 69 satised the displacement criteria. The variation of lateral displacement with angle is plotted in Figures 17 and 18. Note that the optimal angle decreases with decreasing story height since shear deformation becomes more dominant. The stresses in the diagrid members of every structural conguration that satises the lateral displacement requirement were checked with the LRFD code. All the 60- and 42-story buildings satised the code. However, all the 20-story structures failed the code check. Therefore, we conclude that when the displacement constraint of H/500 is imposed the design of 42- to 60-story diagrid structures
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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1.40 1.20 1.00 meter 0.80

K.-S. MOON, J. J. CONNOR AND J. E. FERNANDEZ

Horiz. Displ. @ Top (m)

0.60 0.40 0.20 0.00 34 53 63 69 76 82 degree

Figure 17. Lateral displacement at the top of the 42-story diagrid structures

0.70 0.60 0.50 meter 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00 34 53 63 69 76 82 degree
Horiz. Displ. @ Top (m)

Figure 18. Lateral displacement at the top of the 20-story diagrid structures

having an aspect ratio, H/B, ranging from about 5 to 7 is governed by lateral stiffness, and the design of 20-story diagrid structures having an aspect ratio of about 2, is governed by strength. Thus, in what follows we consider only 60- and 42-story structures. 4. METHODOLOGY OF PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF DIAGRID STRUCTURES In this section, a simple methodology for the preliminary design of diagrid structures is introduced. As was discussed earlier, typical braced cores contribute only 1520% of the total lateral rigidity in properly designed diagrid tall buildings. For this reason and because we can more accurately estimate the lateral rigidity provided by diagrids, all the required lateral stiffness is allocated to the diagrids.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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V M

LOADING DIRECTION

Ld
FLANGE

WEB
B

Figure 19. Six-story diagrid structure module

The procedure begins by specifying the contributions to the total lateral displacement of the structure due to bending and shear deformation. This allocation is based on an assessment of the intrinsic attributes of diagrid structures and the behavioral characteristics of tall buildings related to their height to width ratio, and leads to the required values of shear and bending deformation. Simple equations which convert these required deformation values into cross-sectional areas for the diagrid members are derived. This design methodology is applied to several diagrid structures of various heights and aspect ratios. Based on these studies, empirical guidelines for assessing the relative contribution of bending and shear deformation to the total lateral displacement of diagrid tall structures are derived. With this formula, the preliminary member sizing process is essentially automated. 4.1 Shear stiffness and bending stiffness of diagrids structure We model the building as a beam, and subdivide the beam longitudinally into modules according to the repetitive diagrid pattern. Each module is dened by a single level of diagrids that extend over n stories. Figure 19 illustrates the case of a 6-story module. Depending upon the direction of loading, the faces act as either web or ange elements. The diagonal members are assumed to be pin-ended, and therefore to resist the transverse shear and moment through only axial action. With this idealization, the design problem reduces to determining the cross-sectional area of typical web and ange members for each module. We establish these quantities with a stiffness-based approach (Connor, 2003). Referring both to Figure 8, the shear force V and bending moment M are expressed in terms of the relative displacement and rotation measures, Du and Db, for the module as

V = KT Du
M = K BDb
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

(9) (10)
Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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The motion measures are related to the transverse shear and bending deformation measures by

Du = g h
Db = c h

(11) (12)

where h is the height of the module and c is the curvature. Applying the process described in Section 2.2 leads to the following expressions for the module stiffness measures:

Ad ,w E KT = 2 N w cos 2 q Ld
KB = N f
2 B Ad ,w E sin 2 q 2 Ld

(13)

(14)

where Nw is the number of diagonals extending over the full height in one web plane, and Nf is a similar count for one ange plane. Given V and M, one species the desired transverse shear and bending deformations, g * and c*, and determines the required stiffness using Equations (9) and (10).

KT =
KB =

V g *h
M c*h

(15)

(16)

Lastly, substituting for the stiffness terms, one obtains expressions for the typical areas in the web and ange:

Ad ,w =
Ad , f =

VLd 2 N w Ed hg cos 2 q
2 MLd N f B Ed ch sin 2 q
2

(17)

(18)

Since the diagonal members are assumed to be constant in a plane, one needs to consider loading in both directions in order to establish an upper board value for the areas. 4.2 Specifying the shear and bending deformation measures Optimal design from a motion perspective corresponds to a state of uniform shear and bending deformation under the design loading. Uniform deformation states are possible only for statically determinate structures. Assuming the diagrid structure is modeled as a cantilever beam, the deection at the top is given by

u( H ) = y*H +
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

c*H 2 2

(19)
Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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where g *H is the contribution from shear deformation and c*H2/2 is the contribution from bending. In order to specify the relative contribution of shear versus bending deformation, we introduce a dimensionless factor s, which is equal to the ratio of the displacement at the top of the structure due to bending and the displacement due to shear.

s=

2 Hc* c*H ( g *H ) = 2 2g *

(20)

The maximum allowable displacement is usually expressed as a fraction of the total building height.

u( H ) =

H a

(21)

Noting Equations (19) and (20), Equation (21) expands to

u( H ) = (1 + s)g h =
Then

h a

(22)

g* =
Also, c* is determined using Equation (20):

1 (1 + s)a

(23)

c* =

2g *s 2s = H H (1 + s)a

(24)

Typical values for a are in the neighborhood of 500. It remains to establish a value for s. We introduce a dimensionless factor f, which is dened as the ratio of the strain in a web diagonal due to shearing action to the strain in a ange diagonal due to bending action. Both strains are produced by lateral loading.

f =
The strains, ed,web and ed,lang, can be expressed as

e d ,web e d ,flange

(25)

e d ,web =

Du cos q Du cos q sin q = = g cos q sin q Ld h


BDb sin q BDb sin 2 q B = = c sin 2 q 2 Ld 2h 2

(26)

e d ,flange =
and the equation for f expands to

(27)

f =
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2g cos q sin q 2g e d ,web = = e d ,flange Bc tan q Bc sin 2 q

(28)

Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Combining Equations (28) and (24) leads to an equation for s in terms of f, the diagonal angle, and the aspect ratio:

s=

Hc H (2g Bf tan q ) H = = 2g 2g Bf tan q

(29)

When a truss beam model is used to represent a tall building, the chords correspond to the columns of the building. These elements are required to carry both gravity and lateral loading, whereas the diagonals carry only lateral loading. Since the column force required by the gravity loading may be of the same order as the force generated by the lateral loading, the allowable incremental deformation in the column due to lateral loading must be less than the corresponding incremental deformation in the diagonal. Thus, f for braced-frame type tall buildings must be greater than 1. Typical values range from 3 for elastic behavior to 6 for inelastic behavior. However, in diagrid structures, the diagonals in both the web and ange planes are strained equally by the gravity loading. The diagonals at the interface between the web and ange are subjected to both shearing and bending deformation. Therefore, f for diagrid tall buildings is generally less than 1. Studies indicate that for optimally congured diagrid tall buildings having an aspect ratio (H/B) greater than about 5, f ranges from about 05 to 1. As the aspect ratio increases, the building tends to act more like a bending beam, and f decreases. Figure 20 illustrates in a qualitative sense the trends for f and s as a function of aspect ratio. 4.3 Design studies The methodology is applied to 60-story and 42-story diagrid structures with an angle of 63. The rst step is to divide the structure into appropriate structural modules. For the 60-story building, a six-story segment is used as the structural module. For each structural module, shear forces and bending moments are calculated using the code loadings described in Section 2.3. The 60-story building has an aspect ratio of about 7, and f was taken equal to 05. The corresponding value for s is about 6. Deformation measures were based on a maximum lateral displacement of H/500 = 048 m. Member sizes for the modules were computed using the following equations customized for the six-story module shown in Figure 19:

Ad ,w =
Ad , f =

VLd VLd = 2 2 N w Ed hg cos q 12 Ed hg cos 2 q

(30)

2 MLd 2 MLd N f B 2 Ed ch sin 2 q (6 + 2) B 2 Ed ch sin 2 q

(31)

An estimate of the contribution of the diagonals on each web to the bending rigidity is made by adding one extra diagonal on each ange, resulting in Nf 6 + 2. Proles of the required areas for the typical diagonals in the web and ange planes are plotted in Figure 21. Since the wind can blow in either direction, the role of a plane can be either a ange or a web. The building considered here has a square plan and the preliminary design value for the module is taken as the larger of the two values (bold face in Table 4). A similar study is carried out for a 42-story structure with an aspect ratio of 5 and angle of 63. The parameters for this case are f = 1 and s = 2. Diagonal areas predicted by Equations (30) and (31) are plotted in Figure 22, and the suggested design values are listed in Table 5 (bold face).
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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H /B

H /B

Figure 20. f versus s

Member Sizes for Bending & Shear

Ad for Bending

Ad for Shear

0.3000 0.2500 sq. meters 0.2000 0.1500 0.1000 0.0500 0.0000


2n 31 d st -3 6t 25 h th -3 0t 19 h th -2 4t 13 h th -1 8t h 7t h -1 2t h 1s t6t h h h 4t -5 0t -4 8t 37 -6 h th -4

th

th 49

55

43

rd

stories
Figure 21. Preliminary member sizing for the 60-story diagrid structure

The structures having these preliminary design areas were analyzed with SAP2000 to assess the accuracy of the preliminary sizing methodology. Table 6 compares the results for the displacement at the top of the structure and the required steel tonnage with the conventional approach. There is reasonably close agreement. Considering that no iteration is required, we conclude that the methodology is useful for member sizing at the preliminary design stage.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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Member Sizes for Bending & Shear

Ad for Bending

Ad for Shear

0.1200 0.1000 sq. meters 0.0800 0.0600 0.0400 0.0200 0.0000


d 0t h 4t h 8t h h -1 2t 1s 2n 36 -3 -2 -4 -1 st t6t h th

31

25

19

37

stories
Figure 22. Preliminary member sizing for the 42-story diagrid structure

Table 4. Preliminary member sizing for the 60-story diagrid structure

Story 55th60th 49th54th 43rd48th 37th42nd 31st36th 25th30th 19th24th 13th18th 7th12th 1st6th

V (kn) 2,650 5,300 7,950 10,442 12,845 15,248 17,384 18,986 20,588 22,190

M (kn m) 7,950 71,550 198,750 389,076 639,417 947,697 1,312,848 1,728,462 2,184,126 2,788,776

13

Ad (bending) 00008 00069 00191 00374 00615 00911 01262 01662 02100 02681

7t h

th

th

th

th

Ad (shear) 00207 00414 00621 00816 01004 01191 01358 01483 01608 01734

Table 5. Preliminary member sizing for the 42-story diagrid structure

Story 37th42nd 31st36th 25th30th 19th24th 13th18th 7th12th 1st6th

V (kn) 2,492 4,895 7,298 9,434 11,036 12,638 14,240

M (kn m) 7,476 67,017 184,497 358,848 583,662 848,526 1,262,376

Ad (bending) 00006 00058 00160 00311 00505 00734 01092

Ad (shear) 00083 00164 00244 00316 00370 00423 00477

Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

225

Table 6. Comparison between proposed and conventional iterative method

Structure 42-story 60-story

H 168 m 240 m

B 36 m 36 m

f 10 05

s 2 6

umax (target) 034 m 048 m

Method Proposed method Conventional iterative method Proposed method Conventional iterative method

umax 030 m 029 m 043 m 047 m

Steel tonnage 1620 t 1850 t 6080 t 5440 t

Table 7. umax of the 60-story diagrid structure

s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

umax (target) 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m 048 m

umax (SAP2000) 035 m 042 m 045 m 045 m 045 m 043 m 041 m 039 m 036 m

4.4 Determining the optimal value of s for diagrid tall buildings Even though a assumption-based choice of s values resulted in reasonably good diagonal member areas, additional studies were carried out to establish an empirical relationship between the aspect ratio (H/B) and the corresponding optimal s value. A set of diagrid structures with heights ranging from 33 to 69 stories and various aspect ratios were considered. Figure 23 shows sets of diagonal areas for the 60-story building, having an aspect ratio of 67, and diagonal angle of 63. When s is taken as 1, the maximum displacements at the top due to bending and shear are equal, and the areas required to limit displacement due to bending govern the design for square plan buildings (Figure 23(a)). When s = 9, the maximum displacement at the top due to bending is 9 times that due to shear, and the areas required to limit displacement due to shear govern the design for square plan buildings (Figure 23(b)). These cases represent the extreme limits for s. Choosing s to be 4, and selecting the greater of the member sizes required for the bending and shear criteria, leads to the most economical design (Figure 23(c)). In this case, the bending deformation requirement governs for the lower half portion of the building, and the shear deformation requirement for the upper half. Table 7 shows a comparison of the targeted maximum displacement and the displacements computed with SAP2000. The results show that all the designs are conservative, and the designs corresponding to s values of 3, 4 and 5 appear to be closer to optimal. A closer estimate can be obtained by comparing the steel tonnage required for each design. These results are plotted in Figure 24, and indicate that values of s between 3 and 5 are equally optimal. Similar studies were carried out for 33-, 42-, 51- and 69-story diagrid structures with aspect ratios ranging from 4 to 8. Table 8 and Figure 25 show the results for the set of 42-story structures. All the designs are conservative, and the optimal range for s appears to be between 2 and 3.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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K.-S. MOON, J. J. CONNOR AND J. E. FERNANDEZ


Member Sizes for Bending & Shear
Ad for Bending

Ad for Shear

0.5000 0.4500 0.4000 0.3500 sq. meters 0.3000 0.2500 0.2000 0.1500 0.1000 0.0500 0.0000
d h -1 2t 0t h 0t h 4t h 8t h 2n 6t 4t h -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 -3 8t h -4 tAd for Bending

55

49

43

37

25

stories

19

13

31

7t h

th

rd

th

st

th

th

th

th

Member Sizes for Bending & Shear

Ad for Shear

0.3000 0.2500 sq. meters 0.2000 0.1500 0.1000 0.0500 0.0000


d h -1 2t 1s 4t h 0t h 8t h 2n 6t 0t h 4t h -5 -4 -3 -3 -6 -2 -1 8t h -4 t6t h h

55

49

43

37

25

31

stories

19

13

7t h

th

rd

th

st

th

th

th

th

Member Sizes for Bending & Shear

Ad for Bending

Ad for Shear

0.3500 0.3000 0.2500 sq. meters 0.2000 0.1500 0.1000 0.0500 0.0000 55th - 49th - 43rd - 37th - 31st - 25th - 19th - 13th - 7th - 1st 60th 54th 48th 42nd 36th 30th 24th 18th 12th 6th stories

Figure 23. Preliminary member sizing for the 60-story diagrid structure with various values of s

Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

1s

(a) s = 1

(b) s = 9

(c) s =4

6t h

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

227

10000 9000 8000 7000 6000 ton 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1 2 3 4 5 s
Figure 24. Diagrid steel tonnage for 60-story structure

2500

2000

1500 ton 1000 500 0 1 2 s 3 4

Figure 25. Diagrid steel tonnage for 60-story structure

Table 8. umax of the 42-story diagrid structure

s 1 2 3 4
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

umax (target) 034 m 034 m 034 m 034 m

umax (SAP2000) 025 m 030 m 028 m 026 m


Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

228
0.3500 0.3000 0.2500 sq. meters 0.2000 0.1500 0.1000 0.0500 0.0000

K.-S. MOON, J. J. CONNOR AND J. E. FERNANDEZ

H/500

H/250

55 th

49 th

43 rd

Figure 26. Member sizes for 60-story diagrid structure based on two different maximum displacement criteria

Based on these studies, the following empirical relationship between the optimal s value and the aspect ratio is proposed for diagrid structures greater than 40 stories with an aspect ratio greater than about 5 and a diagrid angle between 60 and 70.

H H s = - 3 for 5 and 60 q 70 B B
4.5 Strength- versus stiffness-based design

37

-4 8t h th -4 2n 31 d st -3 6t 25 h th -3 0t 19 h th -2 4t 13 h th -1 8t h 7t h -1 2t h 1s t6t h

0t h -6

-5

4t h

(32)

The methodology presented here can be interpreted as stiffness-based design. Designs were generated using a generally adopted allowable maximum displacement criterion, u H/500. All these designs satisfy the LRFD code requirement, verifying that lateral stiffness controls the design for tall diagrid structures having an aspect ratio (H/B) greater than about ve. The relative inuence of strength and stiffness on the design depends on the magnitude of the allowable maximum displacement. We investigated this interaction by carrying out a series of design studies on a 60-story tall diagrid structure with s = 4 and gradually increasing the allowable displacement (H/450, H/400, H/350, H/300, H/250). Figure 26 shows the design member sizes for 60-story diagrid structures based on two different maximum displacement criteria: H/500 (048 m) and H/250 (096 m). It was found that, for H/250, some of the diagrid members fail the code requirements. The most severe failure occurred on the leeward face of the structure. The same study was repeated for the 42-story diagrid structure with s = 2. Figure 27 shows the design member sizes for 42-story diagrid structures based on two different maximum displacement criteria: H/500 (034 m) and H/400 (042 m). It was found that, for H/400, some of the diagrid members fail the code requirements. Again, the most severe failure occurred on the leeward face of the structure.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

DIAGRID STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS


0.1200 0.1000 0.0800 sq. meters 0.0600 0.0400 0.0200 0.0000 37th 42nd 31st 36th 25th 30th 19th 24th 13th 18th 7th 12th 1st - 6th

229

H/500

H/400

Figure 27. Member sizes for 42-story diagrid structure based on two different maximum displacement criteria

5. DIAGRID IN URBAN CONTEXT The inherent monumentality of skyscrapers resulting from their massive scale makes their architectural expression a signicant element in an urban context. Thus, constructing any tall building requires careful studies of esthetic adequacy of the new structure within the existing urban context. Tall buildings, like other building types, are composed of various building components. Modern architecture has always been primarily composed of pure verticals and horizontals. This is generally true of the components of the exterior surfaces of tall buildings. In contemporary urban contexts, diagrid tall structures are strikingly dissimilar to their tall neighbors. While many contemporary aesthetic decisions are substantially guided by subjective visual judgments, the use of diagrid structures stands as an innovation that requires a partnership between technical and compositional interests. As such, these structures are set apart in both their iconic and technological signicance 6. CONSTRUCTABILITY OF DIAGRID In general, the joints of diagrid structures are more complicated than conventional orthogonal structures and therefore tend to be more expensive. Constructability is a serious concern, and prefabrication of nodal elements is essential. One strategy to overcome this disadvantageous characteristic of the system is to shop-fabricate the complicated joints. In fact, this strategy has been used for conventional steel tubular structures, which involves many rigid columnbeam connections due to the large number of perimeter columns required in general to make the system work as intended. Due to the triangular conguration of the diagrid structural system, rigid connections are not necessary. Pin connections at the complicated joints for diagrids work well. When designed using a prefabrication strategy, constructability will not be a critical issue for diagrid structures.
Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal

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K.-S. MOON, J. J. CONNOR AND J. E. FERNANDEZ

7. CONCLUSION This study examined the inuence of the diagonal angle on the behavior of diagrid type structures. It was found that, for 60-story diagrid structures having an aspect ratio of about 7, the optimal range of diagrids angle is from about 65 to 75. For 42-story buildings having an aspect ratio of about 5, the range is lower by around 10 because the importance of bending to the total lateral displacement is reduced as the building height decreases. A stiffness-based methodology for determining preliminary design sizes for the diagonals was introduced and applied to a representative set of steel buildings. Results for displacement and required steel tonnage demonstrate the practical usefulness of the proposed preliminary design method. Compared with a conventional strength-based iterative methodology, a stiffness-based methodology is more efcient for todays relatively light and exible structures such as tall buildings, the design of which is in many cases governed by motion rather than strength. The authors expect that the optimal angle study results, the simple member sizing methodology, and other topics discussed, such as architectural, constructability and urban contextual issues, will be very useful to both engineers and architects for preliminary design of diagrid structures. Based on these studies, structural and architectural decisions at the early stage of design can be made in a more integrative and efcient way.
REFERENCES

AISC. 1998. Manual of Steel Construction: Load and Resistance Factor Design. American Institute of Steel Construction: Chicago, IL. ASCE. 1996. Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures. American Society of Civil Engineers: Reston, VA. Clark W, Kingston J. 1930. The Skyscraper: A Study in the Economic Height of Modern Ofce Buildings. American Institute of Steel Construction: New York. Connor J. 2003. Introduction to Structural Motion Control. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. 1995. Structural Systems for Tall Buildings. McGraw-Hill: New York. Willis C. 1995. Form Follows Finance: Skyscrapers and Skylines in New York and Chicago. Princeton Architectural Press: New York.

Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Struct. Design Tall Spec. Build. 16, 205230 (2007) DOI: 10.1002/tal