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Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Executive Cellular Processor (ECP) Release 17.

0 UNIX Users Guide

Issue 8 June 2001 401-610-048 Lucent TechnologiesProprietary This document contains proprietary information of Lucent Technologies and is not to be disclosed or used except in accordance with applicable agreements. Copyright 2001 Lucent Technologies Unpublished and Not for Publication All Rights Reserved

Copyright 2001 Lucent Technologies. All Rights Reserved.


This material is protected by the copyright and trade secret laws of the United States and other countries. It may not be reproduced, distributed, or altered in any fashion by any entity (either internal or external to Lucent Technologies) except in accordance with applicable agreements, contracts, or licensing, without the express written consent of the Customer Training and Information Products organization and the business management owner of the material. For permission to reproduce or distribute, contact the Product Development Manager at 1 800 645 6259 (U.S.) 1 317 322 6847 (International)

Notice
Every effort was made to ensure that the information in this document was complete and accurate at the time of printing. However, information is subject to change.

Federal Communications Commission Statement (FCC) Notication and Repair Information


NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his/her own expense.

Security Statement
In rare instances, unauthorized individuals make connections to the telecommunications network through the use of remote access features. In such event, applicable tariffs require that the customer pay all network charges for trafc. Lucent Technologies cannot be responsible for such charges and will not make any allowance or give any credit for charges that result from unauthorized access.

Trademarks
AIX is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. AutoPACE is a registered trademark of Lucent Technologies. AUTOPLEX is a registered trademark of Lucent Technologies. Dataphone is a registered trademark of AT&T. Flexent is a trademark of Lucent Technologies. HP-UX is a registered trademark of Hewlett-Packard Company. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. Solaris is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. SPARC is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. Sun, and SunOS are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through X/ Open Company Ltd.

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Contents

About This Document


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xxv xxv xxvi xxvi xxvi xxvii xxviii xxviii xxviii xxviii xxix xxix xxx xxx xxxi xxxii xxxii xxxii xxxiii

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Purpose Reason for reissue Changes to support ECP Release 17.0 Additional changes and updates Safety labels Intended audience Prerequisite knowledge and skills How to use this document Conventions used in this document Typographic conventions User input terminology Systems supported Related documentation Related training Related courses How to comment on this document Related documentation For technical assistance

Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System 1-1


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Introduction Chapter contents Logging in to the UNIX operating system User login names Passwords Login methods Types of login names System login name Regular user login name Permissions Files
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File categories File types File-naming rules Directory structure Directories and subdirectories Current directory Parent directory Path Changing directories File systems Security Owners of files and directories Group ID of files or directories Other users or world Obtaining information about a file or directory File type and permissions Determining permissions Changing permissions Shell environments Types of shells Shell properties Special characters Shell variables Delimiter Displaying or setting shell variable values Displaying all exported shell variables and their current values Displaying the value of a specific shell variable Setting the default values of shell variables Appending information to the default value of a shell variable Shell programming language Shell script programs Shell commands versus UNIX commands Processes Listing processes Killing a process UNIX editors UNIX editors in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network environment Editor modes 1-5 1-6 1-7 1-8 1-8 1-8 1-9 1-9 1-10 1-11 1-12 1-12 1-12 1-13 1-13 1-14 1-15 1-15 1-16 1-16 1-16 1-17 1-18 1-19 1-20 1-20 1-21 1-22 1-23 1-25 1-26 1-26 1-26 1-26 1-27 1-28 1-28 1-28

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UNIX standard printing facility

1-29

UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP


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2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-5 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-7 2-8 2-9 2-9 2-9 2-9 2-10 2-11 2-11 2-12 2-12

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Introduction Chapter contents Types of users Files Rules for filenames File types Determining file type Directory structure Main directory Default file systems Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network file systems Permissions and security No groups in UNIX RTR Shell environments Processes Kernel process Supervisor process ed editor Command mode Insert mode Dollar sign ($) Using the ed editor to edit existing files Invoking ed Example ed session Using the ed editor to create new files Example ed session Printing files Standard printing command

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Contents
3 Solaris Operating System on the OMP
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3-1 3-1 3-1 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-6 3-7 3-8 3-8 3-8 3-9 3-10 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-16 3-16 3-17 3-17 3-18 3-18 3-19 3-19 3-23 3-24 3-25 3-26 3-27 3-28 3-29

Introduction Contents User types Types Files Characteristics of files Types of files Directory structure Main directory Default file systems Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network file systems Security File modes File and group ownership Security guidelines Korn shell Default shell of Solaris operating system Shell variables Tilde Keyboard shortcuts Korn shell programming language Shell scripting course What is the ksh programming language? Shell compatibility Logic constructs Syntax List of key words Shell script names Special characters Shell script parameters If statement case statement while loop Until loop for statement break statement continue statement Read statement

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Function statement Function characteristics Shell script examples Processes Types of process System processes User processes vi editor Solaris editors Command-line syntax Command mode Insert commands Using the vi editor to edit files Invoking vi Example session to edit an existing file Using the vi editor to create a new file Invoking vi Example vi session to create a new file Printing UNIX standard printing facility Printing files Examples Canceling a print job Who can cancel a print job 3-30 3-30 3-31 3-40 3-40 3-40 3-41 3-42 3-42 3-42 3-43 3-45 3-46 3-46 3-47 3-48 3-48 3-49 3-50 3-50 3-50 3-51 3-51 3-51

UNIX Commands
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Introduction UNIX commands Command line syntax Options Chapter contents admin at, UAat banner batch, UAbatch cat cd chgrp

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Contents
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chmod chown clear cmp compress cpio crontab, UAcrontab cut date dc, UAdc dd df diff du echo env falloc file find fmove fsize grep head id kill logdir lpr, UAlpr ls man mesg mkdir more mv news nice nohup od passwd pg, UApg pr

4-31 4-37 4-41 4-43 4-46 4-51 4-56 4-61 4-68 4-71 4-76 4-80 4-83 4-87 4-89 4-92 4-95 4-97 4-100 4-103 4-105 4-107 4-111 4-114 4-117 4-121 4-123 4-125 4-131 4-134 4-137 4-140 4-143 4-146 4-149 4-152 4-155 4-159 4-162 4-166

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ps pwd rm rmdir sdiff sleep sort split stty su sum tail time touch tty umask uncompress uname wc who write

4-172 4-178 4-180 4-183 4-186 4-189 4-191 4-195 4-199 4-203 4-206 4-208 4-212 4-215 4-218 4-220 4-222 4-225 4-228 4-231 4-234

Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands


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Introduction Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks commands ECP commands OMP commands AutoPACE subsystem commands Command line syntax Contents Tools for Lucent Technologies personnel only Commands that are executed by other commands amasearch apxhome apxrcv apxsub ARmon

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authgen config cscreset ctrmkrmt DBapxvcr DBcellsw DBend DBllitest DBnetchk DBrcheck DBretune DBsubdel DBsubquery DBsubrehome DBsubsearch DBsubsum DBsurvey DBvlrquery dmptime dpclone dpdelete dpreport dpsrch dpvacant dtclr dtreport dxdcount dxdlist dxdmenu dxdphone dxdroute FTlistcol FTlisttrace FTplmstart FTplmstop FTrfclear FTrfdump FTrfstop FTrftrace fafprint

5-38 5-40 5-42 5-44 5-46 5-48 5-50 5-52 5-55 5-56 5-57 5-60 5-64 5-88 5-89 5-90 5-93 5-99 5-102 5-104 5-108 5-111 5-113 5-118 5-120 5-121 5-123 5-125 5-129 5-131 5-133 5-136 5-143 5-147 5-154 5-159 5-161 5-176 5-178 5-184

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getdp hrtkrp PCcmprs PCgettrx PCgetvcsa PCmtcron PCruntrx PCstpvcsa PCvfilt PFcpfail PFhodisp PFhostaton PFmtodisp PFmtostat PFpgstats patdiff ptresync Rmon saptree systat testpat TIpdunix tg trkreport

5-186 5-188 5-189 5-192 5-194 5-203 5-204 5-206 5-207 5-209 5-211 5-213 5-217 5-219 5-221 5-223 5-226 5-230 5-232 5-235 5-238 5-240 5-241 5-245

History of Revisions
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A-1 A-1 A-1

Reasons for reissues Issue 7 (December 2000)

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Figures

About This Document

Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System


1-1. UNIX directory structure 1-8

UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP


2-1. Output of ls -l command 2-5

Solaris Operating System on the OMP


3-1. 3-2. 3-3. 3-4. 3-5. 3-6. 3-7. 3-8. 3-9. 3-10. 3-11. 3-12. 3-13. 3-14. 3-15. 3-16. 3-17. 3-18. rssi.sh: RSSI conversion shell script Example of the .rssi1 le Example of the .rssi2 le Example of the .rssi3 le Example of the .rssi4 le srno.sh: base conversion shell script Example of the .hex_oct le Example of the .oct_hex le Example of the .hex_dec le Example of the .dec_hex le Example of the .oct_dec le Example of the .dec_oct File Example of the .oct_bin le Example of the .bin_oct le Example of the .dec_bin le Example of the .bin_dec le Example of the .hex_bin le Example of the .bin_hex File 3-32 3-33 3-33 3-33 3-33 3-35 3-38 3-38 3-38 3-38 3-38 3-38 3-39 3-39 3-39 3-39 3-39 3-39

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Figures

UNIX Commands

Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands

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Tables

About This Document


1. UNIX operating systems used by Flexent/AUTOPLEX platforms xxv

Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System


1-1. 1-2. 1-3. 1-4. 1-5. 1-6. 1-7. 1-8. 1-9. 1-10. Topics in Chapter 1 File categories File types Comparison of mounted and unmounted le systems File permission levels Directory permission levels Characters that have special meaning to the shell Shell variables present in all shell environments UNIX editors in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network environment UNIX editor modes 1-2 1-5 1-6 1-12 1-14 1-15 1-17 1-19 1-28 1-28

UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP


2-1. 2-2. 2-3. 2-4. 2-5. 2-6. 2-7. 2-8. 2-9. Topics in Chapter 2 File types that are specic to the UNIX RTR operating system Default les systems in UNIX RTR operating system Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks le systems on the ECP Modes of the ed editor Command mode commands Insert mode commands Using the ed editor to edit an existing le Using the ed editor to create a new le 2-1 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-8 2-8 2-9 2-10 2-11

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Tables

Solaris Operating System on the OMP


3-1. 3-2. 3-3. 3-4. 3-5. 3-6. 3-7. 3-8. 3-9. 3-10. 3-11. 3-12. 3-13. 3-14. 3-15. 3-16. 3-17. 3-18. 3-19. 3-20. 3-21. 3-22. 3-23. Topics in Chapter 3 Solaris le systems AUTOPLEX Group Description ksh variables Possible uses of the tilde in the Korn shell Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands Shell language constructs Reserved key words in ksh programming language Character denition Shell script conditions vi Modes vi Command Line Structure vi Navigational Commands vi search commands vi write and exit commands vi miscellaneous commands vi insert commands vi optional parameters Sample vi session to edit an existing le Example vi session to create a le Options for the lp command Print job condition table Who can cancel a print job 3-1 3-5 3-6 3-8 3-9 3-10 3-16 3-17 3-19 3-19 3-42 3-43 3-43 3-44 3-44 3-45 3-45 3-47 3-47 3-49 3-50 3-51 3-51

UNIX Commands
4-1. 4-2. 4-3. 4-4. 4-5. 4-6. Chapter 4 Table of Contents UNIX RTR at command options UNIX RTR at command arguments Solaris at command options Solaris at command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris banner command arguments 4-2 4-11 4-11 4-12 4-13 4-17

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Tables
4-7. 4-8. 4-9. 4-10. 4-11. 4-12. 4-13. 4-14. 4-15. 4-16. 4-17. 4-18. 4-19. 4-20. 4-21. 4-22. 4-23. 4-24. 4-25. 4-26. 4-27. 4-28. 4-29. 4-30. 4-31. 4-32. 4-33. 4-34. 4-35. 4-36. 4-37. 4-38. 4-39. 4-40. 4-41. 4-42. UNIX RTR cat command options UNIX RTR cat command arguments Solaris cat command options UNIX RTR and Solaris cd command arguments chgrp command options Solaris chgrp command arguments UNIX RTR chmod command options UNIX RTR chmod command arguments Solaris chmod command options UNIX RTR chown command arguments Solaris chown command options UNIX RTR cmp command options UNIX RTR cmp command arguments UNIX RTR compress command options Solaris compress command options UNIX RTR cpio command options UNIX RTR cpio command arguments crontab conditions UNIX RTR crontab command options Solaris crontab command options crontab elds Solaris crontab command arguments cut command options in the Solaris operating system cut command arguments cut command options in the UNIX RTR operating system cut command exit status messages cut command error messages Format date command output date command error messages dc command input constructions dc command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris dd command arguments UNIX RTR df command options UNIX RTR df command arguments Solaris df command options UNIX RTR diff command options
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4-22 4-22 4-22 4-26 4-28 4-29 4-32 4-33 4-33 4-38 4-38 4-43 4-44 4-47 4-48 4-52 4-53 4-56 4-57 4-58 4-58 4-59 4-62 4-63 4-64 4-65 4-65 4-69 4-70 4-72 4-74 4-77 4-80 4-81 4-81 4-84

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4-43. 4-44. 4-45. 4-46. 4-47. 4-48. 4-49. 4-50. 4-51. 4-52. 4-53. 4-54. 4-55. 4-56. 4-57. 4-58. 4-59. 4-60. 4-61. 4-62. 4-63. 4-64. 4-65. 4-66. 4-67. 4-68. 4-69. 4-70. 4-71. 4-72. 4-73. 4-74. 4-75. 4-76. 4-77. 4-78. 4-79. UNIX RTR diff command arguments Solaris diff command options UNIX RTR and Solaris du command options UNIX RTR and Solaris du command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris echo command arguments UNIX RTR env command options UNIX RTR env command arguments Solaris env command options UNIX RTR falloc command arguments Solaris le command options Solaris le command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris nd command arguments UNIX RTR fmove command options UNIX RTR fmove command arguments UNIX RTR fsize command arguments UNIX RTR grep command options UNIX RTR grep command arguments Solaris grep command options Solaris head command options Solaris head command arguments Solaris id command options Solaris id command arguments UNIX RTR kill command options Signal types UNIX RTR kill command arguments Solaris kill command options UNIX RTR logdir command arguments UNIX RTR lpr command options UNIX RTR lpr command arguments Output of the ls command UNIX RTR ls command options UNIX RTR ls command arguments Solaris ls command options Solaris man command options Solaris man command arguments UNIX RTR mesg command options Solaris mesg command options 4-84 4-85 4-87 4-88 4-90 4-92 4-93 4-93 4-96 4-98 4-98 4-101 4-104 4-104 4-105 4-108 4-108 4-109 4-112 4-112 4-115 4-115 4-117 4-118 4-118 4-119 4-121 4-123 4-124 4-125 4-127 4-128 4-128 4-131 4-132 4-134 4-135

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4-80. 4-81. 4-82. 4-83. 4-84. 4-85. 4-86. 4-87. 4-88. 4-89. 4-90. 4-91. 4-92. 4-93. 4-94. 4-95. 4-96. 4-97. 4-98. 4-99. 4-100. 4-101. 4-102. 4-103. 4-104. 4-105. 4-106. 4-107. 4-108. 4-109. 4-110. 4-111. 4-112. 4-113. 4-114. 4-115. 4-116. UNIX RTR mkdir command arguments Solaris mkdir command options Solaris more command options Solaris more command arguments UNIX RTR mv command arguments Solaris mv command options Solaris mv command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris news command options UNIX RTR and Solaris news command arguments UNIX RTR nice command options UNIX RTR nice command arguments Solaris nice command options nohup command arguments UNIX RTR od command options UNIX RTR od command arguments Solaris od command options Solaris od command arguments UNIX RTR pg command options UNIX RTR pg command arguments Solaris pg command options UNIX RTR pr command options UNIX RTR pr command arguments Solaris pr command options UNIX RTR ps command options Solaris ps command options UNIX RTR and Solaris rm command options UNIX RTR and Solaris rm command arguments UNIX RTR rmdir command arguments Solaris rmdir command options UNIX RTR and Solaris sdiff command options UNIX RTR and Solaris sdiff command arguments UNIX RTR and Solaris sleep command arguments UNIX RTR sort command options UNIX RTR sort command arguments Solaris sort command options UNIX RTR split command options UNIX RTR split command arguments 4-137 4-138 4-140 4-141 4-144 4-144 4-144 4-147 4-147 4-150 4-150 4-150 4-153 4-156 4-156 4-157 4-157 4-163 4-163 4-164 4-167 4-168 4-169 4-173 4-175 4-181 4-181 4-184 4-184 4-187 4-187 4-189 4-192 4-192 4-193 4-196 4-196

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4-117. 4-118. 4-119. 4-120. 4-121. 4-122. 4-123. 4-124. 4-125. 4-126. 4-127. 4-128. 4-129. 4-130. 4-131. 4-132. 4-133. 4-134. 4-135. 4-136. 4-137. 4-138. 4-139. 4-140. 4-141. 4-142. 4-143. 4-144. 4-145. 4-146. Solaris split command options 4-196 4-199 UNIX RTR stty command options 4-200 UNIX RTR stty command arguments 4-202 Solaris stty command options 4-203 UNIX RTR su command options 4-204 UNIX RTR su command arguments 4-204 Solaris su command arguments 4-206 UNIX RTR and Solaris sum command options UNIX RTR and Solaris sum command arguments 4-207 4-209 UNIX RTR tail command options 4-209 UNIX RTR tail command arguments 4-210 Solaris tail command options 4-213 UNIX RTR time command arguments 4-213 Solaris time command options 4-216 UNIX RTR and Solaris touch command options UNIX RTR and Solaris touch command arguments 4-216 4-218 UNIX RTR and Solaris tty command options UNIX RTR and Solaris umask command options 4-220 UNIX RTR and Solaris umask command arguments 4-221 4-222 Solaris uncompress command options 4-223 Solaris uncompress command arguments 4-225 UNIX RTR uname command options 4-226 Solaris uname command options 4-228 UNIX RTR wc command options 4-229 UNIX RTR wc command arguments 4-229 Solaris wc command options 4-232 UNIX RTR who command arguments 4-232 Solaris who command options UNIX RTR and Solaris write command arguments 4-235 4-235 4-236 write command error messages

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Tables

Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands


5-1. 5-2. 5-3. 5-4. 5-5. 5-6. 5-7. 5-8. 5-9. 5-10. 5-11. 5-12. 5-13. 5-14. 5-15. 5-16. 5-17. 5-18. 5-19. 5-20. 5-21. 5-22. 5-23. 5-24. 5-25. 5-26. 5-27. 5-28. 5-29. 5-30. 5-31. 5-32. 5-33. Topics in Chapter 5 Commands to be executed by Lucent Technologies personnel only amasearch usage guidelines amasearch command options Output of apxhome command apxrcv command options apxsub command options apxsub input elds ARmon command options cong command options cscreset command options ctrmkrmt command options DBend command options DBretune command options DBsubdel command options DBsubsum command options in the Solaris operating system DBsurvey command options dmptime command options dpclone command options dpdelete command options dpreport command options dpsrch command options dpvacant command options dtreport command options dxdcount command options dxdlist command options dxdphone command options dxdroute command options dxdroute command options FTlisttrace command options FTplmstart command options FTplmstart command exit status messages FTplmstop command options 5-3 5-7 5-12 5-13 5-17 5-21 5-25 5-29 5-37 5-41 5-43 5-44 5-51 5-58 5-61 5-91 5-94 5-103 5-105 5-109 5-112 5-114 5-119 5-122 5-124 5-126 5-132 5-133 5-135 5-145 5-148 5-150 5-155

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5-34. 5-35. 5-36. 5-37. 5-38. 5-39. 5-40. 5-41. 5-42. 5-43. 5-44. 5-45. 5-46. 5-47. 5-48. 5-49. 5-50. 5-51. 5-52. 5-53. 5-54. 5-55. 5-56. 5-57. FTrfclear command options FTrfdump command options Fields in FTrfdump messages FTrfstop command options FTrftrace command options fafprint command options getdp command options PCcmprs command options PCgettrx command options PCgetvcsa command prompts PCruntrx command options PCvlt command options PFcpfail command options PFhodisp command options PFhostaton command options PFmtodisp command options PFmtostat command options PFpgstats command options ptresync command options Rmon command options systat command options testpat command options tg command options trkreport command options and arguments 5-160 5-162 5-165 5-177 5-180 5-184 5-186 5-190 5-192 5-195 5-205 5-208 5-210 5-211 5-214 5-218 5-219 5-221 5-228 5-231 5-236 5-238 5-242 5-245

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Procedures

About This Document

Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System


1-1. 1-2. 1-3. 1-4. Logging in to the UNIX operating system Determining the le type of a le Obtaining information about a le or directory Displaying all exported shell variables and their current values 1-5. Displaying the value of a specic shell variable 1-6. Setting the default values of shell variables 1-7. Changing the value of a shell variable during the current session only 1-8. Appending information to the default value of a shell variable 1-9. Appending information to a shell variable during the current session only 1-10. Outputting a list of running processes 1-11. Killing a process 1-3 1-7 1-13 1-20 1-21 1-22 1-23 1-23 1-24 1-26 1-27

UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP


2- 1. Displaying kernel processes 2- 2. Obtaining a list of supervisor processes 2- 3. Invoking the ed editor 2-7 2-7 2-9

Solaris Operating System on the OMP


3- 1. Creating an executable shell script 3- 2. Canceling a print job 3-15 3-52

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Procedures

UNIX Commands

Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands

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About This Document

Purpose
This FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks UNIX Users Guide provides a general introduction to the UNIX1 operating systems that are used by the various platforms of a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network. The platforms in a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network and the UNIX operating system that each platform uses are listed in Table 1. Table 1. UNIX operating systems used by Flexent/AUTOPLEX platforms Flexent/AUTOPLEX platform Executive Cellular Processor (ECP) Operations and Management Platform (OMP) UNIX operating system of platform UNIX Real Time Reliable (RTR) operating system Sun Microsystems Solaris operating system

This document also describes the following types of commands:


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UNIX RTR commands, which reside and are executed on the ECP Solaris commands, which reside and are executed on the OMP Flexent/AUTOPLEX commands, which reside and are executed on the ECP

1.

Registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively to X/ Open Windows, Ltd.

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This document does not describe UNIX commands that are used to perform system administration in a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network. For information about UNIX commands that are used to perform system administration for the ECP and OMP, see 401-610-160, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Operations, Administration, and Maintenance Guide.

Reason for reissue


This issue of the FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks UNIX Users Guide (Issue 8, June 2001) contains the following additions and changes since Issue 7 (December 2000).

Changes to support ECP Release 17.0


In Chapter 5, Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands, the manual pages for the following commands are added or updated:
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PFpgstats. The PFpgstats command collects paging statistics for Series II cell sites. In ECP Release 17.0, the Supporting AP Data in PFpgstats feature updates the PFpgstats command to also collect statistics for Flexent and IS-634 cell sites.

In ECP Release 17.0, the MSC Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OA&M) Support for 384 Cells feature increases the maximum number of supported cell sites from 222 to 384. The manual pages for the following commands are updated to reect that change:
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cscreset dxdroute FTplmstart FTrfstop FTrfdump PCgetvcsa

Additional changes and updates


Manual pages for the following commands have also been updated since the previous issue of this document:
s s

amasearch apxrcv

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s s s s s s s s s s s

DBretune DBsubdel DBsubsum DBvlrquery dpdelete dpsrch dpvacant dtreport dxdcount FTrftrace getdp

The following command has been added to the list of Tools for Lucent Technologies personnel only:
s

DBacttest

Safety labels
This document may contain the following types of admonishments or safety labels:

The CAUTION admonishment indicates a hazard that can or will cause minor personal injury, loss of data or service, or property damage if the hazard is not avoided.

CAUTION:

The WARNING admonishment indicates a hazard that can cause death or severe personal injury if the hazard is not avoided.

WARNING:

The DANGER admonishment indicates a hazard that will cause death or severe personal injury if the hazard is not avoided.

DANGER:

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Intended audience
This document is designed for Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network service provider personnel who are novice users of the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP and/or the Solaris operating systems on the OMP.

Prerequisite knowledge and skills


To use this document effectively, you should be familiar with the
s s s

general concepts and terminology of computer science components of the 3B21D processor of the ECP components of the OMP

How to use this document


This document contains the following chapters:
s

Chapter 1, Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System, introduces the basic concepts and principles of the UNIX operating system. Chapter 2, UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP, provides a general overview of the UNIX RTR operating system, which is used on the ECP. Chapter 3, Solaris Operating System on the OMP, provides a general overview of the Solaris operating system, which is used on the OMP. Chapter 4, UNIX Commands, describes the most frequently used UNIX commands. Chapter 5, Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands, describes Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network commands, which reside and are executed on the ECP and/or OMP.

Conventions used in this document


The following conventions are used throughout this document:
s s

typographic conventions user input terminology

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Typographic conventions
Different types of information are presented in the following typefaces to emphasize what type of information is being presented:
s

Literal user input. Keystrokes that you are to enter character by character exactly as shown in the text appear in monospace bold type. For example: Enter these characters exactly as shown.

Variable user input. Input values that vary from one execution or instance to another appear in monospace bold italic type. For example: cd directory where directory = the directory to which you want to change.

Literal system output. The names of les, directories, forms, and information that a system displays or outputs exactly as shown in the text appears in monospace regular type. For example: RST SPA=cnam REQUEST ACKNOWLEDGED

Variable system output. Values that vary from one instance to another in system output appear in monospace italic type. For example: RST SPA=SPA_NAME REQUEST COMPLETED where SPA_NAME = the name of the Service Package Application (SPA) that has been successfully restored.

The names of keyboard keys are indicated by bold letters. For example: Press the F4 (Enter Query) function key.

s s

The Control (Ctrl) key is signied by the carat ( ^ ) symbol. Titles of documents and other information products are presented in italic font. For example: FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks UNIX Users Guide

User input terminology


The following words specify what action you should perform to input data or execute commands:
s

The word enter means to key in the specied keystrokes (such as a command) and then press the Return or Enter key.

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The word press means to press the specied key or multiple keys (such as ^e) simultaneously. The word type means to key in the specied keystrokes (such as a value in the eld of a form) without pressing the Return or Enter key.

Systems supported
This document supports ECP Release 17.0. For descriptions of UNIX commands for earlier ECP releases, refer to the earlier issues of this document.

Related documentation
The following Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks documents are either referred to in this document or contain information that relates to this document:
s

401-600-047, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEXWireless Networks Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) Form Security (RFS). Hereafter, that title is shortened to RC/V Form Security. 401-610-036, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Database Update Manual. Hereafter, that title is shortened to Database Update Manual. 401-610-160, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OA&M) Guide. Hereafter, that title is shortened to OA&M Guide. 401-612-024, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Optional Feature Description: DBsurvey (DBS) and Enhanced DBsubsearch for CCF (DBSE) Optional Feature Description. Hereafter, that title is shortened to DBS and DBSE Optional Feature Description. 401-612-080, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Optional Feature Description: Automatic Message Accounting (AMA) Search. Hereafter, that title is shortened to AMA Search Optional Feature Description. 401-612-233, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Subscriber Rehome Optional Feature Description. Hereafter, that title is shortened to Subscriber Rehome Optional Feature Description. 401-660-108, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) Users Guide. Hereafter, that title is shortened to PACE Users Guide.

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401-661-030, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide. Hereafter, that title is shortened to Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide. 401-612-024, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks DBsurvey (DBS) and Enhanced DBsubsearch for CCF (DBSE) Optional Feature Description. Hereafter, that document is referred to as the DBS and DBSE Optional Feature Description. 401-612-052, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Radio Frequency (RF) Call Trace Optional Feature Description. Hereafter, that document is referred to as the RF Call Trace Optional Feature Description. 401-900-004, FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Cell Retune Optional Feature Description. Hereafter, that document is referred to as the Cell Retune Optional Feature Description.

Related training
Lucent Technologies offers a complete curriculum of training courses. For information about Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network training courses, visit the Lucent Technologies Product Training Catalog web site at http://www.lucent.product-training.com To use the Product Training Catalog web site, apply the following guidelines:
s

To search for a course under Find A Course, enter the complete course number (for example, enter cl3703 rather than 3703). To locate a Wireless course under Product Curriculum Paths, look under the Cellular System category.

To register for training courses or inquire about training course schedules, call the appropriate telephone number from the following list:
s

From within the United States: 1 888 LUCENT8 (1 888 582 3688) For classroom training, select Prompt 2. For self-paced training, Select Prompt 3.

From locations outside the United States: voice: (International Access Code) +1 407 767 2798 fax: (International Access Code) +1 407 767 2677

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Related courses
The following Lucent Technologies training courses relate to the subject matter of this document:
s

UC1078, Shell Command Language for Users

How to comment on this document


Lucent Technologies has endeavored to ensure that this document meets your needs. We are interested in your suggestions for improving the document. At the back of this document is a postage-paid comment card. Please complete the comment card and mail it to us at the preprinted address. If your copy of the document has no comment card, please specify the title of the document and mail your comments to Lucent Technologies 1000 E. Warrenville Road P.O. Box 3013 Naperville, Illinois 60566-7013 USA Attn: Customer Training and Information Products ManagerRoom 2V-120 Or e-mail your comments to wireless.docs@lucent.com

Related documentation
The FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Customer Documentation Catalog (401-610-000) is a guide to all Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks customer documents. It describes the technical content and purpose of each document and provides instructions on how to order Lucent Technologies product documentation. To order Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks documents, including documents on CD-ROM, and all other Lucent Technologies product documentation by phone, please use the following numbers: From the United States: Telephone: 1-888-582-3688 Facsimile: 1-800-566-9568

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From Canada: Telephone: 1-317-322-6619 Facsimile: 1-317-322-6359 From Asia, Central America, South America, and Pacic and Caribbean regions: Telephone: 1 317 322 6411 Facsimile: 1 317 322 6699 From Europe, the Middle East, and Africa: Telephone: 1 317 322 6416 Facsimile: 1 317 322 6699 To order documentation by mail, please use the following address: Lucent Technologies Customer Information Center Attention: Order Entry Section 2855 N. Franklin Road P.O. Box 19901 Indianapolis, IN 46219 U.S.A. NOTE: Documents must be ordered by the documentation coordinator of your company.

For technical assistance


Lucent Technologies customer technical support provides technical assistance for all Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network products. For technical assistance, please call the following numbers: From the United States: Telephone: 1-800-CAL-4NSC (1-800-225-4672) From all other countries: Telephone: 1 630 224 4672 Please be prepared to describe the specic problem in your Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network. A Customer Technical Assistance Management (CTAM) operator will either transfer your call directly to a CTS representative or forward your service request to CTS for a representative to return your call as soon as possible. Service-affecting situations are always handled immediately.

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Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System

Introduction
Several implementations of the UNIX operating system are commercially available, such as UNIX System V Release 4 (SVR4), Hewlett-Packard UNIX (HP-UX), the IBM version of UNIX (AIX), and the Sun Microsystems Solaris operating systems. This chapter introduces fundamental concepts that apply to all UNIX operating systems. The Executive Cellular Processor (ECP) of the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network uses the UNIX Real Time Reliable (RTR) operating system. The Operations and Management Platform (OMP) of the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network uses the Solaris operating system. Subsequent chapters of this document describe how the fundamental concepts that are introduced in this chapter apply to the UNIX RTR and Solaris operating systems.

Chapter contents
This chapter covers the topics that are listed in Table 1-1.

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Table 1-1. Topic

Topics in Chapter 1 See Page 1-2 1-4 1-5 1-5 1-8 1-11 1-12 1-16 1-25 1-26 1-28 1-29

Logging in to the UNIX operating system Types of login names Permissions Files Directory structure File systems Security Shell environments Shell programming language Processes UNIX editors UNIX standard printing facility

Logging in to the UNIX operating system


To access the UNIX operating system, a user must have
s s

a user login name a password

User login names


A user login name is a unique name that identies the user to the operating system. The operating system administrator creates a user login name for each user of the system. Each user login name has a unique user identication (uid) number.

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Passwords
A password is a character string that the user enters to obtain authorization from the security mechanisms of the operating system to access the system. Each user login name requires a password to access the system. The users password may be created by the system administrator, or the user may be prompted to specify and enter the password the rst time that the user logs in to the system.

Login methods
The user logs in to the system by means of one of the following:
s s s

a network a direct connection to the system a modem

The system administrator informs the user of the login method that is to be used. To log in to the system, perform Procedure 1-1, Logging in to the UNIX operating system.

Procedure 1-1. Logging in to the UNIX operating system


1. Power on the terminal or monitor. Result: The login: prompt is displayed. 2. At the login: prompt, enter your user login name. Result: The Password: prompt is displayed. 3. At the Password: prompt, enter your password. NOTE: To enhance password security, the password is not displayed as you enter it.

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Result: The security mechanisms either accept or reject the entered password. IF the password is... accepted not accepted THEN... the prompt is displayed and you are placed in your home directory in the system. the login incorrect error message is displayed and you must restart the login procedure at Step 2.

Types of login names


UNIX user login names are of two types:
s s

system login name user login name

System login name


A system login name is a login name that is reserved for the use of the operating system. System login names have uid numbers that are less than or equal to 20. The root user login name has all permissions on the system. The root user is also called the superuser.

Root user default prompt


The default prompt for the root user is a pound sign (#).

Regular user login name


A regular user is any user who does not have root permissions.

Regular user default prompt


The default prompt for a regular user is a dollar sign ($). A user can customize the prompt by modifying the PS1 shell variable. For more information on shell variables, refer to Shell variables in this chapter.

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Permissions
Permissions are values that control what operations users may perform while they are logged in to the operating system. Different users may have different permissions. Permissions are also called privileges.

A user with root login permissions can accidentally destroy an entire le system, thereby losing data, time, and revenue. Therefore, root user login permission should be granted only to personnel who need it and are highly familiar with root user login name capabilities.

CAUTION:

Files
A le is a collection of logically related bytes of data. Every le is of a certain le category and le type, as explained in the following subsections.

File categories
UNIX les fall into three basic categories. The le category of a le is a classication that indicates the type of data that the le contains. The UNIX le categories are dened in Table 1-2. Table 1-2. File categories Denition An ordinary le is a le that contains American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) text or data. Ordinary les are also called plain les or regular les. A directory le, or directory, is a le that contains other les. A special le is a le that represents interfaces to the kernel or to hardware devices.

File category ordinary le

directory le special le

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File types
In addition to a le category, all UNIX les also have a le type. The UNIX le types are dened in Table 1-3. Table 1-3. File Type regular le block le File types Label File Category ordinary special Denition A regular le is a le that contains programs, text, or data. A block le is a le that the operating system uses for attached devices such as disk drives. Block devices send and receive data one block at a time. One block is usually 512 or 1,024 bytes of data. A character le is a le that the operating system uses for attached devices such as terminal devices. Character devices send and receive data one character at a time. A character is equal to 1 byte of data. A directory le, or directory, is a le that contains other les. A symbolic link, or linked le, is a representation of an actual le. The data in an actual le resides in one place on the disk of the computer. Link les allow the same le to reside in different directories and have different names.

character le

special

directory le symbolic link

d l

directory ordinary

Why users need to know the le type of a le


Users need to know a the le type of a le in order to
s s s

navigate through the system understand the consequences of changing an ordinary le versus a link le write to a device

To determine the le type of a le, perform Procedure 1-2, Determining the le type of a le.

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Procedure 1-2. Determining the le type of a le


1. At a UNIX prompt, enter the following command:

ls -l
Result: This command commands the operating system to list the les and directories that reside in the directory from which the command was executed. Output such as the following is displayed:

-rw-rw-r-- 1 suzieq apx 258048 Mar 26 15:53 table


The last eld in that output (table) indicates that the directory contains a le named table. The rst character in the rst eld of the output (-rw-rw-r--) species the le type of the table le. In this example, the rst character in the rst eld is a dash, which indicates that the table le is a regular le. 2. To determine the file type of a specific file, execute the following command:

ls -l filename
where

filename = the name of the le whose le type you want to determine.


Result: Output such as the following is displayed:

drw-rw-r-- 1 filename

suzieq

apx 1024 Mar 26 15:53

In that output, the rst character in the rst eld is a d, which indicates that the le type of the filename le is a directory.

File-naming rules
When you create or access a le, you must specify the name of that le. The names of les are called lenames. Files must be named according to the following rules:
s

A lename cannot contain any of the special shell characters, such as an asterisk (*) or a colon (:), pound sign (#), or at sign (@). For a complete list of shell characters, refer to Special characters in this chapter. A lename cannot contain a slash (/).

If you violate these le-naming rules, the improperly named les may be unreadable or have lenames that you do not expect.

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Directory structure
The set of all les and directories in the UNIX operating system constitute the systems directory structure. The directory from which all other les and directories in the UNIX operating system stem is called the root directory. A typical UNIX directory structure is shown in Figure 1-1.

/ (root)

etc kernel

usr tmp tmp spool file1 cron uucp

Figure 1-1.

UNIX directory structure The root directory is also called the slash directory, or slash (/). NOTE: The word root is often used to refer to both the root directory and the root user login name. Do not, however, confuse the root directory and the root user. The root directory is the directory from which all other les and directories in the UNIX operating system stem. The root user is the user login that is named root, which has all permissions on the system.

Directories and subdirectories


The directories that stem from the root directory are like the branches that stem from the root of a tree. For this reason, the UNIX directory structure is often likened to an inverted tree. A subdirectory is a directory that is located below any given directory in the systems directory structure. For example, in Figure 1-1, the spool directory is a subdirectory of the usr directory, and the usr directory is a subdirectory of the root directory.

Current directory
The current directory is the directory at which the user is currently placed or working in the system's directory structure. The current directory is also called the current working directory.

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The UNIX symbol for the current directory is the dot (.). The dot symbol can be used in command lines to specify the current directory. For example, the command line to determine the permissions of the current directory is

ls -l .

Parent directory
The parent directory is the directory immediately above the current directory. For example, in Figure 1-1, the parent directory of the /usr/spool/cron directory is the /usr/spool directory, and the parent directory of the /usr/spool directory is the /usr directory. The UNIX symbol for the parent directory is dot dot (..). The dot dot symbol can be used in command lines to specify the parent directory. For example, the command to change (move) from one directory to another is cd (change directory). Thus if the current working directory is the /usr/tmp directory, the command line to change to the /usr/spool/cron directory is

cd ../spool/cron

Path
A path is the route through the branches of the directory structure tree that leads to the location of a specic le or directory. Each le or directory has a unique path because no two les can reside in the same location. Paths are also called path names. Each directory and subdirectory in a path is separated by a slash (/). Thus in Figure 1-1, the path to the file1 le is /usr/tmp/file1, and the path to the cron directory is /usr/spool/cron. NOTE: Like many elements in the UNIX operating system, the word and symbol slash (/) has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. The slash symbol represents the root le system but is also the symbol that is used between directory names in a path name.

Full path and relative path


There are two types of path:
s s

full path relative path

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Full path
The full path of a le or directory is the path that starts at the root (/, or slash) directory and lists all subdirectories that lead to the location of that le or directory in the directory structure. To execute commands on a le or directory that is not located in the current directory, you can specify the full path of that le or directory in the command line. For example, to determine the permissions of the report le in the /home/sales directory, the command line is

ls -l /home/sales/report
The full path is also called the absolute path.

Relative path
The relative path of a le or directory is the path that leads to that le or directory from the current directory. Thus the relative path of a le or directory depends on the location of that le or directory in relation to the current directory. For example, to use a relative path to determine the permissions of the report le in the directory /home/sales, the command lines are

cd /home cd sales ls -l report


or

cd /home/sales ls -l report

Changing directories
To change (move) from one directory to another in the directory structure, you execute the cd command. You can use the cd command in the following three ways:
s s s

by changing directories one at a time until you reach the desired directory by changing to the desired directory by specifying its full path by changing to the parent directory by specifying dot dot (..)

Changing directories one directory at a time


To change to a desired directory one directory at a time, enter the cd command and specify the next directory in the path to the desired directory and repeat that process until you reach the desired directory. For example, in the directory structure shown in Figure 1-1, to move from the / directory to the cron directory one directory at a time, the command lines are

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cd usr cd spool cd cron


This method of changing directories can be used only to move down in the directory structure.

Changing directories by specifying a full path


To change to a desired directory by entering a single command, enter the cd command and specify the full path to the desired directory. For example, in the directory structure shown in Figure 1-1, to move from the / directory to the cron directory, the command line is

cd /usr/spool/cron
This method of changing directories can be used to move either up or down in the directory structure.

Changing to the parent (..) directory


To change to the parent directory of the current working directory, execute the cd command and specify dot dot (..). For example, in the directory structure shown in Figure 1-1, to move from the /usr/spool/cron directory to the /usr/ spool/uucp directory, the command line is

cd ../uucp

File systems
A le system is a directory that corresponds to a specic partition of a disk in the computer. The UNIX operating system contains some le systems by default. File systems that are not provided by default must be created by the system administrator. For example, when the AUTOPLEX system software is installed on the 3B21D computer, the system administrator must create le systems such as the /1apx10 le system, which contains AUTOPLEX applications.

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Mounted and unmounted le systems


To enable users to access a le system, the system administrator must notify the UNIX operating system that the le system is available. This notication or advertising of a le system to the UNIX operating system is called mounting. To mount a le system is to make that le system known to the UNIX operating system and available to users. File system mounting is summarized in Table 1-4. Table 1-4. Comparison of mounted and unmounted le systems then users... can access the le system cannot access the le system. Required action None Call the system administrator. When a le system is... mounted unmounted

Security
Security is the system of safeguards that the UNIX operating system provides to prevent unauthorized users from accessing les in the system. Files and directories are made secure by manipulating their permissions. The permissions of a le are attributes that control which users can read, write to, and/or execute that le. Only the root user and the owner of a le or directory can change its permissions.

Owners of les and directories


The owner of a le or directory is the user login name that created that le or directory. The owner of a le or directory has the most permissions to perform actions on that the le or directory. The owner of a le or directory can change its permissions, change its group ID, and/or change its ownership to another user login name. The owner can also delete any le or directory that the owner created.

Group ID of les or directories


A group is a set of users who have a common working relationship, such as a set of people who work in the same organization or on the same project. Each user has a unique user login name, and each user login name must belong to at least one group. The UNIX operating system identies user groups by means of group IDs (gid). The group ID of a le or directory is the name that is assigned to identify a set of zero or more user login names who need access to that le or directory. The permissions that are given to the group ID are set by the root user or the le owner. The owner of a le or directory, however, can access that le or directory regardless of whether the owner belongs to its group ID.

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Other users or world


The other users of a le or directory is the set of all user login names that are created in the operating system that are not the owner of that le or directory and do not belong to its group. The set of other users is also called the world.

Obtaining information about a le or directory


To obtain information about the characteristics of a specic le or directory, perform Procedure 1-3, Obtaining information about a le or directory.

Procedure 1-3. Obtaining information about a le or directory


1. Execute the following command:

cd directory_name
where

directory_name = the directory in which the le or directory about which you are seeking information resides.
2. Execute the following command:

ls -l filename
where

filename = the le about which you seek information.


Result: The system outputs information such as the following about each le and directory that resides in the directory from which the command was executed:

-rw-rw-r-- 1 suzieq apx 258048 Mar 26 15:53 filename


where

- = an ordinary le. Note that the rst character determines the le type. d = a directory. l = a symbolic link. b = a block special le. c = a character special le. p = a pipe special le. - = an ordinary le.

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| = a First In/First Out (FIFO) le. rw-rw-r-- = the le type and permissions of the le. 1 = the number of links to the le. suzieq = the owner of the le. apx = the group ID of the le. 258048 = the size of the le in bytes. Mar 26 = the date that the le was created or last modied. 15:53 = the time that the le was created or last modied on that date. filename = the lename of the le.

File type and permissions


The rst eld in the output of the ls -l command contains ten characters, such as -rw-rw-r--. The rst character in that eld species the le type of the le, as explained in Procedure 1-2, Determining the le type of a le. The other nine characters in the rst eld specify the following sets of permissions to the le:
s

The rst set of three characters species the permissions to the le that are granted to the owner of the le. The second set of three characters species the permissions to the le that are granted to the group owner of the le. The third set of three characters species the permissions to the le that are granted to other users or the world of the le system.

Permission levels
The owner, group, and world of a le system are assigned one of four levels of permission to each le or directory in the system. The four permission levels have different meanings for les and for directories. The permission levels for les are dened in Table 1-5. Table 1-5. File permission levels Symbol Level of Access Permissions to the le are turned off. No regular user can access the le.

Permission level no permission

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Table 1-5.

File permission levels Symbol Level of Access Users can read the le but cannot modify or execute it. Users can read and modify the le but cannot execute it. Users can execute the le if the le is executable. An executable le is a le that contains commands that are executed to perform specic operations whenever that le is executed, such as program les or shell script les.

Permission level read permission write permission execute permission

r w x

The permission levels for directories are dened in Table 1-6. Table 1-6. Directory permission levels Symbol Level of Access No regular user can access the directory. Users can list the les that reside in the directory. Users can add or delete les to the directory. Users can change directories into that directory.

Permission Level no permission read permission write permission execute permission

r w x

Determining permissions
To determine the permissions of a le, execute the following command:

ls -l filename
where

filename = the name of the le.

Changing permissions
To make a le more secure, you reduce or turn off the permissions to the le. The le is less secure when more permissions are turned on. To change the permissions to a le or directory, use the chmod command, as explained in Chapter 4, "UNIX Commands, and Chapter 3, "Solaris Operating System on the OMP.

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Shell environments
A shell is a command-interpretation program, that is, a program that controls how the UNIX operating system interprets and executes commands that the user enters. After the user has entered a valid user login name and password, the UNIX operating system executes the shell program. When the UNIX prompt is displayed on the screen, the user has successfully logged in to (accessed) the operating system and can begin work.

Types of shells
The following types of UNIX shells are currently available:
s s s s s s

Bourne shell (sh) Restricted Bourne shell (rsh) C shell (csh) Korn shell (ksh) Restricted Korn shell (rksh) Job Control version of Bourne shell (jsh)

NOTE: The UNIX shell is different from the craft shell. The craft shell is an application that runs only on the UNIX RTR implementation of the UNIX operating system and is not part of the UNIX operating system itself.

Shell properties
Each type of UNIX shell has special properties. All shells, however, have the following properties:
s

All shells are case-sensitive. Case-sensitivity means that a character that is lowercase has a different meaning than that same character in uppercase. For example, a le that is named REPORT is different from a le that is name report or Report. No shell has an undelete or undo command. The maximum length of a command that is entered at a shell prompt is 255 characters.

s s

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Special characters
In a shell environment, some characters have special meaning, as shown in Table 1-7. Table 1-7. Character Characters that have special meaning to the shell (Page 1 of 2) Special meaning to the shell A wild card that will match any pattern. Example: To list all les in the current working directory whose lenames begin with the letter a, execute

* (asterisk,\ or star)

ls -l a* # (pound sign)
Delete a character. Note: This default special meaning of the # character is usually reassigned to either the [Backspace] key or [Delete] key.

@ (at symbol)

Delete a command line. Note: This default special meaning of the @ character is usually reassigned to either the [Delete] key or the [Ctrl-c] key combination. In the Solaris operating system, this default special meaning of the @ character is the [Ctrl-u] key combination.

| (pipe symbol) Take the output of one command and pipe it as input to another command.
Example: To nd all les on the system whose lenames begin with the letter a and sort them in alphabetical order, execute

find / -name a* -print | sort > (greater than sign)


Redirect the output of command into a specified file. Example: To s nd all les on the system that begin with the letter a s sort those les in alphabetical order s place the output in the a.filelist le execute

find / -name a* -print | sort > a.filelist < (less than sign)
Supply input from a source other than the keyboard. Example: To sort the contents of the filelist le, execute

sort < filelist

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Table 1-7. Character

Characters that have special meaning to the shell (Page 2 of 2) Special meaning to the shell Append specified input to a file. Example: To append the contents of the report1 le to the end of the report2 le, execute

>>

cat report1 >> report2 & (ampersand) ; (semicolon)


Execute the specified command in the background. Delimiter between two commands on the same line. Example: To change to the /tmp directory and list its contents, execute

cd /tmp;ls

Shell variables
A shell variable is a construct that allows information to be stored. The information can be of any kind, such as strings or numbers. There are two types of shell variables:
s

Built-in shell variables. Built-in shell variables are provided in the shell by default. Customized shell variables. Customized shell variables are variables that the user sets to meet specic needs, such as changing directories to a frequently used directory.

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Built-in variables that are present in all shell environments are described in Table 1-8. Table 1-8. Shell variables present in all shell environments Description The users home directory. When a user login name is created, the operating system automatically creates a directory that belongs to that user. That directory is called the users home directory. Whenever the user logs in to the operating system, the user is placed in that directory. When the home directory of a user is created, a set of les are placed in the home directory of that user. One le that is common across UNIX operating systems is the .profile le. The .profile le contains commands that are automatically executed whenever the user logs in to the system. These are often commands that initialize the users UNIX environment. The .profile le can be edited to customize the users work environment to meet the users needs and preferences.

Shell Variable

HOME

PS1 PS2 PATH SHELL TERM

Primary prompt. Secondary prompt. By default, the secondary prompt is a > (greater than symbol). Denes the users search path for commands. Denes the type of shell environment, such as Bourne shell or C shell. Denes the users terminal type.

Delimiter
The colon (:) is used as a delimiter to separate entries of information in the value of a shell variable. For example, to specify the directories that are to be searched by the PATH shell variable, you insert a colon between the names of the directories that are to be searched. For example:

PATH=/bin:/usr/bin

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Displaying or setting shell variable values


This section explains how to determine or set the values of shell variables in your UNIX environment. It denes the following procedures:
s

Procedure 1-4, Displaying all exported shell variables and their current values Procedure 1-5, Displaying the value of a specic shell variable Procedure 1-6, Setting the default values of shell variables Procedure 1-7, Changing the value of a shell variable during the current session only Procedure 1-8, Appending information to the default value of a shell variable Procedure 1-9, Appending information to a shell variable during the current session only

s s s

Displaying all exported shell variables and their current values


To display all exported variables and their current values, perform Procedure 1-4.

Procedure 1-4. Displaying all exported shell variables and their current values
1. Execute the following command:

env
Result: Output such as the following displays all exported shell variables and their current values:

MANPATH=/opt/Zmail/man:/opt/unison/man:/opt/SUNWspro/man:/usr MANPATH=/opt/Zmail/man:/opt/unison/man:/opt/SUNWspro/man:/usr/ MANPATH=/opt/Zmail/man:/opt/unison/man:/opt/SUNWspro/man:/usr/ _1.0/man:/opt/adobe/AcroRead_3.0/man TCL_LIBRARY=/opt/pubstools/tcl/tcl7.3/library LANG=C HELPPATH=/usr/openwin/lib/locate:/usr/openwin/lib/help

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VISUAL=viPATH=/opt/Zmail/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/SUNWspro/bin:/usr/ ccs/bin:/usr/openwin/bin:/opt/ctools:/opt/ctools/eps/bin:/opt/ dwb/bin:/opt/pubtools/usr/bin:/usr/5bin:/bin:/opt/mail/bin:/usr/ ucb:/opt/SUNWwabi/bin:/opt/x11r5/usr/bin/X11:/opt/adobe/bin:/ opt/sde/frame.sde/bin MAILPATH=/usr/mail/suzieq EDITOR=vi LOGNAME=suzieq MAIL=/var/mail/suzieq PS1=${PWD#${PWD%/*/*/*}/}> PS2=> USER=suzieq DISPLAY=0.0 HISTSIZE=500 SHELL=/bin/ksh HISTSIZE=500 TERM=xterm PWD=/home/suzieq/tmp TZ=US/Central

Displaying the value of a specic shell variable


To display the value of a specic shell variable, perform Procedure 1-5. In this procedure, the dollar sign ($) is used to determine the value of a shell variable, and the echo command is used to display the value.

Procedure 1-5. Displaying the value of a specic shell variable


1. Execute the following command:

echo $SHELL_VARIABLE
where

SHELL_VARIABLE = the shell variable whose value you want to display.


Result: Output such as the following displays the value of the specied shell variable:

PATH=/opt/Zmail/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/SUNWspro/bin:/usr/ccs /bin:/usr/openwin/bin:/opt/ctools:/opt/ctools/eps/bin: /opt/dwb/bin:/opt/pubtools/usr/bin:/usr/5bin:/bin:/opt/m ail/bin:/usr/ucb:/opt/SUNWwabi/bin:/opt/x11r5/usr/bin/X

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11:/opt/adobe/bin:/opt/sde/frame.sde/bin

Setting the default values of shell variables


To set the default values of shell variables, perform Procedure 1-6. The default values of shell variables take effect whenever you log in to the system.

Procedure 1-6. Setting the default values of shell variables


1. Enter the following command to change to your $HOME directory:

cd $HOME
2. Using the UNIX editor of your choice, access the .profile file. 3. In the .profile file, search for the line that specifies the default value of the shell variable whose value you want to set. 4. Perform the appropriate action: If the shell variable is present in the .profile le is not present in the .profile le then... change the value of the shell variable to the desired value. add a new line to the .profile le, specifying the name of the shell variable, followed by an = (equal sign), followed by the desired value. Example: To change the default value of the prompt to UNIXPROMPT>, add the following line to the .profile le:

PS1=UNIXPROMPT>;export PS1

Changing the value of a shell variable during the current session only
To change the value of a shell variable during the current session only, perform Procedure 1-7. That procedure changes the value of the specied shell variable during the current session. After you log out of the system, the value of the shell variable reverts to its default setting, if any. You can change the value of a shell variable at any time and any number of times during a session.

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Procedure 1-7. Changing the value of a shell variable during the current session only
1. Execute the following command:

variable_name=string
where

variable_name = the name of the shell variable whose value you want to set for the current session only. string = the value to which you want to set the specified variable.
Example: To change the default primary prompt ($) to lucent1>, execute

PS1=lucent1>
NOTE: In this example, double quotation marks ( ) are placed around the string value because the string contains a special character ( > ). If the string does not contain a special character, the double quotation marks are not required. Result: The primary prompt is changed to lucent1>. Whenever the user presses the [Enter] key, the lucent1> prompt is displayed instead of the default $ prompt. 2. Enter the following command to propagate the specified value of the specified shell variable to subshells:

export PS1

Appending information to the default value of a shell variable


To append information to the default value of a shell variable, perform Procedure 1-8. After Procedure 1-8 is performed, the modied value of the shell variable takes effect whenever you log in to the system.

Procedure 1-8. Appending information to the default value of a shell variable


1. Execute the following command to change to your HOME directory:

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cd
2. Using a UNIX editor, display the .profile file. 3. Search for the line in the .profile file that specifies the value of the shell variable to which you want to append information. 4. Append the desired information to the end of the .profile file. 5. Save the changes to the .profile file. 6. Either log out and log in again to the system or execute the .profile file to activate the information that you have appended to the shell variable. Example: Perform Procedure 1-8 to add the /1apx10/bin directory to the PATH shell variable. Result: The default value of the PATH variable is changed to the following:

PATH=/opt/Zmail/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/SUNWspro/bin:/usr/ccs/ bin:/usr/openwin/bin:/opt/ctools:/opt/ctools/eps/bin:/ opt/dwb/bin:/opt/pubtools/usr/bin:/usr/5bin:/bin:/opt/ mail/bin:/usr/ucb:/opt/SUNWwabi/bin:/opt/x11r5/usr/bin/ X11:/opt/adobe/bin:/opt/sde/frame.sde/bin:/1apx10/bin

Appending information to a shell variable during the current session only


To append information to a shell variable during the current session only, perform Procedure 1-9. That procedure appends the information to the value of the specied shell variable during the current session. After you log out of the system, the value of the shell variable reverts to its default setting, if any. You can append information to the value of a shell variable at any time and any number of times during a session.

Procedure 1-9. Appending information to a shell variable during the current session only
1. Use the following format to append information to the shell variable:

variable=$variable:appended_information
where

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variable = the name of the shell variable to which you want to append
information.

appended_information = the information that you want to append to that shell variable.
NOTE: Remember that the colon (:) delimiter must be typed between entries of information in the value of a shell variable. If the colon is omitted, the text string is appended to the last path name in the value of the shell variable instead of being added as a new entry in the value. Example: To correctly add /1apx10/bin to the PATH shell variable, execute

PATH=$PATH:/1apx10/bin
Result: The specied /apx10/bin string is appended as a new entry to the value of the PATH variable as follows:

PATH=/opt/Zmail/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/SUNWspro/bin:/usr/ccs /bin:/usr/openwin/bin:/opt/ctools:/opt/ctools/eps/bin:/ opt/dwb/bin:/opt/pubtools/usr/bin:/usr/5bin:/bin:/opt/ mail/bin:/usr/ucb:/opt/SUNWwabi/bin:/opt/x11r5/usr/bin/ X11:/opt/adobe/bin:/opt/sde/frame.sde/bin:/1apx10/bin


Example: Execute the following command, omitting the colon, to incorrectly add the new entry /1apx10/bin in the value of the PATH variable:

PATH=$PATH/1apx10/bin
Result: The specied text (/1apx10/bin) is appended to the original value of the PATH variable not as a new entry but as an addition to the last path name in the value. Thus instead of adding /1apx10 as a new entry to the value of the PATH variable, /1apx10/bin is added to the last path name in the original value of the variable as follows:

PATH=/opt/Zmail/bin:/opt/bin:/opt/SUNWspro/bin:/usr/ccs/ bin:/usr/openwin/bin:/opt/ctools:/opt/ctools/eps/bin:/ opt/dwb/bin:/opt/pubtools/usr/bin:/usr/5bin:/bin:/opt/ mail/bin:/usr/ucb:/opt/SUNWwabi/bin:/opt/x11r5/usr/bin/ X11:/opt/adobe/bin:/opt/sde/frame.sde/bin/1apx10/bin

Shell programming language


The shell programming language is a programming language that is built-in to the shell environment. The shell programming language has decision constructs and loops and can read input from a terminal.

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Shell script programs


Shell script programs, or shell scripts, are programs that are written in the shell programming language. Shell scripts do not have to be compiled. Shell scripts can include any standard UNIX command.

Shell commands versus UNIX commands


A shell command is any command that
s s s

resides on the system or is created by a user is written in the shell programming language can be executed at the UNIX prompt

The main difference between a shell command and a UNIX command is that a UNIX command is compiled. For descriptions of UNIX RTR commands that reside on the ECP and commands that reside on the OMP, refer to Chapter 3, "Solaris Operating System on the OMP.

Processes
A process is a set of machine instructions that execute on the hardware of the computer. Processes are modular and perform a specic function. When a command is executed, one or more processes is started. The process runs in the foreground of the system, and the keyboard does not accept input until the process has completed its execution. If a command in a command line is followed by an ampersand (&), the processes that the command starts execute in the background of the system, which frees the terminal for additional input.

Listing processes
To list the currently running processes that were started from a terminal, perform Procedure 1-10 from that terminal.

Procedure 1-10. Outputting a list of running processes


1. Enter the following command:

ps

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Result: Output such as the following lists all processes that were started from the terminal and are running on the system, including both foreground and background processes. The last column of the output lists the names of the processes that were running on the system when the command was executed.

TTY ! !

PID 394985554 398786646

CMD -sh -ps

In that output, each line reports information about a process that is currently running on the system. The second column in each line identies the process ID (PID) of each process, and the third column identies the process or command that is associated with that PID.

Killing a process
Users sometimes need to kill (that is, terminate) a process. A user can kill only processes that the user initiated. The root user, however, can kill any process that was initiated by any user. To kill a process, perform Procedure 1-11.

Procedure 1-11. Killing a process

Perform the following procedure with caution because killing a process can disrupt service. 1. Enter the following command to identify the processes that are currently running on the system:

CAUTION:

ps
Result: A list of currently running processes and their respective process identications (PIDs) is displayed. 2. Enter the following command:

ps ps

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UNIX editors
An editor is a program that is used to create or change regular (ASCII) text les. Editors cannot be used to change programs or data les. To change programs and data les requires the use of debugging tools.

UNIX editors in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network environment


The UNIX operating system has several editors. The editors that are used in a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network are listed in Table 1-9. Table 1-9. Editor basic editor (ed) Visual Editor (vi) UNIX editors in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network environment Description Used on the ECP with UNIX RTR; allows only one line to be edited at a time. Used on the OMP; allows user to see text as it is being edited.

For details on how to use the ed editor, see Chapter 2, "UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP. For details on how to use the vi editor, refer to Chapter 3, "Solaris Operating System on the OMP.

Editor modes
The ed and vi editors have two modes, as explained in Table 1-10. Table 1-10. Mode command mode UNIX editor modes Functions Used to s issue editing commands s navigate within the le s save or exit the le Used to s edit text in the le s insert text in the le

insert mode

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UNIX standard printing facility


Each UNIX operating system supplies a printing facility that is used to print les and system output. The system administrator must congure the printing facility before the facility can be used. For detailed information about the UNIX RTR printing facility, refer to Printing in Chapter 2, "UNIX RTR Operating System on the ECP. For detailed information about the Solaris printing facility, refer to Printing in Chapter 3, "Solaris Operating System on the OMP.

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Introduction
This chapter describes the UNIX Real Time Reliable (RTR) implementation of the UNIX operating system. This chapter builds on the fundamental concepts that were introduced in Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. The UNIX RTR operating system is used on the ECP, which is a 3B21D computer.

Chapter contents
This chapter covers the topics that are listed in Table 2-1. Table 2-1. Topic Types of users Files Directory structure Permissions and security Shell environments Topics in Chapter 2 See page 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-5 2-6

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Table 2-1. Topic

Topics in Chapter 2 See page 2-6 2-7 2-12

Processes ed editor Printing les

Types of users
In the UNIX RTR operating system, there are two type of users:
s

Regular user. A regular user has the same meaning as described in Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. Superuser. The superuser has the same meaning as discussed in Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System.

Files
Rules for lenames
In UNIX RTR, lenames must adhere to the following rules. If a lename violates these rules, the le will be unreadable or will not have the name that the user expects.
s

Do not name a le with any of the special shell characters such as *,:,#,@ etc. Refer to Special characters on page 1 for a complete list. A lename cannot contain a slash (/). Filenames can have a maximum of 14 characters.

s s

File types
All of the le types that are listed in Table 1-3 except symbolic links are used in UNIX RTR.

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The additional le types in the UNIX RTR system are listed in Table 2-2. Table 2-2. Label C i File types that are specic to the UNIX RTR operating system Name contiguous IOP Type ordinary special Denition Disk space is allocated in one contiguous area. Associated with the input/output driver process which transfers data to/from the Input/Output Processor (IOP) unit. Files used for interprocess communication. Temporary files used for interprocess communication and are removed when no longer needed. Associated with writing or reading a magnetic tape with a record size of 512-byte blocks. Disk space is allocated up to six contiguous areas.

P p

pipe pipe

special special

record

special

multi-extent

ordinary

Determining le type
To determine the le type of a le, perform Procedure 1-2, Determining the le type of a le, on page 1-7.

Directory structure
Main directory
All UNIX operating systems have the same directory structure. The rst directory is the root or slash (/) directory, and all other directories stem from the root directory. For more details on directories, see Directory structures and File systems in Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System.

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Default le systems
Default le systems are le systems that are provided as part of the UNIX operating system. The default les systems in the UNIX RTR operating system are listed in Table 2-3. Table 2-3. Default les systems in UNIX RTR operating system Purpose The starting point for all les, directories, and le systems. When a program or process abnormally aborts, a core le is produced and placed in this le system. Contains ECP hardware database (RCVECD). Repository for system programs and les. System log les are kept here Regular users home directories are located in this le system. This is a scratch le system used by the system and users. Files changed during a software update are placed here.

File system

/ /cdmp /database /etc /etc/log /user /tmp /update

Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network le systems


In addition to the default le systems in the UNIX RTR operating system, several le systems are automatically created when the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network software is installed. Those le systems are described in Table 2-4. Table 2-4. Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks le systems on the ECP Purpose Contains Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks les and commands.

File System

/1apx10

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Table 2-4.

Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks le systems on the ECP Purpose Holds cell generic software. Contains the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks database (apxrcv) A second copy or a backup of the data in the le system /1apx10/dbdata.

File System

/1apx10/celgens /1apx10/dbdata /1apx10/dbbackup

Permissions and security


Permissions and security in the UNIX RTR operating system work exactly as explained in Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System, with one exception. In UNIX RTR, there are no groups or group ownership of les or directories. For a detailed explanation of permissions and security in UNIX RTR, see Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System.

No groups in UNIX RTR


Although the UNIX RTR operating system has a le that is named /etc/group, UNIX RTR has no concept of groups. Thus when the ls -l command is executed, the group ID eld in the output of the command is blank, as shown in Figure 2-1.

-rw-rw-r-- 1

suzieq

258048 Mar 26 15:53 report

Legend: 1 = login ID of the user who owns the le. 2 = group ID of the group that owns the le. Figure 2-1. Output of ls -l command

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NOTE: Groups and group owners do not exist on the ECP. Thus all information about groups applies only to the OMP.

Shell environments
The UNIX RTR operating system has the following two types of shells:
s s

Bourne shell (sh) Restricted Bourne shell (rsh)

The Bourne shell was originally written in the late 1970s by Stephen Bourne and was the rst UNIX shell environment. Note that the C shell (csh) is not available in UNIX RTR. For more information about UNIX shells, see Chapter 1, "Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System.

Processes
In the UNIX RTR operating system, there are two types of processes:
s s

kernel process supervisor process

Kernel process
Kernel processes are processes that start when the operating system is started. Kernel processes are the lowest layer of UNIX RTR. Kernel processes perform basic routines for running other processes that communicate with the hardware.

Examples of kernel processes


The following are examples of kernel processes:
s s

read and write operations to and from the disks operations that send and receive messages to and from the Input/Output Processor (IOP) hardware

To obtain a list of the kernel processes that run on the UNIX RTR operating system, perform Procedure 2- 1, Displaying kernel processes, on page 2-7,

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Procedure 2- 1. Displaying kernel processes


1. Execute the following command: ps -k

Supervisor process
Supervisor processes are processes that obtain services from the kernel and kernel processes, including memory management.

Examples of supervisor processes


The following are examples of supervisor processes:
s s

request a disk read enter a wait state

To obtain a list of the supervisor processes that are running on the UNIX RTR operating system, perform Procedure 2- 2, Obtaining a list of supervisor processes.

Procedure 2- 2. Obtaining a list of supervisor processes


1. Enter the following command: ps -ax

ed editor
The original standard UNIX line editor is the ed editor. Like most editors, ed does not edit the le on disk but rather edits a copy of the le that is placed in main memory. The write (w) command takes the contents in memory and writes it to disk. The ed editor has the following two modes:
s s

Command mode Insert mode

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The functions of the modes are described in Table 2-5. Table 2-5. Mode Command mode Modes of the ed editor Function Commands are issued to
s s s

issue editing commands navigate the le save or exit the le

Insert mode

Commands are issued to s edit text in a le.

Command mode
Commands that you execute in the Command mode of the ed editor are listed in Table 2-6. Table 2-6. Command mode commands Description Move to that line in the le. Print lines to the screen. Return to command mode from insert mode. Write the le to disk. Quit and return to the shell. Change contents of a line. Substitute a pattern on the line.

Command any number, such as 1, 4, 100

p . w q c s

Examples
To print Lines 1 through 3, enter

1,3p
To change the string small to little on Line 1 of the le and print the output on the screen, enter the following command:

1s/small/little/p

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Insert mode
Commands that you execute in the Insert mode of the ed editor are listed in Table 2-7. Table 2-7. Insert mode commands Description Append text after the cursor. Insert text before the cursor.

Command

a i

Examples
To append text after Line 24, enter

24a
To insert text at the beginning of the le, enter

1i

Dollar sign ($)


The dollar sign ($) has special meaning in the ed editor. It signies the last line of the le.

Using the ed editor to edit existing les Invoking ed


To start the ed editor, perform Procedure 2- 3, Invoking the ed editor.

Procedure 2- 3. Invoking the ed editor


1. Execute the following command: ed filename where

filename = the le that is to be edited.

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The filename can specify either a full path name or a relative path name. For an explanation of full path and relative path, see Full path and relative path on page 1-9. To edit the le myfile using the full path name to the le, enter

ed /user/suzieq/myfile
To edit the le myfile using the relative path name to the le, enter

cd /user cd suzieq ed myfile

Example ed session
Table 2-8 shows the steps to edit the le poem. The le poem contains the following lines:

1.Mary had a little lamb,


2. its flees as white as snow. 3. And Table 2-8. Step 1 2 3 4 Using the ed editor to edit an existing le (Page 1 of 2) Result The ed editor is invoked in Command mode to edit the le poem. The editor displays the entire contents of the le poem. On line 2, change the word flees to fleece and print Line 2 on the screen. Change the entire contents of Line 3. The user is now in Insert mode until a dot (.) is typed. Add that text at Line 3. End Insert mode. Display the entire contents of the le. Append text after Line 3. Add that text at Line 4. Action

ed poem 1,$p 2s/flees/fleece/p 3c

5 6 7 8 9

And everywhere that Mary went, . (dot) 1,$p 3a The lamb was sure to go.

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Table 2-8. Step 10 11 12

Using the ed editor to edit an existing le (Page 2 of 2) Result Stop inserting text and return the user to Command mode. Write the edited file to disk. Display the entire contents of the file:

Action

. w 1,$p

Mary had a little lamb, its fleece as white as snow. And everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go.
13

Quit the ed editor.

Using the ed editor to create new les


To invoke the ed editor, perform Procedure 2- 3, Invoking the ed editor, on page 2-9.

Example ed session
The steps to create a new le poem are shown in Table 2-9. Table 2-9. Step 1 Using the ed editor to create a new le Result Invoke the ed editor in Command mode to create the new le poem.

Action

ed poem

NOTE:
A question mark (?) appears because the le is new. 2 3

a Mary had a little lamb, its fleece as white as snow. And everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go.

Place the ed editor in Insert mode. Add that text to the le.

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Step 4 5

Action

Result Return to Command mode. Display the entire contents of the le on the screen:

. 1,$p

Mary had a little lamb, its fleece as white as snow. And everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go
6 7

w q

Write the le to disk. Quit the ed editor.

Printing les
Standard printing command
The standard printing command in the UNIX RTR operating system is lpr. By default, output is sent to the Receive-Only Printer (ROP). To redirect output to other devices, you can either change the devices that are associated with output class OPUNIX1 or specify the other device as an argument. For details on the lpr command, see the manual page for lpr in Chapter 4.

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Introduction
This chapter describes the Sun Microsystems Solaris operating system and builds on the basic concepts that were introduced in Chapter 1, Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. The Solaris operating system is used on the Operations and Management Platform (OMP) in Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks.

Contents
This chapter covers the topics that are listed in Table 3-1. Table 3-1. Topics in Chapter 3 See page 3-3 3-4 3-6 3-8 3-15

Description User Types Files Security Korn shell Korn shell programming language

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Table 3-1.

Topics in Chapter 3 See page 3-40 3-42 3-50

Description Processes vi editor Printing

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User types
Types
In the Solaris environment, there are two type of users:
s

superuserThe superuser has the same meaning as discussed in the Chapter 1, Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. regular userA regular user has the same meaning as discussed in the Chapter 1, Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System.

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Files
Characteristics of les
A lename must follow these rules, otherwise a le will be created that is unreadable or doesnt have the name expected.
s

Do not name a le with any of the special shell characters such as *,:,#,@ etc. Refer to Shell properties on page 1-16 for a complete list. Filenames are one word. There cannot be a space or tab in a lename. The maximum length a lename is 256 characters.

s s

Types of les
The le types in the Solaris operating system are explained in Table 1-3 on page 1-6.

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Directory structure
Main directory
The directory structure is the same in all UNIX systems. The rst directory is root or slash ( / ) and other directories stem from here. For more details on directories, refer to Directory structure on page 1-8.

Default le systems
Default le systems come with the UNIX operating system. Table 3-2 lists the Solaris default le systems.

Table 3-2.

Solaris le systems Description Starting point for all les, directories, and le systems. Contains regular users home directories. Repository for optional software programs and les. Contains system and subsystem programs. Contains variable-size les such as log les.

File system

/ /home /opt /usr /var

Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network le systems


In addition to the default le systems in the Solaris operating system, several le systems are automatically created when the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network software is installed. On the OMP, the /omp le system contains software that allows communications between the ECP and OMP and various Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network tools. The Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network software also places files in the /, /opt, /usr, and /var le systems.

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Security
File modes
Permissions and security, with regards to le attributes or le modes, work exactly the same as explained in the Chapter 1, Fundamentals of the UNIX Operating System. Refer there for a detailed explanation of permissions and security.

File and group ownership


File and group ownership in the Solaris operating system work exactly as described in Security on page 1-12. When the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network software is installed, groups are created and added to the system in the /etc/group le. Those groups and their functions are described in Table 3-3. Table 3-3. AUTOPLEX Group Description This security group... restricts access to...

arladmin cdt craftsh dcsmcst dcsrcv dcsstlws ecprcv ecpshell filexfer hcama
mcrt

Administration of Authorized Roaming Lists ECP Control and Display Terminals (CDTs), if equipped ECP Craft Shell 5ESS Digital Cellular Switch (DCS) Maintenance Terminal (MCRT) 5ESS DCS Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) terminals, if equipped 5ESS DCS Supplementary Trunk and Line Work Station (STLWS) terminals, if equipped ECP RC/V subsystem ECP RTR shell File transfers to and from the OMP and associated ECP. High-Capacity Automatic Message Accounting (HCAMA) administration ECP Maintenance Terminal (MCRT), including the Emergency Action Interface (EAI), if available OMP administrator menus OMP technician menus

ompadmin omptech

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Table 3-3.

AUTOPLEX Group Description

This security group... restricts access to...

omprcv ompshell roplog vs01vs16 invct1 pace

OMP RC/V subsystem OMP operating system shell ECP and 5ESS DCS Receive-Only Printer (ROP) RC/V subscriber records and input commands for a virtual system Inventory Control OSCHED

Security guidelines
For detailed information on security in the Solaris operating system of the OMP, see the chapters on system security in 401-610-160, OA&M Guide, Vol. 3.

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Korn shell
Default shell of Solaris operating system
In the Solaris operating system, the default shell is the Korn shell (ksh). The ksh was written by David Korn. The Korn shell gained popularity because
s

it incorporated many of the key strokes that are used in editors such as vi. These keyboard shortcuts ease typing at the UNIX prompt. Benets include repeating previous commands, searching for previous commands, and a history of what was typed is available. it added functionality to the shell programming language.

Shell variables
The shell variables in the ksh are described in Table 3-4. Table 3-4. ksh variables Description Denes the number of columns in a screen. Denes the editor that is to be used.

Shell variable

COLUMN EDITOR

NOTE:
The available editors are vi, emacs, and gmacs.

ENV FCEDIT

Denes the path name of a le that is executed whenever a new ksh is invoked. Denes the editor that is used by fc.

NOTE:
The default value of the FCEDIT variable is ed.

HISTFILE

Species a le that stores the names of commands that have been executed.

NOTE:
The default value of the HISTFILE variable is $HOME/ .sh_history.

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Table 3-4.

ksh variables Description Species the number of executed command names that are stored by the HISTFILE variable.

Shell variable

HISTSIZE

NOTE:
The value of the HISTSIZE variable is user-dened and has no maximum size. After the user-dened maximum is reached, the oldest command is automatically removed. For example, if the HISTSIZE variable is set to 500 (HISTSIZE=500), when the user executes the 501st command, the rst command is removed from the HISTFILE.

LINES PPID PWD OLDPWD VISUAL

Denes the number of lines (rows) in a screen. Species the parent process number. Species the present working directory. Species the previous working directory In-line editing mode is turned on.

NOTE:
Available editors are emacs, gmacs, or vi.

Tilde
The tilde (~) symbol at the beginning of a word has special meaning in the ksh environment. Table 3-5 shows possible uses of the tilde. Table 3-5. Example Possible uses of the tilde in the Korn shell IF... THEN change directories to... the home directory of suzieq.

cd ~suzieq cd ~/mydir

suzieq exists in the /etc/ passwd le,


the user suzieq executes cd ~/mydir,

/home/suzieq/mydir.

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Keyboard shortcuts
Keyboard shortcuts are dependent on the EDITOR shell variable since the editor keystrokes are used. The most common keyboard shortcuts for the vi editor in the ksh environment are listed in Table 3-6. NOTE: At the UNIX prompt, the user is always in Insert mode. To use the keyboard shortcuts, the user must enter the Command mode rst by pressing the [Esc] (Escape) key. After a previously executed command is retrieved, pressing the [Enter] key executes the command. Table 3-6. Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands (Page 1 of 5) Keystroke [Esc] k For example, to retrieve the fth previous command, enter [Esc] 5 k or [Esc] k

Capability Retrieve the last executed command, moving backward in the history le.

k k k k

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Table 3-6.

Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands (Page 2 of 5) Keystroke Press [Esc] and enter

Capability Retrieve the last executed command, moving forward in the history le.

k k ... (The user enters k any number of times.) j

NOTE:
This shortcut is useful when you have gone past the desired command. For example, if you retrieved the fourth previous command from the history le but meant to retrieve the third previous command, press [Esc] and enter

k k k k j
For example, if you retrieved the tenth previous command from the history le but want to retrieve the seventh command, press [Esc] and enter

10 k 3j

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Table 3-6.

Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands (Page 3 of 5) Keystroke [Esc] /string where

Capability Search the history le forward or backward to retrieve a previously executed command.

string = the string for which to search.


OR [Esc] ?string where

string = the string for which to search.

NOTE:
The / starts the search for the specied string from the bottom of the history le (that is, the most recently executed command) and searches backward. The ? does the opposite. It starts the search for the specied string at the beginning of the history le and searches forward. For example, to search for the grep command, [Esc] /grep

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Table 3-6.

Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands (Page 4 of 5) Keystroke [Esc] /string where

Capability Search for the command again (search the history le forward or backward for the command)

string = the string for which to search. n (for next)


OR [Esc] ?string where

string = the string for which to search. N (for next)

NOTE: n is the next occurrence of the specied string, whether forward or backward. N is the next occurrence of the command, searching the history le in the opposite direction that n is searching. Thus, if the search is initiated with a ? (question mark) to search backwards, an n searches backwards and an N searches forward. Conversely, if the search is initiated with a / to search forward, an n searches forward and an N searches backwards.
For example, to search forward in the HISTFILE for the next occurrence of grep, press [Esc] and enter

/grep n

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Table 3-6.

Keyboard shortcuts for ksh commands (Page 5 of 5) Keystroke Retrieve the command by using either of the previous search techniques.

Capability Edit a previous command

w (to go to the word that is to be edited) w (type the replacement)


For example, to change the command

grep ecprcv /etc/group


to

grep craftsh /etc/group


press [Esc] and type

w (to retrieve the previous command) 2w (to go to the second word in the command) cw (to change word; $ appears at the end of the word) craftsh (to change the second word to craftsh)
Then press the [Enter] key.

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Korn shell programming language


Shell scripting course
This chapter provides an overview of the Korn shell (ksh) shell language. To learn more shell scripting, attend the Lucent Technologies course UC1078, Shell Command Language for Users.

What is the ksh programming language?


The Korn shell language is a programming language with its own set of rules, syntax, and logic constructs. Shell language uses commands in the connes of the rules and constructs. Each shell language le is called a shell script. Just as the shell is an interpreted command, so is its language. This means each statement in the shell script is analyzed one at a time and then executed. Another characteristic is that shell scripts are programs that are written to perform a task without having to be compiled. Although shell scripts do not need to be compiled, the le must have execute permission turned on in order to run. Perform the steps Procedure 3- 1, Creating an executable shell script, on page 3-15 to make a shell script executable.

Procedure 3- 1. Creating an executable shell script


1. Create the shell script 2. Execute the following command: ls -l 3. If the permissions are not executable, enter the following command: chmod +x Result: Execute permission is turned on for the owner, group, and others.

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Shell compatibility
All preceding shells are compatible to the Bourne shell. That is, all shells written after the Bourne shell, can run Bourne shell scripts, but the converse is untrue. Thus, Bourne shell scripts cannot run ksh scripts or csh scripts.

Logic constructs
The logic constructs and the purpose of each construct are described in Table 37. Table 3-7. Construct If Statement Shell language constructs Purpose Used to make a decision based on the condition tested Refer to If statement on page 3-19 for more detail. Case Statement Used to make a decision based on the many conditions tested Refer to case statement on page 3-23 for more detail. For Loop Loops through the commands a nite number of times See for statement on page 3-26 for more detail. While Loop Loops through the commands until a nonzero exit status is returned Refer to while loop on page 3-24 for more detail. Until Loop Loops through the commands until a zero exit status is returned For details, see Until loop on page 3-25. Break Statement Continue Statement Read Statement Exit a loop Skip commands in loop without exitting Read from a le or standard input Refer to Read statement on page 3-29 for more detail. Function Statement Allows for modular programming Refer to Function statement on page 3-30 for more detail.

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Syntax
The syntax of the ksh programming language is governed by the following rules:
s s

Reserved key words, such as if, and commands are delimited by a space. Logical constructs (that is, if, case, while, and until) must begin in Column 1 unless they are nested within a construct. Indenting is used for readability but is not required. Comment lines are delimited by the pound sign (#). The exception is the rst line of a shell script. When the rst line has the format #!/bin/ shell, where shell is a specic shell such as sh, ksh, or csh, the script is executed in the specied shell environment. Continuation of a line onto the next is accomplished with the backslash (\). Variables and strings are enclosed in double quotation marks within a condition. Variables may be enclosed in { } (curly braces), but the braces are not required.

s s

s s

List of key words


A key word is a word that has a special purpose in the programming language. The key words in ksh language are listed in Table 3-8. Table 3-8. Keyword Reserved key words in ksh programming language (Page 1 of 2) Purpose Break out of a loop Begin a case statement Skip commands within the loop Execute commands within the loop Ends a loop Ends a case statement Alternate command when if and elif condition are untrue Alternate command when if condition is untrue Exit function or program

break case continue do done easc else elif exit

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Table 3-8. Keyword

Reserved key words in ksh programming language (Page 2 of 2) Purpose Condition is false. Ends an if statement. Begins a for statement Denotes a chunk of code that performs a specic task. Begins an if statement. Signies the beginning of the conditions that are listed in the case statement. Reads from a le or standard input Signies a command to execute when an if condition is true. Condition is true. Begins until loop. Begins while loop.

false fi for function if in read then true until while

Shell script names


When you name shell scripts, do not use the names of shell commands such as cat, ls, and cd.

If you assign the names of shell commands to a shell script, the system cannot distinguish between the shell command and the shell script. This ambiguity may cause the system to function abnormally.

CAUTION:

Special characters
The characters that are described in Table 3-9 have special meanings in a shell script.

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Table 3-9. Character

Character denition Description Signifies a variable. For example:

$variable or ${variable} #

$file
A comment line.

Shell script parameters


Shell scripts can have parameters. There can be up to nine parameters and are all preceded by a dollar sign ($). Thus $1 is the rst parameter, $2 the second, and so on. $0 is the shell script itself. Example: The shell script proc1 has one parameter, as shown in the following example:

proc1 -c

If statement
The if statement tests a condition and changes the ow of program execution based upon the result. Common conditions tested are found in Table 3-10.

Table 3-10. Condition -eq or == -ne or != -gt or > -ge or >= -lt or < -le or <= -d -f -r -s -w

Shell script conditions Description Equality between two items The two items are not equal One item is greater than the other One item is greater than or equal to the other One item is less than the other One item is less than or equal the other Is the le a directory Test if the le is an ordinary le Test if the le is readable Check if the le is empty (i.e. is it a zero-length le) Test if the le is writable

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Table 3-10. Condition -x -a or && -o or ||

Shell script conditions Description Check if the le has execute permission Logical and between two items Logical or between two items

Syntax
There are three basic forms of the if statement. Each builds upon the previous. 1. Simplest Form

if [ condition ] then command ... fi


Example: Simplest form of if statement

#test if the first parameter, $1, is equal to a y if [ then echo $1 = yes fi $1 == y ]

2. Performs a different action if the condition is not met.

if [ condition ] then command

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command ... else command command ... fi


Example: Perform different action if the if condition is untrue.

#test if the first parameter, $1, is equal to a y if [ then echo $1 = yes else echo $1 does not equal y fi
3. Test for multiple conditions.

$1 == y

if [ condition ] then command command ... elif [ condition ] then

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command command ... elif [ condition ] then command command ... else command command ... fi
Example: The following is an example of testing multiple conditions:

#test if the first parameter, $1, is equal to a y, Y, n, or N. if [ then echo $1 =yes elseif [ then echo $1 = no else $1 == n -o $1 == N ] $1 == y -o $1 == Y ]

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echo $1 is not recognized fi

case statement
The if statement is cumbersome to write when there are more than just a couple of conditions to test. The case statement is a short-hand way of testing a lot of conditions at once. The pipe ( | ) is a special character in the case statement. The pipe is used as a logical OR.

Syntax
The case statement has the following syntax:

case $1 in condition) ;; condition) ;; condition) ;; condition) ;; *) esac command command command command command

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Example: The following is an example of the case statement:

#test if the user typed in a y, Y, n, or N answer case $answer

in y | Y) echo $1 = yes ;; n | N) echo $1 = no ;; *) again. ; esac


The asterisk ( * ) is used as a wild card in the case statement. The last case matches anything that is not a y, Y, n, or N. It can also be used as a pattern match.

echo Did not understand the answer. Try

while loop
The while statement allows for repeated execution of a set of commands
s s

for a specied number of times or when a condition has been met

until a zero code is returned to the loop.

Syntax
The while statement has the following syntax:

while (condition) do

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command command ... break done


Example: The following is an example of the while statement:

#Display contents of the file, myfile, every 5 minutes while (true) do cat myfile sleep 300 done
NOTE: The while statement example is an innite loop.

Until loop
The until statement allows for repeated execution of a set of commands
s s

for a specied number of times or when a condition has been met

until a nonzero code is returned to the loop.

Syntax
The until statement has the following syntax:

until (condition)

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do command command ... break done


Example: The following is an example of the until statement:

#Display contents of the file, myfile, every 5 minutes until (false) do cat myfile sleep 300 done

for statement
The for statement enables repeated execution of a set of commands for a specied number of times.

Syntax
The for statement has the following syntax:

for variable in word1 word2 word3 ... do command command

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... done

Each time through the loop word is assigned to variable.

Example
The following is an example of the for statement:

#print files /etc/passwd, /etc/group, and /usr/lib/ crontab for i in /etc/passwd /etc/group /usr/lib/crontab do lp $i done
When the list is long, the for statement can use the wild card.

#print all logfiles in /etc/log for i in /etc/log/* do lp $i done

break statement
The break statement enables the execution of a loop to stop when a condition is met. When the optional parameter n is present, break exits the nth innermost loop.

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Syntax
The break statement has the following syntax:

break n

Example
The following is an example of the break statement:

#Exit the loop when the total variable is less than or equal to 25 while (true) do if [ $total -le 25 ] then break fi done

continue statement
The continue statement enables the execution of a loop to resume. When a condition is met, only the remaining statements are skipped When the optional parameter n is present, continue skips the statements in the nth innermost loop.

Syntax
The continue statement has the following syntax:

continue n

Example
The following is an example of a continue statement:

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#Print all files, in the logs directory, that are readable and not empty LPLOGS=/etc/lp/logs for i in $LPLOGS do if [ -r $i && -s $i then lp $i else echo $i is not readable or $i is an empty file continue fi done ]

Read statement
The read statement reads data from the terminal or from a le.

Syntax
The read statement has the following syntax:

read variable

Example
The following is an example of a read statement:

#test if the user typed in a y, Y, n, or N answer read answer case $answer

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in y | Y) n | N) *) again. esac echo $1 = yes echo $1 = no echo Did not understand the answer. Try

Function statement
Functions are available in the ksh. To make the shell script easy to read and distinguish one function from another, the ksh uses the function keyword.

Function characteristics
Functions have the following characteristics:
s s s

Shell variables within functions are global. Functions can be exported to subshells. An error within the function aborts and returns to the calling program or function. Functions can be removed by the unset command.

Syntax
The function statement has the following syntax:

function name {list} function name() {list}

Example
The following is an example of a function statement:

#Declare the function answer function count()

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Shell script examples dBm and RSSI


The shell script rssi.sh, in Figure 3-1 on page 3-32, converts dBm to Receive Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) units. For a more detailed explanation of RSSI units, see 401-610-036, Database Update Manual. The rssi.sh has four supporting les: .rssi1, .rssi2, .rssi3, and .rssi4. The input string that the dc command needs to make the specic calculation is contained in each le.

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case $1 in h|help) echo " Enter \"rssi\" \"option number\"<CR> and then follow directions. Note: <CR> represents the RETURN character. Options: 1. dBm to RSSI units 2. RSSI units to dBm 3. dB to RSSI units 4. RSSI units to dB An example for option 1: 1. At the system prompt, enter: rssi 1<CR> 2. Next, the system responds with: Enter the dBm value (enter -52 as _52, etc.): 3. Then enter the value in dBm: Enter the dBm value (enter -52 as _52, etc.): _52<CR> 4. The system responds with an answer: The dBm value = 99.8 RSSI units. 5. Round off the answer to a whole number (100). ";; 1) echo " Enter the dBm value (enter -52 as _52, etc.): \c" echo "The dBm value = dc .rssi1 RSSI units." echo "Round off the answer to a whole number.";; 2) echo " Enter the RSSI units: \c" echo "The RSSI units = dc .rssi2 dBm.";; 3) echo " Enter the dB value: \c" echo "The dB value = dc .rssi3 RSSI units." echo "Round off the answer to a whole number.";; 4) echo " Enter the RSSI units: \c" echo "The RSSI units = dc .rssi4 dB.";; *) echo "Enter \"rssi help\" for instructions.";; esac

Figure 3-1.

rssi.sh: RSSI conversion shell script NOTE: The support les (.rssi1, .rssi2, .rssi3, and .rssi4) may require the full path name to be entered into this le.

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1k 130 ? + .78125 / p q

Figure 3-2.

Example of the .rssi1 le NOTE: The 1k may be changed to 2k for a two-decimal place output, and so forth.

.78125 ? * 130 - p q

Figure 3-3.

Example of the .rssi2 le

1k ? .78125 / p q

Figure 3-4.

Example of the .rssi3 le NOTE: The 1k may be changed to 2k for two decimal places, and so forth.

.78125 ? * p q

Figure 3-5.

Example of the .rssi4 le

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Converting to and from hexadecimal, decimal, octal, and binary formats


The shell script shown in Figure 3-6 on page 3-35 takes any number and converts the number to the base requested. The name of the shell script is srno.sh and the script has 12 supporting les. These les are used as input to the dc command.

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case $1 in |h|help) echo This command will perform the following conversions: OPTION BASE TO BASE ALTERNATE OPTIONS ------- --------------------------1 Hexadecimal Octal ho, hex-oct, h-o 2 Octal Hexadecimal oh, oct-hex, o-h 3 Hexadecimal Decimal hd, hex-dec, h-d 4 Decimal Hexadecimal dh, dec-hex, d-h 5 Octal Decimal od, oct-dec, o-d 6 Decimal Octal do, dec-oct, d-o. Syntax: srno [option] Note: The option entered may be the number 1-6 or an alternate. For example, option 1 may be entered as any of: \"srno 1\" \"srno ho\" \"srno hex-oct\" \"srno h-o\" An example: Enter \"srno 1\" The response will be: Note: Use upper case letters for digits A-F, and ignore the h prefix used with RC/V input. Enter the hexadecimal number (followed by a carriage return): FFFFFFFF <-value entered For the given hexadecimal input, the octal value = 37777777777 (for conversions to and from binary, enter \"srno extra\" or \"srno binary\") ";; extra|binary) echo "This command will also perform the following conversions: OPTION BASE TO BASE ALTERNATE OPTIONS ------ ----------- ----------- ----------------7 Octal Binary ob, oct-bin, o-b 8 Binary Octal bo, bin-oct, b-o 9 Decimal Binary db, dec-bin, d-o 10 Binary Decimal bd, bin-dec, b-d 11 Hexadecimal Binary hb, hex-bin, h-b 12 Binary Hexadecimal bh, bin-hex, b-h Syntax: srno [option] Note: The option entered may be the number 7-12 or an alternate. For example, option 7 may be entered as any of: \"srno 7\" \"srno ob\" \"srno oct-bin\" \"srno o-b\" An example: Enter \"srno 7\" The response will be: Note: Ignore the o prefix for octal serial numbers used with the RC/V input. Enter the octal number (followed by a carriage return): 37777777777 <-value entered

Figure 3-6.

srno.sh: base conversion shell script (Sheet 1 of 3)

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1|ho|hex-oct|h-o) echo " Note: Use upper case letters for digits A-F, and ignore the h prefix used with RC/V input. Enter the hexadecimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given hexadecimal input, the octal value = dc .hex_oct";; 2|oh|oct-hex|o-h) echo " Note: Ignore the o prefix used with the RC/V input. Enter the octal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given octal input, the hexadecimal value = dc .oct_hex";; 3|hd|hex-dec|h-d) echo " Note: Use upper case letters for digits A-F, and ignore the h prefix used with the RC/V input. Enter the hexadecimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given hexadecimal input, the decimal value = dc .hex_dec";; 4|dh|dec-hex|d-h) echo " Note: Ignore the d prefix for decimal serial numbers, and ignore the m prefix for the manufacturers decimal number used with the RC/V input. Enter the decimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given decimal input, the hexadecimal value = dc .dec_hex";; 5|od|oct-dec|o-d) echo " Note: Ignore the o prefix used with the RC/V input. Enter the octal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given octal input, the decimal value = dc .oct_dec";; 6|do|dec-oct|d-o) echo " Note: Ignore the d prefix for decimal serial numbers, and ignore the m prefix for the manufacturers decimal number used with the RC/V input. Enter the decimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given decimal input, the octal value = dc .dec_oct";;

Figure 3-6.

Example of a Shell Script Named srno (Sheet 2 of 3)

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7|ob|oct-bin|o-b) echo " Note: Ignore the o prefix for octal serial numbers used with the RC/V input. Enter the octal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given octal input, the binary value = dc .oct_bin";; 8|bo|bin-oct|b-o) echo " Enter the binary number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given binary input, the octal value = dc .bin_oct";; 9|db|dec-bin|d-b) echo " Note: Ignore the d prefix for decimal serial numbers, and ignore the m prefix for the manufacturers decimal number used with the RC/V input. Enter the decimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given decimal input, the binary value = dc .dec_bin";; 10|bd|bin-dec|b-d) echo " Enter the binary number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given binary input, the decimal value = dc .bin_dec";; 11|hb|hex-bin|h-b) echo " Note: Use upper case letters for digits A-F, and ignore the h prefix used with the RC/V input. Enter the hexadecimal number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given hexadecimal input, the binary value = dc .hex_bin";; 12|bh|bin-hex|b-h) echo " Enter the binary number (followed by a carriage return): \c" echo "For the given binary input, the hexadecimal value = dc .bin_hex";; *) echo "Enter \"srno help\"";; esac

Figure 3-6.

Example of a Shell Script Named srno (Sheet 3 of 3) NOTE: The full path name may have to be given for the support les .hex_oct, .oct_hex, .hex_dec, .dec_hex, .oct_dec, .dec_oct, .oct_bin, .bin_oct, .dec_bin, .bin_dec, .hex_bin, and .bin_hex.

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16i 8o ? p q

Figure 3-7.

Example of the .hex_oct le

16o 8i ? p q

Figure 3-8.

Example of the .oct_hex le

16i 10O ? p q

Figure 3-9.

Example of the .hex_dec le

10i 16o ? p q

Figure 3-10.

Example of the .dec_hex le

8i 10O ? p q

Figure 3-11.

Example of the .oct_dec le

10i 8o ? p q

Figure 3-12.

Example of the .dec_oct File

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8i 2o ? p q

Figure 3-13.

Example of the .oct_bin le

2i 8o ? p q

Figure 3-14.

Example of the .bin_oct le

10i 2o ? p q

Figure 3-15.

Example of the .dec_bin le

2i 10O ? p q

Figure 3-16.

Example of the .bin_dec le

16i 2o ? p q

Figure 3-17.

Example of the .hex_bin le

16o 2i ? p q

Figure 3-18.

Example of the .bin_hex File

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Processes
This section describes processes in the UNIX operating system.

Types of process
The Solaris operating system has two types of process:
s s

system processes user processes

System processes
There are two types of system processes
s s

system processes daemon (pronounced demon) processes

System processes
System processes are processes that perform tasks such as disk management, memory management, paging, and swapping. These processes cannot be turned off.

Daemon processes
Daemon processes are subsystem server processes. Daemons are often started when the machine is booted and run continuously. When a daemon is not started at boot time, the system administrator must manually start the daemon process by typing in the command that the starts the daemon. A typical daemon process waits in the background until a process requires service. An example, network daemons are idle until a process requests network access. A system administrator has the option of turning daemons off or on depending on the needs of their operation. For example, in the interest of security, the inetd daemon is disabled, however TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) commands wont work.

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User processes
User processes are processes that belong to regular usersthat is, processes that are not system processes. User processes can be killed by the user who started the process or by the root user. Typical processes include
s s s

Shell scripts UNIX commands Application software

To obtain a list of the processes for a specic user, enter the following command:

ps -fu user
where

user = the user login name


Example: To determine the processes for the user suzieq, enter

ps -fu suzieq
Result: The following output is returned:

UID PID PPID C STIME TTY suzieq 16582 16580 0 09:31:47 ? /dt/bin/Xsession suzieq 16627 1 0 09:32:06 ? /dt/bin/ttsession -s suzieq 16657 16654 0 09:32:24 pts/3 suzieq 16784 16645 0 10:02:34 ? rm -title $SYS

TIME CMD 0:01 /bin/ksh /usr 0:02 /bin/ksh /usr 0:01 /bin/ksh 0:02 /bin/sh -c xte

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vi editor
Solaris editors
User preference determines the editor that is used during a login session. This chapter focuses on the Visual Editor (vi). NOTE: The original UNIX line editor, ed, is available on the Solaris operating system as well as emacs and gmacs. For more information about ed, see ed editor on page 2-7. The vi editor has two modes, which are described in Table 3-11.

Table 3-11. Mode

vi Modes Function Commands are issued to s issue edit commands s navigate within the le s change to insert mode s invoke a UNIX shell NOTE: When you exit the shell, you return to vi.
s

Command Mode

Save or exit the le Edit text within the le to insert, delete, and modify existing text. Switch back to command mode by pressing the [Esc] key.

Insert Mode

Command-line syntax
The format of the vi command is

[a] operator [b] object


When describing a command, optional parts or parameters are surrounded by square brackets [ ].

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. Table 3-12. vi Command Line Structure Number of times the operation is to be performed Basic editing operations such as change or delete Number of objects the operation is performed on. Types of objects include s word -- delimited by a space s sentence -- delimited by a ., !, or ? followed by two spaces s paragraph -- delimited by a blank line

a operator b objects

Example: Change the next four words

4cw
Example: Yank (or copy) next three sentences

3y}

Command mode
The most frequently used vi navigational commands are described in Table 3-13. Navigational commands move the user from one part of the le to another. . Table 3-13. Keystroke vi Navigational Commands (Page 1 of 2) Function Move left one character. Move right one character. Move down one line. Move up one line. Move to beginning of next word. Move to beginning of the word. Move to end of the word. Move to next sentence. Move to beginning of the line.

h l or Spacebar j k w b e ) 0

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Table 3-13. Keystroke

vi Navigational Commands (Page 2 of 2) Function Move to the end of the line. Move to the last line of the le. Scroll forward to next page. Scroll back to previous page. Scroll forward half of a page. Scroll back half of a page.

$ :$
[Ctrl-f] [Ctrl-b] [Ctrl-d] [Ctrl-u]

Search commands
The vi search commands, which allow the user to look for a specic string or pattern in a le, are described in Table 3-14 on page 3-44. Table 3-14. Keystroke vi search commands Function Search forward from current position in the le. Search backward from current position in the le. Read the previous search in the same direction (that is, if it was a forward search, continue the search forward to nd the next occurrence of string.) Read the previous search in the opposite direction (that is, if it was a forward search, continue the search forward to nd the next occurrence of string.)

/string ?string n

Saving and exiting a le


The vi commands that write information from memory to disk and then quit vi are described in Table 3-15 on page 3-44. Table 3-15. Keystroke vi write and exit commands Function Write the le to disk. Write the le to the le filename. Write the le to disk and quit the vi editor. Quit without writing the changes to the le. Write the le to disk if changes were made and exit vi.

:w :w file_name :wq :q! ZZ

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Miscellaneous commands
Miscellaneous vi commands are described in Table 3-16. Table 3-16. Keystroke vi miscellaneous commands Function Invoke the vi editor on the file file2. Read the contents of file2 into the file that you are editing.

:e file2 :r file2

NOTE:
Place the contents of file2 on the next line of the current le.

:sh or :ksh J :n

Invoke a subshell environment. Join the next line with the current line. Next file.

NOTE:
Useful when vi has more than one le open.

u ~ (tilde) . (dot)

Undo the last command. Reverse case (i.e. change a capital to lower case and vice versa). Repeat the last command. Show all settings for the current session. Print the line numbers in the current session.

:set all :set number

Insert commands
The most frequently used vi insert commands are described in Table 3-17. Table 3-17. Keystroke vi insert commands Function Append text after the current position. Append text at the end of the line. Insert text before the current position. Insert text at the beginning of the line. Open a line for editing after the current line. Open a line for editing before the current line. Delete a character.

a A i I o O d

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Table 3-17. Keystroke

vi insert commands Function Delete a line. Delete the line leaving a blank line in its place. Delete a word. Change a character. Change a line. Change the current position of a line. Change a word.

dd D dw c cc C cw

Using the vi editor to edit les Invoking vi


To invoke the vi editor, enter vi [ parameters ] filename where

filename = the le that is to be edited. The specied filename can be a either the full path name or the relative path name to the le.
s

full path namethe user does not have to be in the directory in which the le resides. For example:

vi /var/adm/sulog
s

relative path namethe user must be in the directory in which the le resides. For example: To edit the le sulog in the /var/adm directory, enter

cd /var/adm vi sulog
The optional parameters to vi are described in Table 3-18.

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Table 3-18. Parameter

vi optional parameters Description Where n is a specic line number.

+n

NOTE: $ is equivalent to the last line of the le.


+/string -r filename
The vi editor opens the le to the rst occurrence of the specied string. Recover and edit the filename le after a system or editor crash.

Example session to edit an existing le


The use of the vi editor to edit the existing le poem is shown in Table 3-19 on page 3-47. The le poem has the following contents:

Mary had a little lamb Its flees as white as snow And

Table 3-19. Step 1 2 3 4

Sample vi session to edit an existing le (Page 1 of 2) Result Invokes the vi editor and places the user in Command mode. Moves the cursor to Line 2. Moves the cursor to the second word in Line 2. Changes the word flees to fleece.

Action

vi poem j w cw

NOTE:
The letter s in the word flees is changed to the dollar sign ($), which indicates that the user is in Insert mode. 5 6

type, fleece
Press the [Esc] key.

Changes the word flees to fleece. Exits Insert mode and returns the user to Command mode.

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Table 3-19. Step

Sample vi session to edit an existing le (Page 2 of 2) Result Moves the cursor to the beginning of Line 3. Changes the entire contents of the line. The $ at the end of line indicates that the user is in Insert mode and that the next words that are typed will replace the line. Changes Line 3 and adds Line 4.

Action Press [Return].

Type

And everywhere that Mary went Press return The lamb was sure to go
9 Press the [Esc] key. The vi editor enters Command mode, and the poem file now has the following contents:

Mary had a little lamb Its fleece as white as snow And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go
10

:wq

Write the edited le to disk and quit vi.

Using the vi editor to create a new le


This section explains how to use the vi editor to create a new le.

Invoking vi
To invoke the vi editor, enter vi [ parameters ] filename where

filename = the le that is to be created.


The specied lename must follow the rules that are described in Characteristics of les on page 3-4 and may be either an absolute path name or a relative path name.
s

If you specify the full path name, you do not have to be in the directory in which the le resides. For example:

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vi /var/adm/sulog
s

If you specify the relative path name, you must be in the directory in which the le resides. For example, to edit the le sulog in the directory /var/ adm, enter

cd /var/adm vi sulog
The optional parameters to vi are described in Table 3-18.

Example vi session to create a new le


The use of the vi editor to create a new le is shown in Table 3-20. The new le will be named poem. Table 3-20. Action 1 2 3 Example vi session to create a le Result A new le opens with a ~ (tilde) at the beginning of each line. Puts the user in insert mode, appending text after the current line. The typed text appears in the file:

vi poem a
Type

Mary had a little lamb Its fleece as white as snow And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go
4 5 Press the [Esc] key.

Mary had a little lamb Its fleece as white as snow And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go
Enter command mode. Write the le to disk and quit vi.

:wq

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Printing
UNIX standard printing facility
In the Solaris operating system, the standard line printing facility is lp.

Printing les
To print les in the Solaris environment, use the lp command at the UNIX prompt. The most commonly used options for the lp command are described in Table 321. The options can be used in any combination with each other.

Table 3-21. Option

Options for the lp command Function Send the print job to the specied printername printer.

d printername

NOTE:
The specied printer name must be accompanied by this option. If the printer name is omitted, either the print request goes to the default printer or the lp command uses the lename as the printer name and the shell waits, essentially hanging, until a printer name is typed or a keyboard interrupt is sent.

m n s t

After the job has printed, send e-mail to the user who requested the print job. Specify number of copies to be printed. Suppress message. After the lp command is executed, the message request id is... is displayed. Print a title on the cover page.

NOTE:
Each print job has a cover page, which provides information about the job, such as the request ID, user login name, and the time and date that the job was executed. This is very helpful in separating the start/end of each print job. If the option is not used, the tile is the request identication number.

Write a message on the screen after the le is printed.

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Examples
The following examples illustrate the execution of the lp command: To print the le report to the default printer, enter

lp report
To print the le report to the printer prt21 and send e-mail when the job completes, enter

lp -d prt21 -m report
To print ve copies of the le report to the default printer, enter

lp -n 5 report

Canceling a print job


To cancel a print job in the Solaris operating system, the conditions in Table 3-22 must be true.

Table 3-22. When...

Print job condition table then... the job can be canceled. the job can be canceled. the job cannot be canceled.

a job is still in the print queue a job is printing AND it has not been sent completely to the printer buffer a job has printed

Who can cancel a print job


Table 3-23 species who is allowed to cancel a print job. Table 3-23. When... The owner of the print job cancels the job, Someone other than the owner of the print job cancels the job Who can cancel a print job then... the job is canceled. the job is not canceled.

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Table 3-23. When...

Who can cancel a print job then... the job is canceled regardless of whether root owns the job.

the root user cancels a print job,

To stop the print job, enter the cancel command. To cancel a print request, perform Procedure 3- 2, Canceling a print job, on page 3-52.

Procedure 3- 2. Canceling a print job


1. If the user has the print request number (that is, the number that is displayed when the lp command completes), go to Step 3. 2. Execute the following command to determine the print request number: lpstat -u user where user = the user login name. 3. Enter the following command to cancel the print job: cancel print_request_number where print_request_number = the print request number of the print job that is to be canceled.

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UNIX Commands

Introduction
This chapter describes commonly used UNIX commands.

UNIX commands
UNIX commands allow the user to perform different types of tasks, such as
s s s s s

display process information search the system copy les archive les display ASCII le contents

Most UNIX commands, especially the older commands, are abbreviations of a UNIX-related term or of the task that the command performs. For example, bin stands for binary directory, which is the directory where programs reside. Another example is the du command, where du is an abbreviation for disk usage.

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Command line syntax


The format of a command is either
s s

command -options -[optional options] file(s) command -options -[optional options] [optional files]

Options
Options begin with a dash (-). Options are either required or optional. If an option is optional, the option is enclosed in square brackets [ ]. A pipe symbol ( | ) is used in the command line syntax as a required choice of either choosing one or the other.

Arguments
Arguments are either required or optional. If optional, the argument is surrounded by brackets [ ]. A typical argument is a lename.

Chapter contents
This chapter describes the most frequently used UNIX commands. A quick reference to the commands is in Table 4-1. Table 4-1. Chapter 4 Table of Contents (Page 1 of 4) Function Administer user login IDs. Execute a job at a specied time. Display words in large format Execute a job when system load level permits. Display contents of a specied ASCII le. Change directory. Change group ownership to a different group ID. Change the modes of a le. Change ownership of a le to a different user login. Clear the display screen. See page 4-6 4-10 4-16 4-18 4-21 4-25 4-28 4-31 4-37 4-41

Command

admin at banner batch cat cd chgrp chmod chown clear

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Table 4-1.

Chapter 4 Table of Contents (Page 2 of 4) Function Compare two les. Compress or decompress a le. Copy le archives in and out. Schedule a job to execute routinely. Cut selected elds from a le. Display the date and time. Calculate numbers. Convert and copy a le. Display the amount of free space that is available for a le system. Display the differences between two les. Display the amount of disk space that is used. Write output the same as the input. Obtain current environment settings. Allocate a contiguous le. Determine the le type (such as data or text) of a le. Search the system for the specied criteria. If no criteria are specied, the find command prints all les that it nds. Move a le into a contiguous secondary storage area. Display the size and allocated size of a contiguous le. Search a specied le for a specied character string. Display the rst ten lines of a le. Display the user login name and group name of the user. See page 4-43 4-46 4-51 4-56 4-61 4-68 4-71 4-71 4-80 4-83 4-87 4-89 4-92 4-95 4-97 4-100

Command

cmp compress cpio crontab cut date dc dd df diff du echo env falloc file find

fmove fsize grep head id

4-103 4-105 4-107 4-111 4-114

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Table 4-1.

Chapter 4 Table of Contents (Page 3 of 4) Function Terminate a running process. Display the home directory of the user. Send output to the Receive-Only Printer (ROP). List the contents of a directory. Display the online manual page for a specied command. Permit or deny messages to be written to the terminal screen. Create a new directory. Display the contents of an ASCII text le one screen at a time. Rename the specied le. Display news items. Execute a command at a lower priority. Allow a process to continue to run after the user has exited. Display the specied le in various formats (such as octal or hexadecimal format). Allow a user to change the password of the user. Display the contents of a le one page at a time. Format and display the contents of a le. Output a list of processes that are running on the system. Display the present working directory. Remove a specied le from the system. Remove a specied directory from the system. Display the differences between two les. Suspend execution for a specied number of seconds. See page 4-117 4-121 4-123 4-125 4-131 4-134 4-137 4-140 4-143 4-146 4-149 4-152 4-155 4-159 4-162 4-166 4-172 4-178 4-180 4-183 4-186 4-189

Command

kill logdir lpr ls man mesg mkdir more mv news nice nohup od passwd pg pr ps pwd rm rmdir sdiff sleep

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UNIX Commands

Table 4-1.

Chapter 4 Table of Contents (Page 4 of 4) Function Sort data. Split a le into pieces. Set terminal options. Temporarily assume the login identity of a another user. Display the checksum and block count of a le. Display the last ten lines of a le. Determine the amount of time that a command took to nish executing. Either create an empty le or update the date and time for a le, as shown with the ls -l command. Identify the Teletypewriter (TTY) that the user is using. Same as at command. See manual page for at. Set default permissions when a le is created. Uncompress les that were compressed by the compress command. Display system information. Count the words, characters, or lines in a le. Display the user login names of users who are using the system. Write a message to a specied terminal. See page 4-191 4-195 4-199 4-203 4-206 4-208 4-212 4-215 4-218 4-10 4-220 4-222 4-225 4-228 4-231 4-234

Command

sort split stty su sum tail time touch tty UAat umask uncompress uname wc who write

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admin
Name
adminadminister user login names.

Synopsis
admin -a nlogin admin -d ologin admin -c ologin admin -o ologin -n nlogin

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the admin command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the admin command resides in the following directory:

/bin/admin

Description
The admin command adds, deletes, or renames user login names and/or changes the passwords of user login names.

Creating a user login name


To create a user login name, enter

admin -a nlogin
where

nlogin = the user login name that you want to create.

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UNIX Commands

When you execute the admin command to create a new user login name, the operating system creates
s

a directory for that user login name under the /usr directory, such as the directory /usr/john an entry for that user login name in the /etc/passwd le

The directory that the operating system creates for each user login name is called the home directory of the user. Whenever the user logs in to the operating system, the user is placed in the home directory of the user. Each user login identication (uid) number is unique and not within the range of system login IDs. All newly created user login names have the same group ID. The password for the new user login ID is cleared. Password aging is set for a minimum of 2 weeks and a maximum of 10 weeks.

Deleting a user login name


To delete a user login name, enter

admin -d ologin
where

ologin = the user login name that you want to delete.


You can delete only user login names. You cannot delete system login IDs. Before you can delete a user login name, you must rst delete all at and crontab jobs that that user login name owns. If a user login name and the home directory of that user login name have the same name, deleting the user login ID also deletes
s s

the home directory and all directories and les under the home directory the entry for the user login ID in the passwd le

Renaming a user login name


To rename a user login name, enter

admin -o ologin -n nlogin


where

ologin = the old user login name. nlogin = the new user login name.
You can rename only user login names. You cannot rename system login IDs. Before you can rename a user login name, you must rst delete all at and crontab jobs that the old user login name owns. If the old user login name and the home directory of the old user login name have the same name, both the old user login name and its home directory are renamed to the new user login name.

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If the old user Iogin ID and its home directory have different names, the user login name is changed but the home directory name is not changed. In either case, no les are deleted.

Clearing a password
Clearing a password is removing the encrypted password entry for a specied user login name from the passwd le. To clear a password, enter

admin -c ologin
where

ologin = the user login name for which the password is to be cleared.
After you clear the password of a user login name, the next time that the user login name attempts to log in to the operating system, the system requests the user to specify a new password.

System login name


A system login name is a login name that is reserved for the use of the operating system. System login names have uid numbers that are less than or equal to 20. The admin command can only clear the password of a system login name. The admin command cannot create or delete a system login name.

Known bugs
If you attempt to create a le already exists that by the name of a new (or renamed) logins home directory, then creation of the new home directory fails. If the current working directory of any process is a logins home directory that is to be deleted, then deletion of the home directory fails. This situation is difcult to detect beforehand. As a result, the password le deletion continues, but the login directory is not deleted. To clear out the directory, perform the following steps: 1. Wait until the other users are logged off the system. 2. Execute the following command:

cd /
3. Add the user login name. 4. Delete the user login name.

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UNIX Commands

Examples
To add the user login name ralph, enter

admin -a ralph
To clear the password of user login name ralph, enter

admin -c ralph
To rename user login name ralph to john, enter

admin -o ralph -n john


To delete the user login name john, enter

admin -d john

Associated commands and/or les


/bin/admin /etc/passwd

See also
at, crontab

Diagnostics
Various diagnostic tests are executed if any of the following conditions occur:
s s s s

The user login name is too short or too long. The user login name includes characters that login names cannot contain. The nlogin user login name already exists. The ologin user login name does not exist or is a system login name.

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at, UAat
Name
at, UAatexecute a job at a specied time.

Description
Users are allowed to use the at command if their user login IDs appear in the le /user/lib/cron/at.allow. If the at.allow le does not exist, the at command checks the /user/lib/cron/at.deny le. When a login ID is listed in the at.deny le, the user is denied permission to use the at command.

Availability UNIX RTR and Solaris


The at command is in the /usr/sbin and the /bin directories.

UNIX RTR
The UXat command is located in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


at time [ date ] [ increment ] at -l [ job ] at -r job UAat time [ date ] [ increment ] UAat -l [ job ] UAat -r job

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UNIX Commands

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR at command are described in Table 4-2. Table 4-2. Option UNIX RTR at command options Description List all scheduled jobs Delete a scheduled at job

l r

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR at command are described in Table 4-3. Table 4-3. UNIX RTR at Command Arguments Description May be specied as s One, two, or four digits, where digits one and two specify hours; four digits specify hours and minutes.
s s s

Argument

time

Hour:minute A.M. or P.M. can be appended The words noon, midnight, now, and next.

date

When a date is not given, the current date is assumed. The date may be specied as s month name, followed by a day number s month name, followed by a day number and year number s day of the week s the word today or tomorrow A number that is accompanied by either s minutes s hours s days s weeks s months s years

increment

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Solaris Syntax
at [-c|-k|-s] [-m] [-f file] [-q queuename] -t time at [ -c | -k | -s ] [ -m ] [ -f file ] [ -q queuename ] timespec at -l [ -q queuename [ at_job_id ] at -r at_job_id

Options

Table 4-4. Option

Solaris at Command Options Description Invoke and run job in a csh environment. Invoke and run job in a ksh environment. Specify the path of a le that is used as the source. List all scheduled jobs Send mail to the invoking use.r after the job has completed Specify a queue to schedule a job.

c k f file l m q queuename

NOTE:
Beginning and default queue is queue a. Ending queue is z.

r at_job_id s t time

Remove the job that has the specied identication number. Invoke and run job in a sh environment. Schedule the job to run at the specied time.

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UNIX Commands

Arguments
Table 4-5. Solaris at Command Arguments Description Job identication number May be specied as s One, two, or four digits, where digits one and two specify hours; four digits specify hours and minutes
s s s

Argument

at_job_id time date increment

Hour:minute A.M. or P.M. can be appended. The words noon, midnight, now, and next.

date
May be specied as s One, two, or four digits, where digits one and two specify hours; four digits specify hours and minutes
s s s

Hour:minute A.M. or P.M. can be appended. The words noon, midnight, now, and next.

increment
A number that is accompanied by either s minutes s hours s days s weeks s months s years

Examples UNIX RTR Examples


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at 7:15 p.m. on January 27.

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cat poem | at 7:15 p.m. Jan 27


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at 10:00 on Saturday.

cat poem | at 10:00 Saturday


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at noon tomorrow.

cat poem | at noon tomorrow


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at same time tomorrow.

cat poem | at now + 1 day


Example: List all jobs that are scheduled.

at -l

Solaris Examples
Example: Sort the le poem at 7:30 tomorrow and send mail when the job is completed.

at -m 0730 tomorrow sort poem outfile


[Ctrl-d] Example: Display the contents of the le poem at 10:00 on Saturday.

cat poem | at 10:00 Saturday


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at noon tomorrow.

cat poem | at noon tomorrow


Example: Display the contents of the le poem at the same time tomorrow.

cat poem | at now + 1 day

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UNIX Commands

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is...

Then... the execution of the at command succeeded. an error occurred and the job was not scheduled.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


crontab(1), date(1), csh(1), ksh(1), sh(1), touch(1), ulimit(1), umask(1), getdate(3C), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/cron.d/at.deny, which includes the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the at command. /usr/lib/cron/at.deny, which includes the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the at command. This is a link to the /etc/cron.d/ at.deny le.

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banner
Name
bannerdisplay a specied character string in a large format.

Description
The banner command displays one or more words in a large format.

Availability UNIX RTR


The banner command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The banner command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


banner string

Options
The banner command has no options.

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UNIX Commands

Arguments

Table 4-6.

UNIX RTR and Solaris banner Command Arguments Description The string of characters that are to be displayed in a large format, with a blank space the delimiter for a new line.

Argument

string

NOTE:
If string is surrounded by quotation marks, up to ten characters are printed on one line.

Examples UNIX RTR and Solaris Examples


Example: Print hello world in large format:

banner hello world

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0 >0

Then... the execution of the banner command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

echo(1)

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batch, UAbatch
Name
batch, UAbatchexecute a job at a specied time.

Description
The batch command executes a job when the system load permits.

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the batch command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories. The UXbatch command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the batch command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR operating system Syntax


batch UAbatch

Solaris operating system Syntax


batch

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UNIX Commands

Options
No options used with the batch command. To display a list of scheduled jobs or to cancel a job, use the at command. For more information about the at command, refer to at, UAat on page 10.

Arguments
No arguments are used with the batch command.

Examples
Example: Find all les that are named core.

batch find / -name core -print > /tmp/corefiles


[Ctrl-d]

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0 >0

Then... the execution of the at command succeeded. an error occurred and the job was not scheduled.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


crontab(1), date(1), csh(1), ksh(1), sh(1), touch(1), ulimit(1), umask(1), getdate(3C), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/cron.d/at.deny, which includes the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the batch command

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/usr/lib/cron/at.deny, which includes the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the batch command; this is a link to the /etc/ cron.d/at.deny le.

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UNIX Commands

cat
Name
catdisplay the contents of a specied ASCII text le.

Description
The cat (concatenate) command displays the contents of one or more specied ASCII les.

Data is lost when redirecting the output onto one of the les originally being read. In the example, the original data in file1 is overwritten.

CAUTION:

Availability UNIX RTR


The cat command is located in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The cat command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


cat [ -us ] [ files ]

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR cat command are described in Table 4-7. Table 4-7. Option UNIX RTR cat command options Description Unbuffer the output. Default is buffered. Suppress the error message. cat: cannot open le if the le does not exist

u s

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR cat command are described in Table 4-8. Table 4-8. UNIX RTR cat command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

Argument

files

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

Solaris Syntax
cat [ -nbsuvet ] [ files ]

Options
The options for the Solaris cat command are described in Table 4-9. Table 4-9. Solaris cat command options Omit line numbers from blank lines Display a dollar sign ($) at the end of each line, prior to a new-line

b e

NOTE:
The -e option is used only with the -v option.

Precede each line with its line number

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UNIX Commands

Table 4-9.

Solaris cat command options Unbuffer the output. Default is buffered Suppress the error message

u s

cat: cannot open file


if the le does not exist

Display tabs and for-feeds

NOTE:
Tabs are displayed as ^I and form-feeds are displayed as ^L. The -t option is used only with the -v option.

Display all non-printing character except tabs, new-lines, and form-feeds

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-8.

Examples
Example: Display contents of the le poem.

cat poem
Example: Display contents and line numbers and suppress error messages.

cat -s poem
Example: Create le fruit from the les apple and oranges.

cat apple oranges > fruit

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0

Then... the execution of the cat command was successful

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If the exit status is... >0

Then... an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

touch(1), environ(5)

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UNIX Commands

cd
Name
cdchange directory.

Description
The cd (change directory) command allows the user to change the present working directory. The location the user is at is called the present working directory.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the cd command is in the directories /usr/ sbin and /bin.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the cd command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


cd [directory]

Options
The cd command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the cd command are described in Table 4-10. Table 4-10. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris cd command arguments Description Specify the absolute or relative path name of the directory that becomes the new working directory

directory

Examples
Example: The current working directory is /usr/spool/uucp. Change to the /usr/ spool directory. This can be accomplished by either method.

cd ..
Example: The current working directory is /usr/spool/uucp. Change to the /usr directory.

cd ../../usr
Example: The current working directory is /usr/spool/uucp. Change to /bin.

cd /bin

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the at command succeeded. an error occurred

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UNIX Commands

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

csh(1), ksh(1), pwd(1), sh(1), chdir(2), environ(5)

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chgrp
Name
chgrpchange the group ID of a specied le.

Description
The chgrp (change group) command changes the group ownership of the specied le.

Availability Solaris
The chgrp command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Syntax Solaris Syntax


chgrp [ -fhR ] group files )

Options\
The options for the chgrp command are described in Table 4-11. Table 4-11. Option chgrp Command Options Description Force the change and do not report errors. If the le is a symbolic link, change the group ID of the link and not the group of the referenced le. Recursive option. chgrp descends through the directory and any subdirectories.

f h R

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UNIX Commands

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris chgrp command are described in Table 4-12. Table 4-12. Argument Solaris chgrp Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the les that are to be modied. Specify a group name or group ID from the group database.

files group

Examples
Example: Change group ownership from user1 to apx for the le documents.

chgrp apx documents


Example: Change group ownership from user1 to apx for all les in the current directory.

chgrp apx *
Example: Change group ownership from user1 to apx for all les, subdirectories, and symbolic links starting from the directory apxdir.

cd apxdir chgrp -Rs apx

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the chgrp command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


chmod(1), chown(1), id(1) ksh(1M), chown(2), group(4), passwd(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/group, which includes the name of the group database

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UNIX Commands

chmod
Name
chmodchange the permissions (modes) of the specied le.

Description
The chmod (change mode) command changes read, write, and/or execute permissions of the specied le.

Availability UNIX RTR


The chmod command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The chmod command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


chmod [ auo ]-|+mode files chmod -mode files chmod # file
NOTE: The plus sign (+) grants permission. The minus sign (-) denies permission.

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR chmod command are described in Table 4-13. Table 4-13. Option UNIX RTR chmod Command Options Description Grant/deny read permission. Grant/deny write permission. Grant/deny execute permission. Grant/deny all (that is, user and others permission). Grant/deny user permission. Grant/deny other permission.

+r, -r +w, -w +x, -x a +|- [ r | w | x ] u +|- [ r | w | x ] o +|- [ r | w | x ] number

r, w, and x is an octal representation of the mode. r=4 w=2 x=1


When added together the numbers signify an overall permission. For example, 7 indicates that all permissions are turned on, and 5 indicates that only read and execute permissions are turned on. There must be three numbers to signify owner, group, and other, in that order.

NOTE:
A 0 (zero) indicates that all permissions are turned off.

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UNIX Commands

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR chmod command are described in Table 4-14. Table 4-14. Argument UNIX RTR chmod command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s) Specify the change to be made

files mode

Solaris Syntax
chmod [ -fR ] [ augo ] - | +mode files ] chmod [ -fR ] -mode files ] chmod # file
NOTE: The plus sign (+) grants permission. The minus sign (-) denies permission.

Options
The options for the Solaris chmod command are described in Table 4-15. Table 4-15. Option Solaris chmod command options Description Grant/deny read permission Grant/deny write permission Grant/deny execute permission Grant/deny all (that is, user, group, and others permission Grant/deny user permission

+r, -r +w, -w +x, -x a u

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Table 4-15. Option

Solaris chmod command options Description Grant/deny group permission Grant/deny other permission r,w,x is an octal representation of the mode r=4 w=2 x=1 When added together the numbers signify an overall permission. For example 7 would equal all permissions turned on, 5 equals read and execute permissions only are turned on. There must be three numbers to signify owner, group, and other, in that order

g o
#

NOTE:
A 0 (zero) indicates all permissions are turned off.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-14.

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UNIX Commands

Examples
Example: Change the permissions of the poem le. Command Result Turn on read permission for all users. Turn off read permission for all users. Turn on write permission for all users. Turn off write permission for all users. Turn on execute permission for all users. Turn off execute permission for all users. Turn on read permission for the owner. Turn off read permission for the owner. Turn on write permission for the owner. Turn off write permission for the owner. Turn on execute permission for the owner. Turn off execute permission for the owner.

chmod +r poem chmod -r poem chmod +w poem chmod -w poem chmod +x poem chmod -x poem chmod u+r poem chmod u-r poem chmod u+w poem chmod u-w poem chmod u+x poem chmod u-x poem

Example: Deny execute permission to all for the poem le.

chmod a-x poem


or

chmod 666 poem

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the chmod command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

ls(1), chmod(2),environ(5)

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UNIX Commands

chown
Name
chownchange ownership of a specied le.

Description
The chown (change owner) command changes the ownership of the le.

Availability UNIX RTR


The chown command is in the /usr/sbin and the /bin directories.

Solaris
The chown command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


chown [ owner files ]

Options
The chown command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR chown command are described in Table 4-16. Table 4-16. Argument UNIX RTR chown command arguments Description Specify the path name of the file(s) whose user ID is to be changed. Specify user ID to be assigned ownership of the le

files owner

NOTE:
The owner must be a user name or user ID from the user database.

Solaris Syntax
chown [ -fhR ] owner[ :group ] file(s) ]

Options
The options for the Solaris chown command are described in Table 4-17. Table 4-17. Option Solaris chown Command Options Description Force the change and dont report errors If the le is a symbolic link, change the group of the link and not the group of the referenced le Recursive option. chgrp descends through the directory and any subdirectories

f h R

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-16.

Examples
Example: Change ownership of the le documents from user1 to apx.

chown apx documents

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UNIX Commands

Example: Change ownership from user1 to autoplex for all les in the current directory.

chown autoplex *
Example: Change ownership from user1 to UID 203 for all les in the current directory.

chown 203 *

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the chgrp command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


chgrp(1), chmod(1), chown(1), passwd(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/group, which is the name of the group database /etc/passwd, which is the name of the user database

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UNIX Commands

clear
Name
clearclear the display screen.

Description
The clear command clears the text on the screen.

Availability Solaris
The clear command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


clear

Options
The clear command has no options.

Arguments
The clear command has no arguments.

Examples
Example: Clear the terminal screen.

clear

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the clear command was successful an error occurred

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UNIX Commands

cmp
Name
cmpcompare two specied les.

Description
The cmp (compare) command compares the contents of two specied les.

Availability UNIX RTR


The cmp command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The cmp command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


cmp [ -ls ] file1 file2

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR cmp command are described in Table 4-18. Table 4-18. Option UNIX RTR cmp command options Description Display the byte number, in decimal, and the differing bytes, in octal, for each difference. Display return codes only.

l s

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR cmp command are described in Table 4-19.

Table 4-19. Argument

UNIX RTR cmp command arguments Description Specied les to be compared

file1, file2

NOTE:
If a dash (-) is used as a lename, then the lename is obtained from standard input.

Solaris Syntax
cmp [ -ls ] file1 file2 [skip1] [ skip2 ]

Options
Same as the UNIX RTR options. See Table 4-18.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-19.

Examples
Example: Compare the le poem and the le sonnet.

cmp poem sonnet

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0 1 >1

Then... the les are identical the les are different; this includes the case where one le is identical to the rst point of the other an error occurred

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UNIX Commands

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

comm(1), diff(1), environ(5)

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compress
Name
compresscompress a specied le to a smaller size or decompress the specied le to its original size.

Description
The compress command compresses the specied le to a smaller size or decompresses a compressed le to its original size. After a le is compressed, its lename has a .Z extension.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the compress command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the compress command is in the /bin and /1apx10/testbin/sbin directories.

Synopsis UNIX RTR operating system Syntax


compress [-fv] [-b bits] files compress [-cfv] [-b bits] files compress -d files

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UNIX Commands

Options
The options for the compress command in the UNIX RTR operating system are described in Table 4-20. Table 4-20. Option UNIX RTR compress command options Description Write output to the terminal. No les are changed, and the corresponding .Z le is not created. Force compression even if compression does not reduce the size of the le. Verbose option. Write messages to the screen about the compression of each le. Set the upper limit, in bits, for common substring codes. The value of bits must be between 9 and 16; the default value is 16. Specifying a value lower than 9 results in larger, less compressed les. Decompress the specied le and restores the le to its original size.

-c -f -v -b bits

-d

NOTE:
When the -d option is used, the .Z extension is removed from the lename of the specied le.

files

files = the path name of the les to compress/uncompress.

NOTE:
If the files argument is omitted or a dash (-) is specied for files, the compress command uses standard input.

Solaris operating system Syntax


compress [-fv] [-b bits] files compress [-cfv] [-b bits] files

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Options
The options for the Solaris compress command are described in Table 4-21. Table 4-21. Option Solaris compress command options Description Write to the terminal. No les are changed and the corresponding .Z le is not created. Force compression even if compression does not reduce the le size. Verbose option. Display messages about the compression of each le. Set the upper limit, in bits, for common substring codes. Bits must be between 9 and 16 (16 is the default). Numbers lower than 9 result in larger, less compressed les.

-c -f -v -b bits

files

files = the path name of the les to compress/uncompress.

NOTE:
If the files argument is omitted or a dash (-) is specied for files, the compress command uses standard input.

Exit status and error messages


Exit status messages for the compress command are described in the following table: If the exit status is... Then... the compress command executed successfully. an error occurred. one or more les were not compressed because the size would have increased and the -f option was not specied. an error occurred.

0 1 2

>2

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Error messages for the compress command are described in the following table. Error Message Meaning Invalid options were specied on the command line Maxbits must follow -b, or invalid maxbits, not a numeric value. The le that is specied to uncompress is not compressed. The le is assumed to already be compressed. Respond y if you want the output le to be replaced; n if not. An SIGSEGV signal violation was detected, which usually indicates that the input le is corrupted. Percentage of the input saved by compression.

Usage: compress [-fvc] [-b maxbits [file(s)] Missing maxbits file: not in compressed format file: already has .Z suffix-no change file: already exits; do you wish to overwrite (y or n): uncompress: corrupt input

Compression: xx.xx%

NOTE:
Relevant only with the -v option.

-- not a regular file: unchanged -- has xx other links: unchanged -- file unchanged filename too long to tack on .Z

When the input le is not a regular le (such as a directory), it is left unchanged. The input le has links and is left unchanged. No space is achieved by compression of the le. The input is left uncompressed. The path name is too long to append the .Z extension to the lename.

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the compress command: To compress all les in the current working directory, enter

compress *
To compress the les poem, report, and document and receive messages about the compression of each le, enter

compress poem report document

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Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

ln(1), pack(1)

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cpio
Name
cpiocopy le archives in and out.

Description
The cpio (copy in and copy out) command is a le archive utility.

Availability UNIX RTR


The cpio command is in the /usr/sbin and the /bin directories.

Solaris
The cpio command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


cpio -o [ achsBv ] cpio -i [ Bcdehmrstuv6 ] [ patterns ] cpio -p [ adlmruv ] directory
The cpio command is commonly used in conjunction with the find command and the redirection symbols (< and >). If the < or > symbol is not used, the archive le is written or read to the screen.

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR cpio command are described in Table 4-22. Table 4-22. Option UNIX RTR cpio Command Options Description Process a UNIX System Sixth Edition archive format le. Reset access times of input les after being copied. Block the input/output in 5,120 bytes.

6 a B

NOTE:
The B option does not work with the p option. Also, the B option works only when data is written to or from a character device such as /dev/rmt0.

c d e h

Writes the header information in ASCII format for portability. Create directories as needed. Retain entire allocated of single extent and multiextent les. Normally, the le is truncated to its actual size. Swap the binary header information.

NOTE:
The h option is not valid when the c option is used.

Link les versus copying whenever possible.

NOTE:
Can only be used in conjunction with the p option.

m r s t u v

Retain previous le modication times. Interactively rename les. Swap data les. Display a table of contents. Copy unconditionally (replace). Prints the lenames.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR cpio command are described in Table 4-23. Table 4-23. Argument UNIX RTR cpio command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

directory

Specify a path name of an existing directory to be used as the target directory

NOTE:
This argument can be used only with the -p option.

pattern

Uses the pattern-matching notation similar to that used by the shell for le name pattern matching. Metacharacters are dened as follows: s * = match any string. s ? = match any single character. s [...] = match any one of the enclosed characters. s ! = exclude les that contain this pattern.

Solaris Syntax
cpio -o [aAchsBv] [-C bufsize] [-H header][-O file [-M message ] ] cpio -i [bBcdehmrstuv] [-E file] [patterns] cpio -p [adlmruv] directory

Options
Same as the UNIX RTR options. See Table 4-22.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-23.

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Examples
Example: Use the cpio command in conjunction with the find command to archive all les, directories, and subdirectories unconditionally with blocking, of the current directory to create the cpio.arch archive in the /usr/tmp directory.

find . -print | cpio -ocduB > /usr/tmp/cpio.arch


Example: Use the cpio command in conjunction with the find command to archive the les poem, chapter, book, creating the cpio archive book.cpio in the current directories using all the options mentioned in Table 4-22 except blocking.

find poem chapter book | cpio -ovcdum > book.cpio


Example: Read the book.cpio cpio archive.

cpio -ivcdum <book.cpio


Example: Read the table of contents of the book.cpio cpio archive.

cpio -itvcdum < book.cpio

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0 >0

Then... the execution of the cpio command was successful an error occurred

An error message is printed for les UID or GID are too large to t in the selected header format.

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Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include

ar(1), cat(1), echo(1) find(1), ls(1), touch(1), setfacl(1), sh(1), tar(1) archives(4), environ(5)

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crontab, UAcrontab
Name
crontabschedule a job to execute routinely.

Description
The chronological table (crontab) command allows a user to schedule job to be run periodically by the cron daemon. To determine when a user can or cannot use crontab, see Table 4-24.

When the crontab command is entered without arguments, do not attempt to exit by pressing [Ctrl-d]. Pressing [Ctrl-d] removes all entries in your crontab le. To exit without data loss, press [Ctrl-c]. Table 4-24. When ... a users name appears in the /etc/ cron.d/cron.allow le, crontab conditions then the user is... allowed to use the cron facility. allowed to use the cron facility.

CAUTION:

/etc/cron.d/cron.allow does not exist and the users name does not appear in the /etc/cron.d/deny le, /etc/cron.d/cron.allow does exist and the users name does not appear in it, /etc/cron.d/cron.allow does not exist and the users name appears in the /etc/cron.d/deny le, /etc/cron.d/cron.allow and /etc/ cron.d/deny do not exist,

not allowed to use the cron facility. not allowed to use the cron facility.

not allowed to use the cron facility.

Availability UNIX RTR


The crontab command is located in the /bin directory.

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The UAcrontab command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Solaris
The crontab command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


crontab [file] crontab -r crontab -l

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR crontab command are described in Table 4-25. Table 4-25. Option UNIX RTR crontab command options Description Lists the contents of the crontab le Remove a users crontab le

l r

Solaris Syntax
crontab [file] crontab [-elr]

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Options
The options for the Solaris crontab command are described in Table 4-26. Table 4-26. Option Solaris crontab command options Description Edit a copy of the current users crontab le A crontab le consists of lines, each with six elds. The elds are separated by spaces or tabs. The meaning of each eld is described in Table 4-27.

l r

Lists the contents of the crontab le Remove a users crontab le

The elds for the crontab command are described in Table 4-27. Table 4-27. Field 1 2 3 4 5 crontab Fields Meaning Minute Hour Day of the Month Month of the Year Day of the Week Value 0-59 0-23 1-31 1-12 0-6

NOTE:
0 is equal to Sunday 6 Command to be executed The name of a command or shell script

NOTE: Each of these elds may be either


s s

an asteriskall legal values list of elements separated by commas

An example entry would look like

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Example: Remove les in /tmp and /usr/tmp at 3:00 a.m. every Monday and Thursday.

0 3 * * 1,4 rm /tmp/* /usr/tmp/*


Example: Execute the shell script, myscript, every 15 minutes, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. every Monday through Friday.

0,15,30,45 8-17 * * 1-5 myscript

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris crontab command are described in Table 4-28. Table 4-28. Argument Solaris crontab Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: Add entry to the crontab le.

crontab -e
Example: List entries in the crontab le.

crontab -l

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is... 0 >0

Then... the execution of the crontab command was successful an error occurred

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Associated commands and/or les


The following commands are associated with the crontab command:

atq(1), atrm(1), ed(1), sh(1), cron(1M), su(1M), umask(1), environ(5)


The following elds are associated with the crontab command:
s

/etc/cron.d
This is the mail cron directory.

/etc/default/cron
This contains the cron default settings.

/etc/cron.d/cron.deny
This le contains the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the cron command.

/usr/lib/cron/cron.deny
This le contains the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the cron command. This is a link to the /etc/cron.d/cron.deny le.

/var/cron/log
This le contains accounting information.

/var/spool/cron/crontabs
This is the spool area for the crontab les.

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cut
Name
cutcut and display specied character positions or elds from a specied le.

Description
The cut command cuts and displays specied character positions or elds from a specied le. The objects that are to be cut are separated by a delimiter on the command line. The default delimiter is a semicolon (;).

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the cut command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the cut command is in the /1apx10/ expbin directory.

Synopsis Solaris operating system Syntax


In the Solaris operating system, the cut command has the following syntax:

cut -b list [files] cut -c list [files] cut -f list [-ddelim] [-s] [files]

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Options
The options for the cut command in the Solaris operating system are described in Table 4-29. Table 4-29. Option cut command options in the Solaris operating system Description List the byte positions that are to be cut from the le.

-b list

list = the objects that are to be cut from the le. Specify the objects in one of the following formats: s a comma-separated list of integers s a comma-separated list of integers with an optional dash (-) to indicate a range of integers s an integer to specify an object and a dash to specify all objects from that object to the end of the line -c list
List the character positions that are to be cut from the le.

list = the objects that are to be cut from the le. Specify the objects in one of the following formats: s a comma-separated list of integers s a comma-separated list of integers with an optional dash (-) to indicate a range of integers s an integer to specify an object and a dash to specify all objects from that object to the end of the line

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Table 4-29. Option

cut command options in the Solaris operating system Description List the elds that are to be cut from the le.

-f list

list = the objects that are to be cut from the le. Specify the objects in one of the following formats: s a comma-separated list of integers s a comma-separated list of integers with an optional dash (-) to indicate a range of integers s an integer to specify an object and a dash to specify all objects from that object to the end of the line -ddelim delim = the character that is to be used as the eld delimiter other than the default semicolon delimiter.

NOTE:
A space and other characters that have a special meaning to the shell must be enclosed in quotation marks. There is no space between the -d option and the delim character.

-s

Suppress lines with no delimiter characters in case of -f option. If the -s option is not specied, lines with no delimiter characters are passed through untouched.

Arguments
The arguments for the cut command in the Solaris operating system are described in Table 4-30. Table 4-30. Argument cut command arguments Description

files

files = the path name of the les from which the specied character positions or elds are to be cut.

NOTE:
If you omit or specify a dash (-) for the files argument, the cut command uses standard input.

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UNIX RTR operating system Syntax


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the cut command has the following syntax:

cut -clist [files] cut -flist [-dchar] [files]

Options
The options for the cut command in the UNIX RTR operating system are described in Table 4-31. Table 4-31. Option cut command options in the UNIX RTR operating system Description List the character positions that are to be cut from the le.

-c list

list = the objects that are to be cut from the le. Specify the objects in one of the following formats: s a comma-separated list of integers s a comma-separated list of integers with an optional dash (-) to indicate a range of integers s an integer to specify an object and a dash to specify all objects from that object to the end of the line -f list
List the elds that are to be cut from the le.

list = the objects that are to be cut from the le. Specify the objects in one of the following formats: s a comma-separated list of integers s a comma-separated list of integers with an optional dash (-) to indicate a range of integers s an integer to specify an object and a dash to specify all objects from that object to the end of the line

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Table 4-31. Option

cut command options in the UNIX RTR operating system Description

-dchar

char = the character to use as the eld delimiter other than the default delimiter. If char is not specied, a tab is used as the delimiter.

NOTE:
A space and other characters that have a special meaning to the shell must be enclosed in quotation marks. There is no space between the -d option and the char character.

Arguments
The cut command has the same arguments in the UNIX RTR operating system as in the Solaris operating system (see Table 4-30).

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


The exit status messages for the cut command are described in Table 4-32. Table 4-32. cut command exit status messages then... the cut command executed successfully. an error occurred.

If the exit status is...

0 >0

The error messages for the cut command are described in Table 4-33. Table 4-33. cut command error messages Meaning The command line contained a syntax error. The command line contained a syntax error. The command line contained a syntax error.

Error message

cut: -n may only be used with -b cut: -d may only be used with -f cut: -s may only be used with -f

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Table 4-33.

cut command error messages Meaning The specied file either does not exist or cannot be read. If the command line species multiple les, processing continues with the next specied le. The command line did not specify the delimiter character. The command line did not specify the list of character positions or elds that are to be cut from the le. The command line specied an invalid range of objects. The command line specied too many ranges. The command line specied a range in decreasing order. The command line specied an invalid range. An error occurred when the cut command attempted to operate on the specied le. The cut command required more memory than was available.

Error message

cut: cannot open file

cut: no delimiter specified cut: no list specified cut: invalid range specifier cut: too many ranges specified cut: range must be increasing cut: invalid character in range cut: internal error processing input cut: unable to allocate memory

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the cut command: To obtain a list of all user login names and their associated user IDs by cutting Fields 1 and 3 from the /etc/passwd le and using the colon (:) as the delimiter, enter

cut -d: -f1,3 /etc/passwd


To obtain a list of all login names by cutting elds from the /etc/passwd le and using the colon (:) as the delimiter, enter

cut -d: -f1 /etc/passwd

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To cut Character Positions 1 and 3 from the /user/spool/cron/crontab le, enter

cut -c1,3 /user/spool/cron/crontab


To cut all characters from Character Position 10 to the end of the line from the le /user/spool/cron/crontab , enter

cut -c10 /user/spool/cron/crontab

Associated commands and/or les


The following les are associated with the cut command:

grep(1), paste(1), environ(5)

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date
Name
datedisplay the current date and time.

Description
The date command displays the date and time of the system clock.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the date command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the date command is in the /1apx10/ubin and /bin directories.

Synopsis Syntax
The date command has the following syntax in both the Solaris and UNIX RTR operating systems:

date [-u] [[mmdd]|mmddHHMM [cc]yy] [SS]

Options
The date command has no options. You can, however, format the output of the date command in various ways, as described in Table 4-34.

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Table 4-34. Option

Format date command output Description Print the current month. Print the current day of the month. Print the current hour of the day. Print the current minute of the hour. Print the last two digits of the current year. Print the current seconds of the minute.

%m %d %H %M %y %S

Arguments
The date command has no arguments.

Examples
To display the current date, enter

date
To print the date in the format of Date: 06/01/98 Time: 14:38:01, enter

date Date: %m/%d/%y Time: %H:%M:%S

Exit Status and/or Error Messages

If the exit status is...

then... the date command executed successfully. an error occurred.

0 >0

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Error messages that the date command may generate are described in Table 435. Table 4-35. Error date command error messages Description An attempt to change the date was made by a user who is not the root user The command line syntax was incorrect

no permission bad conversion

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


strftime(3C), environ(5)

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dc, UAdc
Name
dc, UAdccalculate numbers.

Description
The desk calculator (dc) command typically operates on decimal integers. However, maintained is an input base, output base and a number of fractional digits. The dc command implementation uses a stacking mechanism that is called reverse Polish.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dc and UAdc commands are in the /bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


dc [filename] UAdc [filename]

Solaris Syntax
dc [filename]

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Options
The dc and UAdc commands have no options. However, dc takes the input constructions listed in Table 4-36 as the source for computation. Table 4-36. Construct dc command input constructions (Page 1 of 3) Description Specify number (a number is an unbroken string of the digits 0 through 9) to be pushed onto the stack.

number

NOTE:
A negative number is represented by an underscore (_) typed before the number. Also, numbers may contain decimal points.

<x>x=x

Pop and compare the top two elements of the stack.

NOTE:
Register x is evaluated if the elements obey the stated relationship.

+ / * %
()

Specify what operation is performed for the top two values on the stack. Valid operations are s add + s subtract s divide / s multiply * s remainder % s exponentiation ( )

NOTE:
The two entries are popped off the stack and the result is pushed on the tack in their place. Any fractional part of an exponent is ignored.

? (...) ! c d f

Execute the input line (usually taken from the terminal). Put the bracketed ASCI string onto the top of the stack. Interpret the rest of the line as a UNIX system command. Pop all values on the stack. Duplicate the top value on the stack. Print all values on the stack.

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Table 4-36. Construct

dc command input constructions (Page 2 of 3) Description Use the top value on the stack as the radix for further input. The i construct pushed the input base on the top of stack.

Pop the top of the stack and used that value as a non-negative scale factor.

NOTE:
The appropriate number of places are printed on output and maintained during multiplication, division, and exponentiation. The interaction of scale factor, input base, and output base will be reasonable if all are changed together.

lx Lx

Push the value stored in register x onto the stack. Treat register x as a stack and its top value is popped onto the main stack.

NOTE:
The register x is not altered. All registers start with a zero value.

o O p

Use the top value on the stack as the number radix for further output. Pushes the output base on the top of the stack. Print the top value on the stack.

NOTE:
The top value remains unchanged.

q
Q

Quit dc. Pop the top value on the stack and the string execution level is popped by that value

NOTE:
If executing a string, the recursion level is popped by two.

sx Sx

Pop the contents of the stack and store in register x. Treat register x as a stack and the value is pushed on the stack.

NOTE:
The register x can be any character.

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Table 4-36. Construct

dc command input constructions (Page 3 of 3) Description Replace the top element on the stack by its square root.

NOTE:
Any existing fractional part of the argument is taken into account; otherwise, the sale factor is ignored.

x X z Z

Treat the top element of the stack as a character string and execute it as a string of dc commands. Replace the number on the top of stack with its scale factor. Push the stack level onto the stack. Replace the number on the top of the stack with its length.

Arguments
The arguments for the dc command are described in Table 4-37. Table 4-37. Argument dc command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le to be operated on.

filename

NOTE:
If filename is omitted, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: Print the rst ten values of n!.

(la1+dsa*pla10>y)sy 0sal lyx

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the error message is... Then...

x is unimplemented, stack empty, Out of space, Out of headers, Out of pushdown, Nesting Depth,

x is an octal number.
not enough elements are on the stack to perform the requested operation. the free list is exhausted; that is, there are too many digits. too many numbers are being kept around. too many items are on the stack. there are too many levels of nested execution.

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dd
Name
ddconvert and copy a le.

Description
The disk-to-disk copy (dd) command copies the input le to the specied output with possible conversions.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dd command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The dd command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


dd [ argument=value ]

Options
The dd command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the dd command are described in Table 4-38. Table 4-38. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris dd command arguments (Page 1 of 2) Value Input lename; standard input is the default. Output lename; standard output is the default. Set block size; 512 is the default. Set output block size;512 is the default. Sets both input and output block size, superseding ibs and obs. Set the conversion buffer size to n.

if=file of=file ibs=n obs=n bs=n cbs=n

NOTE:
The cbs argument is used only if ascii or ebcdic conversion is specied. When ascii is specied, the characters are placed into the conversion buffer, converted to ASCII, the trailing blanks are trimmed, and a new line is added before sending the line to the output. When EBCDIC is specied, ASCII characters are read into the conversion buffer, converted, and blanks are added to make up an ouput record of size n.

skip=n

Skips n records before copying

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Table 4-38. Argument

UNIX RTR and Solaris dd command arguments (Page 2 of 2) Value Seek n records from the beginning of the output le before copying. Copy only n input records. Set conversion type. Valid types are s asciiconvert EBCDIC to ASCII s ebcdicconvert ASCII to EBCDIC s ibmslightly different map of ASCII to EBCDIC s lcasemap letters to lowercase s ucasemap letter to uppercase
s s s s

seek=n count=n conv=type

swabswap every pair of bytes noerrordo not stop processing on an error syncpad all input records to ibs ...,...several comma-separated conversions

NOTE:
The ascii/ebcdic conversion table is taken from the 256character standard.

ibm corresponds to certain IBM print train conventions. swap adds 1 byte to the size of les with an odd number of bytes.

Examples
The following examples illustrate the execution of the dd command: To copy from Tape Drive 0 to Tape Drive 1, enter

dd if=/dev/rmt/0m of=/dev/rmt/1m
To read an EBCDIC tape that is blocked at twenty 80-byte EBCIDIC card images per block into the ASCII le ibmdata, enter

dd if=/dev/rmt/0m of=ibmdata ibs=1600 cbs=80 conv=ascii,lcase

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


Exit status and/or error messages for the dd command are described below. If the exit status is... then... the input le was copied successfully. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include

cp (1), sed(1), tr(1), environ(5)

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df
Name
dfdisplay the amount of free space available for a le system.

Description
The display le system (df) command displays the number of free blocks and free inodes that are available for le systems. File systems may be specied by either the associated device name or the le system name.

Availability UNIX RTR


The df command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The df command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


df [-f] [filesystems]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR df command are described in Table 4-39. Table 4-39. Option UNIX RTR df Command Options Description Displays only free blocks

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR df command are described in Table 4-40. Table 4-40. Argument UNIX RTR df command arguments Description Report on the specied block device

block_device

NOTE:
The le system that is associated with the block device does not need to be mounted.

directory

Report on the specied directory

Solaris Syntax
df [ -abelt ] [ directory | block_device ]

Options
The options for the Solaris df command are described in Table 4-41. Table 4-41. Solaris df command options Description Report on all le systems, even those commented out in

Optio n a b e l t

/etc/mnttab
Display number total of kilobytes free Display only the number of les free Report on local le systems only Print full listings with totals

NOTE:
Overrides the -b and -e options.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-40.

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Examples
Example: Display free blocks and inodes for all le systems.

df
Example: Display free blocks for all le systems.

df -f
Example: Display free blocks and inodes for the root le system.

df /

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the df command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


find(1), mount(1M), statvfs(2) default_fs(4), mnttab(4), vsftab(1), ulimit(1), umask(1), getdate(3C), environ(5)

Associated les
/dev/dsk/*, which is the disk device /etc/default/fs, which is the default local le system type /etc/mnttab, which is the mount table /etc/vfstab, which is the list of default parameters for each le system

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UNIX Commands

diff
Name
diffdisplay the differences between two les.

Description
The difference (diff) command identies differences between two specied les. The diff command displays line-by-line differences between two ASCII text les. The results are written to standard output in the format

n1 a n3,n4 n1,n2 d n3 n1,n2 c n3,n4 n1 and n2 represent lines from the rst le and n3 and n4 represent lines from the second le. The lines resemble the ed(1) commands to convert the rst le to the second le. By exchanging a and d and reading backward, the second le is converted to the rst le.
Following each of these lines, come the lines affected in the rst le agged by a less-than (<) sign. All lines that are affected in the second le are agged by a greater-than (>) sign.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the diff command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the diff command is in the /usr/bin directory.

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Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


diff [ -befh ] file1 file2

Options
The options for the diff command are described in Table 4-42. Table 4-42. Option UNIX RTR diff command options Description Ignore trailing blanks (e.g. SPACES and TABS) Produce a script of a,c, and d commands for the ed editor which will recreate file2 from file1 Produce a similar script as the -e option except
s s

b e f

It cannot be used with ed writes the output in the opposite order

Perform a fast difference algorithm. This option works well when changes are short and well separated.

NOTE:
The -e and -f options cannot be used with this option.

Arguments
The arguments for the diff command are described in Table 4-43. Table 4-43. Argument UNIX RTR diff command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les to be compared.

file1, file2

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

directory1, directory2

The path name of the directories that are to be compared.

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Solaris Syntax
diff [ -bitw ] [ -e | - f | -h ] file1 file2 diff [-bitw ] [ -e | -f | -h ] [ -l ] [ -r ] directory1 directory

Options
The options for the Solaris diff command are described in Table 4-44. Table 4-44. Option Solaris diff Command Options Description Ignore trailing blanks (that is, spaces and tabs) Produce a script of a,c, and d commands for the ed editor which will recreate file2 from file1 Produce a similar script as the -e option.

b e f

NOTE:
The -f option
s s

cannot be used with ed writes the output in the opposite order

Perform a fast difference algorithm. This option works well when changes are short and well separated.

NOTE:
The -e and -f options cannot be used with the -h option.

i l r t w

Ignore case. Compare directories and produce output in long format. Compare recursively to common subdirectories encountered Expand tabs Ignores all blanks (SPACE and TAB)

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-43.

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Examples
Example: Display differences between file1 and file2.

diff file1 file2


Example: Ignore case when comparing file1 and file2.

diff -b file1 file2

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 1 >1 then... no differences were found. differences were found. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


bdiff(1), cmp(1), comm(1) cmpdir(1), ed(1), pr(1), sdiff(1), environ(5)

Associated les
/tmp/d?????, which is the temporary le that is used for comparison /usr/lib/diffh, which is the executable le that is used with the -h option

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du
Name
dudisplay the amount of disk space that is used.

Description
The disk usage (du) command displays the disk usage. By default, les are written in 512 byte blocks.

Availability Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the du command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR
In the UNIX RTR operating system, the du command is in the directories /usr/ sbin and /bin.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris


Syntax du [-dkr] [-s|-o] [files]

Options
The options for the du command are described in Table 4-45. Table 4-45. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris du command options Description Do not cross le systems Verbose option prints error messages to the screen, such as les that cant be opened Report only the total sum verses individual le usage

a r s

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Arguments
The arguments for the du command are described in Table 4-46. Table 4-46. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris du command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, the current directory is used.

Examples
Example: Display total disk usage for /tmp.

du -s /tmp

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the du command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


ls(1), stat(2), environ(5)

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echo
Name
echowrite output the same as the input.

Description
The echo command writes the output to the standard output, separated by blanks and terminated by a new line. The echo command is useful to
s s s

produce diagnostics in commands les send known data into a pipe display the contents of environment variables

Availability Solaris
The echo command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR
The echo command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


echo [argument]

Options
There are no options used with this command.

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Arguments
The arguments for the echo command are described in Table 4-47. Table 4-47. Format UNIX RTR and Solaris echo command arguments Description Identied as shell variable, words, or the wild card.

argument

NOTE:
When formatting the output, the echo command understands C programming conventions.

\b Backspace \c Print line without advancing to the next line \f Form-feed \n New-line \r Carriage return \t Tab \\ Print a backslash \number 8-bit character whose ASCII code is the 1-, 2, or 3-digit octal number n, which must start with a zero

Examples
Example: Display value of the PATH shell variable.

echo $PATH
Example: Echo Mary had a little lamb and its fleece as white as snow on two separate lines.

echo Mary had a little lamb\nits fleece as white as snow

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the echo command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


echo(1B), printf(1), shell_builtins(1), tr(1), wc(1), ascii(5), environ(5)

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env
Name
envdisplay the current environment settings.

Description
The environment (env) command displays the current environment settings.

Availability UNIX RTR


The env command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The env command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


env [-] [name=value] [utility [arguments...] ]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR env command are described in Table 4-48. Table 4-48. Option UNIX RTR env command options Description Ignore the environment that is inherited by the shell.

NOTE:
This option restricts the environment for utility to the environment that is specied by the arguments.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR env command are described in Table 4-49. Table 4-49. Argument UNIX RTR env command arguments Description Modify the execution environment.

name=value

NOTE:
The modication is done prior to the execution of utility.

utility argument

Specify the command that is to be executed. A list of the arguments that are passed to utility.

Solaris Syntax
env [ -i | - ] [ name=value] [ utility [ arguments... ] ]

Options
The options for the Solaris env command are described in Table 4-50.

Table 4-50. Option

Solaris env command options Description Ignore the environment inherited by the shell.

-, -i

NOTE:
This option restricts the environment for utility to that specied by the arguments.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-49.

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Examples
Example: Display all shell variables and their values.

env

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 1-125 126 127 Then... the execution of the env command was successful an error occurred

utility was found but could not be invoked utility could not be found

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


ksh(1), sh(1), exec(2), profile(4),environ(5)

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UNIX Commands

falloc
Name
fallocallocate a contiguous le.

Description
The le allocation (falloc) command creates a contiguous le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the falloc command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the falloc command is in the /bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


falloc filename blocks

Options
The falloc command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the falloc UNIX RTR command are described in Table 4-51. Table 4-51. Argument UNIX RTR falloc command arguments Description Creates a le that is named filename. Allocates space for the specied le.

filename blocks

NOTE:
Each block is 512 bytes.

Examples
To create a contiguous le that is named database with a size of 1,000 blocks, enter

falloc database 1000

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UNIX Commands

le
Name
filereport the le type (such as data le or text le) of specied les.

Description
The file command performs a series of tests on each specied le to determine the le type of each le. Sample results include
s s s s s s s

ASCII text block device character device data le directory empty le links

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the file command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the file command is unavailable.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


file [ -h ] [ -m mfile ] [ -f ffile ] file file [ -h ] [ -m mfile ] file file [ -c ] [ -m mfile ] file

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Options
The options for the Solaris file command are described in Table 4-52. Table 4-52. Option Solaris le command options Description Check magic le for format errors Check les listed in ffile as well as the le argument Dont check symbolic links Use an alternate magic le

c f ffile h m mfile

NOTE: /etc/magic is the default magic le containing a numeric or string constant which indicates le type. This number is known as a magic number. Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris le command are described in Table 4-53. Table 4-53. Argument Solaris le Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: Determine the contents of all les in a directory.

file *
Example: Determine the contents of the le hello.c.

file hello.c

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the file command was successful an error occurred The following error occurs when the -h option is specied and the le is a symbolic link.

symbolic link to file

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


ls(1), filehdr(4), magic(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/magic, which is the magic number le

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nd
Name
findsearch the le system for specied criteria.

Description
The find command searches the system for specied criteria.

Availability UNIX RTR


The find command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The find command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


find path ...expression

Options
The find command has no options.

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Arguments
The options for the find command are described in Table 4-54. Table 4-54. UNIX RTR and Solaris nd command arguments Description Specify a path name that is the starting point in the directory hierarchy

Arguments

path

expressionbelow are valid expressions and the description of each atime n cpio device ctime n mtime n name pattern print type c
Search system for all les accessed n days ago Write le on the device in cpio format. Search system for all les changed n days ago Search system for all les modied n days ago Search system for le having this pattern in its name Print results to the screen True if the c is
s s s s s s s

1contiguous bblock special le ccharacter special le ddirectory ppipe or o eextent fplain le

user login

Search the system for les that belong to user in the /etc/passwd le

Examples
Example: Find all les that belong to the user login name omptech.

find / -user omptech -print

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Example: Find and print all les from the current directory.

find . -print

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... all paths were traversed successfully an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


chmod(1), ls(1), sh(1), test(1), stat(2), umask(2),

Associated les
/etc/passwd, which is the name of the user database /etc/dfs/fstypes, which is the le that registers distributed le system packages

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UNIX Commands

fmove
Name
fmovemove a specied le into a contiguous secondary storage area.

Description
The le move (fmove) command performs an operation on the specied le. The operation that the fmove command performs depends on the le type of the specied le, as indicated in the following table. If the le is a... regular le multiextent le contiguous le (that is, a single extent) then fmove... converts the le to a multiextent le. attempts to t the data into as few extents as possible. makes the le a multiextent le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the fmove command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the fmove command resides in the /bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


fmove [ -a ] file

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR fmove command are described in Table 4-55. Table 4-55. Option UNIX RTR fmove command options Description Run a bitmap audit on the le system before moving the le

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR fmove command are described in Table 4-56. Table 4-56. Argument UNIX RTR fmove Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le

file

Examples
fmove /bin/ps

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fsize
Name
fsizedisplay the size and allocated size of a specied contiguous le.

Description
The le size (fsize) command displays the size of a contiguous le and the amount of disk space that is allocated to a specied le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the fsize command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the fsize command resides in the /bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


fsize file

Options
The fsize command has no options.

Arguments
The arguments for the fsize command are described in Table 4-57. Table 4-57. Argument UNIX RTR fsize Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le

file

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Examples
Example: Display size of the le appecd.

fsize appecd

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UNIX Commands

grep
Name
grepsearch a specied le for a specied character string.

Description
The global regular expression (grep) command searches a specied le for specied character string and prints all lines that contain that string. If the specied character string contains a space, the character string must be surrounded by quotation marks. NOTE: For an explanation of regular expressions, see the online manual page for the regexp(5) command.

Availability UNIX RTR


The grep command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The grep command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


grep [-bclnsv] pattern files

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR grep command are described in Table 4-58. Table 4-58. Option UNIX RTR grep command options Description Precede each line with the block on which the line is located.

NOTE:
The rst block is zero.

c l n s v

Print only a count of the lines that contain the pattern. Print only names of les with matching lines. Does not repeat if the le has more than one matching line. Print line number. Suppress error message about non-existent or unreadable les. Print all lines that do not contain pattern.

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR grep command are described in Table 4-59. Table 4-59. Argument UNIX RTR grep command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

filename

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, then standard input is used.

limited-regularexpression

Search for pattern in the filename

Solaris Syntax
grep [ -bchilnsvw ] limited-regular-expression filename ]

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Options
The options for the Solaris grep command are described in Table 4-60. Table 4-60. Option Solaris grep command options Description Precede each line with block number Print only a count of the lines that contain the pattern Prevent le name from being appended to the line of output Ignore case Display only the names of the les with matching lines, separated by NEWLINE Print line number Suppress error messages Print all lines that do not contain pattern Search for the regular expression as a word

b c h i l n s v w

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-59.

Examples
Example: Search the le doc.lst and print all occurrences of the word author and which line number the word author is found in the le.

grep -n author doc.lst


Example: Print all occurrences of Author, in the le doc.lst.

grep Author doc.lst


Example: Print all lines in the le doc.lst except those that contain author.

grep -v author doc.lst

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 1 2 Then... one or more matches were found no matches were found either a syntax error was detected on the command line or the le was inaccessible

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


egrep(1), sed(1), sh(1), environ(5), regex(5), regexp(5)

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UNIX Commands

head
Name
headdisplay the rst ten lines of the specied le.

Description
The head command displays the rst ten lines of each specied text le. If a le is not specied in the command line, then input is taken from standard input. NOTE: When more than one le is specied, the beginning of each le is indicated by the following notation:

==> filename <==


where

filename = the name of the le.

Availability Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the head command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


head [ -number | -n number ] [ files ]

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Options
The options for the Solaris head command are described in Table 4-61. Table 4-61. Option Solaris head command options Description Start at the specied line number, number, from the beginning of the le

-number, -n number

Arguments
The options for the Solaris head command are described in Table 4-62. Table 4-62. Argument Solaris head command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, then standard input is used.

Example
Example: Print on the screen the rst ten lines of file1.

head file1
Example: Print on the screen the rst 25 lines of file1.

head -25 file1

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the file command was successful. an error occurred.

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Associated commands and/or les


Associated commands include:

cat(1), more(1), pg(1) tail(1), environ(5)

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id
Name
iddisplay the user login name, user ID (uid), and group name (gid) of the user.

Description
The identication number (id) command displays the user login name, user ID, and group name, real or effective.

Availability UNIX RTR


The id command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The id command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


id

Options
The id command has no options.

Solaris Syntax
id [-a] [user]

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Options
The options for the Solaris id command are described in Table 4-63. Table 4-63. Option Solaris id Command Options Description Display user name, UID, and all groups to which the user belongs

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris id command are described in Table 4-64. Table 4-64. Argument Solaris id Command Arguments Description Display UID and primary GID for login. If login is omitted, id reports on the user issuing the command

user

Examples
Example: Determine who is logged in on this terminal.

id

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the id command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


who(1), getdir(2), getuid(2), environ(5)

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Associated les
/etc/group, which is the name of the group database /etc/passwd, which is the name of the user database

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UNIX Commands

kill
Name
killterminate a process.

Description
The kill command terminates a process that is running on the operating system. The processes that are running at any given time are listed in the process table.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the kill command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the kill command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


kill [-signal] pid

Options
The options for the kill command are described in Table 4-65. Table 4-65. Option UNIX RTR kill command options Description Specify the signal to send using the symbolic name of the signal

-signal

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Signal types are described in Table 4-66. Table 4-66. Signal 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Signal types Description Hangup Interrupt Quit Illegal instruction Trace/Breakpoint trap Abort Emulation Trap Floating point exception Kill (cannot be caught or ignored) Bus error Segmentation violation Bad system call Write on a pipe with no one to read it Alarm clock Software termination signal

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR kill command are described in Table 4-67. Table 4-67. Argument UNIX RTR kill command arguments Description The process number of the process that is to be killed. This value is in the column labelled PID.

pid

Solaris operating system Syntax


kill -s signal pid(s)

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UNIX Commands

kill [ -signal ] pid(s)

Options
The options for the Solaris kill command are described in Table 4-68. Table 4-68. Option Solaris kill Command Options Description Specify the signal to send using the symbolic name of the signal

s signal

NOTE:
The symbolic name of the signal is found in <signal.h>

signal

Specify the signal to send using the symbolic name of the signal

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris kill command are the same as the UNIX RTR arguments; see Table 4-67.

Examples
The following example illustrates the execution of the kill command: To kill process 22754, enter

kill 22754

Use the kill command with extreme care. Misuse of kill can cause a system phase, le corruption or data base corruption. Do not use the -9 option unless it is absolutely necessary. Always try to terminate a process without any options rst to prevent database corruption.

CAUTION:

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... then... the specied signal was successfully processed for at least one matching process. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


csh(1), jobs(1), ksh(1), ps(1),sh(1), shell_builtins(1), wait(1), kill(2), signal(3C), environ(5), signal(5)

Associated les
<signal.h>, which is the C programming language header le that contains the signal denitions

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UNIX Commands

logdir
Name
logdirdisplay the home directory of the specied user.

Description
The login directory (logdir) command displays the home directory of the specied user.

Availability UNIX RTR


The logdir command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


logdir [users]

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR logdir command are displayed in Table 4-68. Table 4-69. Argument UNIX RTR logdir command arguments Description Display the home directory of user.

user

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Examples
Example: Display omptechs home directory.

logdir omptech

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UNIX Commands

lpr, UAlpr
Name
lprsend to the Receive-Only Printer (ROP).

Description
The line printer (lpr) command sends standard input to the local line printer, that is, the ROP. To direct output to other devices, change the devices that are associated with the output class OPUNIX1 or specify the desired device as an argument.

Availability UNIX RTR


The lpr command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories. The UAlpr command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


lpr [-s] [device] UAlpr [-s] [device]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR lpr command are described in Table 4-70. Table 4-70. Option UNIX RTR lpr command options Description Displays output in large parts.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR lpr command are described in Table 4-71. Table 4-71. Argument UNIX RTR lpr Command Arguments Description Specify printer name

device

Examples
Example: Send the output of the date command to be printed on ttyv.

date|lpr ttyv
Example: Print the /etc/passwd le on the ROP.

lpr < /etc/passwd

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UNIX Commands

ls
Name
lslist the les and directories in a specied directory.

Description
By default, the list (ls) command lists in alphabetical order the les and directories in a specied directory. The output depends on the le type requested, options, and arguments.

Table 4-72. When...

Output of the ls command Then... the contents of the directory is listed. the lename is listed along with any additional information requested. the current directory is listed

the le is a directory, the le is an ordinary le, no les are specied,

When using the long listing option (ls -l), output such as the following is returned:

-rw-rw-r-- 1
where

suzieq

apx

258048 Mar 26 15:53 report

- = ordinary le. Note that the rst character determines the le type of the le: d = directory l = symbolic link b = block special le c = character special le p = pipe special le - = ordinary le | = First In First Out (FIFO) le

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rw-rw-r-- = the le type and permissions of the le. The permissions are specied in a set of three and are read from left to right. The rst set of permissions (rw-) is the permissions for the le owner, the second set (rw-) is for groups permission, and the third set (r--) is for anyone who is not the owner or in the group. Note the permissions are
s s s s

r = read w = write x = execute - = no permission

1 = the number of links to the le. suzieq = the owner of the le. apx = the group ID of the le. 258048 = the size of the le in bytes. Mar 26 = the date that the le was created or last modied. 15:53 = the time that the le was created or last modied on that date. report = the lename of the le.

Availability UNIX RTR


The ls command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The ls command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


ls [-abcdfilorstu] [files]

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR ls command are described in Table 4-73. Table 4-73. Option UNIX RTR ls command options (Page 1 of 2) Description List all les, including those that begin with a dot ( . ), which by default are not displayed. Force printing of unprintable characters to be displayed in the octal \ddd notation Use time of last modication for sorting (-t option) or printing (-l option) List attributes of a directory versus its contents Force each argument to be interpreted as a directory and list the name found in each slot. This option turns off the -l, -t, -s and -r options and turns on the -a option. This option lists the les in the directory in alphabetical order. Print inode number in the rst column of the report List in long format. Information displayed is s owner s group s size in bytes s symbolic link

a b c d f

i l

NOTE:
A symbolic link is denoted with an arrow (->) after the lename.
s

time of last modication

NOTE:
If the time is greater than six months the year is also displayed

o r

Displays the same information as the -l option with one exceptiondoesnt display the owner Reverse order of the sort to be reverse alphabetic or oldest rst

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Table 4-73. Option

UNIX RTR ls command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Displays size of le in blocks Sort by time stamp (latest rst) instead of in alphabetic order

s t

Use time of last access verses last modication for sorting (-t option) or (-l option)

Arguments
The arguments to the UNIX RTR ls command are described in Table 4-74. Table 4-74. Argument UNIX RTR ls command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

file(s)

Solaris Syntax
ls [ -adFlRt ] [ files(s) ]

Options
The options to the Solaris ls command are described in Table 4-75. Table 4-75. Option Solaris ls command options (Page 1 of 2) Description List all les, including those that begin with a dot (.), which by default are not displayed. List attributes of a directory versus its contents. Distinguish le types by placing appropriate characters after the lename. Characters include

a d F

/ -- slash indicates a directory * -- asterisk indicates an executable le @ -- at sign indicates a symbolic link

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UNIX Commands

Table 4-75. Option

Solaris ls command options (Page 2 of 2) Description List in long format. Information displayed is s owner s group s size in bytes s symbolic link

NOTE:
A symbolic link is denoted with a -> after the lename
s

time of last modication

NOTE:
When the time is greater than six months the year is also displayed

R t

Recursively lists subdirectories Sort by time stamp (latest rst) instead of in alphabetic order

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-74.

Examples
Example: List all les and directories in /usr.

ls -a /usr
Example: List les in /usr/bin.

cd /usr ls bin
or

ls /usr/bin
Example: Display long listing of /usr/bin.

cd /usr

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ls -ld bin
or

ls -l /usr/bin
or

cd /usr/bin ls -l
Example: Display a long listing of les recursively in /usr.

ls -lR /usr

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... all information was written successfully an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


chmod(1), cp(1), csh(1), setfacl(1), terminfo(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/passwd, which is the name of the user database /usr/shar/lib/terminfo/?/*, which is the terminal information database

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UNIX Commands

man
Name
mandisplay the online manual page for a specied command.

Description
The manual page (man) command outputs the online manual page for the specied command to standard output.

Availability Solaris
The man command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


man [-adl] [-s #] name

Options
The options to the Solaris man command are described in Table 4-76. Table 4-76. Option Solaris man command options Description Show all manual pages within the MANPATH shell variable.

-a

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Table 4-76. Option

Solaris man command options Description Display debugging information s what a section-evaluates to s method used for searching s path names searched List all manual pages found for name within the search path Look for a man page in section number, #. Each section of the UNIX manual is described as s Section 1shell commands s Section 2system calls
s s s s s s

l s #

Section 3subroutines Section 4special les Section 5le formats and conventions Section 6games Section 7database and language conventions Section 8maintenance commands

Arguments
The arguments to the Solaris man command are described in Table 4-77.

Table 4-77. Argument

Solaris man command arguments Description Specic item to be searched

name

Examples
Example: Display on-line manual page for the command grep.

man grep
Example: Display on-line manual page for the regular expressions in Section 5.

man -s5 regexp

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UNIX Commands

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the man command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


apropos(1), cat(1), col(1), eqn(1), more(1), nroff(1), refer(1), refer(1), tbl(3C), troff(1) vgrind(1), whatis(1), catman(1M), environ(5), eqnchar(5), man(5)

Associated les
/usr/share/man, which is the root directory of the standard manual page
subtree

/usr/share/man/man.cf, which contains the default search order for the manual sections /usr/share/man/man?/*, which is the unformatted manual pages /usr/share/man/cat?/*, which is the manual pages in nroff format /usr/share/man/fmt?/*, which is the manual pages in troff format /usr/share/lib/tmac/an, which is the standard manual page macro package /usr/share/lib/pub/enqchar, which is the standard denitions for eqn and neqn

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mesg
Name
mesgallow or deny messages to be written to the terminal screen.

Description
The message (mesg) command allows or denies others to write to your terminal.

Availability UNIX RTR


The mesg command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The mesg command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


mesg [n][y]

Options
The options to the UNIX RTR mesg command are described in Table 4-76. Table 4-78. Option UNIX RTR mesg command options Description Denies a user to write to your terminal Permits a user to write to your terminal

n y

Arguments
The UNIX RTR mesg command has no arguments.

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Solaris Syntax
mesg [-n|-y] [n|y]

Options
The options to the Solaris mesg command are described in Table 4-79. Table 4-79. Option Solaris mesg command options Description Denies a user to write to your terminal Permits a user to write to your terminal

-n, n -y, y

Arguments
The mesg command has no arguments.

Examples
Example: Report current state.

mesg
Example: Deny a user to write to your terminal.

mesg n

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Exit Status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 1 2 Then... messages are allowed messages are denied an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


talk(1), write(1), environ(5)

Associated les
/dev/tty, which is the terminal devices

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UNIX Commands

mkdir
Name
mkdir make a new directory.

Description
The make directory (mkdir) command creates a directory with all permissions turned on for owner, group, and others unless altered by the tty command.

Availability UNIX RTR


The mkdir command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The mkdir command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


mkdir dirs

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Arguments
The options to the UNIX RTR mkdir command are described in Table 4-80. Table 4-80. Option UNIX RTR mkdir command arguments Description The names of the directory that is to be created.

dirs

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Solaris Syntax
mkdir [ -m mode ] [ -p ] dir(s)

Options
The options to the Solaris mkdir command are described in Table 4-81. Table 4-81. Option Solaris mkdir Command Options Description Set mode upon creation using the octal format described on page 4-32 Create the directory and all non-existing parent directories

m mode p

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-80.

Examples
Example: Create the directory test.

mkdir test
Example: Create the directory tst1, tst2, and tst3.

mkdir tst1 tst2 tst3


Example: Create the directory /tmp/test.

mkdir /tmp/test

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 Then... all the specied directories were created successfully or the -p option was specied and the specied directories now exist an error occurred

>0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


rm(1), sh(1), umask(1), intro(2), mkdir(2) environ(5)

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more
Name
more display the contents of the specied ASCII text le, one screen at a time.

Description
The more command displays the contents of the specied ASCII text le one screen at a time. To view the next screen, press the [spacebar].

Availability Solaris
The more command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


more [-cdflrsw] +line_number [+/pattern/] [files]

Options
The options to the Solaris more command are described in Table 4-82. Table 4-82. Option Solaris more command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Clear the screen before displaying Display error messages instead of ringing the bell if an unrecognized command is used Dont fold long lines Dont treat a formfeed character as page breaks Display unrecognized control characters as Control-C

c d f l r

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Table 4-82. Option

Solaris more command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Squeeze option replaces multiple blank lines with a single blank line Wait to exit until any key is struck Display line numbers Start at line number Start two lines above the line containing the pattern

s w -lines +linenumber +/pattern

Arguments
The arguments to the Solaris more command are described in Table 4-83. Table 4-83. Argument Solaris more command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

Examples
Example: View le /etc/group.

more /etc/group
Example: Clear screen before viewing the le /etc/group.

more -c /etc/group

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the more command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cat(1), csh(1), ctags(1), man(1), nroff(1), script(1), sh(1), ul(1), environ(4), terminfo(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/usr/lib/more.help, which is the help le for the more command

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UNIX Commands

mv
Name
mv rename a le.

Description
The move (mv) command renames a le.

The UNIX operating system assumes the user knows the result of executing the mv command, and the system does not ask the user to conrm execution of the mv command. Thus if a le exists with the same name as the target le, that le is overwritten.

CAUTION:

Availability UNIX RTR


The mv command is in the /usr/sbin and /bin directories.

Solaris
The mv command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


mv source_file target_file

Options
There are no options used with this command.

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Arguments
The options to the UNIX RTR mv command are described in Table 4-84. Table 4-84. Argument UNIX RTR mv command arguments Description The path name of le or directory that is to be moved. A new path name of the le or directory that is to be moved.

source_file target_file

Solaris Syntax
mv [ -fi ] source_file target_file mv [ -fi ] source_file target_dir

Options
The options to the Solaris mv command are described in Table 4-85. Table 4-85. Option Solaris mv Command Options Description Move le(s) without prompting Prompt for conrmation whenever the move would overwrite an existing le

f i

Arguments
The arguments to the Solaris mv command are described in Table 4-86. Table 4-86. Argument Solaris mv command arguments Description Path name of le or directory to be moved A new path name of the le or directory being moved A path name of an existing directory into which the les are moved

source_file target_file target_dir

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UNIX Commands

Examples
Example: Move the le report to report.may.

mv report report.may
Example: Move the les in /home/user1/Mail/doc/email to /home/user1/email.

mv /home/user1/Mail/doc/email/* /home/user1/email

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... all input les were moved successfully an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cp(1), cpio(1), ln(1), rm(1), setfactl(1), chmod(2), environ(5)

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news
Name
news display news items.

Description
The news command displays current items of interest. The news command is one vehicle that the UNIX system administrator uses to keep users informed about changes in the operating system or computing environment.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the news command is in the /usr/sbin and the /bin directories.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the news command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


news [ -a ] [ -n ] [ -s ] [ items ]

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Options
The options to the news command are described in Table 4-87. Table 4-87. Option a n s UNIX RTR and Solaris news Command Options Description Print all items regardless of currency Report names of current items without displaying item contents Report number of current items

Arguments
The arguments to the news command are described in Table 4-88. Table 4-88. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris news command arguments Description Specify particular news item to be displayed

items(s)

Examples
Example: Display all current items, starting with the most current item rst.

news
Example: Display item headings.

news -s

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the news command was successful an error occurred

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


profile(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/profile, which is the UNIX system prole where news is usually invoked during the login process. /var/news/*, which is the directory where the news items reside .

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UNIX Commands

nice
Name
nice execute a command at a lower priority.

Description
The nice command executes a command at a lower Central Processor Unit (CPU) priority. Only the root user can raise priority. The higher the number is, the lower the priority is.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the nice command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the nice command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


nice [-increment] command argument
NOTE: When the nice command is executed without an option, the command defaults to a decrement of 10. Increments greater than 19 are equivalent to 19.

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR nice command are described in Table 4-89. Table 4-89. Option UNIX RTR nice command options Description Decrements the priority level. Valid priorities range from 1 to 19.

increment

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR nice command are described in Table 4-90. Table 4-90. Argument UNIX RTR nice command arguments Description The name of the command to be invoked The list of argument(s) of the command

command argument

Solaris Syntax
nice [-increment|-n increment] command [argument...]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR nice command are described in Table 4-91. Table 4-91. Option Solaris nice command options Description Decrements the priority level. Valid priorities range from 1 to 19.

-increment, -n increment

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-90.

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Examples
Example: Execute the du command and subtract 12 from the current priority level.

nice -12 du -s > /tmp/diskspace


Example: Execute the du command and subtract 10 from the current priority level.

nice du -s > /tmp/diskspace

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 1125 126 127 then... an error occurred.

command was found but could not be invoked. command could not be found.
NOTE: If the command is invoked, the exit status of nice is the exit status of command.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


csh(1), ksh(1), nohup(1), priocntl(1), sh(1), shell_bulitins(1), nice(2), environ(5)

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nohup
Name
nohupallow a process to continue to run after the user has exited.

Description
The no hangup (nohup) command allows a process to continue to run after the user has logged off the system. All information that is normally sent to the screen, such as error messages, is sent to the nohup.out le. This le can be in one of two places when the process begins. If current directory is... writeable by the user not writeable by the user then nohup.out is placed in... the current directory. the home directory of the user.

The nohup command is typically run in the background to allow the user to continue to work at the UNIX prompt. Otherwise, the UNIX prompt does not reappear until the job is nished.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the nohup command resides in the /bin directory.

Solaris
The nohup command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


nohup command [arguments...]

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Options
The nohup command has no options.

Arguments
The arguments for the nohup command are described in Table 4-92. Table 4-92. Argument nohup command arguments Description The name of the command that is to be invoked. The list of arguments that command uses.

command argument

Examples
To continue to run my.script, enter

nohup my.script&

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


The nohup command generates the exit messages that are described in the following table. If the exit status is... 126 127 then...

command was found but cannot be invoked.


an error occurred or command cannot be found.

NOTE: If the command is invoked, the exit status of nice is the exit status of command.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


batch(1), chmod(1), csh(1), ksh(1), nice(1), sh(1), shell_builtins(1), signals(3C), environ(5)

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Associated les
nohup.out $HOME/nohup.out
The output le of the nohup execution and the current directory has write permission turned on. The output le of the nohup execution and the current directory has write permission turned off.

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UNIX Commands

od
Name
od display the specied le in the specied format.

Description
The octal dump (od) command displays the specied le in the specied format. The default format is octal.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the od command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the od command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


od [-b1cdosx1] file [[+] [x2] offset [.] [b2]]

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR od command are described in Table 4-93. Table 4-93. Option UNIX RTR od command options Description Interpret bytes in octal format. Interpret bytes in ASCII format. Interpret words in signed decimal format. Interpret words in octal format. Interpret 16-bit words in signed decimal format. Interpret words in hexadecimal format. Offset in the le. Offset interpret in hexadecimal format. Offset interpret in decimal format. Offset interpret in 512-byte blocks.

b1 c d o s x1 + x2 . (dot) b2

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR nice command are described in Table 4-94. Table 4-94. Argument UNIX RTR od command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

file

Solaris Syntax
od [-bcDdFfosx1] [-] [file] [offset_string]

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Options
The options for the Solaris od command are described in Table 4-95. Table 4-95. Option Solaris od command options Description Interpret bytes in octal format. Interpret bytes in ASCII format. Interpret words in unsigned decimal format. Interpret words in signed decimal format. Interpret double long words in extended precision format. Interpret long words as oating point format. Interpret long words in unsigned octal format. Interpret words in octal format. Interpret long words in signed decimal format. Interpret words in signed decimal format. Display input data. Interpret long words in hexadecimal format. Interpret words in hexadecimal format. Use standard input in addition to any specied les.

b c D d F f O o S s v X x -

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris od command are described in Table 4-96. Table 4-96. Argument Solaris od command arguments Description Offset in the le. Offset interpret in hexadecimal format, where b = the last hexadecimal digit. Offset interpret in decimal format.

+ 0xb, xb 0x. (dot, x.(dot))

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Table 4-96. Argument

Solaris od command arguments Description Offset interpret in 512 byte blocks Use standard input in addition to any lenames. Specify the path name of the input les.

b,B file

Examples
Example: Interpret the /usr/adm/wtmp data le in ASCII format

od -c wtmp
Example: Interpret the /usr/adm/wtmp data le in hexadecimal format.

od -x wtmp
Example: Interpret the /usr/adm/wtmp data le in ASCII format with a decimal offset of 100.

od -c wtmp +100

Exit Status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... then... the execution of the od command succeeded. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


sed(1), environ(5)

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passwd
Name
passwdchange the user login password of the user.

Description
The password (passwd) command allows the user to change the login password of the user. Passwords must
s s s s

contain between six and eight characters contain at least two alphabetic characters contain at least one numeric or special character (such as !, %, or ^). differ from the user login name and any change in the sequence of the login name characters. For example, the following passwords are unacceptable for the login name suzieq:

qsuzie eqizsu
s

differ from the old password by at least three characters

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the passwd command resides in the directory /usr/bin.

Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the passwd command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

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Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


passwd

Options
Only the root user can use the options for the passwd command.

Arguments
Only the root user can use the arguments for the passwd command.

Examples
Example: User suzieq wants to change her password.

passwd

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... then... the execution of the passwd command succeeded. an error occurred. permission is denied. an invalid combination of options was entered. an unexpected failure occurred and the password remains unchanged. an unexpected failure occurred because the le /etc/ passwd is missing. a failure occurred because the password le is busy. an invalid argument was entered. the password aging option is disabled.

0 >0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


finger(1), login(1), id(1M), su(1M), passwd(4), shadow(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/etc/passwd, which is the name of the user database /etc/shadow, which is the name of the shadow user database /etc/default/passwd, which is the default values for password ags

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pg, UApg
Name
pg, UApgdisplay the contents of a specied le one page at a time.

Description
The page (pg) command displays the contents of a specied le one page at a time. To go to the next page, press the [Return] or [Enter] key when the : (colon) prompt is displayed.

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the pg command resides in the /usr/bin directory, and the UApg command resides in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the pg command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


pg [ number ] [ -p string ] [ -cefs ] [ +line_number ] [ +/pattern/ ] [ files ] UApg [ number ] [ -p string ] [ -cefs ] [ +line_number ] [+/pattern/ ] [ files ]

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UNIX Commands

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR pg command are described in Table 4-97. Table 4-97. Option UNIX RTR pg command options Description Set the number of lines that are displayed in a page.

number

NOTE:
The default number of lines is 23.

p string c e f s +line_number +/pattern/

Set the page prompt. Clear screen before displaying next page. Cause pg not to pause at the end of each le. Inhibit pg from splitting lines longer than the screen width. Display all messages and prompts on standard out mode. The standard out mode is usually inverse video. Begin at the specied line_number of the le. Start at the rst line that contains the specied pattern.

Arguments
The arguments for the pg command are described in Table 4-98. Table 4-98. Argument UNIX RTR pg command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le.

file(s)

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

Solaris Syntax
pg [-number] [-p string] [-cefnrs] [+line_number] [+/pattern/] [filename]

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Options
The options for the Solaris pg command are described in Table 4-99. Table 4-99. Option Solaris pg command options Description Set the number of lines that are displayed in a page.

number

NOTE:
The default number of lines is 23.

p string c e f n r s +line_number +/pattern/

Set the page prompt to string. Clear screen before displaying next page. Do not pause at the end of each le. Do not split lines that are longer than the width of the display screen. End the command as soon as a command letter is entered. Disallow shell escape. Display all messages and prompts on standard output mode (usually inverse video). Begin the display at the specied line number of the le. Begin the display at the rst line that contains the character string pattern.

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-94.

Examples
Example: Page through /usr/adm/wtmp.

od -c wtmp | pg
Example: Page through /usr/adm/wtmp and clear the screen each time.

od -c wtmp | pg -c

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Example: Page through the /usr/spool/cron/crontab le, starting at the rst occurrence of the character string etc.

pg +/etc/ /usr/spool/cron/crontab

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... then... the pg command executed successfully. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cat(1), grep(1), more(1), terminfo(4), environ(5), regex(5)

Associated les
/tmp/pg*, which is the name of the temporary le that is created when a pipe is used /usr/share/lib/terminfo/?/*, which is the terminal information database

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pr
Name
pr format and display the contents of a specied le.

Description
The print (pr) command displays the contents of a specied le with a heading. The heading consists of
s s s s

page number date time lename

If a le is not specied, standard input is used.

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the pr command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the pr command resides in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


pr [-amd] [-e] [-i] [-n] [-w] [-o] [+|-k] [files]

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR pr command are described in Table 4-100. Table 4-100. Option UNIX RTR pr command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Print multicolumn output across the page. Merge and print all les simultaneously, one per column. Double space. Expand input tabs to character position k=1, 2*k+1, 3*k+1, etc.

a m d eck

NOTE:
If c is specied, its treated as the input tab character. Default for c is the tab character. If k is omitted or equals zero, default tab settings at every eight position is assumed.

ick

Replace white space, in the output, by inserting tabs to character positionk=1, 2*k+1, 3*k+1, and so forth.

NOTE:
If c is specied, it is treated as the output tab character. Default for c is the tab character. If k is omitted or equals zero, the default tab settings at every eightsd position is assumed.

nc

Provide k-digit line numbering (default for k is 5). The number occupies the rst k+1 character positions of each column of normal output or each line of -m output. If c (an non-digit character) is given, it is appended to the line number to separate it from whatever follows.

NOTE:
Default for c is the tab character.

wk

Sets the width of a line to k character positions.

NOTE:
Default width is 72.

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Table 4-100. Option

UNIX RTR pr command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Offset each line by k character positions. The number of character positions per line is the sum of the width and output.

ok

NOTE:
Default offset is zero.

lk

Sets the length of a page to k.

NOTE:
Default page length is 66.

h p f

Use the next argument as the header to be printed instead of the lename. Pause before displaying the next page Use form-feed character for new pages.

NOTE:
Default is a sequence of line-feeds

r t sc

Reports only failures to open les Suppress headers and trailers Separate columns by c

NOTE:
Default separator is a tab character.

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR pr command are described in Table 4-101. Table 4-101. Argument UNIX RTR pr command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

file(s)

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

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Solaris Syntax
pr [+page] [-column] [-admrt] [-e [char][ gap]] [-h header] [-i [char] [gap]] [ -l lines ] [-n [char] [width]] ] [-o offset] [-s [char] ] [-w width] [-fp ] files

Options
The options for the Solaris pr command are described in Table 4-102. Table 4-102. Option Solaris pr command options (Page 1 of 3) Description Begin output at page number. Produce output with specied number of columns.

+ page column

NOTE:
Default number of columns is one.

a d e char gap

Print multicolumn output across the page in round-robin fashion. Double space. Expand input tabs to the next greater column position specied by the formula n *gap+1.

NOTE:
If any nondigit character char is specied, char is treated as the input tab character. Default for c is the tab character. If gap is omitted or equals zero, default tab settings at every eight position is assumed.

Use form-feed character for new pages.

NOTE:
Default is a sequence of line-feeds.

h header

Use header as the header to be printed instead of the lename.

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Table 4-102. Option

Solaris pr command options (Page 2 of 3) Description Replace multiple character white space, in the output, by inserting tabs to character position gap+1, 2*gap+1, 3*gap+1, etc.

i char gap

NOTE:
If any nondigit character char is specied, it is treated as the output tab character. Default for char is the tab character. If gap is omitted or equals zero, default tab settings at every eight position is assumed.

l lines

Sets page length to lines.

NOTE:
Default page length is 66.

m n char width

Merge and print all les simultaneously, one per column Provide width-digit line numbering (default for width is 5). The number occupies the rst width column positions of each text column of default output or each line of the -m output

NOTE:
If any nondigit character char is specied, it is appended to the line number to separate it from whatever follows. Default for char is a tab.

o offset

Offset each line by offset positions. The number of character positions per line is the sum of the width and output.

NOTE:
Default offset is 0.

Pause before displaying the next page on the screen.

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Table 4-102. Option

Solaris pr command options (Page 3 of 3) Description Write no error messages on failure to open les Separate columns by char

r s char

NOTE:
Default separate is a tab character

w width

Sets the width of a line to width character positions.

NOTE:
Default width is 72 when the -s and -w options are not specied. However, the default width is 512 when -s is specied and -w is not.

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-101.

Examples
Example: Display file1 and file2 as a double-spaced, 3-column listing with the heading report.

pr -3dh report file1 file2

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the pr command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


expand(1), lp(1), environ(5)

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ps
Name
pslist the processes that are currently running.

Description
The process (ps) command outputs information about active processes. Without options, ps outputs information only about processes that are associated with the controlling terminal. Since new processes are started and old processes terminate, ps lists only those processes that are running when the ps command is executed.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the ps command is in the /usr/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the ps command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR operating system Syntax


ps [ -aklxp ] [ -s swapdev ] [ -t tlist ]

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Options
The options for the ps command are described in Table 4-103. Table 4-103. Option UNIX RTR ps command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Display the supervisor processes that are associated with terminals. Display kernel processes. Column headings and their descriptions include the following: s PSTAT = process status s PR = current priority.
s

a k

s s s s s s s

TOUT = real-time clock value for a single or repetitive timeout. RTOUT = the time interval between timeouts for repetitive time-outs (milliseconds). EVENTS = the process event-ag word. PID = the process number. CHAN = the process control channel. UTID = the utility ID. ADDR = the address of the PCB segment descriptor. DCT = the dispatcher control table index. ID = the one-character identier that is given in the specication le. DEVICE = the name of the controller device.

All values printed in hex are prexed by 0x.

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Table 4-103. Option

UNIX RTR ps command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Generate a long listing. Column headings and their description include the following: s PSTATProcess status s PRICurrent priority s KTIMETime spent in the kernel (milliseconds) s STIMETime spent in supervisor processes (milliseconds) s TTYTerminal associated with the process. s PIDProcess number
s s s s s

PPIDParent process number UTIDUtility ID SIZESize, in bytes, of the process SLEEPBit pattern on which the process is sleeping CMDCommand line used to invoke the process

All values printed in hex are prexed by 0x.

x p

Display supervisor processes that are not associated with terminals. Include the parent process number.

NOTE:
The -k and -l options cannot be used with the -p option.

s swapdev t list

Use the le swapdev versus /dev/swap. Restrict listing to data.

Arguments
The UNIX RTR ps command has no arguments.

Solaris operating system Syntax


ps [ -efl ] ps [ -ufl login ]

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Options
The options for the Solaris ps command are described in Table 4-104. Table 4-104. Option Solaris ps command options Description Print information about all processes Generate a full listing. Items are s UID = the user ID s PID = the process ID s PPID = the parent process ID. s C = obsolete.
s s s

e f

s s

CLS = the scheduling class STIME = the time that the process started. TTY = the controlling terminal. If there is no controlling terminal, a ? is printed. TIME = the cumulative execution time. CMD = the full path name and options that are used with the command.

Generate a long listing. Additional items to the full listing include the following: s F = obsolete. s S = the state of the process, which may be one of the following: O = the process is running on a processor S = the process is waiting on an event. R = the process is in the run queue. Z = the process has terminated and lost its associated parent process. T = the process is stopped.
s s

s s s

PRI = the priority of the process. NI = the Nice value that is used in the priority computation. ADDR = the memory address. SZ = the size of the process WCHAN = the address of an event for which the process is sleeping.

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Table 4-104. Option

Solaris ps command options Description Display the processes that were started by the specied login.

u login

Arguments
The Solaris ps command has no arguments.

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the ps command: To see what processes are running on the system, execute

ps
To display the kernel processes, execute

ps -k

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


Exit status messages for the ps command are described in the following table. If the exit status is... then... the execution of the ps command was successful. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


kill(1), nice(1), priocntl(1), who(1), getty(1M), proc(4), ttysrch(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/dev/pts/*, which is the names of users, one per line, who are authorized to access the batch command /dev/term/*, which is the terminal search le

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/etc/passwd, which is the user database le /proc/*, which is the process control les /tmp/ps_data, which is the internal data structure

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pwd
Name
pwdidentify the present working directory.

Description
The print working directory (pwd) command displays the current working directory in a full path format.

Availability UNIX RTR


The pwd command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The pwd command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


pwd

Options
The pwd command has no options.

Arguments
The pwd command has no arguments.

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Examples
Example: Display the current working directory.

pwd

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the pwd command was successful. an error occurred. The error messages Cannot open .. or Read error in .. indicate a possible le system problem. Report such messages to the system administrator.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cd(1), ksh(1), sh(1), shell_buitins(1),environ(5)

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rm
Name
rmremove a specied le from the le system.

Description
The remove (rm) command deletes les. If a le is write protected, a ? is displayed, which prompts the user for conrmation. If a y is typed, the le is deleted, otherwise it remains.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the rm command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the rm command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


rm [ -f ] [ -i ] [ -r ] [ files ]

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Options
The options for the rm command are described in Table 4-105. Table 4-105. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris rm command options Description Force the removable of the le even if it is write-protected. Interactively remove les, prompting the user for conrmation for every le. Recursively remove les, directories, and subdirectories.

f i r

Arguments
The arguments for the rm command are described in Table 4-106. Table 4-106. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris rm command arguments Description Specify the path name of the les that are to be removed

files

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: User suzieq wants to delete all le and directories that reside in /home/ suzieq/lastyear.

rm -fr lastyear
Example: User suzieq wants to interactively delete some les and directories that reside in /home/suzieq/lastyear.

rm -ri lastyear
Example: User suzieq wants to delete les with the sufx .old.

rm *.old

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Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the rm command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


rmdir(2), unlink(2), environ(5)

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rmdir
Name
rmdirremove a specied directory from the le system.

Description
The remove directory (rmdir) command deletes a directory. A directory must be empty before it can be deleted. If a user attempts to remove a non-empty directory, the command will fail and an error message is printed on the screen.

Availability UNIX RTR


The rmdir command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The rmdir command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


rmdir dirs

Options
There are no options used with this command.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR rmdir command are described in Table 4-107. Table 4-107. Argument UNIX RTR rmdir command arguments Description Specify the path name of the directory to be removed.

dir(s)

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

Solaris Syntax
rmdir [ -ps ] [ dirname ]

Options
The options for the Solaris rmdir command are described in Table 4-108. Table 4-108. Option Solaris rmdir command options Description Remove the directory and its parent directories, which become empty. Suppress messages printed on the screen when the -p option is used.

p s

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-107.

Examples
Example: User suzieq wants to delete the directory /home/suzieq/lastyear.

rmdir /home/suzieq/lastyear

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Example: User suzieq wants to delete the directory /home/suzieq/lastyear. Her current working directory is /home/suzieq.

rmdir lastyear

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the rmdir command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


rmdir(2), unlink(2), environ(5)

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sdiff
Name
sdiffdisplay the differences between two les side by side.

Description
The side-by-side difference (sdiff) command produces a side-by-side difference listing of two les. Each line of each le printed with
s s s s

A blank when the lines are identical < if the line only exists in le1 > if the line only exists in le2 | if the lines are different

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the sdiff command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the sdiff command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


sdiff [ -l ] [ -s ] [ -o output ] [ -w n ] filename1 filename2

Options
The options for the sdiff command are described in Table 4-109.

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Table 4-109. Option

UNIX RTR and Solaris sdiff command options Description Sets width of output to n

w n

NOTE:
Default width is 130

l s o output

Print only left side of identical lines Suppress identical lines Use output as the name of a third le that is created as a user-controlled merging of file1 and file2. Identical lines are copied to output. Each set of differences are grouped together. After printing each group, sdiff prompts the user with a % and waits for one of the following
s s s s s s s

s s

lAppend the left column to the output le rAppend the right column to the output le sSilent mode does not print identical lines vTurn off silent mode elInvoke ed with the left column erInvoke ed with the right column ebInvoke ed with the concatenation of left and right column eInvoke ed with a zero length le qQuit

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR and Solaris sdiff commands are described in Table 4-110. Table 4-110. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris sdiff command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

filename1, filename2

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Examples
Example: Compare file1 and file2.

sdiff file1 file2


Example: Suppress identical lines when comparing file1 and file2.

sdiff -s file1 file2

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the sdiff command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


diff(1), ed(1), environ(5)

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sleep
Name
sleepsuspend execution for a specied number of seconds.

Description
The sleep command suspends the execution of a command.

Availability UNIX RTR


The sleep command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The sleep command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


sleep time

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Arguments
The arguments for the sleep command are described in Table 4-111. Table 4-111. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris sleep command arguments Description Species amount of time in seconds to suspend execution.

time

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Examples
Example: Execute the who command after 5 minutes.

sleep 300; who

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the sleep command was successful for at least time. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


wait(1), alarm(2), sleep(3C), wait(3B), environ(5)

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sort
Name
sortsort data.

Description
The sort command sorts lines of the les and displays the output to the screen. The default eld delimiter is a space.

Availability UNIX RTR


The sort command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The sort command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


sort [ -cmubdfinr ] [ -tchar ] [ +pos ] [ -pos ] [ -o output ] file1 file2

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR sort command are described in Table 4-112. Table 4-112. Option UNIX RTR sort command options Description Check input le is sorted according to the ordering rules. Merge onlyassume input le is already sorted. Unique option only prints the rst occurrence of duplicate lines. Specify the name of an output le. Comparisons of letters, digits, and blanks are signicant. Fold lower-case letters into uppercase. Restrict key to initial numeric string. Ignore non-printable characters. Reverse sense of comparisons. Ignore leading blanks characters. Use char as a eld separator. Specify a sort key denition. Denition is
s

c m u o output d f n i r b t char -pos1 -pos2

field_start and field_endrestrict to a portion of a line typemodier from the list of characters specied with the -b, -d, -f, and -i options.

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR sort command are described in Table 4-113. Table 4-113. Argument UNIX RTR sort command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

files

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted or a dash (-) is used as a lename, standard input is used.

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Solaris Syntax
sort [-cmu] [-o output] [-T directory] [-dfinr] [-b] [-t char] [-k keydef] files

Options
The options for the Solaris sort command are described in Table 4-114. Table 4-114. Option Solaris sort command options Description Check to ensure that input le is sorted according to the ordering rules. Merge onlyassume that the input le is already sorted. Unique option. Print only the rst occurrence of duplicate lines Specify the name of an output le. Specify directory containing temporary les. Comparisons of letters, digits, and blanks are signicant. Fold lower-case letters into uppercase. Restrict key to initial numeric string. Ignore non-printable characters. Reverse sense of comparisons. Ignore leading blanks characters Use char as a eld separator Specify a sort key denition. Denition is
s

c m u o output T directory d f n i r b t char k keydef

field_start and field_end = restrict to a portion of a line. type = modier from the list of characters specied with the -b, -d, -f, -i, -n, and -r options.

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Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-113.

Examples
Example: Print all the unique spellings in a list of words in alphabetical order.

sort -u +0f +0 list


Example: Sort the /etc/passwd le by the UID, which is the third eld.

sort -t: +2n /etc/passwd

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 Then... the execution of the sort command was successful or the -c option was specied and the output was sorted correctly. The le was not ordered properly with the -c option or if the -c and -u options were specied, two input lines were found with identical keys. an error occurred.

>1

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


comm(1), join(1), uniq(1), passwd(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/var/tmp/stm???, which is the temporary les that are created during the sort process

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split
Name
splitsplit a le into pieces.

Description
The split command reads the specied le and writes it into a set of les. If a le name is omitted, standard input is read.

Availability UNIX RTR


The split command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The split command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


split [ -n ] [ file [ prefix ] ]
NOTE: The prex argument is the name of the output le. Each split le has a sufx. The sufx starts with aa and continues on until zz. The name of the output le cannot be longer than 12 characters. If no output prex is given, x is the default value.

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR split command are described in Table 4-115. Table 4-115. Option UNIX RTR split command options Description Create les with a length of the specied length.

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR split command are described in Table 4-116. Table 4-116. Argument UNIX RTR split command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le

file

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

prefix

Specify prex used for each split le

Solaris Syntax
split [-linecount|-l linecount] [-a suffixlength ] [ file [name] ] split -b n [k | m] [-a suffixlength] [ file [name] ]

Options
The options for the Solaris split command are described in Table 4-117. Table 4-117. Option Solaris split command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Split le into n bytes Split le into n*1024 bytes

b n bnk

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Table 4-117. Option

Solaris split command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Split le into n*1048576 bytes Specify number of lines in each piece

b nm linecount, -l linecount

NOTE:
Default is 1000 lines.

a suffixlength

Species suffixlength letters to form the sufx portion of the lenames of the split le

NOTE:
Default sufx length is two.

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-116.

Examples
Example: Split file1.

split file1
Example: Split file1 naming the output le split.file with each split.file having 200 lines.

split -n 200 split.file

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Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the split command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


csplit(1), statvfs(1), environ(5)

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stty
Name
sttyset terminal options.

Description
The set terminal teletype (stty) command is used to display or change terminal settings.

Availability UNIX RTR


The stty command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The stty command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


stty [ -g ] [arguments]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR stty command are described in Table 4-118. Table 4-118. Option UNIX RTR stty command options Description Report current settings in a form that is used as an argument to another stty command.

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Arguments
Arguments are used to modify terminal settings. To have the same settings upon login, execute the stty command in the .profile le. Arguments for the UNIX RTR stty command are described in Table 4-119. Table 4-119. Argument UNIX RTR stty command arguments (Page 1 of 2) Description Allow/disallow even parity. Allow/disallow odd parity. Hang up phone line immediately. Set terminal baud rate to the number.

even /-even odd/-odd 0 50 5 110 134 150 200 300 600 1200 1800 2400 4800 9600 exta extb hup/-hup nl/-nl lcase/-lcase LCASE/-LCASE

Hang up/do not hang up data set connection on last close. Allow only new-line/allow carriage return to end input lines. Map/do not map uppercase to lowercase. Map/do not map uppercase to lowercase.

cr0 cr1 cr2 ccr3

Select delay for carriage returns .

NOTE:
Larger numbers are slower.

nl0 nl1 nl2 nl3

Select delay for line-feeds.

NOTE:
Larger numbers are slower.

tab0 tab1

Select delay for horizontal tabs.

NOTE:
Larger numbers are slower.

bs0 bs1

Select delay for backspaces.

NOTE:
Larger numbers are slower.

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Table 4-119. Argument

UNIX RTR stty command arguments (Page 2 of 2) Description Select delay for form-feeds.

ff0 ff1

NOTE:
Larger numbers are slower.

cooked or raw/-raw echo/-echo lfkc/-lfkc erase c

Enable/disable canonical input (erase and kill processing). Echo back/do not echo back every character typed. Echo/do not echo line feed (LF) after kill character. Set erase character to c.

NOTE:
Default erase character is the pound sign (#).

kill c

Set kill character to c.

NOTE:
Default kill character is the at sign (@).

tabs/-tabs or tab3) ek term

Preserve/expand to spaces tabs when printing. Reset erase and kill characters back to the defaults. Set all modes suitable for the terminal type term, where term is a s tty33 s tty37 s vt05 s tn300 s ti700 s tek

Solaris Syntax
stty [ -a ] [ -g ] stty [ modes ]

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Options
The options for the Solaris stty command are described in Table 4-120. Table 4-120. Option a g Solaris stty command options Description Display all terminal settings Reports current settings in a form that is used as an argument to another stty command

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-119.

Examples
Example: Display current terminal settings.

stty
Example: Set erase character to be the backspace key.

stty erase=^h

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... then... the execution of the stty command was successful. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


tabs(1), ioctl(1), write(2), getwidth(3I), environ(5), ldterm(7M), termio(7I), termiox(7I)

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su
Name
sutemporarily assume the user login ID of another user.

Description
The superuser (su) command temporarily allows the user to either become root or another user. Once the user exits, they will be placed in the original shell environment they were in before assuming the other users login. To be able to temporarily become another user and assume that logins identity, the user must know the logins password.

Availability UNIX RTR


The su command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The su command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


su [ - ] [ user ]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR su command are described in Table 4-121. Table 4-121. Option UNIX RTR su Command Options Description Assume user identity and user environment by executing users .profile le.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR su command are described in Table 4-122. Table 4-122. Argument UNIX RTR su Command Arguments Description The user login name that is to be assumed. If user is omitted, the user is attempting to become the root user.

user

Solaris Syntax
su [ - ] [ username [ arg(s)] ]

Options
Same as UNIX RTR options. See Table 4-121.

Arguments
The arguments for the Solaris su command are described in Table 4-123. Table 4-123. Argument Solaris su command arguments Description User login name to be assumed. If omitted, the user is attempting to become the root user. A command and its arguments passed to the new shell

username arg

Examples
Example: User suzieq becomes user johnnieb but retains her shell environment.

su johnnieb
Example: User suzieq becomes user johnnieb and inherits his shell environment.

su - johnnieb

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Example: The user becomes root and inherits the shell environment of root.

su -

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the su command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


csh(1), env(1), ksh(1), login(1), sh(1), syslogd(1M), syslog(3), passwd(4), profile(4), sulog(4), environ(5)

Associated les
$HOME/.profile, which is the username environment that is invoked with the - option /etc/passwd, which is the user database le /etc/profile, which is the UNIX system prole /var/adm/sulog, which is the log le of users who executed the su command /etc/default/su, which is the le that contains the default su parameters

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sum
Name
sumdisplay the checksum and block count of a le.

Description
The sum command calculates and displays a 16-bit checksum. The number of blocks in the le is also displayed.. NOTE: Uses for this command include nding bad spots or validation of transferred les.

Availability UNIX RTR


The sum command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The sum command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


sum [ -r ] file

Options
The options for the sum command are described in Table 4-124. Table 4-124. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris sum command options Description Calculates checksum using a different algorithm

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Arguments
The arguments for the sum command are described in Table 4-125. Table 4-125. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris sum command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les.

files

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: Calculate the checkum of the data le appecd.

sum appecd

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the sum command was successful. an error occurred.

The error Read error is indistinguishable from the End of File (EOF) on most devices; check the block count.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cksum(1), sum(1B), wc(1), environ(5)

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tail
Name
taildisplay the last ten lines of a le.

Description
The tail command displays the last ten lines of a text le. If a le isnt specied on the command line, then input is taken from standard input.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the tail command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the tail command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


tail [ + | - [ number ] [ lbc [ f ] ] ] [ file ]

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Options
The options for the UNIX RTR tail command are described in Table 4-126. Table 4-126. Option UNIX RTR tail command options Description Start at this position from the beginning of the le Start at this position from the end of the le Species number to be lines

+number -+number l

NOTE:
Lines is the default unit. Thus, if omitted, the count will be in lines.

b c f

Species number to be blocks Species number to be blocks Termination of the tail command doesnt occur when the end of le is reached. Tail enters an innite loop whereby it sleeps for a time, attempts to read the le again.

NOTE:
This is useful when monitoring the growth of a le thats being written by another process

Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR tail command are described in Table 4-127. Table 4-127. Argument UNIX RTR tail command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input les

files

NOTE:
If the lename is omitted, standard input is used.

Solaris Syntax
tail [ +number ] [ lbr ] ] [ file ] tail [ -lbr ] ] [ file ]

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Options
The options for the Solaris tail command are described in Table 4-128. Table 4-128. Option Solaris tail command options Description Start at this position from the beginning of the le Species number to be lines.

+number l

NOTE:
The default unit of output is lines. Thus, if omitted, the count is in lines.

b c r

Species the number to be blocks. Species the number to be blocks. Reverse lines from specied point.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-127.

Examples
Example: Tail the last ten lines of file1.

tail file1
Example: Display the last 25 lines of file1.

tail -25 file1


Example: Display the beginning 25 lines of file1.

tail +25 file1

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the tail command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


cat(1), head(1), more (1), pg(1), dd(1M), environ(5)

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time
Name
timedetermine the amount of time that a command took to nish executing.

Description
The time command calculates how long a command takes to execute. When the command completes, the time spent in the system and execution is reported in seconds.

Availability UNIX RTR


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the time command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
In the Solaris operating system, the time command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


time command [ argument... ]

Options
The UNIX RTR time command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR time command are described in Table 4-129. Table 4-129. Argument UNIX RTR time command arguments Description Specify the command to be executed

command

Solaris Syntax
time [ -p ] command [ argument... ]

Options
The options for the Solaris time command are described in Table 4-130. Table 4-130. Option Solaris time command options Description Print output in the format

real %f\n user %f\n sys %fn <real seconds>, <user seconds>, <system seconds>

NOTE: %f is a oating point number.


\n is a new line.

Arguments
Same as the UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-129.

Examples
Example: Time the du command.

time du -s

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 1 to 125 126 127 Then... an error occurred.

command was found but could not be invoked. command could not be found.

NOTE: If the utility is invoked, the exit status of time is the exit status of utility.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


csh(1), shell_bulitins(1), timex(1), times(2), environ(5)

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touch
Name
touchcreate an empty le or update the date and time for a le as shown with the ls -l command.

Description
The touch command sets the access and modication times of the les. If the les do not exist, it creates an empty le with that name.

Availability UNIX RTR


The touch command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The touch command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


touch [ -acm ] files

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Options
The options for the touch command are described in Table 4-131. Table 4-131. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris touch command options Description Only change the access time Do not create a specied le if it does not exist Only change the modication time of the le

a c m

Arguments
The arguments for the touch command are described in Table 4-132. Table 4-132. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris touch Command Arguments Description Specify the path name of the les to be modied.

files

Examples
Example: Change modication time of the le report.

touch -m report
Example: Create an empty le report1.

touch report1

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the touch command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


time(2), environ(5)

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tty
Name
ttydisplay the teletypewriter that the user is logged into.

Description
The terminal teletype (tty) command displays the path name of the users terminal to standard output.

Availability UNIX RTR


The tty command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The tty command is located in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


tty [ -s ]

Options
The options for the tty command are described in Table 4-133. Table 4-133. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris tty command options Description Suppress printing the terminals path name, allowing one to test just the exit code

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Arguments
There are no arguments used with this command.

Examples
Example: Determine the terminal to which you are logged in.

tty

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 1 >1 then... standard input is a terminal. standard input is not a terminal. an error occurred.

The error not a tty means that the -s option was not specied and standard input is not a terminal.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


isatty(3C), ttyname(3C), environ(5)

Associated les
/usr/lib/crontab.allow, which is the names of users, one per line, who are authorized to access the batch command /usr/lib/crontab.deny, which is the names of users, one per line, who are denied access to the batch command

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umask
Name
umaskset default permissions when a le is created.

Description
The umask (UNIX mask) command displays the current mask value or sets the le mode creation mask of the current shell environment to the specied value. This mask affects the initial value of the le permissions of subsequently created les.

Availability
The umask command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


umask [ -S ] [ mask ]

Options
The options for the umask command are described in Table 4-134. Table 4-134. Option UNIX RTR and Solaris umask command options Description Produce symbolic output.

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Arguments
The arguments to the umask command are described in Table 4-135. Table 4-135. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris umask command arguments Description A string that species the new le mode creation mask.

mask

Examples
The following example illustrates the execution of the umask command: To give newly created les permissions of 755, enter

umask 022

Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... then... the execution of the umask command was successful. an error occurred.

0 >0

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


chmod(1),csh(1), ksh(1), sh(1), chmod(2), creat(2), profile(4), environ(5)

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uncompress
Name
uncompressuncompress a specied le.

Description
The uncompress command expands les that were compressed by the compress command. Compressed les have a sufx of .Z.

Availability Solaris
The uncompress command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis Solaris Syntax


uncompress [ -fv ] [ -b bits ] files uncompress [ -cfv ] [ -b bits ] files

Options
The options for the uncompress command are described in Table 4-136. Table 4-136. Option Solaris uncompress command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Write to the terminal, les are changed, and the corresponding .Z le is not created

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Table 4-136. Option

Solaris uncompress command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Force compression even if it does not actually reduce the size Verbose option writes messages to the screen regarding the reduction of each le Set the upper limit, in bits, for common substring codes. bits must be between 9 and 16 (16 is the default). Numbers lower than 9 result in larger, less compressed les.

f v b bits

Arguments
Arguments for the Solaris uncompress command are described in Table 4-137. Table 4-137. Argument Solaris uncompress command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, or a dash (-) is used as a le name, standard input is used.

Examples
Example: Expand all compressed les in the current working directory.

uncompress *.Z
Example: Uncompress les jan.rpt.Z, feb.rpt.Z, and march.rpt.Z in the current working directory.

uncompress jan.rpt.Z feb.rpt.Z march.rpt.Z

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Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 1 2 then... the execution of the compress command was successful. an error occurred. one or more les were not compressed because the size would have increased and the -f option was not specied. an error occurred.

>2

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


ln(1), pack(1)

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uname
Name
unamedisplay system information.

Description
The UNIX name (uname) command displays the system name.

Availability UNIX RTR


The uname command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The uname command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


uname [ -snrva ]

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR uname command are described in Table 4-138. Table 4-138. Option UNIX RTR uname command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Display the system name Display the network node name

s n

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Table 4-138. Option

UNIX RTR uname command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Display the operating system release Display the operating system version Display all system information

r v a

Arguments
The uname command has no arguments.

Solaris Syntax
uname [ -aimnprsv ]

Options
The options for the Solaris uname command are described in Table 4-139. Table 4-139. Option Solaris uname command options Description Display all system information Print hardware platform Display machine hardware name Display the network node name Print processor type Display the operating system release Display the system name Display the operating system version

a i m n p r s v

Arguments
There are no arguments used with this command.

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Examples
Example: Print the system name.

uname
Example: Print all system information.

uname -a

Exit status and/or error messages

If the exit status is... 0 >0

then... the execution of the uname command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


sysinfo(2), uname(2), environ(5)

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wc
Name
wccount the words, characters, or lines in a specified file.

Description
The word count (wc) command displays a count of lines, words, and/or characters in a le. If no options are specied, all counts are displayed.

Availability UNIX RTR


The wc command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The wc command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


wc [ -clw ] file(s)

Options
The options for the UNIX RTR wc command are described in Table 4-140. Table 4-140. Option UNIX RTR wc command options Description Display character count. Display number of lines. Display number of words.

c l w

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR wc command are described in Table 4-141. Table 4-141. Argument UNIX RTR wc command arguments Description Specify the path name of the input le(s)

file(s)

NOTE:
If the le name is omitted, standard input is used.

Solaris Syntax
wc [ -c | -C | -m ] [ -lw ] file(s)

Options
The options for the Solaris wc command are described in Table 4-142. Table 4-142. Option Solaris wc command options Description Display character count Same as -c option Same as -c option Display number of lines Display number of words

c C m l w

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-141.

Examples
Example: Display word count of file1.

wc -w file1

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Example: Display number of lines in file1.

wc -l file1

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 then... the execution of the wc command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


isspace(3C), iswalpha(3C), iswspace(3C), setlocale(3C), environ(5)

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who
Name
wholist the user login names who are currently using the system.

Description
The who command displays the users currently logged in along with information about each user which includes
s s s s

Login name Terminal name Date Time

Availability UNIX RTR


The who command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Solaris
The who command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR Syntax


who [ file ] who am i

Options
The who command has no options.

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Arguments
The arguments for the UNIX RTR who command are described in Table 4-143. Table 4-143. Argument UNIX RTR who Command Arguments Description Obtains the list of users from file versus reading the

file

/etc/utmp am i
Displays the user name by which you are logged in to the system.

Solaris Syntax
who [ -bdHlmprsTu ] [ file ] who am i

Options
The options for the Solaris who command are described in Table 4-144. Table 4-144. Option Solaris who command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Process /var/adm/utmp or the named le with the -b, -d, -l, -p, -r, -t, -T, and -u options turned on Indicate the time and date of the last reboot. Display all processes that have expired and not been respawned by the init process. Print headings above the regular output List only the lines the system is waiting for someone to login Output only information about the current terminal Specify x number of users to display per line List any other process which is currently active and hasnt been previously spawned by the init process Display only names and number of users logged on

a b d H l m n x p q

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Table 4-144. Option

Solaris who command options (Page 2 of 2) Description Indicate the current run-level of the init process List only the name, line, and time List name, line, time, state idle, PID, and comment elds Display users currently logged in

r s T u

Arguments
Same as UNIX RTR arguments. See Table 4-143.

Examples
Example: Display all users on the system.

who

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the who command was successful. an error occurred.

Associated commands and/or les Associated commands


date(1), login(1), mesg(1), init(1M), su(1M), wait(3B), inittab(4), utmp(4), environ(5)

Associated les
/sbin/inttab, which is the script for the init process /var/adm/utmp, which is the current user and accounting information /var/adm/wtmp, which is historic user and accounting information

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write
Name
writewrite a message to a specified terminal.

Description
Copies lines from your terminal to another users terminal. When invoked, the following message is sent to the other users terminal:

Message from sender_login (ttyxx)


where

sender_login = sender login ID. xx = the terminal ID of the sender.


At this point, the recipient of the message should write back to the sender. Communication continues until an End of File is read from the terminal or an interrupt is sent. At that point, the write command writes EOT (End of Transmission) on the other terminal and exits. Permission to write may be denied or permitted by use of the mesg command. Writing to others is allowed by default. Although the user may have granted write permissions, certain commands (such as pr) prohibit write access while executing. If a ! character occurs at the beginning of a line, the write command calls the shell to execute the rest of the line as a command. When you rst write to another user, wait for that user to write back before starting to send. Each person should end a message with a distinctive signal, such as o, for over to signal the recipient that you have nished your message and that the recipient can reply. The signal oo (for over and out is suggested when conversation is to be terminated.

Availability UNIX RTR


The write command is in the /usr/bin directory.

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Solaris
The write command is in the /usr/bin directory.

Synopsis UNIX RTR and Solaris Syntax


write user [line]

Options
The write command has no options.

Arguments
The arguments for the write command are described in Table 4-145. Table 4-145. Argument UNIX RTR and Solaris write command arguments Description Specify which line or terminal to write

line

NOTE:
Useful when the user login ID that is being written to is logged on more than one terminal.

user

Species the user login ID of the user to whom the message is written.

Examples
Example: Write to the user suzieq.

write suzieq

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Exit status and/or error messages


If the exit status is... 0 >0 Then... the execution of the write command was successful. the user is not logged in or has denied permission.

Error messages for the write command are described in Table 4-146. Table 4-146. Error write command error messages Description Writing failed because the recipient user is not logged in Writing failed because the recipient user has denied permission Writing to your terminal has failed because permissions have been denied Write to user failed because the recipient user has denied permissions after you began

user is not logged on Permission denied Warning: cannot respond, set mesg -y Can no longer write to user

Associated commands and/or les Associated commandsmail(1), mesg(1), pr(1),


sh(1), talk(1), who(1), setuid(2), termios(3), environ(5)

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Introduction
This chapter describes the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network commands that reside on the Executive Cellular Processor (ECP) and/or Operations and Management Platform (OMP). This chapter describes commands that serviceprovider personnel can execute without assistance from Lucent personnel. The command descriptions in this chapter are presented in a UNIX manual page format. If other detailed information about the command is available, the manual page refers to the document where the information is located.

Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks commands


Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless networks commands are commands that users enter at the UNIX prompt to affect the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network. The commands are standard with the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network or can be purchased with the optional feature to which the commands are related.

ECP commands
The Flexent/AUTOPLEX ECP commands reside in the following directories: /1apx10/expbin /1apx10/testbin

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/1apx10/ubin

OMP commands
The Flexent/AUTOPLEX OMP commands reside in the following directories: /omp/bin /omp/dcsinfo/bin /omp/dbbin /omp/enh/pgm /omp/etc /omp/lib/admin

AutoPACE subsystem commands


AutoPACE commands are used to analyze Flexent/AUTOPLEX system performance. Only the AutoPACE Special Engineering Studies (SES) tool is still supported. Other AutoPACE tools are superseded by the Watchmark Prospect tool.

Command line syntax


A command is composed in one of the following syntaxes (formats):
s s

command -options -[optional options] les command -options -[optional options] [optional les]

Options
Options begin with a dash (-). These are either required or optional. The [ ] (square brackets) signify that the options are optional. A pipe symbol ( | ), is used in the command line to indicate that the user should choose one or the other.

Arguments
Arguments are either required or optional. If an argument is optional, the argument is surrounded by [ ] (square brackets). A typical argument is a lename.

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Contents
This chapter describes the following Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network commands for the ECP and/or OMP. Table 5-1. Topic Tools for Lucent Technologies personnel only amasearch apxhome apxrcv Topics in Chapter 5 Function Lists commands that should be used only by Lucent Technologies personnel. Examine and print selected billing records. Retrieve subscriber information. Administer Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network databases. Add or remove subscriber records. Monitor Autonomous Registrations (ARs). Verify the Authentication Key. Display conguration information. Reset a cell-site controller. Transfer les. Reserve voice channels. Move a cell from one Digital Cellular Switch (DCS) to another and/or change the trunk group numbers that are associated with a cell. Display the number of total, used, and available records in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network databases. Print information about the Linked List Indexed (LLI) database. Validate various aspects of the Multiple Systems network. Count the number of records in each database. Superseded by the RFSadmin command on the OMP in ECP Release 11.0. Delete a large number of subscriber records. See page 5-7

5-12 5-17 5-20

apxsub ARmon authgen config cscreset ctrmkrmt DBapxvcr DBcellsw

5-23 5-36 5-38 5-40 5-42 5-44 5-46 5-48

DBend DBllitest DBnetchk DBrcheck DBrcvadm DBsubdel

5-50 5-52 5-55 5-56 5-60

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Table 5-1. Topic

Topics in Chapter 5 Function Analyze subscriber-related service trends, rapid marketing analysis, and timely auditing of the subscriber database. Transfer large amounts of subscriber data from the ECP to the OMP and vice versa. Identify primary availability of mobile subscribers. Quickly summarize the subscriber database. Extract specic information from the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network databases. Query the Visitor Location Register (VLR) database and list all directory numbers (DNs) that are in the VLR database. Display the boot time of the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network elements. Duplicate a dialing plan. Delete a dialing plan. Generate a dialing plan report. Search the dialing plan database. List dialing plans that have the vacant codes. Initialize the digit table les. Generate a comprehensive summary of the data in the digit table databases. Produce a digit table matrix count report. Display routing information. Invoke the digit-by-digit menu. Interactively test digit tables. Determine the basic routing for a given dialed number, calling mobile directory number (DN), and origination location. See page 5-64

DBsubquery

DBsubrehome DBsubsearch DBsubsum DBsurvey DBvlrquery

5-64 5-89 5-90 5-93 5-99

dmptime dpclone dpdelete dpreport dpsrch dpvacant dtclr dtreport dxdcount dxdlist dxdmenu dxdphone dxdroute

5-102 5-104 5-108 5-111 5-113 5-118 5-120 5-121 5-123 5-125 5-129 5-131 5-133

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Table 5-1. Topic FTlistcol

Topics in Chapter 5 Function Collect the TDMA Flexible Channel Allocation (FLCA) short and/or long lists on the Physical Antenna Faces (PAFs) that are listed in an input le. Retrieve the interference-level measurements of the channels on the TDMA FLCA short or long list on a specied PAF of a cell. Start a Power-Level Measurement (PLM) study. Stop a PLM study. Delete call trace records from a specied log le. Print radio frequency (RF) call trace records. Stop any running RF call trace process. Start an RF call trace. Display active Feature Activation File (FAF) entries. Generate a list of the current populated dialing plans. Report failures of the previous hour. Execute the compress utility for the Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) subsystem. Start the PCruntrx command. Start a Voice Channel Selection Activity (VCSA) study. Execute the PCcmprs command every hour. This command was migrated to the OMP in Release 11. This command was migrated to the OMP in Release 11. This command was migrated to the OMP in Release 11. Extract data from the PACE databases. Stop a VCSA study. Filter any non-ASCII characters from the les that a Voice VCSA study created. Collect call-processing failure statistics. See page 5-136

FTlisttrace

5-143

FTplmstart FTplmstop FTrfclear FTrfdump FTrfstop FTrftrace fafprint getdp hrtkrp PCcmprs PCgettrx PCgetvcsa PCmtcron PCplmcnv PCrftrace PCrunho PCruntrx PCstpvcsa PCvfilt PFcpfail

5-147 5-154 5-159 5-161 5-176 5-178 5-184 5-186 5-188 5-189 5-192 5-194 5-203 5-204 5-206 5-207 5-209

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Table 5-1. Topic

Topics in Chapter 5 Function Display a handoff (HO) matrix study. This command was migrated to the OMP in Release 12. Generate a report of mobile originations and terminations. Gather mobile origination and termination statistics. Collect paging statistics. Produce a set of dialing pattern differences. Generate a pattern tree (ptree) data le. Monitor resources. Perform search and verify operations on a pattern tree (ptree) data le. Monitor system and display statistics. Start a craft shell. Generate the digit table tree for a given dialing plan. Print the les in the /etc/log/OPDCSLOG directory in ASCII format. See manual page for at command. See manual page for batch command. See manual page for crontab command. See manual page for dc command. See manual page for lpr command. See manual page for pg command. See page 5-211 5-213 5-217 5-219 5-221 5-223 5-226 5-230 5-232 5-235 5-240 5-241 5-245 4-10 4-18 4-56 4-71 4-123 4-162

PFhodisp PFhostaton PFmtodisp PFmtostat PFpgstats patdiff ptresync Rmon saptree systat TIpdunix tg trkreport UAat UAbatch UAcrontab UAdc UAlpr UApg

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Tools for Lucent Technologies personnel only


The commands that are listed in Table 5-2 on page 5-7 are diagnostic and monitoring commands that are designed to be executed only by
s s

Lucent Technologies personnel or service provider personnel under the strict guidance of Lucent personnel

This document does not provide manual pages for commands that are not designed for execution by service provider personnel. Table 5-2. Commands to be executed by Lucent Technologies personnel only (Page 1 of 4) Function Search through the symbol table. Interpret messages to/from the Digital Cellular Switch (DCS). Dump Automatic Message Accounting (AMA) data. Monitor Call-Processing Database Node (CDN) performance data. Take a sample snapshot of CallProcessing Database Node (CDN) performance data. Set the memory in the cell. Send general-purpose messages. Check Logical Processor Ports (LPG) ports of nodes. Count messages to and from the Digital Cellular Switch (DCS), Call-processing Database Nodes (CDNs), Cell Site Nodes (CSNs), and 3B21D processor. Count X.25 messages for the Cell Site Nodes (CSNs). Test the functionality of the DBtransactor process. Directory Location /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

Command 3bsearch 5emsg amdd CDNmon CDNsnap

cellmem CIux CMIpg CMmsgacct

/1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

CMpfcnts DBacttest

/1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

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Table 5-2.

Commands to be executed by Lucent Technologies personnel only (Page 1 of 4) Function Test the DBtransactor command. Create an empty database. Lock disk databases. Dump the raw contents of a database. Increase the size of the subscriber databases. Check the status of the database tools before booting. Dump and set the global data structure. Dump the contents of a database in raw format. Troubleshoot the database. Print elds from the database records. Execute the apxrcv command on the OMP. Reload data into a database. Retrot the subscriber database. Rebuild the subscriber database. Send messages to the Digital Celluar Switch (DCS). Measure Digital Celluar Switch (DCS). message response time. Dump postmortem stack from faults. Dump message structure. Start the dump of message structures. Stop the dump of message structures. Performs same functions as the uudecode command. Directory Location /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/ubin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/ubin /1apx10/ubin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/ubin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

Command DBapcttest DBapxcrt DBdsklock DBdump DBexpand DBfcheck DBglob DBIIitest DBmonitor DBprint DBrcvftam DBreload DBsubretro DBsubrld dcsload DCSmgtime dmp_stk FTmsgflags FTmsgstart FTmsgstop FTuudecode

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Table 5-2.

Commands to be executed by Lucent Technologies personnel only (Page 1 of 4) Function Performs same functions as the uuencode command. Generate messages from the Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network to a system of another vendor. Print intervendor cell site data. Print intervendor trunk data. Print Umem output in a line orientation. Print data in the X.25 tables. Dump data for Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) forms for the OMP tool. The PCtetparm command is not a stand-alone command. It is called by Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) commands to get input. The PCmterfile command is not a stand-alone command. It prints errors from the PCcmrs command. Print data from the network nodes. Collect debug information. Simulate messages from the network databases. Send events to various processes. Dump postmortem event data from the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network nodes. Start the UNIX performance collection tools. Stop the UNIX performance collection tools. Directory Location /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

Command FTuuencode imecho

initivc initivt lou lvl2dump ODAcdmadur PCgetparm

/1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /user/pace/bin

PCmterfile

/user/pace/bin

RXuxprint SCdebug scpsim sendev SIpmdump

/1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/ubin

start.utools stop.utools

/1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

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Table 5-2.

Commands to be executed by Lucent Technologies personnel only (Page 1 of 4) Function Send a Transaction Capabilities Application Part (TCAP) message to another MSC. Test the patterns in a dialing plan. Debug tool. Change global data. Get traps and changes data in real time. Display Operating Systems for Distributed Systems (OSDS) performance data. Dump and change state data and Ring Database Unit (RDBU) tables. Directory Location /1apx10/testbin

Command tcsim

testpat UXhook UXmem UXndb UXosspy

/1apx10/ubin/testpat /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin /1apx10/testbin

UXstate

/1apx10/testbin

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Commands that are executed by other commands


The following Flexent/AUTOPLEX commands are executed not by serviceprovider personnel but automatically by other commands in the Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network system. These commands are not intended for execution by service-provider personnel. Therefore, this document does not provide manual pages for these commands:
s s s s s s

DBrehome DBrelinfo DBsubmerge DBunload DBxfer PCgetplm

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amasearch
Name
amasearchsearch for Automatic Message Accounting (AMA) information.

Description
The AMA Search feature is a Feature Activation File (FAF) feature that is initiated by entering the amasearch command to examine billing records and print selected information. To print individualized data, you must specify the mobile directory number (MDN) and the time interval for that MDN. By default, the amasearch command prints to the standard output (that is, the terminal where amasearch is invoked). Each output report provides AMA record information that is based on structure code and call type. If no data is available for a specic eld, the eld remains blank.

Using the amasearch command may affect system performance. For guidelines on safe use of amasearch, see Table 5-3 on page 5-12. Table 5-3. amasearch usage guidelines Search Interval 6 hours 60 minutes 30 minutes 15 minutes

CAUTION:

Current Call Rate (Calls/Hour) 1,000 5,000 10,000 25,000

For example, if the system currently has 1000 calls per hour, the search interval should be less than 6 hours. For more details, refer to 401-612-080, Optional Features: AMA Search.

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Availability UNIX RTR


The amasearch command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
amasearch {[-m mbldn] -s sttime -e endtime [-n number] [-S switchid] [-g tgnum] [-o] [-t] [-b blocks] [-c|-l] [-i] [-T] [-x] [-u] [-d level] -h}

Options
Options for the amasearch command are described in Table 5-4 on page 5-13. Table 5-4. Option b block amasearch command options (Page 1 of 2) Description The number of blocks for working span.

The -b option is for secondary data only. Blocks must be between 4 and 200. The default value is 66. c d level e endtime Count the call records only. The debug level. The end time of the search. The end time is a ten-digit MMddyyhhmm entry, where

NOTE:

MM = the month (01 to 12). dd = the day (01 to 31). yy = the year (00 to 99). hh = the hour (00 to 23). mm = the minute (00 to 59).

The end time (endtime) is based on the time that the data was written to disk, not the time that the call was made. g tgnum The trunk group number to search for.

NOTE:

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Table 5-4. Option i l m mbldn

amasearch command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Print AMA block/record information. Output in long form, that is, output the detailed call record. A directory number (DN) that consists of 1 to 14 digits.

If the -m option is not entered, the search proceeds based on the other parameters (that is, if the -n option is entered, all records for calls to the called number between the start and end time are printed). If neither the -m nor the -n option is used, all records between the start time and end time are printed. Lucent Technologies recommends that the -m option always be specied unless unusual circumstances arise in which a search without -m is necessary. n number The called number, which consists entirely of digits.

NOTE:

Do not enter any of the following prexes as part of a called number, because the prex is stripped off by call processing when the number is stored in the AMA record unless the Dialed Digits in Automatic Message Accounting (DDAMA) feature is activated: 10XXX+, 10XXX 1+, 10XXX 0+, 10XXX 011+, 0+, 1+, 01+, and 011+ For a 0- call, 0 is entered as the called number. For a 00- call, 00 is entered as the called number. For a 10XXX(#) call, 10XXX is entered as the called number. Also note that 10XXX becomes 101XXXX when the Feature Group D Carrier Identication Code Expansion (FGD-CICE) feature is active (BWM95-0001). o Search for call origination records.

NOTE:

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Table 5-4. Option s sttime

amasearch command options (Page 1 of 2) Description The start time of the search, which is a ten-digit MMddyyhhmm, where

MM = the month (01 to 12). dd = the day (01 to 31). yy = the year (00 to 99). hh = the hour (00 to 23). mm = the minute (00 to 59).

The start time (sttime) is based on the time that the data was written to disk, not the time that the call was made. S switchid t T u x h The ID of the switch to search for call records. Search for call termination records. Print AMA tracer records. Print AMA data in human-readable format (default value). Dump AMA data in raw (hexadecimal) format. Print a help message that explains how to use the amasearch command.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate the use of the amasearch command: To request an AMA search for mobile 312-367-7626 from August 1, 1995, at 8:00 a.m. to August 1, 1995, at 8:15 a.m., specifying only origination AMA records for calls that were made on Digital Cellular Switch (DCS) 5 using Trunk Group 111, enter amasearch -m3123677626 -s0801950800 -e0801950815 -o -S5 -g111 To request a long report of an AMA search for all records from October 1, 1992, at 8:05 a.m. to October 1, 1992, at 8:10 a.m., enter amasearch -s1001920805 -e1001920810 -l

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To request a count report for an AMA search for mobile 312-979-1000 from June 13, 1992, at 12:03 p.m. to June 15, 1992, at 1:30 a.m. and redirect the output to the le called file, enter amasearch -m3129791000 -s0613921203 -e0615920130 -c > file

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apxhome
Name
apxhomeretrieve information about specied subscribers.

Description
The apxhome command retrieves information about specied subscribers from the Mobile Unit Features Database (mufdb). In ECP Release 14.0 and earlier, when you execute the apxhome command, the command waits for you to enter the directory number (DN) of a subscriber. In ECP Release 15.0, you must enter the Mobile Identication Number (MIN) of a subscriber. The apxhome command then retrieves and outputs information about the specied DN or MIN from the mufdb database. The apxhome command then waits for you to enter another DN or MIN and retrieves and outputs information about that DN or MIN. To exit the apxhome command, press the [Return] key. In ECP Release 16.0, to execute apxhome you must input either
s s

a valid 10-digit MIN, such as 7082670001;M or a valid International Mobile Station Identity (IMSI) directory number of 8 to 15 digits, such as 12345678;I

The information that the apxhome outputs for each specied DN or MIN is described in Table 5-5 on page 5-17. Table 5-5. Displayed msid=number srno=hexnumber srno2=hexnumber Output of apxhome command (Page 1 of 2) Description

number = the DN or MIN of the subscriber. hexnumber = the primary Manufacturer Serial Number (MSN) in hexadecimal format. hexnumber = the rst auxiliary MSN in hexadecimal format.

The srno2 value is used with the Multiple Units with the Same Directory Number (MUSDN) feature.

NOTE:

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Table 5-5. Displayed

Output of apxhome command (Page 1 of 2) Description

srno3=hexnumber

hexnumber = the second auxiliary MSN in hexadecimal format.

The srno3 value is used with the MUSDN feature. omaj=number tmaj=number hl=number

NOTE:

number = the major class of the originating mobile. number = the major class of the terminating mobile. number = the hotline digits.

The hl value is output only if hotline digits are present.

NOTE:

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the apxhome command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the apxhome command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
apxhome

Options
The apxhome command has no options.

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the apxhome command: 1. To display information for DNs 630 979 5579 and 630 979 4442, enter apxhome

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2. Enter the DN of the rst subscriber about whom you seek information: 6309795579 Result: The apxhome command retrieves and outputs information such as the following about DN 630 979 5579 from the mufdb database: dn=6309795579 srno=878ae444 omaj=5 tmaj=1 hl=2226303333 3. Enter the DN of the next subscriber about whom you seek information: 6309794442 Result: The apxhome command returns information such as the following about DN 630 979 4442: dn=6309794442 srno=878ae442 srno2=878ae440 omaj=1 tmaj=1 hl=not found

References
For more information about the apxhome command, see the following document:
s

401-610-036, Database Update Manual

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apxrcv
Name
apxrcvadminister the various databases.

Description
The Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network application databases are administered by the Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) program. By default, the user is given a screen form interface. When the apxrcv command is invoked with the -text option, however, a text line interface is used. The text line interface expects user input to be in the format field=value.

Availability UNIX RTR


The apxrcv command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Solaris operating system


The apxrcv command is in the /omp/bin directory.

Synopsis
apxrcv [ -help ] [ -names ] [ -term term ] [ -print file ] [ -echo file ] [ -masks directory ] [ -db[f] name ] [ journal | njournal ] [ review | nreview ] [ -high ] [ -lock ] [ -text [ -keys ] [ -brief ] [ -fields ] [ -txtecho ] [ -snap ] [ -ignwarn ] [ -txtelog file ] [ -check | -rcheck ][ -txtpipe ] ] [ -txtfmt -tstrcv -fldname ][ -errdisplay number_of_seconds ] [ -sleep X where X = the vnumber of seconds to sleep between operations.

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Options
The options for the apxrcv command are described in Table 5-6 on page 5-21. Table 5-6. Option -help, -h -names, -n -term, -t -print, -p -echo -masks -db -dbf journal njourna review nreview -high -lock -text -keys -brief -fields -txtpipe -txtecho -snap -ignwarn -txtelog -check apxrcv command options Description Display online help about the apxrcv command. List the database names. Terminal type (default value is $TERM or vt100). Print screens to le. Save keystrokes in a le. Masks directory (defaults to /1apx10/dbmasks). Access the specied master database. Access the specied at le disk database. Save screens and error messages in a journal le. Do not create a journal le. Allow review-only of databases. Allow review, update, insert, and delete operations, if permitted. Run at high priority. Run locked in memory. Text input format. Prompt with key elds. Generate brief output. Print all eld names. Text input will be from a pipe. Echo input key strokes. Turn on text transaction logging. Ignore all warning messages. Log errors and warnings to a le. Check input syntax, no operations performed.

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Table 5-6. Option -rcheck -tstrcv -txtfmt -fldname

apxrcv command options Description Check input syntax, no operations performed (the record is not read). (used with -brief and -text options) for DBtstrcv process. adbdump text output is in rc/v text input format. adbdump text output includes eld names. Specify the time interval to display error messages. In apxrcv -text, the system will sleep for X seconds after each RC/V operation, when X is an integer value.

-errdisplay -sleep X

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the apxrcv command: To invoke the master copy of the databases, enter apxrcv To run apxrcv on the backup copy of the trunk database, enter apxrcv -dbf /1apx10/dbbackup/trunkdb

See also
For more information about the apxrcv command, see 401-610-036, Database Update Manual.

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apxsub
Name
apxsubinsert, verify, or delete subscriber records.

Description
The apxsub command can be used to perform the following operations on the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network application database:
s

insert new subscriber records that are cloned from a service-providerdened set of service prole subscriber records delete subscriber records verify that a specied subscriber record is in the database

s s

As the apxsub command executes, the command 1. reads a le of service prole denitions 2. determines the database permissions of the user 3. prints user help information 4. generates a > prompt for user input When you enter the apxsub command at a UNIX terminal, the command returns some help information and a > prompt prompts you to enter input. To enter the required input on a single command line, enter the input in the following syntax: op; MIN|IMSI; DN; SRNO; BILLNO; MLC; PIN; AKEY; profile As shown in the syntax line, you must separate each input eld by a semicolon. The function of each input eld is explained in Table 5-8 on page 5-29. After you have entered input for all elds, apxsub parses the input for correctness, attempts to perform the specied operation, and returns the results to standard output (stdout). This process continues until you enter q to quit apxsub.

Subscriber Record
The subscriber record is actually a collection of records from various Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network application databases. For simplicity, this manual page uses the following terminology:
s

Subscriber database refers to the entire collection of subscriber-related databases.

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Subscriber record refers to the entire collection of records in those databases.

The subscriber database consists of the following databases:


s s s s s s s

Authentication (AU) Database (audb) Custom Calling Features (CCF) Database (ccfdb) Mobile Unit Features (MUF) Database (mufdb) Subscriber Auxiliary (SUBAUX) Database (subauxdb) Subscriber User Zone (SUBUZ) Database (subuzdb) Map Directory Number to MIN (DN2P) Database (dn2pdb) Map MIN to LDN Numbers (P2LDN) Database (p2ldndb)

Where appropriate, this manual page refers to a specic database. You administer the subscriber record primarily through the sub form in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX Recent Change and Verify (apxrcv) subsystem. The auth form in apxrcv is used to administer the subscriber authentication data. For more information about subscriber authentication data, see 401-610-036, Database Update Manual.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the apxsub command is in the directory /omp/bin.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the apxsub command is in the directory /1apx10/testbin.

Synopsis
apxsub [-dhn] [-f fname] [-l logfile] [-m mode]

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Options
The options for the apxsub command are described in Table 5-7 on page 5-25. The options may be entered in any order. Table 5-7. Option -d apxsub command options Description Display the control structure.

Use the -d option only for debugging. -f fname Use the specied le fname for input to apxsub. By default, apxsub takes input from standard input (stdin). The fname le should contain input lines in the same format as the format of input from a terminal, with one transaction per line. The apxsub command ignores blank lines and continues to execute until the End-of-File (EOF) is found. If any of the input lines in the le fails syntax checks, the transaction is aborted and apxsub reads the next line. The same success/failure indications are printed on the terminal (stdout) for each transaction as in the terminal-input mode. Display online user help for apxsub. Log all transactions to the specied le logfile. On the ECP, transactions are written to the /user/DBLOG/logfile le, where logfile is the specied lename. On the OMP, transactions are written to the /omp-data/logs/DBLOG/logfile le. The transactions are written to the logfile le in the standard input syntax for apxsub. Thus the specied logfile le may be used with the -f option as an input le to subsequent executions of apxsub. If the specied logfile le does not exist, apxsub creates that le. If the specied logfile le already exists, apxsub appends the transactions to logfile. Only successful transactions are written to logfile. If the -l option is not specied, transactions are not logged.

NOTE:

-h -l logfile

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Table 5-7. Option -m mode

apxsub command options Description Set the serial number display mode to the specied mode, where mode is one of the following values: s s s s s d = decimal. h = hexadecimal (default value). m = manufacturer's decimal. o = octal. p = PCS manufacturer's decimal.

-n

Do not check to determine whether the input serial numbers are in the Fraudulent Mobile Database (frmdb). The default action is to determine whether the input serial numbers are keys to records in the frmdb.

Usage
A subscriber record contains many elds. The retrieval key is the Mobile Identication Number (MIN) eld. The values of the following elds are probably unique to each subscriber:
s s s s s s

directory number (DN) serial number (SRNO) billing number (BILLNO) mobile lock code (MLC) personal identication number (PIN) authentication key (AKEY)

All of the other elds in the subscriber record determine the service prole, such as custom calling features, of the subscriber. The values of those elds may be common among many subscribers.

Service proles
A service prole is a subscriber record in the application database with a key (that is, MIN) that the service provider never assigns to an actual subscriber. An example of such a MIN is 9999990001. The service prole is originally inserted in the application database by the apxrcv subsystem. When the apxsub command is used to insert a record, apxsub reads from the database the subscriber record that corresponds to the service prole identier. This record is read into a buffer and overlaid with the values of the SRNO, BILLNO, MLC, and PIN elds that the user input in the apxsub command line or, if the -f fname option was specied, from the specied fname le. The apxsub command takes the

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user-specied DN as the key and inserts the resulting record into the database. Call processing checks the input serial numbers to prevent fraudulent use of a service prole MIN and SRNO to obtain service. NOTE: A subscriber record that is used as a service prole should have
s s

a key that is never assigned to a subscriber a value in the SRNO eld that is never assigned (such as 0)

Service prole denitions


All service proles must be dened in a le that is named subdef. The subdef le contains MIN-string pairs (ASCII characters) that determine the service prole MIN and its mnemonic string. These strings are service prole identiers. For example, the subdef le might contain the following lines: 9999990001 poms 9999990002 ccf1 9999990003 ccf2 The subdef le must contain ten-digit MINs, and each MIN must be followed by a service prole identier string. White space (such as a blank, tab, or new line) is required between the MIN and its identier string. Spaces or tabs are not allowed between the digits in the MIN or between the characters in the identier string. No more than 1,000 service prole identiers should be dened in the subdef le. To use the apxsub command on the ECP, the subdef le must reside in the directory /1apx10/dbdata/ on the ECP. The OMP does not use the subdef le from the ECP. To use apxsub on the OMP, the subdef le must reside in the directory /omp-data/dbdata/ on the OMP. The service provider must use the ed editor program at an ECP UNIX terminal to create the /1apx10/dbdata/ subdef le on the ECP or transfer the le to the ECP from the OMP. If the subdef le is missing or unreadable, apxsub prints an error message to the terminal and exits.

Inserting subscriber records


The apxsub command allows service providers to dene up to 1,000 service proles. When you use apxsub to insert a new subscriber record, which can be done on a single input line, you must specify the MIN, DN, SRNO, BILLNO, MLC, and service prole identier. The service prole identier corresponds to a specic set of values for all of the other elds in a subscriber record (that is, elds other than the SRNO, BILLNO, and MLC elds). Before the record is inserted, however, apxsub checks to determine whether the specied SRNO is present in the frmdb. If the SRNO is in the frmdb, the record is not inserted and apxsub prints a failure message to stdout. To disable checking the frmdb, use the -n option.

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Deleting/verifying subscriber records


To use the apxsub command to delete or verify a subscriber record, the MIN is the only required input. Note that the verify operation veries only whether the MIN is in the subscriber database. If the MIN is in the database, the verify operation prints the MIN, DN, SRNO, BILLNO, and MLC elds of the record.

Input syntax
As stated earlier, when you execute the apxsub command, the command returns some help information and a > prompt prompts you to enter input in the following syntax: op; MIN|IMSI; DN; SRNO; BILLNO; MLC; PIN; AKEY; profile As shown in the syntax line, you must separate each input eld by a semicolon. The function of each input eld is explained in Table 5-8 on page 5-29.

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Table 5-8. Field op

apxsub input elds Description The op eld species the database operation to perform: s i = insert subscriber record. s d = delete subscriber record. s v = verify presence of subscriber record. You may enter f to change the format in which the serial number is displayed in the verify operation. This format is relevant only to the serial number display that results from the verify operation. The possible display formats are the same as the display formats that the apxrcv process uses (see description of -m mode option in Table 5-7 on page 5-25). The op eld is a required eld; that is, the op eld cannot be left blank. If you enter f for the op eld, the possible display formats are printed and you are prompted to choose one of them. The display format that you select remains in effect until you select another format. The display format that is in effect when you exit apxsub is the initial display format the next time that you execute apxsub. Immediately before apxsub terminates, the display format code is written to the /tmp/apxsub.login le of the machine on which apxsub is run, where login is the user login ID. The display format is read from the apxsub.login le during initialization of apxsub. If the apxsub.login le does not exist, apxsub creates the le when apxsub terminates, and the default display format is hexadecimal.

MIN|IMSI

Either the 10-digit (decimal) MIN or the 8- to 15-digit International Mobile Station Identity (IMSI) of the subscriber. This eld is the primary key and cannot be left blank. In ECP Releases 15.0 and earlier, you must specify the MIN. In ECP Releases 16.0 and later, you may specify either the MIN or the IMSI. If you specify the IMSI, the CDMA IMSI optional feature must be activated.

DN

The ten-digit (decimal) DN of the subscriber whose record is to be inserted. The DN eld is the secondary key. To insert a record, the DN eld cannot be left blank. The apxsub command ignores blanks or tabs between the digits in a DN on the input line. This allows you to leave blanks between the area code, ofce code, and line number, if desired.

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Table 5-8. Field SRNO

apxsub input elds Description The serial number value to use to insert a record. As with the apxrcv process, the rst character of the value of the SRNO eld determines how the apxsub command interprets the rest of the digits in the SRNO eld. The rst character must be one of the characters that is specied in the description of the -m option (see Table 5-7 on page 5-25) and be in the following range of values: s d = d0 through d4294967295. s h = h00000000 through hffffffff. s m = m[000-255][00000000-16777215]. s o = o00000000000 through o37777777777. s p = p[00000-16383][000000-262143]. The SRNO eld cannot be left blank, and the specied SRNO must not be present in the frmdb database. The apxsub command checks the frmdb database for the presence of the specied SRNO immediately before apxsub inserts the record in the database. If the SRNO is present in the frmdb database, apxsub aborts the insertion. To disable the check for the SRNO in the frmdb database, use the -n (no fraud check) option. The apxsub command ignores blanks or tabs between individual characters in the SRNO eld on the command line.

BILLNO

The billing number to use to insert a record. The value of the BILLNO eld must be a decimal number of no more than 20 digits. The BILLNO eld is optional. If the BILLNO eld is left blank, its value is set to equal the value of the DN eld (left justied with trailing zeroes). The apxsub command ignores blanks or tabs between individual characters in the BILLNO eld on the command line. The mobile lock code (MLC). The value of the MLC eld must be a decimal number in the range 0 to 999. The MLC eld is optional. If the MLC eld is left blank, the MLC eld in the mufdb record is set to null (binary zero). Nulls display as blanks. The personal identication number (PIN) of the subscriber. The value of the PIN eld must be a decimal number in the range 0 to 9999. The PIN eld is optional. If the PIN eld is left blank, the PIN eld in the ccfdb record is set to null (binary zero). Nulls display as blanks.

MLC

PIN

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Table 5-8. Field AKEY

apxsub input elds Description The authentication key (AKEY). The value of the AKEY eld must be a 20digit decimal number in the range 0 to 18446744073709551615. The AKEY eld is optional. If the AKEY eld is left blank, the AKEY eld in the audb record is set to null (binary zero). For security reasons, the value of the AKEY eld is not displayed. The subscriber record that is to be used as the service prole when inserting a record. The profile eld is a user-dened character string that is mapped to a user-dened MIN in the subdef le (see Service prole denitions on page 5-27).

profile

User input prompt


When the > prompt appears on the terminal screen, the apxsub command expects user input. You may enter the input in a single line in the following format: op; MIN; DN; SRNO; BILLNO; MLC; PIN; AKEY; profile If you enter a blank line, apxsub prompts you for the operation code. At that point, you may enter only the operation code. The apxsub command then prompts you to enter a value for the next eld. The command continues to prompt you for input eld by eld until you have entered all input that is required for the specied operation. At each step in this process, apxsub prompts you with the > prompt when it expects user input. At any point during the eld-by-eld prompting, you may input values for all of the remaining elds (separated by semicolons). If the input data for a eld fails the data integrity checks, apxsub prompts you to reenter the value for that eld. If you input all of the remaining elds (separated by semicolons) during the eld-by-eld prompting, you must reenter
s s

the rst eld that fails the data integrity checks any of the remaining semicolon-separated elds

That capability is available only if apxsub was executed without the -f option. When the -f option is used and the input to apxsub is from a le, the rst error that apxsub encounters causes apxsub to ignore the entire input line and read the next line of data. Whenever the > prompt appears, you may enter a
s s s

q to quit the apxsub session question mark (?) to get a reminder of the command-line syntax an exclamation point (!) to abort the current operation

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Examples
The following examples illustrate how to execute the apxsub command to perform different database operations.

Inserting a subscriber record


Enter the following input after the > prompt from apxsub to insert a subscriber record with a
s s s s s

MIN of 312367111 DN of 312-367-1111 SRNO of 7777 (decimal) MLC of 322 service prole that is contained in the 9999990001 subscriber record (denoted by the poms identier string):

i; 3123671111; 312 367 1111; d7777; ; 322; ; ; poms System response: 3123671111 inserted Note that the BILLNO, PIN, and AKEY elds were left blank. As previously stated, when the BILLNO eld is not specied, the BILLNO eld is populated with the DN. After apxsub is executed, apxsub returns a success/failure message.

Deleting a subscriber record


To delete the record from the example above, enter the following input after the > prompt: d; 3123671111 System response: 3123671111 deleted

Verifying a subscriber record


To verify a record with a MIN of 3125552222, enter the following input after the > prompt: v; 3125552222 The system returns the following output: Mobile Id. No. = 3123552222 Directory No. = 312 555 2222 Serial No. = 44 (hexadecimal) Billing No. = 3123552222 Mob. Lock Code = 777

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Note that if the specied record is found in the database, apxsub prints the values of the MIN, DN, SRNO, BILLNO, and MLC. If the specied record is not found in the database, apxsub returns the following message: 3125552222 not found

Associated les
The following les are associated with the apxsub command.

ECP les
The following ECP les are associated with the apxsub command:
s

/1apx10/dbdata/subdef The le that contains the service proles. The subdef le on the ECP is not used by the OMP version of apxsub.

/tmp/apxsub.login The le to which the SRNO display format code is written when apxsub terminates and from which the display code is read when apxsub is reexecuted.

/user/DBLOG This directory contains log les on the ECP.

OMP les
s

/omp-data/dbdata/subdef The OMP le that contains the service proles. The subdef le on the ECP is not used by the OMP version of apxsub.

/tmp/apxsub.login The le to which the SRNO display format code is written when apxsub terminates and from which the display code is read when apxsub is reexecuted.

/omp-data/logs/DBLOG The log le directory. For users who are accustomed to using the ECP version of apxsub, this directory is symbolically linked to the /user/ DBLOG directory on the ECP.

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Error messages
The apxsub command may generate the following error messages. If these messages are generated, take the corrective action that is specied for each message.
s

This product is not setuid to root. Please contact CTSO immediately to correct. The mode of the apxsub tool should be correct when the tool is installed. Ask CTS to correct the mode and then reexecute apxsub.

Access denied by RC/V password security. This error message indicates you have not been provisioned in the RC/V Password Security le on the ECP to access subscriber-related databases. Ask your local administrator to use the DBrcvadm tool to set the proper permissions for the audb, ccfdb, frmdb (unless the -n option was used), mufdb, dn2pdb, and subuzdb databases.

ERROR. Cannot open subscriber profile ID definition file (X). This error message indicates that the Service Prole Denitions le, where X is /1apx10/dbdata/subdef on the ECP or /omp-data/dbdata/ subdef on the OMP, is missing or unreadable. Ensure that the le exists and is readable by the user.

OMP-only error messages


The apxsub command may generate the following error messages only on the OMP:
s

ERROR: Unable to get a message port. Maximum number of simultaneous sessions reached: 7 This error message occurs when seven apxsub sessions are already running on the OMP and you attempt to run another session.

Feature activation access failure - try again later Feature activation qualifier access failure - try again later. RDBU Shared memory segment uninitialized These error messages appear when either the Feature Activation (FA) tables or Ring Data Base Update (RDBU) tables in OMP shared memory are not available. These tables should exist in OMP shared memory. Wait 10 to 15 minutes and reexecute apxsub. If the same error message appears, contact CTS.

DB Tools on the OMP - Phase 2 feature is not active in the Feature Activation File!

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To use the apxsub command on the OMP, the DB Tools on the OMP Phase 2 feature must be turned on in the Feature Activation File (FAF).

See also Related commands


s

apxrcv

Related documents
s s

401-600-047, RC/V Form Security 401-610-036, Database Update Manual

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ARmon
Name
ARmonmonitor Autonomous Registrations (ARs).

Description
The ARmon command monitors ARs.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the ARmon command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the ARmon command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
ARmon [-i minutes] [-x intervals] [-t]

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Options
The options for the ARmon command are described in Table 5-9 on page 5-37. Table 5-9. Option -i minutes ARmon command options Description

minutes = the number of minutes to monitor ARs.

If the -i option is not specied, the default value is 10 minutes. -x n

NOTE:

n = the number of times to monitor ARs for the specied number of minutes.

If the -x option is not specied, the default number of times to monitor ARs is 30. -t print a timestamp and total for each monitoring of ARs.

NOTE:

Examples
The following example illustrates use of the ARmon command: To monitor ARs ve times for 1 minute and forward the output data to the /tmp/ armon.out le, enter ARmon -i 1 -x 5 > /tmp/armon.out

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authgen
Name
authgenverify the Authentication Key (AKEY).

Description
The authgen command produces a six-digit checksum that is entered into the mobile station to verify that the AKEY was previously entered correctly. The AKEY is obtained by looking on the authentication form.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the authgen command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the authgen command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
authgen

Options
The authgen command has no options.

Examples
Example: Run authgen and enter the AKEY when prompted. authgen AUTHENTICATION AKEY CHECKSUM CALCULATION TOOL

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Please note that the Authentication Algorithm Version (AAV)used for calculations by this tool is 0xc7. This AAV value is currently the only valid value used in the industry today. ENTER AKEY (1-20 digits): 12345678901234567890 ENTER ESN using one of the following formats: Manufacturers - mXXXXXXXXXXX Decimal Hexadecimal Octal - dXXXXXXXXXX - hXXXXXXXX - oXXXXXXXXXXX

ENTER ESN: h11111111 6 DIGIT CHECKSUM = 061564

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cong
Name
congdisplay conguration information.

Description
The config command displays conguration information about a specied Flexent/AUTOPLEX network element. The config command prompts you for the device and logical number of the element.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the cscreset command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the cscreset command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
config [dcs | ecp | cel | csn | gp | ss7 | cdn | dln | apn | q | Q | <]

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cong command options


Table 5-10. Option apn cdn cel csn dcs dln ecp gp q, Q, < cong command options Description Display conguration. Display conguration regarding the CDN. Display conguration regarding the cell. Display conguration regarding the CSN. Display conguration regarding the Digital Cellular Switch (DCS). Display conguration regarding the Direct Link Node (DLN). Display conguration regarding the ECP. Display conguration. Quit.

Examples
To obtain conguration information about the ECP, enter config ecp

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cscreset
Name
cscresetreset the Cell Site Controller (CSC).

Description
The cscreset command resets the specied CSC.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the cscreset command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the cscreset command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
cscreset -c cell [ -d datalink ] -f csc | -k csc

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Options
The options for the cscreset command are described in Table 5-11 on page 5-43. Table 5-11. Option c cell cscreset command options Description

cell = the cell controller that is to be reset. Valid cell values are s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier datalink = the data link to be reset.

d datalink

Valid datalink values are 0 and 1. f csc Force the CSC to be active.

NOTE:

The -f option cannot be used in conjunction with the -k option. Valid csc values are 0 and 1. h k csc Display online help about the cscreset command. Clear the active CSC

NOTE:

The -k option cannot be used in conjunction with the -f option. Valid CSC values are 0 and 1.

NOTE:

Examples
To force a reset on Cell 1 of CSC 10 on Datalink 1, enter cscreset -c 10 -d 1 -f 0

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ctrmkrmt
Name
ctrmkrmtestablish a rudimentary networking connection.

Description
The ctrmkrmt command establishes a rudimentary networking connection to log in to another computer.

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the ctrmkrmt command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the ctrmkrmt command is in the /omp/bin directory.

Synopsis
ctrmkrmt name

Options
The options for the ctrmkrmt command are described in Table 5-12 on page 5-44. Table 5-12. Option ctrmkrmt command options Description

name

name = the name of the other computer to which the user wants to log in.

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Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the ctrmkrmt command: To log in to the computer apx1, enter ctrmkrmt apx1

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DBapxvcr
Name
DBapxvcrreserve Advanced Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) voice channels.

Description
The DBapxvcr command reserves AMPS and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) voice channels such that those channels are predominately used by mobile units of a specic mobile power class (MPC). A reservation means the voice channel allocation gives preference to voice channels whose MPC reservations match the MPC of the mobile unit. The DBapxvcr command prompts the user to specify the
s s s

cell site number voice radio channel number(s) MPC

NOTE: For voice radio channels that are already reserved, DBapxvcr does not perform MPC updates for voice.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the DBapxvcr command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the DBapxvcr command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
DBapxvcr

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Options
The DBapxvcr command has no options.

Examples
To execute the DBapvcr command, enter DBapxvcr

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DBcellsw
Name
DBcellswmove a cell from one Digital Cellular Switch (DCS) to another DCS.

Description
The DBcellsw command moves a cell from one DCS to another and/or changes the trunk group numbers that are associated with a cell. DBcellsw prompts the user for the cell number and switch ID. The tool updates the backup databases, including
s s s s s

celldb trunkdb rdtkdb dlcdb mcadb

Availability UNIX RTR


The DBcellsw command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
DBcellsw

Options
The DBcellsw command has no options.

Examples
The following example illustrates the execution of the DBcellsw command:

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To move Cell 44 to Switch ID 2, enter DBcellsw Do you wish to continue (y/n) y Enter cell number to move to new switch ID : 44 Move cell 44 from switch ID 4 to switch ID (Enter 4 for no change) : 2

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DBend
Name
DBenddisplay the number of total, used, and available records in the database.

Description
The DBend command displays the number of total, used, and available records in any Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network application database or in all valid databases. Invalid databases include rgdb, vlrdb, and vlruzdb.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the DBend command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the DBend command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
DBend -n dbname [all] -p path [-s] [-h]

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Options
Table 5-13. Option h n dbname all p path DBend Command Options Description Display online help for using DBend. Display the number of allocated, used, and free records for the specied dbname database. Display the number of allocated, used, and free records for all databases. Species the relative path name (path) of the directory that contains the database.

The path name must be specied even when DBend is run from the directory in which the databases reside. If . is used, it must be enclosed in quotation marks. s Display the valid Multiple Size Option (MSO) database sizes for all valid databases to which MSO applies.

NOTE:

Examples
To display the number of allocated, used, and free records for the Mobile Unit Feature Database (mufdb), enter DBend -n mufdb -p /1apx10/dbdata To execute DBend from the current directory and display the MSO for all databases, enter DBend -s -n mufdb -p . To display the number of allocated, used, and free records for all databases, enter DBend -n all -p /1apx10/dbdata

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DBllitest
Name
DBllitestprint information about the Linked List Indexed (LLI) Database.

Description
The DBllitest tool calculates the size of the LLI database. After you execute DBllitest, you enter a key value for a specic record. DBllitest then prints the number of records that are on that key. You can also use DBllitest to update a record and then use the DBdump tool to verify that the record was updated. If you use the apxsub command to insert a new subscriber record in the subscriber database, DBllitest automatically selects the rst available record from the subscriber database to insert new data.

DBllitest is a database test vehicle for the LLI database. DBllitest is a powerful tool and must be used very carefully. If you use DBllitest incorrectly, you may accidentally delete or insert database records. Do not use the DBllitest command without the assistance of the Customer Technical Support (CTS). DBllitest is available in the central ofces of service providers. DBllitest works only on the copy of the database that you specify, and DBllitest records are dumped in hexadecimal format. Unlike Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) tools, DBllitest does not interface with the database primitives. DBllitest does not trigger clients. DBllitest writes over a database that is locked by an RC/V process. DBllitest does not ensure that all copies of the database that is being modied are updated. DBllitest may not be fully tested in the lab or the ofce. DBllitest copies over the contents of the record that you modify in whatever database location you specify. To use DBllitest successfully, you need to know
s s s s s

CAUTION:

the physical layout of the key the hexadecimal value of the key the physical layout of the record the hexadecimal eld value that is expected fmthdr (format header) produces this layout

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Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the DBllitest command is in the directory /omp/testbin.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, DBllitest is in the /1apx10/ testbin/DBllitest directory.

Synopsis
DBllitest

Examples
The following is an example of using DBllitest to edit and update a record in the Mobile Unit Features Data Base (mufdb): $ DBllitest Enter desired function number ("1" for menu, "q" for quit) >

1
The available functions are: 0 Quit ("q" will also quit). 1 Display this menu of functions. 2 Print ECP error log. 3 Print CDN error log. 4 Database create, pad, DBSPEC print, capacity calculation. 5 Initialize/back-up main memory. 6 Record read, delete. 7 Record insert, update. 8 Record sequencing. 9 Database checks. 10 Make an error log entry. 11 Execute a hash function, Dump keylist. Enter desired function number ("1" for menu, "q" for quit) >

7
The available functions 0 Return to main menu. 1 Insert a record into 2 Insert a record into 3 Update a record in a are: a disk database. main memory database. disk database.

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4 Update a record in main memory database. 5 Edit & insert a record in a disk database. 6 Edit & update a record in a disk database. Enter desired function number from submenu > 6 Input database file name > mcadb Enter a blank line to exit record update mode. Input key value, 4 byte(s) as 8 hex numerals > 006d0000

Associated les
/1apx10/testbin/DBllitest (ECP file)

See also
DBend

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DBnetchk
Name
DBnetchkvalidate various aspects of the Multiple System network.

Description
The DBnetchk command is a menu-driven tool that validates various aspects of the Multiple System network. The /user/DBLOG/netaud.out le is created, which contains violations and discrepancies detected.

Availability UNIX RTR


The DBnetchk command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
DBnetchk

Options
The DBnetchk command has no options.

Examples
Example: Invoke DBnetchk. DBnetchk

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DBrcheck
Name
DBrcheckcount the number of records in each database.

Description
The DBrcheck command counts the number of records in each database and reports the total.

Availability UNIX RTR


The DBrcheck command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
DBrcheck

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Examples
Example: Count the number of records in each database. DBrcheck

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DBretune
Name
DBretuneretune the database frequencies.

Description
The DBretune command enables specialized service-provider personnel to retune a cellular system. DBretune performs the database work that is required to retune a cellular system. DBretune operates on the following databases:
s s s s s

ceqdb trunkdb rdtkdb reseldb fcidb

Thus DBretune allows an almost dynamic reconguration of a Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network. When DBretune is initiated on the ECP, it operates on the backup copies of the databases. When DBretune is initiated on the OMP, it operates on the local copes of the databases. The DBretune command requires the Cell Retune (CELLRE) optional feature to be activated. To purchase the CELLRE feature, contact your account representative.

Synopsis
DBretune [-h][-c file][-t file][-x]

Options
The options for the DBretune command are described in Table 5-14 on page 5-58.

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Table 5-14. Option -c file -t file -x

DBretune command options Description Where file species the cell equipage input le. Where file species the trunk input le. Facilitates the transfer of the databases (celldb, ceqdb, dlcdb, fcidb, rdtkdb, reseldb, and trunkdb) from the /1apx10/dbbackup directory on the ECP to the current working directory on the OMP.

The -x option must be used with either the -t or the -c option. The -x option is an OMP-only option and is ignored on the ECP. -h Display the help message for the DBretune command.

NOTE:

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the DBretune command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the DBretune command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Examples
To update databases from data in the trunk input le, enter DBretune -x -t trunk.txt The following is a sample trunk input le: SW 2 2 TG 111 111 TM 1 2 VRNO 0 1 SAT/DVCC 2 0 VRCHNL 727 782 EXPANDED y y

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2 2 2

111 111 111

3 4 5

2 3 4

0 1 1

760 521 485

y n n

To update databases from data that is in the cell equipage input le, enter DBretune -x -c ceq.txt The following is a sample cell equipage input le: CELL 11 16 28 41 42 ANT 0 0 0 0 0 DCC 0 3 2 2 0 SETUP 334 346 335 349 336

To update databases from both input les, enter DBretune -c ceq.txt -t trunk.txt

Associated commands and/or les


When DBretune is executed on the ECP, a retune.err log le is written to the /user/DBLOG directory. When DBretune is executed on the OMP, a retune.err log le is written to the /omp-data/logs/DBLOG/root directory.

See also
For more information about the DBretune command, see 401-612-160, Cell Retune Optional Feature Description.

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DBsubdel
Name
DBsubdeldelete subscriber database records.

Description
The Delete Subscriber Database Records (DSDR) optional feature provides a quick and easy way to delete large numbers of subscriber records from the database. Before the DSDR feature was introduced, service-provider personnel had to delete records manually at the Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) interface or by using shell scripts. To delete thousands of records took several days to complete by either method. With the DSDR optional feature, however, the process takes only about 1 hour. The DBsubdel command deletes marked subscriber records from the subscriber databases (mufdb, ccfdb, subauxdb, and audb) on the ECP. To do this, the DBsubdel command rebuilds each database entirely. DBsubdel copies the records that are to be preserved into a new database, which then replaces the original database.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the DBsubdel command is in the directory /omp/bin.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the DBsubdel command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
DBsubdel [-c database] [-i database] [-o database] [-k 0|1|2|3] [-OEvh]

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Options
The options for the DBsubdel command are described in Table 5-15 on page 5-61. Table 5-15. Option -c database DBsubdel command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Where database is the database from which to delete records. The following databases are valid: s mufdb (Mobile Unit Features Database) s ccfdb (Custom Calling Features Database) s subauxdb (Auxiliary Subscriber Database) s audb (Authentication Database) s subuzdb (Subscriber User Zone Database) s p2ldndb (Primary MSID to local DN Mapping Database) s s2pdb (Secondary MSID to Primary MSID Mapping Database) s Dn2pdb (Mobile Directory Number to Primary MSID Database) -i database -k t Where db = the old (input) database from which to delete records. Where t species which subscriber records to copy into the new le. The following values are valid for t: s 0 = copy all records into the new le. This is the default value. s 1 = copy only the unmarked records into the new le. s 2 = copy only the marked records into the new le and unmark those records in the new le. s 3 = copy only the marked records into the new le and leave those records marked in the new le. -o database -O

database = the new (output) database to create.


Transfer backup subscriber databases from the /1apx10/ dbbackup directory on the ECP to the /tmp/olddb directory on the OMP.

The -O option may be used on the OMP only. The -O and -E options are mutually exclusive.

NOTE:

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Table 5-15. Option -E

DBsubdel command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Transfer subscriber databases from the /tmp/newdb directory on the OMP to the /1apx10/dbbackup directory on the ECP.

The -E option is not valid with any other options and is available on the OMP only. The -O and -E options are mutually exclusive. -v Allow verication of databases through the use of the apxrcv tool.

NOTE:

The -v option can be used only with the -O option.

NOTE:

-h

Print online help for the DBsubdel command.

Executing the DBsubdel command


If you execute the DBsubdel command without options, DBsubdel prompts you for input. Perform the following steps: 1. Enter the following command:

DBsubdel
Result: The following output is returned: APX-1000 Subscriber Database(s) DBsubdelete WARNING: This program is used to delete AUTOPLEX(Rg) sub records. Proceed ONLY IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING, otherwise you may seriously damage the system. Choose one of the following deletes ("q" to exit): 0. mufdb (mobile unit features) 1. ccfdb (custom calling features) 2. subauxdb (auxiliary subscriber data) 3. audb (authentication data) 4. subuzdb (subscriber user zone) 5. p2ldndb (primary MSID to local DN mapping) 6. s2pdb (secondary MSID to primary MSID mapping) 7. dn2pdb (mobile directory number to Primary MSID) Enter delete ID > 2. At the Enter delete ID > prompt, enter the number that corresponds to the database from which you want to delete records.

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3. To exit the DBsubdel command, enter q

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the DBsubdel command: To create the new database /conv/mufdb with only the unmarked records copied to the new database, enter DBsubdel -c mufdb -i mufdb -o /conv/mufdb -k 1

See also
For more information about the DBsubdel command, refer to 401-612-148, Delete Subscriber Database Records (DSDR) Optional Feature Description.

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DBsubquery
Name
DBsubqueryquery and update the subscriber database.

Synopsis
DBsubquery [+ (cDeIklL(L1)Mmsuvx) ] [- (cDdefhIiklL(L1)Mmpsuvx)] [output_file] DBsubquery [+d delim_char] DBsubquery [+f format_file] DBsubquery [+p format_file] DBsubquery [+i bypass_file] DBsubquery [+n matches_found] NOTE: Database searches are conducted with the + options. Explanatory text for the corresponding + option appear on the standard output (but no database searches occur) for any of the - options.

Feature activation required


In this document, wherever a specic feature is mentioned in regard to some of the functionality of the tool (such as The feature ... must be active...), the user may activate that feature or any features above that feature in order to guarantee that functionality. For example, when the DBsubquery Update-Capable feature is activated, all features below that feature that include Enhanced and +f are functional. An exception to this rule is the +p option. When the +p option is activated, that option activates all lower features except the Update Capable feature.

Description
The DBsubquery command, which resides on both the ECP and the OMP, can be used as follows:

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(OMP only) to transfer copies of the backup subscriber database les from the ECP to the current directory on the OMP and (OMP only) to transfer copies of the current directory subscriber database les from the OMP to the backup directory (/1apx10/dbbackup/) on the ECP and to nd subscriber database records that meet certain search criteria and to mark or unmark those records (See Marking and Unmarking Records (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature) on page 5-69,) to change the values in certain elds of those records (see Changeable Fields (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature) on page 5-70,) or print subscriber database elds found in the input le for records which meet the search criteria (OMP only) to print private subscriber database elds such as akey, ssd, and so on that are found in the input le for records that meet the search criteria.

s s

Search criteria
The search criteria consists of the following:
s

Records satisfying expressions typed by the user at the Query? prompt of form: [(] KEYWORD OPERATOR VALUE [)] [[(] BOOLEAN KEYWORD OPERATOR VALUE [)]] [...] where KEYWORD is the name of a subscriber database eld (see Keyword Details on page 5-68,) OPERATOR is either =, !=, < or > (as interpreted in C- language programs) VALUE is a representation of the value to search for in that eld (see VALUE DETAILS) BOOLEAN is one of {and AND &} or {or OR |} [...] means that at least 2, and at most 12 sets of [(] KEYWORD OPERATOR VALUE [)] phrases are allowed in a Query? expression. The "DBsubsearch Multi-Query for MUF, CCF and SUBAUX (DBSQ)" must be active in order to use more than two such phrases. The [(] and [)] indicate that the entire Query? expression, or phrases therein, can optionally be enclosed within parentheses. These parentheses are interpreted as they would be in C-language programs (that is, the subexpression within parentheses is evaluated rst).

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Records whose keys are represented in the bypass_file that is specied with the +i option. The "DBsubquery Update Capable (DBSUBQUC)" feature must be active for this search method to be available. No Query? prompt appears in this case.

NOTE: Expressions that are entered at the Query? prompt must span only one line and be no longer than 190 characters. Thus extremely long expressions or expressions such as (sw = 14 & cgsa = 14) | (sw = 15 & cgsa = 15) are not allowed.

Output
In ECP Releases 13.0 and later, the output of the DBsubquery tool is the keys of records that match the search criteria, with the output formatted as follows on each line: <10-digit msid value> OR <8-15 digit imsi value> These keys may be written to the standard output (if the string "here" is given for the output_file parameter) or to the le that is specied in the output_file parameter. If no output_file is specied, then a count of the number of records searched and the number of such keys found is written to the standard output. If the +n match_count option is specied, only the rst match_count keys that match the search criteria are output. NOTE: If the DBsubquery Update-Capable feature is active and either the change (+c), mark (+m) or unmark (+u) operations are requested, statistics on that specic invocation of DBsubquery are written to the log le DBsubq_uc.log. For more information, see Procedure , Log File Details (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature), on page 5-70.

Value Details
Although numeric values are used internally to search for matching records, there are different ways to enter the search value for some subscriber database elds.
s s

+ YES/NO elds may be specied as y or 1 (for yes) and n or 0 (for no). + the eld dntype may be denoted as one of the letters that is used on the Recent Change sub form (such as h, a, t, or s) or as a decimal number between 0 and 255. The mapping from dntype letters to equivalent decimal values is as follows:

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dntype letter | equivalent numeric value h a t s r m d u l o c n p e x f g b y j k q w | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 26

Note that + values for certain keywords may be specied with ?, '*, or null (case-insensitive). The ? denotes match on any character in that position of the string. For example, pic = 02?3 matches on records with the rst two characters in the pic eld being equivalent to 02, anything in the third character, and 3 in the fourth character. The '*' must be either the last character or the only character given in the eld value string. It denotes match on anything from here onward in the eld value string. For example, hldgt = * matches all records in the database, whereas icfdgt = 630555* matches on records with the rst six digits of the icfdgt eld being equivalent to 630555.

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The null eld value indicates a match on the value 0 in the equivalent database eld. Thus ccfdgt = null matches on all records with no CCF digits (that is, the ccfdgt eld has a value of 0). + The eld pc must be specied with four characters (for example, pic = 0088). A 0 that is specied anywhere in the specied pic eld value is internally represented as 10; a match on a 0 (null) character) may be requested by entering - for that character (for example, pic = -288 denotes a search for a pic value of 288 that has not been expanded to four digits. To search for records with no pic value (that is, the internal value for the pic eld is null), enter either pic = null or pic = ---- at the Query? prompt. + the mpci eld may be specied as one of the strings that is used on the RC/V sub form (553, 54b, 95, 136, 3388, or 136a, which correspond to internal values 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5, respectively) or as a decimal number between 0 and 31. NOTE: Any alphabetic characters that are used in the above search values are not casesensitive. Thus, either y or Y may be used for YES/NO els, a null pic value may be represented as NULL, null, or even NuLl, and an mpci" eld string may be specied as either 54b or 54B.

Keyword Details
The keywords that are allowed in Query? expressions are typically the actual database eld names. The following are some notable exceptions:
s s

split_npa, which refers to the database eld cp_othnpa marked, which is a YES/NO eld that denotes whether a record is marked or unmarked (YES means marked, and NO means unmarked. lock, which refers to the database eld pic_lock

The dn, npa, nxx, and mdn elds are dened only for 10- digit National Signicant Numbers (NSNs)) When you query, if any of these eld names are used at the Query? prompt, then only records that have 10-digit NSNs match. If the 10-digit restriction is undesirable, use the nsn eld instead. Digits and DBsubquery's '?' and '*' wild cards may be combined to match in the desired positions. For example: To nd NSNs that begin with 708, followed by any seven digits, enter nsn = 708??????? To nd NSNs that begin with 708, followed by any number of digits, including none, enter

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nsn = 708* Find NSNs that begin with any three digits that are followed by 555, followed by any number of digits, including none, enter nsn = ???555* The -k and +k options write to the standard output a list of the keywords that are currently supported for use in Query? expressions and in the +f format_file. Keywords are case-insensitive. Therefore, any combination of capital and small letters may be used to identify them. For information on subscriber database eld names, see 401-610-036, Database Update.

User restrictions (MARK, UNMARK, CHANGE) (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


The use of DBsubquery to perform mark, unmark or change operations (that is, the +m, +u, and +c options, respectively) in the default (update) mode is restricted to users who have root permissions. For security reasons, the ability to update subscriber databases must be curtailed as follows. Usage of the OMP +e transfer option from the OMP current directory to the ECP backup directory (/1apx10/dbbackup) requires at least one of the UpdateCapable options (that is, +m, +u, and +c) to be used at the same time. A failure in the database transfer from the OMP to the ECP leads to an inconsistent state of the ECP backup database les. In order to x this inconsistency a backup must be performed on the ECP. Usage of the verify-only (+v) option along with the mark, unmark, or change options is not restricted to users with root permissions, as no database changes are made.

Marking and Unmarking Records (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


Records that meet the search criteria can be marked (that is, made invisible to Recent Change and Call Processing without being removed from the database) by specifying the +m option on the command line. Records can also be unmarked (that is, made visible again to Recent Change and Call Processing) by specifying the +u option on the command line. Either marking or unmarking (but not both) can be specied in one invocation of DBsubquery. In addition, marking or unmarking can be requested along with the change operation (+c option).

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Log File Details (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


Invoking DBsubquery with any of the change (+c), mark (+m) or unmark (+u) operations results in run-time statistics being written to the /omp-data/logs/ DBLOG/DBsubq_uc.log le on the OMP (/user/DBLOG/DBsubq_uc.log on the ECP). The statistics contained in this le include
s s

the time this invocation of DBsubquery started and ended an indication (marking or unmarking) if either the +m or +u options, respectively, was requested the login name of the user responsible for this invocation of DBsubquery the command-line typed by the user for this invocation of DBsubquery an indication of the run-mode (Verify-Only Mode, if the +v option was specied; otherwise "Update Mode") in which the tool was run the name of the query bypass le and the number of keys represented therein (if the +i option was given) the response to the Query? prompt typed by the user (if any) a list of the eld(s) changed and their new values (if the +c option was typed) (for each subscriber database le) counts of the number of records read, the number of records changed (including marked/unmarked), the number of records unchanged because they did not meet the search criteria and the number of records unchanged because the update would have resulted in an inconsistency in the database (for details, see Caveats on Changing Fields.

s s s

s s

Changeable Fields (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


Records that meet the search criteria can be updated within a certain set of elds by specifying +c on the command-line. This can be done by answering the appropriate prompts in the user interface. The user interface displays a series of prompts to display elds, choose elds, delete elds and input eld values. Opportunities are given to redisplay elds, choose more elds, delete other elds, and change eld values until user is satised. Once nal elds are chosen and values input, user is prompted to continue with update to complete the transactions as shown on the screen and database records are changed.

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NOTE: In prompting for a response, the default value for the given prompt is displayed in brackets, as in (y/[n]), where n is the default value. This is the value taken when carriage return is the input. A menu of changeable elds can be viewed by answering y to the following prompt: Display fields to update? (y/[n]): If y is chosen, the following appears: Select which fields to display: Valid choices include all, an individual eld number, a range of eld numbers, or elds that begin with a single alphabet letter, as in all, 77, 60-100, or c). At the DISPLAY=> prompt, enter the elds to display. Valid choices are: all, a single number, a range of numbers, or a single alphabet letter. Screens are split so as to allow user to easily view a limited number of elds at one time. The user is prompted to continue viewing elds if they do not t on one screen. If all is chosen, the following appears: [1 ] acr [121] rpin_type [2 ] apx_only [122] sdt_active [3 ] ascp_active [123]sendtone [4 ] async_auth [124]smsorigres [5 ] async_crypt [125] smstermres [6 ] autossd [126] sos_avail [7 ] caldelact [127] so7_auth [8 ] caldlalo [128]so8_auth [41 ] icsr [81 ] mwi_active

[42 ] ignore_esn

[82 ] omaj

[43 ] immbill

[83 ] paac

[44 ] insnd_all

[84 ] pgch

[45 ] insnd_bnum

[85 ] pgnum

[46 ] insnd_dstar

[86 ] pic

[47 ] insnd_ilata

[87 ] pin_active

[48 ] insnd_inter

[88 ] pref_ev

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[9 ] ccfact [129]so15_auth [10 ] ccfdt [130]so16_auth Continue? (y/[n]) [11 ] ccfi3d [131]spina_home [12 ] ccfmax [132]spina_roam [13 ] cd [133]sppa [14 ] cgsa [134]sub_coi [15 ] cnap [135]sub_ocoi [16 ] cpnd [136] sw [17 ] cpnr [137]tmaj [18 ] cw [138]twc [19 ] cwar [139]vad_id [20 ] cwdatime [140]vmaj [21 ] dc1 [141]vman_mail [22 ] dc2 [142]vms_id [23 ] enhccf [143]vp_active

[49 ] insnd_loc

[89 ] pref_8k

[50 ] insnd_nodgt

[90 ] pref_13k

y [51 ] insnd_olata [91 ] projacc

[52 ] insnd_pound

[92 ] psofpr

[53 ] insnd_rtvc

[93 ] rac1

[54 ] insnd_star

[94 ] rac2

[55 ] insnd_1dgt

[95 ] rasa1

[56 ] insnd_2dgts

[96 ] rasa2

[57 ] insnd_3dgts

[97 ] rasa3

[58 ] insnd_4dgts

[98 ] rasa4

[59 ] insnd_5dgts

[99 ] rasa5

[60 ] insnd_6dgts

[100] rasa6

[61 ] insnd_7dgts

[101] rasa7

[62 ] insnd_8dgts

[102] rasa8

[63 ] insnd_9dgts

[103] rasa9

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[24 ] ecp_level [144]vssw1 [25 ] exmin [145]vssw2 [26 ] fax_auth [146]vssw3 [27 ] fax_crypt [147]vssw4 [28 ] fldpg [148]vssw5 [29 ] fmr [149]vssw6 [30 ] ghost [150]vssw7 Continue? (y/[n]) [31 ] glsfeatctl [151]vssw8 [32 ] hlci [152]vssw9 [33 ] hldgt [153] [34 ] hli3d [154]

[64 ] insnd_10dgts

[104] rasa10

[65 ] insnd_11dgts

[105] rasa11

[66 ] insnd_12dgts

[106] rasa12

[67 ] insnd_13dgts

[107] rasa13

[68 ] insnd_14dgts

[108] rasa14

[69 ] insnd_15dgts

[109] rasa15

[70 ] ip_crypt

[110] rasa16

y [71 ] lcr [111] rasa17

[72 ] mas_auth

[112] rasa18

[73 ] mbillalw

[113] rasa19

[74 ] mpci

[114] rasa20

vssw11 [35 ] hpin_type [155]vssw12 [36 ] icfab [156]vssw13 [37 ] icfi3d [157]vssw14 [38 ] icfmax [158]vssw15

[75 ] mrs

[115] rasa21

[76 ] mrsact

[116] rasa22

[77 ] mrs_i

[117] rasa23

[78 ] mrs_iact

[118] rasa24

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[39 ] icfnoad [159]vssw16 [40 ] icfsvcord Continue? (y/[n]) y

[79 ] mrsno

[119] rc

[80 ] msstat

[120] rlp_tmr

Display more fields? (y/[n]) If the user chooses y to Display more elds?, the above scenario continues until user chooses to stop. If the user chooses n, the following will appear on the screen: Choose field(s) to update by entering number(s) desired at the "CHOICES=>" prompt (< to quit) (for example, 1,2,3" or 1,10, 15, 60,70, 71, 72).

CHOICES=> Prompt
At the CHOICES=> prompt, the list of numbers representing the desired elds (white space is ignored) is typed, separated by a comma and terminated with a Return. If '<' is typed, DBsubquery aborts immediately. If numbers are followed by a Return, the following prompts appear: Choose more field(s) to update? (y/[n]) Delete chosen field(s)? (y/[n]) At this point, if the user does not choose more elds or does not delete elds, a prompt to enter an update value for each eld chosen appears on the screen. For example, if the response to CHOICES=> was "1, 2,3, 4", then the following prompts appear (one at a time): Specify value for "acr": y or n (or 1 or 0, respectively): Specify value for "apx_only": y or n (or 1 or 0,respectively): Specify value for "ascp_active": y or n (or 1 or 0, respectively): Specify value for "async_auth": y or n (or 1 or 0, respectively): Enter the desired update value after each "Specify value..." prompt and press Return to view the next "Specify value..." prompt. When all the "Specify value..." prompts have been answered, a nal verication screen such as the one below appears: You chose the following field(s) to update: value for "acr" is 1 value for "apx_only" is 1 value for

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"ascp_active" is 1 value for "async_auth" is 1 Is this correct (y/[n])? (< to quit) Answering '<' at this prompt causes DBsubquery to abort immediately. Answering 'y' causes DBsubquery to verify that the update value(s) entered are allowable. If any of the update value(s) are disallowed, error messages for each disallowed value appear and the original changeable elds menu is displayed (giving you a chance to re-try). If all of the update value(s) are found to be allowable, the tool continues processing. If 'n', 'N' or anything other than 'y', 'Y', or "<" is typed at the "Is this correct..." prompt, the original changeable elds menu reappears (giving you a chance to retry). If all values input are given as valid, the user is allowed to continue to add/delete further elds with the following prompt: Choose more fields to update? (y/[n]) If more updates are chosen, the user is returned to the Display screen and goes through the menus as before. Other wise, if no more updates are chosen, the user is prompted to continue with the update. If the user chooses y, then updates are completed. If the user chooses n, the DBsubquery aborts immediately. One of either the +m (mark) or +u (unmark) operations (but not both) may be given along with the +c option. NOTE: The options +f, +l or +L may not be specied along with +c.

Caveats on Changing Fields


Whenever the change operation (+c) is requested and the set of elds to change and their new values is specied, DBsubquery veries that the changes do not cause an inconsistency in the database for any of the records meeting the search criteria. This is done because such inconsistencies may prevent subsequent access of the records for update via Recent Change. If DBsubquery nds that any changes would cause database inconsistencies, it logs the number of such records, writing in DBsubq_uc.log a text explanation of the discovered inconsistency. Any records that meet the search criteria and have such inconsistencies detected in them are not updated.

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Verify-Only Mode(DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


DBsubquery can do a "trial-run" of the mark (+m), unmark (+u) or change (+c) operations if the +v option appears on the command-line. With this, no updates to the subscriber databases are performed, but statistics on what the tool WOULD HAVE updated are output. By default, the subscriber databases are updated if the mark, unmark or change operations are requested. NOTE: You must specify either +c, +m or +u along with +v.

Query Bypass File Format (DBsubquery UpdateCapable Feature)


If the +i command-line option is given, a bypass_file parameter is required. The bypass_file specied with the +i option can contain keys that are either nsn (referred to previously as dn,) msid, or imsi. This is indicated by using the +D, +M, or +I option. (If none of +D/+M/+I are used, the default is +D.) With the +D option: (1) <3-digit npa value><3-digit nxx value><4-digit mdn value> (2) <3-digit npa value><delim_char><3-digit nxx value><delim_char><4-digit mdn value> where delim_char = any ASCII character except decimal digits 0 through 9 or a. With the +M option: <10-digit msid value> With the +I option: <8-15 digit imsi value>

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NOTE: You must specify either +c, +m, or +u on the command line along with the +i. The bypass_file is assumed to be in the current directory unless a full path name is given.

Delimiter Character in Query Bypass File (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


If the +d command-line option is given, DBsubquery looks for the ASCII character delim_char as the delimiter between the "npa", "nxx," and "mdn values in the query by-pass le bypass_file given with the +i option. The delim_char can be any ASCII character except decimal digits 0 to 9 or a. If delim_char is a character that is special to the UNIX shell (such as ';', ':', '&', etc.), then it must be preceded on the command-line by the UNIX escape character '\'. For example, DBsubquery +m +i bp_file +d \; is the command-line for a request to mark records whose keys are represented in the bypass le bp_file wherein "npa", "nxx," and "mdn" values are delimited by the character ;. NOTE: If +d is specied, then +i must also be specied and the argument delim_char is required. In addition, the tool halts, and no changes occur to the subscriber databases, if the delim_char argument to +d differs from the delimiter character used in the +i query bypass le argument.

+f/+p Format File (DBsubquery +f/+p OPTION Feature)


With the format output option (+f), the DBsubquery tool can output a delimited set of eld values (including NULL values) along with the keys of records meeting the search criteria. The eld values and delimiter used for this output are dened in the le format_file as follows: NULL=<character used for NULL fields> DELIMITER=<character used to delimit key and other field value(s)> <keyword><"DELIMITER=" character>[keyword2<"DELIMITER=" character>keyword3 ...]

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Specifying a character on the "NULL=" line and on the "DELIMITER=" line is optional (the default character for null values and the default delimiter character is a space). If any of the keywords' elds has a null value, the "NULL=" character (or a space, by default) will be output for the length of that eld (e. g., if "pic" is one of the keywords in format_file and the (4-character) "pic" eld has a null value in a record that matches the Query? criteria, then there will be 4 "NULL=" characters written to output_file to represent that record's "pic" eld value). If the eld is non-NULL, the length of the eld is accounted for in the output. For example, billno is a 20 character eld but the value could be less than 20 characters. If so, it appears as: ;3125551212; The keyword values can be any of the values supported for the Query? expressions (see options -k and +k) and more than one keyword can be specied per line in format_file. The keywords must be separated by the character given on the "DELIMITER=" line. If two or more keywords are specied on a line in format_file and no delimiter character is given on the "DELIMITER=" line, then the keywords must be separated by a space (that is, the default delimiter character). The +f/+p option requires the parameter format_file and cannot be specied along with the change, mark or unmark operations (+c, +m or +u, respectively). In addition, the argument output_file must also be given (either "here" or an output lename) in order to view the formatted output. NOTE: The dn, npa, nxx, and mdn elds are dened only for 10-digit National Signicant Numbers (NSNs.) When any of these elds is requested in the format_file, if some records contain an NSN that is not 10 digits in length, the dn/npa/nxx/ mdn elds printed for these records are lled with the "NULL=" character specied. NOTE: If the +l, +L, or +L1 options are given (see Long Output Options below), then the values of those keywords (delimited by the "DELIMITER=" character or, by default, a ";") are printed rst in the output le, followed by the values of the keywords in the +f/+p format le. NOTE: The +p option is exclusive of +f because it is the same functionality except that it adds the capability to print private data elds such as akey and ssd. This feature requires a password and a message with a Major Alarm capability is sent to the ROP if this option is exercised.

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Long Output Options


The command-line options +l, +L, and +L1 allow the user to output, in addition to key values, the values of a xed set of elds for records meeting the search criteria. The elds' values are delimited with the ";" character, unless the +f option is given (in which case, the "DELIMITER=" character is used as the delimiter). NOTE: Before you run the +L1 option, the ccfdb database must be backed up in order to print valid data for these elds due to the volatile nature of the data. The xed set of non-key elds currently being supported for output via the +l and +L options is the following: nsn - National Significant Number srno - Serial number omaj - Origination major class tmaj - Termination major class dc1 - Primary dialing class dc2 - Secondary dialing class sw - Switch Identification pic - Primary Interexchange Carrier icf - Immediate Call-Forwarding Available cfbl - Call-Forwarding on Busy Line Available cfda - Call-Forwarding on No Answer Available cfnpr - Call-Forwarding on No-Page Response Available mrs - Message Recording Service Available cw - Call-Waiting Available twc - Three-Way Calling Available exmin - Long MIN Paging Active

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billno - Billing Number The eld values output for both +l and +L are the same. The only difference between these options is the headings they output. The headings for +l and +L are output only when the output_file parameter is given the value "here". The +L heading text, in contrast, extends over 2 lines. The xed set of non-key elds currently being supported for output via the +L1 options is as follows nsn - National Significant Number dcsid - DCS Identifier ecpid - ECP Identifier sid - System Identification Number The +L1 heading aligns the heading with the eld value. Null values are printed with dashes. NOTE: The +l, +L, and +L1 options MAY NOT be specied along with the change operation (+c), as the elds' values may have changed as a result of that operation. In addition, the parameter output_file must be given on the command-line (with "here" or an output lename) in order to view the output.

Option to Quit after N Matches


Use of the +n option enables the user to halt the tool after matches_found records are found that meet the Query? search criteria, where matches_found is a positive integer. NOTE: The +n option DOES NOT apply for the "query bypass" (+i) search criteria.

Database File Transfer (ECP to OMP)


Specication of the +x command-line option enables the user to transfer a copy of the backup subscriber database les from the ECP to the current directory on the OMP. This option may be combined with any other command-line option so that queries, change operations, etc. can be performed at the OMP.

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Usage of the +x option assumes that there is sufcient space in the le system associated with the current OMP directory to hold all of the subscriber database les (mufdb, ccfdb, subauxdb, audb, p2ldndb, s2pdb, subuzdb, and dn2pdb). In addition, the +x option overwrites any existing copies of those les that may be present in the current OMP directory.

Database File Transfer (OMP to ECP) (DBsubquery Update-Capable Feature)


Specication of the +e command-line option enables the user to transfer a copy of the current directory subscriber database les on the OMP to the backup directory on the ECP (/1apx10/dbbackup). this option may be combined with other command-line option so that queries, change operations, and other related operations can be performed at the OMP but requires at least one of the UpdateCapable options (+c +m +u). NOTE: The +e option overwrites any existing copies of the subscriber database les (mufdb, ccfdb, subauxdb, audb, p2ldndb, s2pdb, subuzdb, and dn2pdb) in the ECP backup directory.

Options
The following options are available with the DBsubquery tool (the options may appear in any order):
s

+c = Change values in 1 or more of the supported changeable elds for records meeting the search criteria (DBsubquery Update-Capable feature) +d delim_char = Look for character delim_char as a delimiter in the query bypass le. This option must be accompanied by the +i option (DBsubquery Update-Capable feature). +e (OMP only) = Transfer a copy of the current directory subscriber database les from the OMP to the backup directory (/1apx10/ dbbackup) on the ECP (DBsubquery Update-Capable feature) +f format_file = Output the key values and the eld values specied and delimited as per format_file for records meeting the Query? criteria. This must be accompanied by an output_file (DBsubquery +f Option feature). +p format_file (OMP only) = Output the key values, eld values, and private data specied and delimited as per format_file for records meeting the Query? criteria. This feature requires a password and when exercised, a message is written to the ROP with Major Alarm capabilities. This must be accompanied by an output_file (DBsubquery +p Option

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feature). To change the password, "chgpwd" password must be used as the password. This is followed by a prompt to enter current password. Encrypted password is kept in the le /etc/dbsqppwd.
s

+i bypass_file = Search for records whose keys are represented in the le bypass_file, which is assumed to be in the current directory unless its full path name is given (no Query? prompt will appear). This must be accompanied by either the +c, +m or +u options (DBsubquery UpdateCapable feature). +k = Write to standard output a list of keywords that can be used in Query? expressions or in the +f format le, then output the Query? prompt. +l, +L, or +L1 = Output the key eld values and the values of a xed list of elds (delimited by ';') for records meeting the search criteria. These must be accompanied by an output_file to see the elds. +m = Mark the records meeting the search criteria (DBsubquery UpdateCapable feature) +s = Display text on the standard output describing the syntax allowed in Query? expressions, then output the Query? prompt +u = Unmark the records meeting the search criteria (DBsubquery UpdateCapable feature) +v = Do a verify-only run of the +c, +m or +u operation whereby no changes are made to the subscriber data bases, but statistics on what would have been changed are output. This must be accompanied by either the +c, +m, or +u options (DBsubquery Update-Capable feature). +x (OMP only) = Transfer a copy of the backup subscriber database les from the ECP to the current OMP directory (DBsubquery Update-Capable feature). -h = Print a help message to the standard output

Return values
None

Examples
The following examples illustrate the different uses of the DBsubquery tool. Examples (1), (2) and (4)-(7) apply to all feature-activation levels, Example (3) applies to the DBsubsearch Multi-Query for MUF, CCF and SUBAUX (DBSQ)" feature and beyond, Example 8 applies to the "DBsubquery +f or +p option (DBSQF) or (DBSQP)" features and beyond and Examples 9 through 13 apply to the "DBsubquery Update-Capable (DBSUBQUC)" feature.

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Example 1
To search the subscriber database for all records having the "sw" value equal to 11 or the "cgsa" value equal to 7, with only a count of the records meeting those criteria sent to the standard output, type DBsubquery and, at the Query? prompt, type sw = 11 | cgsa = 7

Example 2
To search for all marked records and to capture their keys in the output le marked_recs, type DBsubquery marked_recs and, at the Query? prompt, enter marked = y Example 3 For a long output to the standard output of records with "npa" values of 630 and "nxx" values of "979" or "713" or "224" and having "mpci" values other than 553 wherein the headings take up only 1 line, type DBsubquery +l here and, at the Query? prompt, type npa = 630 & (nxx = 979 | nxx = 713 | nxx 553) = 224) & (mpci !=

To do the same thing, but with two lines of headings, type DBsubquery +L here and enter the same text at the Query? prompt.

Example 4
To nd the rst 100 records with a null "pic" value and capture their keys in the le null_pics, type DBsubquery +n 100 null_pics

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and, at the Query? prompt, type pic = null

Example 5
To output a listing of the keywords available to the standard output and perform a search of the database while that listing is shown, type DBsubquery +k, then enter the desired search criteria at the Query? prompt. Type DBsubquery -k for a listing only (no database searches occur).

Example 6
For a "help" message to be displayed at the standard output, type DBsubquery -h.

Example 7
For an explanation of the syntax to be used in Query? expressions and to perform a search of the database while that explanation is shown, type DBsubquery +s, Then enter the desired search criteria at the Query? prompt. For just an explanation of syntax without doing a database search, type DBsubquery -s.

Example 8
To search for records having "tmaj" values greater than 1 and to output keys, keyword values and null values as specied in the current directory le tmaj_fmt to the output le tmaj_out, type DBsubquery +f tmaj_fmt tmaj_out or DBsubquery +p tmaj_fmt tmaj_out

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Then, at the Query? prompt, type tmaj > 1

Example 9
To change values in one or more elds for records with an "sw" value equal to 3, type DBsubquery +c, Then type sw = 3 at the Query? prompt. Responses given on the prompt screens displayed prior to the Query? prompt determine which elds are changed and what the new value(s) will be in those records. Statistics on this invocation appear on the standard output and in the log le DBsubq_uc.log.

Example 10
To search for and mark records whose keys are represented in the le my_input, which has the per-line format <dn>, <msid>, or <imsi>. (that is, no delimiter), type DBsubquery +m +i my_input Statistics on this invocation appears on the standard output and in the log le DBsubq_uc.log.

Example 11
To search for and unmark records whose keys are represented in the le delim_input, which has a ';' delimiting npa, nxx and mdn on each line, type DBsubquery +u +i delim_input +d \; Statistics on this invocation will appear on the standard output and in the log le DBsubq_uc.log.

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Example 12
To change values in one or more eld(s) for records that have "npa" values of 312 and to do it in "verify-only" mode (that is, where no changes are actually made to the records), type DBsubquery +v +c then, at the Query? prompt, type npa =312 Statistics on this invocation appear on the standard output and in the log le DBsubq_uc.log le.

Example 13
At the OMP, to transfer copies of the backup subscriber databases to the current directory, then mark and change values in one or more elds for those records having "dc2" values of 200 or "dc1" values of 128, type DBsubquery +x +m +c Then, at the Query? prompt, type dc2 = 200 OR dc1 = 128 Statistics on this invocation appear on the standard output and in the log le DBsubq_uc.log.

Example 14
At the OMP, to mark and change values in one or more elds for those records having "dc2" values of 200 or "dc1" values of 128, then transfer copies of the current directory subscriber databases on the OMP to the ECP backup directory (/1apx10/dbbackup) type DBsubquery +e +m +c Then you are asked to conrm if you want to transfer the current directory subscriber databases on the OMP to the ECP backup directory (/1apx10/ dbbackup) after executing your query. You selected the +e transfer option (OMP to ECP). This overwrites your /1apx10/dbbackup subscriber databases on the ECP.

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Do you want to proceed (Y/N)? If your answer is yes, then at the Query? prompt, type in your query response.

Files ECP Files


/1apx10/ubin/DBsubquery = The DBsubquery tool on the ECP. /user/DBLOG/DBsubq_uc.log = The DBsubquery Update-Capable log le on the ECP.

OMP Files
/omp/bin/DBsubquery = the DBsubquery tool on the OMP. /omp-data/logs/DBLOG/DBsubq_uc.log =The DBsubquery UpdateCapable log le on the OMP. /etc/dbsqppwd = the DBsubquery +p password le on the OMP.

See also
For more information about the DBsubquery command, see
s s

401-612-168, DBsubquery and DBsubsum Optional Feature Description 401-610-036, Database Update Manual

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DBsubrehome
Name
DBsubrehomerehome a subscriber.

Description
The DBsubrehome command provides the capability to
s

mark certain records in the source subscriber database; that is, hide the records from call processing and the Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) subsystem modify certain elds in the source subscriber database transfer and/or merge large volumes of data from a source to a destination subscriber database

s s

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the DBsubrehome command is in the /omp/ bin directory. DBsubrehome calls the DBrehome command, which is in the directory /omp/rehome.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the DBsubrehome command is unavailable.

For complete information


The DBsubrehome command is provided in the Subscriber Rehome optional feature. For complete information about the DBsubrehome command, refer to 401-612-233, Subscriber Rehome Optional Feature Description.

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DBsubsearch
Name
DBsubsearchsearch the Mobile Unit Features Data Base (mufdb) for subscriber information. NOTE: In ECP Releases 15.0 and later, the DBsubsearch command is replaced by the DBsubquery command (see the manual page for DBsubquery).

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DBsubsum
Name
DBsubsumsummarize the subscriber conguration.

Description
The DBsubsum command summarizes the subscriber conguration that is stored in the backup copy of the Mobile Unit Features Database (mufdb). DBsubsum summarizes mufdb records with respect to
s s s s s s s s s s s

features rate center Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) routing class dialing class directory number (DN) type major class presubscribed Inter-Local Access and Transport Area (LATA) carrier automatic call trace value distributions message-recording service immediate billing

A brief summary of the results are printed to the screen. The complete results are written to the le DBsubsum.log in the current working directory. The -m option prints summaries with Mobile Station Identication (MSID) distributions. The -i option prints summaries with International Mobile Station Identier (IMSI) distributions. If neither the -m nor the -i option is used, DBsubsum prints summaries with the logical representation of the Network Operating Center (npanxx) distributions. If the -{hxmi} options are used, DBsum does not read the mufdb.

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Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the DBsubsum command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the DBsubsum command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
The DBsubsum command has the same syntax and options in both the Solaris and UNIX RTR operating systems. DBsubsum [-{xmi}] DBsubsum -{hxmi}

Options
The options for the DBsubsum command are described in Table 5-16 on page 5-91. Table 5-16. Option -h -x -m -i DBsubsum command options in the Solaris operating system Description Display online help for the dbsum command. Transfer the mufdb from the ECP. Print summaries with MSID (rst six digits) distributions. Print summaries with IMSI (rst eight digits) distributions.

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the DBsubsum command: To run a quick summary of the subscriber conguration, enter DBsubsum

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See also
For more information about the DBsubsum command, see 401-612-168, DBsubquery and DBsubsum Optional Feature Description.

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DBsurvey
Name
DBsurveygenerate information about a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network Recent Change/Verify (RC/V) subsystem form.

Synopsis
DBsurvey -i inputfile -o outputfile [-m maskdir] [-c] [-v] [-f dbname] [-h]

Description
The DBsurvey command generates a list of form elds (specied by the user) that match selection criteria (also specied by the user) for a Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network RC/V form. The user creates a le in a special syntax that contains the query, and DBsurvey places the results in a specied output le. Results are given in a semicolon-separated list, one form instance per line (that is, the same format as the "raw" mode dump of the apxrcv prtlist function, which is value;value;value;). NOTE: The term database is an archaic term for this tool. Wherever the term database occurs in this manual page, substitute the term RC/V form. All access is through RC/V-level form and elds.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, DBsurvey is in the /omp/bin/ directory. NOTE: To execute DBsurvey on the OMP, you must rst copy the databases from the ECP to the OMP.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, DBsurvey is in the /1apx10/ubin/ directory.

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NOTE: In ECP Releases 13.0 and 14.0, DBsurvey cannot be executed on the subscriber and trunk databases on the ECP. In those releases, execute DBsurvey only on the OMP. In ECP Releases 15 and later, execute DBsurvey on either the ECP or the OMP.

Options
The DBsurvey command has the same options in both the Solaris and UNIX RTR operating systems. The options are described in Table 5-17 on page 5-94.

Table 5-17. Option

DBsurvey command options Description Where inputfile species the name of the le that contains the RC/V form query. Where outputfile is the name of the le that holds the results of the survey features. Where makdir is the directory that contains the RC/V form mask les. Check the query le for syntax errors but do not perform the survey. Execute DBsurvey in verbose mode, that is, print what DBsurvey is doing as it executes. Where form species the elds of the specied RC/V form that you want to be printed. Print the help message for the DBsurvey command.

-i inputfile -o outputfile -m makdir -c -v -f form -h

Query syntax
Queries are stored in a le and use the following syntax for each database in the query: DB: formname {UKLIST: filename} MATCH: fieldname op value [AND fieldname op value | OR fieldname op value] OUTPUT: fieldname [fieldname] {COUNT} [USE: fieldname ASKEY: fieldname IN: database] {STOPAT: number} ENDDB

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where +\fo +\fo '[X]' indicates zero or more occurrences of X. '{X}' indicates zero or one occurrence of X.

+\fo X | Y indicates either X or Y. +\fo 'database' is the name of a Flexent/AUTOPLEX database (actually, the name of an RC/V form). +\fo 'fieldname' is the abbreviated name of a eld in the RC/V form. These abbreviated eld names are taken from the mask internal le that describes the RC/V form of the database. The abbreviated eld names are the same names that are used in the Text RC/V subsystem and are documented in 401-610-036, Database Update Manual. +\fo +\fo +\fo EQ NE GT GR 'value' is the value of the eld. 'number' is an integer. 'op' is one of the following:

equal not equal greater than greater than or equal

LT less than LE less than or equal

Directives
DB species the name of an RC/V form that is to be used in the query. COUNT indicates that a count of the number of records that matched the survey selection criteria should be printed. STOPAT indicates how many records are to be matched before processing is terminated for this RC/V form. OUTPUT species the elds of the matching records that are to be written to the output le. MATCH species the selection criteria that are used to determine which records are desired.

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UKLIST species that DBsurvey is to use the named le as a klist le. USE/ASKEY/IN denotes the elds in one form that are to be used as keys into another form. This is used only when a query involves more than one form. ENDDB denotes the end of the directives list for a database.

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the DBsurvey command: To list all eld names for a form, enter DBsurvey -f fscode That command returns the following results to standard output: Keys are: 1) fsc 2) cgsa 3) rc Data fields are: 4) fsctype 5) fsci3d 6) fscci 7) fscdgt 8) fscnri 9) fscrecf 10) fsctone 11) sendxx To obtain a list of subscribers in Area Code 218, enter DBsurvey -i query -o results The query input le to that command (that is, the le that is named query) contained the following lines: DB: sub OUTPUT: dirno.spa dirno. nxx dirnomdn lbill_no MATCH: dirno.npa EQ 218 STOPAT: 10 ENDDB This species the sub form (using the latent, now erroneous term DB). The elds are the Area Code (dirno.npa), Ofce Code (dirno.nxx), Station Number (dirno.mdn), and Billing Number (lbill_no). The MATCH lines says to match on any record in which the Area Code (dirno.npa) is equal to 218. For brevity in this example, the STOPAT directive is added so that we list only the rst ten matches in case the MATCH directive would produce too many matches.

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Here are the results (in le results): 218;712;7636;2187127636 218;712;8633;2187128633 To obtain a list of subscribers outside Area Code 708, enter DBsurvey -i query -o results The query input le to that command (that is, the le that is named query) contained the following lines: DB: sub OUTPUT: dirno.npa dirno.nxx dirno.mdn lbill_no MATCH: dirno.npa NE 218 STOPAT: 10ENDDB In that command, DBsubsurvey searches for any subscriber with an Area Code that is not equal to 218. The following results occur: 000;000;0234;0000000234 219;712;0001;2197120001 219;712;0002;2197120002 219;712;0003;2197120003 219;712;0004;2197120004 219;712;0005;2197120005 219;712;0006;2197120006 219;712;0007;2197120007 219;712;0008;2197120008 219;712;0009;2197120009 Use one form (roam) to get keys for another form (nnbr). Here is an example of using all of the Extended System Identier entries in the roam form to look up information in the corresponding nnbr form: DB: roam MATCH: dcsid GE 0 USE: dcsid ASKEY: dcsid IN: nnbr USE: ecpid ASKEY: ecpid IN: nnbr USE: sid ASKEY: sid IN: nnbr OUTPUT: dcsid ecpid sid COUNT ENDDB DB: nnbr MATCH: omaj GT 0 OUTPUT: omaj COUNT ENDDB

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This example gets all of the records in roam with a nonzero Extended System Identier Switch (dcsid) and uses the three Extended System Identier elds (dcsid, ecpid, sid) as keys into the nnbr form. Then, in the nnbr form, the Originating Major Class (omaj) is printed since, in the RC/V subsystem, it is either null or 1 to 255 and therefore always not equal to 0. Here are the results (in le results): 0 ;7 ;22 13;13;2 13;13;2 13;13;2 14;13;2 14;13;2 14;13;2 ;1 ;1 ;1 ;1 ;1 ;1 ;1

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


When the DBsurvey command succeeds, it returns an exit code of 0. When DBsurvey fails, it returns and exit code of -1.

Caveats
There is no indication when a failure occurs because of locked databases. The path names to the databases are hard-coded into the tool. On the ECP, the directory /1apx10/dbbackup is used. On the OMP, the /omp-data/dbbackup directory is used. Before DBsurvey can be run on the OMP, a full set of databases must be le-transferred from the ECP to that directory on the OMP.

See also
The DBsubquery command can be used as an alternative to DBsurvey for subscriber data only. For more information about DBsubquery and the query language, see 401-612-024, Database Survey (DBsurvey) Optional Feature Description. 401-610-036, Database Update Manual, describes all RC/V form and elds, including the internal mask eld name.

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DBvlrquery
Name
DBvlrqueryquery the Visitor Location Register (VLR) database and list all directory numbers (DNs) in the VLR.

Description
The DBvlrquery command allows the user to dump the DNs that are in the users VLR. Execute DBvlrquery when duplicate VLRs occur. Execute DBvlrquery on each MSC to nd duplicate VLRs.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the DBvlrquery command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the DBvlquery command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
DBvlrquery

Options
The DBvlrquery command has no options.

Arguments
The DBvlrquery command has no arguments.

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Example
The DBvlrquery command prompts the user with questions as the command executes. Enter either y for yes or n for no in response to all questions. Some questions offer the q option to exit the command. The following sequence illustrates the execution of DBvlrquery: 1. The user executes the DBvlrquery command.

Result:
The system displays output such as the following: WARNING: This tool will allow the user to BKUP the vdn2pdb that is on the ACDN and then dump the DNs that are in their VLR. Use when duplicate VLRs occur execute on each MSC to find duplicates. CAUTION: This tool can cause disk memory overflow if the VLRs are very large. This tool may also take a long time to execute. Would you like more detailed info on the TOOL (y/n/q): 2. Enter y. The system then displays output such as the following: The tool can be executed anywhere on the 3B platform. It requires no arguments--just answer all the questions (y/n). It is intended as a diagnostic tool when you think you may have duplicate VLRs in your system. You need to execute this tool on each MSC and then find the DN that exists on both. You can then use APXRCV to delete the VLR record from one of the systems. Depending on the size of your system, this tool can take a long time to execute. It is the BKUP of the VDN2P database that can take the longest. Make certain that you have the resources (disk space available) and time to execute this tool. It is recommended that you execute the tool during low traffic periods (in the middle of the night or during your maintenance activities). Do you wish to continue with the TOOL (y/n/q)? 3. Enter y. The system then displays a prompt such as the following: Generate report in file (/user/DBDUMP/vdn2pdmp)?

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(y/n=stdout): 4. Enter y to direct the output to the file /user/DBDUMP/vdn2pdmp. The system then displays a prompt such as the following: Do you want to BKUP vdn2pdb (from ACDN to disk)? (y/n/q): 5. Enter y.

Result:
The system then executes the BKUP:DATABASE;DB vdn2pdb. If you enter n, the BKUP does not occur. The system assumes that you have already performed a BKUP and simply want to dump the report again. The system then displays the following output and returns the UNIX command prompt (#): running TIpdunix command: (BKUP:DATABASE;DB vdn2pdb) GENERATING REPORT Report Complete. - see /user/DBDUMP/vdn2pdmp file DBvlrquery completed in 0 hrs 3 min 36 sec. #

Associated commands and/or les


If you answer y to the generate report file prompt, the DBvlrquery command generates a /user/DBDUMP/vdn2pdmp le.

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dmptime
Name
dmptimedisplay boot time.

Description
The dmptime command displays the boot time of the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network elements. If dmptime is executed without options, the boot times of the ECP and all CDNs are reported.

Availability UNIX RTR operating system


The dumptime command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
dmptime [-c cdnid | all] [-d dlnid | all] [-e] [-h] [-o okp_file]

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Options
Table 5-18. Option c all c cdnid d all d dlnid e h o okp_file dmptime Command Options Description Display the boot time of all CDNs. Display the boot time of CDN that is named cdnid. Display the boot time of all Direct Link Nodes (DLNs). Display the boot time of the DLN that is named dlnid. Display the boot time of the ECP and all CDNs. Display the syntax of dmptime. Specify the full path name of the OKP symbol le.

Example
Example: Display the boot time of the ECP and all CDNs. dmptime Example: Display the boot time of DLN 244. dmptime -d244

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dpclone
Name
dpclonecopy a dialing plan.

Description
The dpclone command copies Dialing Plan Database (dplandb)records from one dialing plan to another dialing plan. The dialing plan from which records are copied is considered the source dialing plan. The dialing plan to which records are copied is considered the destination dialing plan. The dpclone command also invokes the ptresync command to create the pattern tree (ptree) data le for the destination dialing plan. When dpclone invokes ptresync, ptresync creates a ptree data le for the destination dialing plan. If records in the destination dialing plan are corrupted (due to syntax error, overlap, or fatal error), the source dialing plan was also corrupted. In that case, an error message noties the user of the corruption. NOTE: While the dpclone command executes, the dplandb database and ptree les for the source and destination dialing plans are locked. This precaution prevents other users from altering the dialing plans that the dpclone command is using. The dpclone command optionally allows you to duplicate a subset of the source dialing plan patterns. An input le is read to determine which pattern numbers in the source dialing plan are to be copied into the destination dialing plan. The dpclone command also optionally allows you to insert records from the source dialing plan into an existing dialing plan. Exercise care to avoid placing overlapping patterns in the dplandb database.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the dpclone command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the dpclone command resides in the directory /1apx10/ubin.

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Synopsis
dpclone -s dpnum -d dpnum [-f filename] [-O]

Options
The options for the dpclone command are described in Table 5-19 on page 5-105. Table 5-19. Option -s dpnum -d dpnum -f filename dpclone command options Description

dpnum = the number of the source dialing plan. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. dpnum = the number of the destination dialing plan. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. filename = the name of the le in the current directory that species the subset of patterns that are to be duplicated into the destination dialing plan. Each line of this le must contain one of the following: s one pattern number s a range of pattern numbers, that is, two pattern numbers that are separated by a dash (-) s any combination of pattern numbers or ranges of pattern numbers
You can also renumber the destination dialing plan by either of the following methods: s Specify the pattern number that is to be duplicated, followed by a colon (:), followed by the new pattern number. or s Specify the range of pattern numbers that are to be duplicated, followed by a colon (:), followed by the beginning new pattern number. (The new pattern number is incremented by one for each pattern in the pattern range.)

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Table 5-19. Option -O

dpclone command options Description Override the destination dialing plan check. The -O option allows you to insert records from a source dialing plan into an existing dialing plan, with the following caveats: s You cannot overwrite an existing pattern number. s If you put in overlapping patterns, you can direct the ptresync command to catch and remove the overlapping patterns. If you do not want the overlapping patterns to be removed, you cannot run the tg command on the destination dialing plan.

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the dpclone command: To clone Dialing Plan 1 to Dialing Plan 200, enter dpclone -s 1 -d 200 To clone a subset of Dialing Plan 1 into Dialing Plan 100, enter dpclone -s 1 -d 100 -f patnums where

patnums is a le that contains data such as the following:


23 27-40 50:200 300-400:1000 500-550 600 To clone a subset of Dialing Plan 1 into the existing Dialing Plan 100, enter dpclone -s 1 -d 100 -f patnums -O where

patnums is a le that contains data such as the following:


23 27-40 50:200

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300-400:1000 500-550 600

See also
For more information about the dpclone command, see 401-661-030, Digit-byDigit Feature Users Guide.

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dpdelete
Name
dpdeletedelete all records or specied records of a dialing plan.

Description
The dpdelete command normally deletes all records of a specied dialing plan from the dialing plan database (dplandb). When dpdelete is executed with the -f option, dpdelete deletes a specied subset of the records of the specied dialing plan. After you have copied, modied, and tested a dialing plan to x errors or provide new capabilities, you can use either of the following methods to provide the modied dialing plan to subscribers:
s

Use existing subscriber dialing class values to change the startdb entries to point to the new dialing plan. or

Change all subscriber dialing classes to correspond to existing startdb records.

Both of those methods, however, require you to input extensive data and are prone to errors. The easiest method to provide a new or modied dialing plan to subscribers is to replace an existing dialing plan with a new or modied dialing plan. To do this, perform the following steps: 1. Execute the dpdelete command to delete the old dialing plan. 2. Execute the dpclone command to copy the new or modied dialing plan to the location of the old dialing plan (see dpclone on page 5-104).

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the dpdelete command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the dpdelete command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

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When the 3B21D computer is used, the dplandb database resides in the directory /1apx10/dbdata, and the pattern tree (ptree) data les reside in the /1apx10/dbdata/ptree directory. Otherwise, those les reside in the current directory.

Synopsis
dpdelete -d dpnum [-f filename]

Options
The options for the dpdelete command are described in Table 5-20 on page 5-109. Table 5-20. dpdelete command options Option -d dpnum -f filename Description Delete the specied dpnum dialing plan. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. Delete from the dialing plan the patterns that are identied in the specied filename le in the current directory. In each line of this le, specify either s one pattern number or s a range of pattern numbers, that is, two pattern numbers that are separated by a minus sign ()

The following table explains the use of the -f option. If you execute dpdelete without the -f option then dpdelete deletes... all records of the specied dialing plan. It removes the ptree data les that are associated with that dialing plan. a subset of records in the specied dialing plan. It invokes the ptresync command to update the ptree data les.

with the -f option

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NOTE: While the dpdelete command executes, the dplandb database and ptree data les for the source and destination dialing plans are locked. This precaution prevents other users from altering dialing plans that dpdelete is using.

Examples
The following examples illustrate use of the dpdelete command: To remove Dialing Plan 1 from the dplandb database, enter dpdelete -d 1 To delete a subset of patterns from Dialing Plan 1, enter dpdelete -d 1 -f filename where

filename = a le that lists the patterns that are to be deleted from the dialing plan. For example:
23 27-40 50

See also Related commands


dpclone ptresync

Related les
s s

dplandb database ptree program data les, including

ptdpnum podpnum ptdpnum.err

Related documents
s

401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide

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dpreport
Name
dpreportproduce a dialing plan report.

Description
The dpreport command produces a report on the specied dialing plan. The report contains one line for each dplandb record using the specied dialing plan number as the key. Since a dialing plan may contain many records, the report is always written to the le /1apx10/dbdata/ptree/dpdpnum.rpt, where dpnum is the specied dialing plan.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dpreport command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
dpreport -d dpnum [ -p ] [ -l pgnum ]

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Options
Table 5-21. Option d dpnum p l pgnum dpreport Command Options Description Species the dialing plan number. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. Sorts the dialing plan records by pattern Species number of records per page

Examples
Example: Generate a dialing plan report for Dialing Plan 1. dpreport -d 1 Example: Generate a sorted report with 10 lines per page for Dialing Plan 3. dpreport -d 3 -p -l 10

See Also
Related documents 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide

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dpsrch
Name
dpsrchsearch the Dialing Plan Database (dplandb).

Description
The dpsrch command searches the dialing plan database (dplandb) for records that match specied criteria. The dpsrch command writes a report to standard output (stdout) about the records that match the specied criteria. The default report contains one line for each record that matches the criteria. If you specify multiple search parameters in the dpsrch command line, only records that match all of the specied parameters are reported.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the dpsrch command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the dpsrch command resides in the directory /1apx10/ubin.

Synopsis
dpsrch {-d dplan1 [-d dplan2...] |-p pattern |-P substring |-L patlength |-c calltype |-x destx |-m dnmodtype |-n patnum or patnum1-patnum2} |-v cancel_sub

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[-o formatstring] [-r rcvoper|-t rcvoper] [-f] [-l pagelines] [-q] [-s] [ -H pageheader] NOTE: The dpsrch command line must specify at least one of the following options: -d, -p, -P, -L, -c, -x, -m, -n, or -v.

Options
The options for the dpsrch command are described in Table 5-22 on page 5-114. Table 5-22. Option -d dplan dpsrch command options (Page 1 of 3) Description Find records in which the dialing plan number key matches the specied dplan. The value of dplan may range from 1 to 255. Find records in which the pattern eld matches the specied pattern.

-p pattern

The specied pattern need not be in canonical form. If the specied pattern contains blanks, pattern must be enclosed in quotation marks. A subset pattern does not match a larger pattern. For example, the option -p "979 1234" does not match "979 X(4)." -P substring Find records in which the pattern eld contains the specied substring.

NOTE:

If the specied substring contains blanks, substring must be enclosed in quotation marks. If the substring begins with a carat symbol (^), the pattern eld is matched only if substring matches the pattern that starts at the rst character of the pattern. -L patlen -c calltype Find records in which the pattern eld is patlen number of digits long. Find records in which the calltype eld matches the specied calltype.

NOTE:

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Table 5-22. Option -x destx

dpsrch command options (Page 1 of 3) Description Find records in which the destx eld matches the specied destx. Find records in which the dnmodtype eld matches the specied dnmodtype. Find records in which the pattern number key matches the specied patnum.

-m dnmodtype -n patnum -o formatstring

formatstring = the elds to include in output. The formatstring values are processed from left to right. Valid values for formatstring include
1 Dialing Plan 2 Pattern Number 4 Pattern 5 Call Type 6 Destination Index 7 Prex Type 8 Number of Digits to Delete 9 Reanalyze After Deleting? a DN Modication Type b Feature/Carrier Code Starting Position c Feature/Carrier Code Length d Start Position of Feature Code Terminal Address

The -o option may be used in conjunction with the -r option. -r rcvoper Generate Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) script output, where rcvoper = the RC/V operation: s u = update. s d = delete. s r = review-change-insert.

NOTE:

When you use the -r option, redirect the output of dpsrch to a le.

NOTE:

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Table 5-22. Option

dpsrch command options (Page 1 of 3) Description Generate text RC/V output, where rcvoper = the text RC/V operation: s u = update. s d = delete. s i = insert.

-t rcvoper

When you use the -t option, redirect the output of dpsrch to a le. -f -l pagelines -q -v -s Display the valid values for the -o option. Print records, where pagelines = the number of records to print per page. Do not print page headings. Match records that are indicated by cancel subscriber validation, either y or n. Include search parameters in output. Print the parameters with which dpsrch was invoked at the top of each page or include the parameters as a comment at the beginning of an RC/V script. Add an extra blank line at the top of each page or include an extra blank line as a comment at the beginning of an RC/V script.

NOTE:

-H pageheader

Examples
To nd records in which dplan = 1 or 2, destx = 13, and calltype = 1, enter dpsrch -d 1 -d 2 -x 13 -c 1 To nd a four-digit dialing pattern in Dialing Plan 1, enter dpsrch -d 1 -p "xxxx" where

xxxx = the four-digit dialing pattern.


To nd the patterns in Dialing Plan 1 that contain the digit string 312, enter dpsrch -d 1 -P 312

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To nd the patterns in Dialing Plan 1 that begin with the digit string 312, enter dpsrch -d 1 -P ^312 To generate an RC/V script to delete the records in Dialing Plan 1 that have a length of four digits, enter dpsrch -d 1 -L 4 -r d apxrcv <<! dpland 1 1 d < < !

See also
For more information about the dpsrch command, see 401-661-030, Digit-byDigit Feature Users Guide.

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dpvacant
Name
dpvacantlist the dialing plans to which vacant code treatment is applied.

Description
The dpvacant command lists the dialing plans to which the vacant code treatment is applied. The dialing plans to which the vacant code treatment is applied are those dialing plans for which digit tables were built by using the tg command with the -v option. Vacant code treatment allows analysis to move to another dialing plan (without rereading the startdb) if no pattern is matched in the current dialing plan. The dpvacant command also lists the dialing plan that contains the treatment for each. Input to the dpvacant command is the digit table databases or digit table les.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the dpvacant command is in the directory /omp/bin/dpvacant.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the dpvacant command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
dpvacant [-d #] -t db|file

Options
The options for the dpvacant command are described in Table 5-23 on page 5-119.

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Table 5-23. Option -d #

dpvacant command options Description

# = the number of the dialing plan for which vacant code treatment information is to be returned. db = the digit table database from which the dpvacant command is to get digit table input.
or

-t db|file

file = the digit table le from which the dpvacant command is to get digit table input.

Examples
The following examples illustrate the use of the dpvacant command: To generate a list of all dialing plans that have vacant code treatment for Dialing Plan 1, enter dpvacant -d 1 To generate a list of all dialing plans that have vacant code treatment, enter dpvacant -t db For each of those dialing plans, the list indicates which dialing plan contains the vacant code treatment. In terms of the tg command, the following options are used:
s

Dialing plans that have vacant code treatment are specied with the -d option. The dialing plan that contains the treatment of all dialing plans is specied with the -v option.

See also
Related commands: tg Related documents: 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide

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dtclr
Name
dtclrclear the digit table.

Description
The dtclr command initializes the digit table les. Execute dtclr when you start the table generation process from the beginning. For more information regarding dtclr, refer to 401-661-030, FLEXENT/ AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dtclr command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
dtclr

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Examples
Example: Initialize the digit table les. dtclr

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dtreport
Name
dtreportproduce a digit table report.

Description
The dtreport command provides a comprehensive summary of the data populated in the primary digit tables, ambiguous tables, and resolution tables and entries for the specic dialing plan. The dtreport command allows the user to trace a string of digits through a set of digit tables built for a specic dialing plan and verify the validity of the string from a call processing perspective. NOTE: Since the digit tables for a dialing plan may contain a large number of records, the report is always written to the /1apx10/dbdata/tg/dtable.rpt le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the dtreport command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the dtreport command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
dtreport -d dpnum -t db | file [ -l pgnum ]

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Options
The options for the dtreport command are described in Table 5-24 on page 5-122. Table 5-24. Option d dpnum l pgnum dtreport command options Description Where dpnum species the dialing plan number. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. Where pgnum species the number of records per page.

The default lines per page is 50. t db t file Read information from the digit table database (db ). Read information from the le file..

NOTE:

Examples
To generate a digit table report for Dialing Plan 25 and read digit tables from the digit table databases, enter dtreport -d 25 -t db To generate a digit table report for Dialing Plan 25, read digit tables from file1, and print 60 lines of output per page, enter dtreport -d 25 -t file1 -l 60

See also
For more information about the dtreport command, see 401-661-030, Digit-byDigit Feature Users Guide.

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dxdcount
Name
dxdcountprovide a numerical count summary of the data in the primary digit tables.

Description
The dxdcount command provides a numerical count summary of the data populated in the primary digit tables, ambiguous tables, and resolution tables and entries for the specic dialing plan. The dxdcount command allows you to periodically check on the usage of the digit table entries. The matrix count report is always written to the le /1apx10/dbdata/tg/ dxdcount.dp#.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the dxdcount command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the dxdcount command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
dxdcount -d dpnum -t db | file

Options
The options for the dxdcount command are described in Table 5-25 on page 5-124.

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Table 5-25. Option d dpnum t db t file

dxdcount command options Description Species the dialing plan number dpnum. The value of dpnum may range from 1 to 255. Read information from the digit table database db. Read information from the le file.

Examples
To generate a digit table matrix report for Dialing Plan 25 and read digit tables from the digit table databases, enter dxdcount -d 25 -t db

See also
For more information about dxdcount, refer to 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

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dxdlist
Name
dxdlistsummarize the ow of routing data.

Description
The dxdlist command generates reports that summarize the ow of routing data from the Dialing Plan Database (dplandb)form through the tgldb form. You can also add options to the dxdlist command to answer some crossreferencing questions. For example, you can use the dxdlist command to determine which destination index values lead to Trunk Group X.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the dxdlist command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the dxdlist command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
dxdlist [-a rac] [-D] [-I] [-R] [-T] [-U string] [-W] [-c rc] [-d] [-h] [-i ri] [-l lines] [-o file] [-p pic] [-r rls] [-s sw][-t tg] [-u string] [-w width] [-x destx]

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Options
The options for the dxdlist command are described in Table 5-26 on page 5-126. Table 5-26. Option -a rac -D dxdlist command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Use only the specied rate center rac. To specify multiple rate centers, separate each rac entry with a comma. Print only the condensed Digit-by-Digit Routing Database (dxdrtedb). The -d option may be used with the -I, -R, and/ or -T options. Print only International Direct Distance Dialing (IDDD) routes. The dxdlist command outputs s only unique IDDD routes s the rst country code that is encountered with each IDDD route s the number of countries that use that IDDD route The -I option may be used with the -D, -R, and/or -T options. -R Print only the condensed Routing List Selector Database (rlsdb). The -R option may be used with the -D, -I, and/or -T options. Print only the condensed tgldb. The -T option may be used with the -D, -I, and -R options. In the page header, remove the date stamp and center the user-dened string. Provide warning of potentially unused rlsdb and tgldb records.

-I

-T -U string -W

The rlsdb and tgldb records are not used in standard routing but may be used for special routing, handoffs, and other applications. -c rc -d -h Use only routing class rc. To specify multiple routing classes, separate each rc entry with a comma. Check the dxdrtedb and rlsdb databases for duplicate records. Display online help.

NOTE:

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Table 5-26. Option -i ri -l lines -o file -p pic

dxdlist command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Use only route index ri. To specify more than one route index, separate each ri entry with a comma. Print lines number of lines per page. The default number of lines per page is 60. Place the output of the dxdlist command in the le file. By default, the dxdlist command outputs to standard output. Use only Primary Interexchange Carrier (PIC) pic. To specify multiple PICs, separate each pic entry with a comma.

The entry 0 (no PIC) is different from the entry 000 (PIC 000). -r rls -s sw -t tg -u string Use only Routing List Selector (RLS) rls. To specify multiple RLSs, separate each rls entry with a comma. Use only switch sw. To specify multiple switches, separate each sw entry with a comma. Use only trunk group (TG) tg. To specify multiple TGs, separate each tg entry with a comma. In the page header, print the date stamp and center the user-dened string. This is the default format of page headers in dxdlist output. Set the page width to width number of columns. The default width is 80 columns. Use only destination index destx. To specify more than one destination index, separate each destx entry with a comma.

NOTE:

-w width -x destx

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the dxdlist command: To generate a table, enter dxdlist To dump the rlsdb database, enter dxdlist -R

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To search for all routes with a route class of 99 and a rate center of 100, enter dxdlist -c 99 -a 100

See also
For more information about the dxdlist command, see 401-661-030, Digit-byDigit Feature Users Guide.

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dxdmenu
Name
dxdmenuprovide access to the Digit-by-Digit (DxD) commands via a menu.

Description
The dxdmenu command is a menu-driven program that provides access to the DxD commands. The dxdmenu command frees the user from having to know the UNIX command-line options associated with each command. When dxdmenu is invoked, a screen is displayed that lists available DxD commands. The user selects a command and is then prompted for any input data needed by the command. Prompts for optional input are identied by the pound sign (#) symbol. The default value for all optional input is no; carriage return species to use this default. Once the input data has been entered, dxdmenu executes the specied command. Control is returned to dxdmenu when the command completes. The user may then invoke another command. Help is available by entering H, h, or ? at the menu. dxdmenu can be exited by entering Q, q, E, or e at the menu. For more information about dxdmenu, see 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dxdmenu command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
dxdmenu

Options
There are no options used with this command.

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Examples
Example: Invoke the digit-by-digit menu. dxdmenu

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dxdphone
Name
dxdphoneinteractively test the digit tables.

Description
The dxdphone command allows the user to interactively test the digit tables generated by the tg command for any particular dialing plan. The user is prompted for a dialing plan number (1 to 255) and then for a telephone number. The user enters the telephone number in the following format: 0,1,...,9,*,# (digits ) +, ,- (digit separators ) b,e,q,h,i,?,< (control characters (see below) - 1st digit only Entering a t rather than a telephone number toggles the printing of a detailed trace of the digit tables as the digit tables are traversed for a given phone number. Output from the dxdphone command is in following format: DN DESTX CALLTYPE PREFIX DNMOD: CODE: the dialed number (after any deleting/reanalyzing) theDestination index - key to dxdrtedb the call type - number and mnemonic the dialed prex - number the DN modication type - number and mnemonic the carrier code or feature/service code

For more information about the dxdphone command, refer to 401-661-030, Digitby-Digit Feature Users Guide.

Availability UNIX RTR


The dxdphone command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

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Synopsis
dxdphone [ -f ] -t db | file

Options
Table 5-27. Option f t db t file dxdphone Command Options Description Display the ow through the digit tables Get digit table input from the digit table databases db. Get digit table input from the digit table les file.

Digit tables are assumed to be created from a previous execution of the tg command.

NOTE:

Examples
To test Dialing Plan Number 7 from digit table databases, enter dxdphone -t db Enter 7 when prompted for a dialing plan number; enter phone numbers (test cases). To test Dialing Plan Number 16, use digit table les, and get the detailed ow, enter dxdphone -f -t file Enter 16 when prompted for a dialing plan number; enter phone numbers (test cases).

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dxdroute
Name
dxdroutedetermine the basic routing for a specied dialed number.

Description
The dxdroute command determines the basic routing for a specied dialed number, calling mobile directory number (MDN), and origination location. The dxdroute command simulates call processing and, in its output, traces the sequence of database lookups through the Trunk Group List Database (tgldb) form. The dxdroute command allows routing to be checked without invoking the Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) subsystem and manually tracing the set of database lookups that call processing performs. The dxdroute command is the primary tool for testing digit-by-digit data ofine. When you execute the dxdroute command, the command prompts you to enter the information in Table 4-27. Table 5-28. Prompt Subscriber Number Destination Number Switch CGSA (optional) dxdroute command options Valid Values Enter a 14-digit subscriber number with no spaces or delimiters. Enter a destination number of up to 32 digits with no spaces or delimiters. Enter the number of the switch from which the call will originate. This value may range from 1 to 16. Enter the number of the Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) from which the call will originate. This value may range from 1 to 16. Enter the number of the cell site from which the call will originate. This value may range from s 1 to 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 to 222 in ECP Releases 16.0 and earlier Enter the number of the face from which the call will originate. This value may range from 0 to 6.

Cell (optional)

Face (optional)

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Server Group

Enter the number of the server group number from which the call will originate. This value may range from 0 to 1. This value is required if Face is input.

To return to the MDN prompt, type <. To exit the dxdroute command, type q, e, or b. NOTE: Currently, dxdroute does not read the Face Code Information Database (fcidb) or Interexchange Carrier Database (icdb). Calls that access those databases are not fully handled by dxdroute. Although dxdroute performs digit analysis on all call types (that is, the startdb access and digit table traversal), this provides only limited information for calls that, for example, use the fcidb.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the dxdroute command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the dxdroute command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
dxdroute -t db|file [-f] [-u] [-h] [-e] [-T]

Options
The options for the dxdroute command are described in Table 5-29 on page 5-135.

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Table 5-29. Option -t db|file

dxdroute command options Description Species where to get the digit tables: s db = from the digit table database db. s file = from the digit table UNIX le file. Turn on trace of digit table traversal.

-f

To toggle this trace on/off, enter t in response to the prompt for the MDN. -u Indicates that the MSC/MTSO is not in the United States. This option affects only the prex that is used for International Direct Distance Dialing (IDDD). Echo the input. Use this option when input is redirected. Use the trunk group range (a value between 1 and 2000) to route the call. Display online help for the dxdroute command.

NOTE:

-e -T -h

Examples
To run dxdroute for a specied database db, enter dxdroute -t db

References
For more information about dxdroute, refer to 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

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FTlistcol
Name
FTlistcolcollect TDMA Flexible Channel Allocation (FLCA) lists for specied Physical Antenna Faces (PAFs) of a cell site.

Description
The FTlistcol command allows service providers to collect FLCA lists for specied PAFs of cell sites. The user creates an input le for FTlistcol that species
s s

the PAFs for which FTlistcol is to collect FLCA lists whether FTlistcol is to collect an FLCA short or long list for each PAF

FTlistcol calls the FTlisttrace command to retrieve the specied type (short or long) of FLCA list for each PAF that is specied in the input le. In this manual page, the list that species the PAFs for which FLCA lists are to be collected is called the request list. Each line of the request list represents a request for a FLCA short or long list for a specied PAF. Currently, the request list may specify a maximum of 12 requests. FTlistcol outputs all retrieved FLCA lists to an output le. The user species the name of that output le in the rst line of the input le. FTlistcol repeats calling FTlisttrace to retrieve FLCA lists for the specied PAFs for a specic time period, which the user species on the second line of the input le. The period of time that FTlistcol requires to retrieve the FLCA lists from the rst to the last PAF on the request list is called the polling cycle. The user can also specify a guard time, which is the minimum time between two consecutive polling cycles. Setting a guard time prevents FTlistcol from collecting FLCA lists more frequently than the cell site can update the measurements on those lists. The user species the guard time on the third line of the input le. The user can also specify the number of short list iterations for each long list iteration. This prevents FTlistcol from collecting the same list information due to the less frequent update of long lists. The user species that value on the fourth line of the input le. Typically, the cell site updates the short lists more frequently than it updates the long lists. If the request list includes both short and long lists, the user is likely to collect many long lists that have the same content. With this iteration number set to a value greater than one, the user can collect the short and long lists more efciently.

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For example, if the user species the number 3 on the fourth line of the input le, FTlistcol retrieves the long lists only every three polling cycles. That is, in the rst three consecutive polling cycles, the rst cycle will retrieve all short and long lists that are specied on the request list. The second and third polling cycles, however, will retrieve only the specied short lists. This process is repeated for the next set of three consecutive polling cycles, and so on. The user must specify a value on the fourth line of the input le. If the request list contains only long lists, however, the value on the fourth line of the input le is ignored. The input le for FTlistcol should be in the following format and may contain a maximum of 12 request lines:

Filename of output file Time duration for FTlistcol to run (in minutes, from 1 to 720) Minimum time between polling cycles (in seconds, from 5 to 1800) Number of short list iterations for each long list iteration (1 to 50) cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list cell_number paf_number type_of_list
The input le for FTlistcol contains the following lines:
s

The rst line species the le to which FTlistcol is to output the retrieved FLCA lists. The second line species the time duration for FTlistcol to run. The third line species the minimum time that is required between two consecutive polling cycles. The fourth line species the number of short list iterations for each long list iteration. The remaining lines constitute the request list. The request list can specify a maximum of 12 requests. FTlistcol ignores any PAF and list type that are specied after the 36th line in the request list.

s s

The user must specify each line of the request list in the following format:

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cell_number paf_number type_of_list


The rst two elds (cell_number and paf_number) specify the PAF from which FTlistcol is to retrieve the FLCA list. The third eld (type_of_list) species the type of FCLA list (1 for short list, 2 for long list) that FTlistcol is to retrieve from the PAF that the rst two elds specify. These three elds are separated by spaces. The following is an example of an input le for FTlistcol: Name of output file 30 60 5 125 34 34 93 34 34 39 38 89 88 83 212 4 6 2 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1

FTlistcol outputs the retrieved lists to the le that is specied on the rst line of the input le. The output of FTlistcol has the following format: Input filename Start time Record 1 Record 2 Record 3 . . . Record N

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End Time The rst line of the output le is the name of the input le. The next line in the output le species the date and time that FTlistcol began to execute and is separated from the input lename line by a blank line. The output le then contains the retrieved lists in the record format. Each record in the output le represents a response from FTlisttrace. One blank line separates each record. The last line of the output le indicates the end of the retrieved FLCA lists and species the date and time that FTlistcol completed execution. Each record in the output le has one of three formats, depending on whether the record is for a short list, long list, or error message, as shown in the following examples. The following is an example record for a FLCA short list: Thu Feb 4 15:08:12 CST 1999: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 45 34 42 44 41 65 75 35 25 30 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 -70.0 -93.0 -97.6 -130.0 -56.6 -71.6 -34.0 -93.7 -70.7 -60.8 154 -75.0 -92.0 0.00 -85.5 -75.2 -34.0 -75.3 -92.7 -75.1 -75.9 5 1 30

In a short-list record, the elds in the rst line contain


s

the time stamp of when FTlisttrace received the response from a cell site the cell-site number the PAF number the type (1 = short) of the retrieved list the SOB value that is used when the FTlisttrace command is run with the -i option

s s s s

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The SOB value may range from -30 to +30 dB, with a default value of 0 dB. The elds are separated by tabs. In a record for a short-list, the columns after the time-stamp line contain the following data:
s s s s s

The rst column is the reference line number. The second column is the channel number. The third column is the server group number. The fourth column is the uplink measurement on this channel. The fth column is the downlink measurement.

These ve columns are separated by tabs. The following is an example record for a long FCLA list: Thu Feb 4 15:08:23 CST 1999: 0 1 2 3 . . . 96 97 98 99 7 35 25 30 -75 -92 -75 -75 45 34 42 44 -70 -93 -97 -130 154 5 2

As in a short-list record, the elds in the rst line of a long-list record contain
s

the time stamp for when FTlisttrace received the response from a cell site the cell-site number the PAF number the type (2 = long) of the retrieved list

s s s

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Unlike a short-list record, a long-list record does not include the SOB value. These elds in the rst line of a long-list record are separated by tabs. In a long-list record, the columns after the time-stamp line contain the following data:
s s s

The rst column is the reference line number. The second column is the channel number. The third column is the uplink measurement on this channel.

The three columns are separated by tabs. The following is an example record for an error message from the FTlistcol command: Thu Feb 4 15:08:43 CST 1999: 154 5 2 ERROR Wrong long list (type 1) on paf 5 in cell 154 received. In an error-message record, the rst line is the time stamp line. The remainder of the record contains the error message that FTlisttrace generated.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTlistcol command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTlistcol command is unavailable.

Synopsis
FTlistcol paflist where

paflist = the input le that species the PAFs for which FTlistcol is collect FLCA lists.

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Notes
When FTlisttrace is executed, the UNIX port that is assigned to send the list request message is dedicated to that FTlisttrace process. Therefore, only one execution of FTlisttrace at a time is allowed. Since FTlistcol calls FTlisttrace to collect FLCA short and long lists, Lucent Technologies recommends that service providers execute FTlistcol only when no other executions of FTlistcol or FTlisttrace are in progress.

See also
FTlisttrace

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FTlisttrace
Name
FTlisttracestart a TDMA Flexible Channel Allocation (FLCA) short or long list trace.

Description
The FTlisttrace command allows service providers to retrieve interferencelevel measurements of the channels on the TDMA FLCA short or long list on a specied Physical Antenna Face (PAF) of a cell site. The -c option species the cell site on which the PAF is located. The -p option species the PAF for which the FLCA list trace is to be performed. The -l option indicates the type (short or long) of FLCA list that FTlisttrace is to retrieve from the specied cell site. If 1 is speced, the short list is retrieved and printed to standard output. If 2 is specied, the long list is retrieved and printed to standard output. If the user omits the -l option, FTlisttrace retrieves the short list by default. The -h option prints a help message on how to use the FTlisttrace command. When the user species the -i option, FTlisttrace uses the SOB Recent Change and Verify (RC/V) parameter for the PAF (which is supplied by the cell) to sort the short list by interference level. The SOB value may range from -30 to +30 dB, with a default value of 0 dB. For each channel in the short list, an additional value is computed beyond the values that the cell site supplies. This additional value for each channel is the Sorting Interference Value (SIV) and is used as the basis for sorting the channels, within server groups, in order of increasing SIV. To sort the channels by SIV, the FTlisttrace script uses the greater of the following values:
s s

uplink interference + SOB value downlink interference

This is the same relationship that the cell site uses for FLCA channel selection. The -i option is used only with short-list requests. If the -i option is used with a long-list request, an error message is displayed. Each measurement is printed in dBm units. If a measurement is unavailable, 0 is printed.

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The record for an FCLA short list is printed in the following format: cell=cell number line 0 1 2 chan 45 34 ... sg 0 1 ... paf=paf number uplink(dBm) -70 -93 ... sob=0 dnlink(dBm) -75 -92 ... siv -70 -93 ...

The record for an FCLA long list is printed in the following format: cell=cell number line 0 1 2 paf=paf number chan 34 45 ... identifier=long

list part number


uplink(dBm) -93 -70 ...

In a record for a long list, the value of the identier indicates the order of the part of the long list buffer that is sent by the cell site. A value of 1 species the rst part of the long list, and 2 species the second part.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTlisttrace command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTlisttrace command is unavailable.

Synopsis
FTlisttrace [-c cell -p paf] [-l type] [-i] where

cell = the cell site on which the PAF is located.

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paf = the PAF for which the FLCA list is to be retrieved,


where 0 = omni. 1 = alpha. 2 = beta. 3 = gamma. 4 = delta. 5 = epsilon. 6 = zeta.

type = the type of FLCA list to retrieve from the cell site,
where 1 = short list. 2 = long list.

Options and arguments


The options and arguments for the FTlisttrace command are described in Table 5-30 on page 5-145. Table 5-30. Option -c cell FTlisttrace command options (Page 1 of 2) Description

cell = the cell site on which the PAF is located.

Specify only one cell site. -p paf

NOTE:

paf = the PAF for which the FCLA list is to be retrieved.

Specify only one PAF.

NOTE:

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Table 5-30. Option -l type

FTlisttrace command options (Page 1 of 2) Description

type = the type of FCLA list that is to be retrieved.


where 1 = short list. 2 = long list.

-h -i

Print the help message for the FTlisttrace command. Sort the short list by increasing SIV within increasing server groups.

The -i option is used only with short-list requests.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate the execution of the FTlisttrace command: FTlisttrace FTlisttrace FTlisttrace FTlisttrace -c -c -c -c 24 24 10 12 -p -p -p -p 2 2 3 6 -l -l -l -l 1 1 -i 2 2 > file &

See also
FTlistcol

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FTplmstart
Name
FTplmstartstart a Power Level Measurement (PLM) study.

Description
The FTplmstart command sends a PLM request to a specied cell site.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTplmstart command is in the /omp/bin directory. The FTplmstart command is available in ECP Releases 11.0 and later.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTplmstart command is in the directory /1apx10/testbin.

Synopsis
FTplmstart -w PASSWD -c CELL -m MODE [-g SG] [-a ANTENNA] [-b CARRIER] [-s SERVICE OPTION] [-G GENERATION] [-t TAG] d [-v CHANNEL|CHANNEL,TECH,TIMESLOT]

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Options
The options for the FTplmstart command are described in Table 5-31 on page 5-148. Table 5-31. Option -w PASSWD FTplmstart command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Execute FTplmstart with the password PASSWD.

The default password is scoping3. -c CELL Perform the PLM study on cell site number CELL. Valid cell values are s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier -m MODE Perform the PLM study in PLM mode MODE.

NOTE:

Valid PLM modes are 1 to 15. -g SG

NOTE:

SG = the server group of the selected cell site.

The -g option is valid only for PLM Modes 1, 2, 5, and 6. Valid values are 0 or 1. -a ANTENNA

NOTE:

ANTENNA = the antenna face of the selected cell site.

The -a option is valid only for PLM Modes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 to 15. Valid values are 0 to 6. -b CARRIER

NOTE:

CARRIER = the CDMA broadband carrier number.

The -b option is valid only for PLM Modes 7 to 15. Valid values are 1 to 10.

NOTE:

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Table 5-31. Option

FTplmstart command options (Page 1 of 2) Description

-s SERVICE OPTION

SERVICE OPTION = the service option type (Modes 7 and 8 only), where SERVICE OPTION is one of the following values:
0 = 2G Voice 8K RC1 (for Mode 7) 1 = 2G Voice 13K RC2 (for Mode 7 or 8) 2 = 2G Voice EVRC RC1 (for Mode 7) 3 = 3G1X Voice 8K RC3 (for Mode 7) 4 = 3G1X Voice 13K RC4 (for Mode 7) 5 = 3G1X Voice EVRC RC3 (for Mode 7) 6 = 3G1X Data FCH 9.6kbps RC3 (for Mode 7) 7 = 3G1X Data SCH 19.2kbps RC3 (for Mode 7 or 8) 8 = 3G1X Data SCH 38.4kbps RC3 (for Mode 7 or 8) 9 = 3G1X Data SCH 76.8kbps RC3 (for Mode 7 or 8) 10 = 3G1X Data SCH 153.6kbps RC3 (for Mode 7 or 8) 11 = 3G1X Data SCH 19.2kbps RC4 (for Mode 8) 12 = 3G1X Data SCH 38.4kbps RC4 (for Mode 8) 13 = 3G1X Data SCH 76.8kbps RC4 (for Mode 8) 14 = 3G1X Data SCH 153.6kbps RC4 (for Mode 8) 15 = 3G1X Voice 13K RC5 (for Mode 8)

-G GENERATION_TYPE

where GENERATION_TYPE is the generation option with one of the following values: 0 = 2G voice (default). 1 = 2G & 3G1X calls. 2 = 3G1X voice. 3 = 3G1X data.

The -G option is allowed for Modes 11 to 15 only.

NOTE:

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Table 5-31. Option -t tag

FTplmstart command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Identify the PLM study with the unique identier tag.

NOTE: TAG may contain a maximum of four characters.


-d -v CHANNEL| Turn on debugging.

CHANNEL = the voice channel to measure.

CHANNEL,TECH,TIMESLOT]
The value of CHANNEL may range from 1 to 1999. A maximum of ten channels may be specied per study.

NOTE:

TECH = the technology of the channel. The following values are valid: s 0 = AMPS. s 1 = TDMA. s 3 = AMPS and TDMA. TIMESLOT = a bit eld for each time slot. Valid values are 1 to 7, where Time Slot 1 is the LSB and Time Slot 3 is the MSB. Thus a value of 5 species Time Slots 2 and 3, and a value of 3 species Slots 1 and 2, and so forth. TIMESLOT is needed only if TECH is TDMA.

The -v option is valid only for PLM Modes 1, 5, and 6.

NOTE:

Exit Status and/or Error Messages


Exit status messages for the FTplmstart command are described in Table 5-32 on page 5-150. Table 5-32. FTplmstart command exit status messages indicates that the at command executed successfully. command line options were incorrect. initialization of RDBU failed. more than one cell was specied. the specied cell is not active. Exit status message zero 1 2 3 4

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Table 5-32.

FTplmstart command exit status messages indicates that the specied cell is not equipped. the specied cell is invalid. more than one PLM mode was specied. the specied PLM mode was outside the range of valid values. more than one server group was specied. the specied server group was outside the range of valid values. more than one of the specied antenna were outside the range of valid values. the specied antenna was outside the range of valid values. more than ten voice channels were specied. the specied voice channel was outside the range of valid values. the entered password failed. no password was entered. no cell site was specied. no PLM mode was specied. no server group and antenna were specied. PLM Mode 1 does not require voice channels. PLM Mode 2 requires the -g, -a, and -v options. PLM Mode 3 requires the -v option. PLM Mode 4 has no directory setup; the -g, -a, and -v options are not needed. PLM Mode 5 feature not activated, the -g, -a, and -v options are required. PLM Mode 6 requires the -g, -a, and -v options. cannot connect to the UNIX port. stop processing. bad return from UXwgetmsg. UXSENDMSG failed. the message was too large to t in the output le.

Exit status message 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

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Table 5-32.

FTplmstart command exit status messages indicates that the open of the output le failed. the write to the output le failed. the close of the output le failed. $HOME was not set in the shell environment. the maximum directory length was exceeded. the cell DB-READ routine failed. cannot get database keys for the cell site. cannot attach to shared memory. the feature is not active. the validation request was rejected. the validation response was unknown. received no messages during the maximum wait time. cannot create directory. the carrier exceeded the DBN_CAR-1. the specied service option exceeded 2. the read of the ceq database failed. the read of the cell database failed. the read of the ecp database failed. the pilot measurement interval was not specied. the specied cell site is incompatible with ECP Releases 13.0 or later. the specied cell is an IS-634 cell site. No PLM study is allowed. non-CDMA mode is started on a CDMA Flexent cell site. non-TDMA mode is started on a TDMA Flexent cell site. no face/microcell is specied for Flexent TDMA Mode 3. data option out of range (0 to 3) the -s option is required for PLM 7 or 8. the value of the -s option for PLM 7 must be from 0 to 10. the value of the -s option for PLM 8 must be 1 or from 7 to 15.

Exit status message 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

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Table 5-32.

FTplmstart command exit status messages indicates that the specied cell site is not a CDMA cell site. the specied PLM mode is invalid. not one of the mode pair that has been requested to start (that is, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, or 13-14). not one of the mode pair that has been started (7-8, 9-10, 11-12, or 13-14). the Physical Antenna Face (PAF) and/or carrier were not equipped. the specied mode was not CDMA on a CDMA cell site.

Exit status message 128 129 130 131 132 133

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the FTplmstart command: To start a PLM study on Cell Site 100, using Mode 1 and Service Option 1, on Antenna 3 and identify the study with the tag tst1, enter FTplmstart -wscoping3 -c 100 -m 1 -g 1 -a 3 -t tst1 To start a PLM study for Cell 100, Mode 2, Service Option 1, Antenna 3, Voice Channel 657, Technology 234, and Timeslot 456 and identify the study with the tag cel10, enter FTplmstart -wscoping3 -c 100 -m 2-g 1 -a 3 -v 657 234 456 -t cel10

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FTplmstop
Name
FTplmstopstop a Power Level Measurement (PLM) study.

Description
The FTplmstop command stops a PLM study.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the FTplmstop command is in the directory /omp/bin in ECP Releases 11.0 and later.

UNIX RTR
In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTplmstop command is not available.

Synopsis
FTplmstop -w PASSWD -c CELL -m MODE [-g SG] [-a ANTENNA] [-b CARRIER] [-s TIME] [-o FILE] ] [-D OUTPUT FILE DIRECTORY] [-P] [-d]

Options
The options for the FTplmstop command are described in Table 5-33 on page 5-155.

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Table 5-33. Option

FTplmstop command options Description Execute FTplmstop with the password PASSWD.

-w PASSWD

The default password is scoping4. -c CELL Perform the PLM study on the specied CELL cell site. Valid cell values are s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier Perform the PLM study in the MODE PLM mode.

NOTE:

-m MODE

The value may range from 1 to 15. -g SG Perform the study on the specied cell site in the specied server group SG.

NOTE:

The value may range from 0 to 1. Valid for Modes 1, 2, 5, and 6 only. -a ANTENNA The antenna face/Microcell of the cell site on which to perform the study.

NOTE:

The value may range from 0 to 6. Valid for Modes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 through 15 only. -b CARRIER The CDMA broadband carrier number.

NOTE:

The value may range from 1 to 10. Valid for Modes 7 to 15 only. -s TIME -o FILE The number of seconds to wait for the next cell site message before timing out FTplmstop. Put the output in the specied FILE le.

NOTE:

-D OUTPUT_FILE_DIRECTORY Put the output in the specied DIRECTORY directory.

The default output directory is $HOME/pace/plm.

NOTE:

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Table 5-33. Option -P -d

FTplmstop command options Description Write the output data in PA&CE format. Turn on debugging.

Examples
To stop the PLM study on Cell Site 100 with the study running in Mode 1, Server Group 1, Antenna 3, and place the data in the le FTplmtst1, enter FTplmstop -wscoping4 -c 100 -m1 -g 1 -a 3 -o FTplmtst1

Exit status and/or error messages


The FTplmstop command issues the following exit status and/or error messages. If the exit status is... zero 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 then... the FTplmstop command executed successfully. options were not correct on the command line. initialization of the RDBU failed. more than one cell site was specied. the specied cell site is not active. the specied cell site is not equipped. the specied cell site is out of range for cells. more than one mode was specied. the specied mode is out of range for PLMs. more than one server group was specied. the specied server group is out of range. more than one antenna is out of range. the specied antenna is out of range. the maximum number of voice channels is exceeded. the specied voice channel is out of range. the password failed. no password was entered.

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If the exit status is... 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

then... no cell site was specied. no PLM mode was specied. no server group and antenna were specied. PLM 1 does not require voice channels. PLM 2 requires the -g, -a, and -v options. PLM 3 requires the -v option. PLM 4 has no directory setup; the -g, -a, and -v options are not needed. PLM 5 Feature Not Activated, the -g, -a, and -v options are needed. PLM 6; the -a and -g options are needed. cannot connect to the UNIX port. stop processing. bad return from UXwgetmsg. the UXSENDMSG failed. the message is too big to t in the output le. the output le failed to open. the write to the output le failed. the output le failed to close. $HOME is not set in the shell environment. the maximum directory length was exceeded. the Ccell DB-READ routine failed. cannot get database keys for the cell site. cannot attach to shared memory. the feature is not active. the validation request was rejected. the validation response is unknown. no messages were received during the maximum wait time. cannot create directory. the carrier exceed the DBN_CAR-1. the service option exceeds 2.

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If the exit status is... 46 47 48 49 50

then... the read of the ceq database failed. the read of the cell database failed. the read of the ecp database failed. the pilot measurement interval was not specied. the cell site is not compatible with ECP Release 13.0 or later.

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FTrfclear
Name
FTrfcleardelete log le records for a speced radio frequency (RF) trace tag.

Description
The FTrfclear command scans a specied binary log le to identify RF call trace records that match a specied tag name. FTrfclear then deletes all of the matched records from the log le. FTrfclear does not clear the default log les (FTRFTRACE* les) when the FTrftrace command is running.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTrfclear command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the FTrfclear command is unavailable.

Synopsis
FTrfclear -t tag [-f logfile] [-h]

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Options
The options for the FTrfclear command are described in Table 5-34 on page 5-160. Table 5-34. Option -t tag FTrfclear command options Description Delete call trace records that match the specied trace identier tag.

The character string tag must contain eight or fewer characters. -f logfile Delete call trace records from the specied binary le logfile.

NOTE:

If the -f option is not used, FTrfclear searches for and deletes call trace records from the /omp-data/logs/ rfct/FTRFTRACE log les. -h Display online help for FTrfclear.

NOTE:

Examples
To delete all call trace records that have a tag tracetst from the default log les, enter FTrfclear -t tracetst To delete all call trace records that have a tag tracetst from the /tmp/ logfile binary log le, enter FTrfclear -t tracetst -f /tmp/logfile

Associated commands and/or les Associated les


/omp-data/logs/rfct/FTRFTRACE0 /omp-data/logs/rfct/FTRFTRACE1

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FTrfdump
Name
FTrfdumpoutput radio frequency (RF) call trace records.

Description
The FTrfdump command scans a binary log le for RF call trace records that match the parameters that are specied on the command line. For each record match that is found, FTrfdump prints the trace data in different formats for each technology type. The data is arranged in pairs of one request message from the Call-processing/Database Node (CDN) and a reply message from the cell site. The directory number (DN) and message tag form the key to the messages. The -F option delivers the data in real-time mode. For users of the Mobile Directory Number Radio Frequency Call Trace (MDNRFCT) feature, this option replaces the -o option of the FTrftrace command. By default, measurements are in
s s

Receive Signal Strength Units (RSSUs) for analog mode or Interim Standard 54 Revision B (IS-54B) for TDMA.

Stored Dynamic Mobile Attenuation Code (SDMAC) is also provided.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTrfdump command is in the /omp/bin/ directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTrfdump command is not available.

Synopsis
FTrfdump [-F] [-t tag] [-d dirnumber] [-f file] [-o outfile] [-D] [-r] [-x] [-h]

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Options
The options for the FTrfdump command are described in Table 5-35 on page 5-162. Table 5-35. Option -F FTrfdump command options Description Output data in real time when the trace is active.

The user terminates real-time output with an interrupt signal, which is usually Control-c or the Delete key. -d dirnumber Where dirnumber is the 1- to 14-digit Mobile Directory Number (MDN) for which call trace records are to be printed.

NOTE:

If you use the -d option alone, all call trace records for this mobile unit are printed. If you use the -d option with the -t option, all records that match the specied DN and the tag are printed. To generate consistent data, you must use the -d option when you dump the trace output of a Multiple DN session. -f file Where file is the binary le that is used to dump call trace records.

NOTE:

If you do not specify the -f option, the /omp-data/logs/ rfct/FTRFTRACE log les are searched by default. -h -o outfile -r -t tag Print online help for FTrfdump. Send output to the specied le outfile. Output the call trace data in raw ASCII format. Print call trace records for the call trace that is associated with the unique identier tag.

NOTE:

The specied tag must be eight or fewer characters.

NOTE:

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Table 5-35. Option -x

FTrfdump command options Description Print all data for Cell Releases 5.1 and later.

Use this option for TDMA call traces in order to dump the time slot data. -D Print signal strength measurements in dBm.

NOTE:

If you do not use the -D option, signal strength measurements are in Radio Signal Strength Units (RSSUs) for analog or in IS-54B for TDMA (default value). When you use the -r option, each message is printed in the following format:
s s

NOTE:

AutoPACE header (rst record of le) Locate request without the -x option type:time:DN:tag:cell:vrg:ra:SAT:chnl:ant:sg:DCS:tg:mem: poll:cells:valid1:handoff:SCM:mcell:carr Locate request with the -x option type:time:DN:tag:cell:vrg:ra:timeslot:SAT/DVCC: chnl:ant:sg:DCS:tg:mem:poll:cells:valid1:handoff:SCM:mcell:carr Three-sector cell locate reply with and without the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:omni1:alpha1:beta1:gamma1 Pre-HSOPL 6-sector nonserving cell locate reply with and without the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:delta0:epsilon0:zeta0:omni1:alpha1:beta1: gamma1:delta1:epsilon1:zeta1 Pre-HSOPL six-sector serving cell locate reply with and without the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:delta0:epsilon0:zeta0:omni1:alpha1:beta1: gamma1:delta1:epsilon1:zeta1:sdmac:sderr HSOPL nonserving cell analog mode locate reply with and without the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:delta0:epsilon0:zeta0:omni1:alpha1:beta1:gamma1:delta1: epsilon1:zeta1

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HSOPL serving cell analog mode locate reply without the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:delta0:epsilon0:zeta0:omni1:alpha1:beta1:gamma1:delta1: epsilon1:zeta1:sdmac:sderr HSOPL cell analog mode locate reply with the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:omni0:alpha0:beta0: gamma0:delta0:epsilon0:zeta0:omni1:alpha1:beta1:gamma1:delta1: epsilon1:zeta1:sdmac:sderr:vrcusse HSOPL cell TDMA mode locate reply without the -x option Nothing printed. HSOPL cell TDMA mode locate reply with the -x option type:cell:time:DN:tag:measurement:nnbrs: [ncell:nant:dcsid:ecpid:sid:mahomeas:] mobsse:mobber:drusse:druber:drufer:sdmac:sderr Group 1 Neighbor List data without the -x option Nothing printed. Group 1 Neighbor List data with the -x option type:time:DN:tag:cell:sg:ant:nnbrs [:ncell:nant:sg:nsg:mfa:hobias] MAHO List data without the -x option Nothing printed. MAHO List data with the -x option type:time:DN:tag:cell:sg:ant:nnbrs [:ncell:nant:cscode:sg0bias:sg1bias:sg0vmac:sg1vmac: dth0:dth1:dcsid:ecpid:sid] Stop message type:time:DN:tag CDMA RF Call Trace Request (Type 15) type:time:DN:tag:pri_cell:sec_cell:sec_cell:sec_cell:sec_cell:sec_cell: DCS:tg:mem:SCM:poll:HO CDMA RF Call Trace Reply (Type 16) type:cell:time:DN:tag:valid2:rsn:HO:SCM:freq:seq:Vo_type:tic:gain:elapse: #_of_pn[:cell:ECPID:ps:ant:pn:p_grp:chn_elm:chn_elm:chn_elm:p_str: trp_dly:eb_no:keep:] :tic:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf: m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:tic:m_rtf: m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:full_wo_err:full_wo_err: full_wo_err:full_wo_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err: bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm: 1/2_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/8_frm:1/8_frm:1/8_frm: 1/8_frm:

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NOTE: Null values for any of the elds are represented as underscores ( _ ).
s

CDMA 6-way Soft Handoff RF Call Trace Reply (Type 17) type:cell:time:DN:tag:valid2:rsn:HO:SCM:freq:seq:ctype:tic_hi:tic_lo:gain: elapsed:#_of_pn[:cell:ECPID:ps:paf:pn:p_grp:chn_elm:chn_elm:chn_elm: p_str:trp_dly:eb_no:keep:]*:tic_hi:tic_lo:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf: m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:m_ftf:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat:c_stat: tic_hi:tic_lo:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:m_rtf:full_wo_e rr: full_wo_err:full_wo_err:full_wo_err:full_wo_err:full_wo_err:full_wo_err: full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err:full_w_err: bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual:bad_qual: 1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/2_frm:1/4_frm:1/ 4_frm: 1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/4_frm:1/8_frm:1/8_frm:1/8_frm:1/ 8_frm: 1/8_frm:1/8_frm:1/8_frm: *Null values for any of the elds are represented as underscores ( _ ).

The elds in FTrfdump messages are described in Table 5-36 on page 5-165. Table 5-36. Field type Fields in FTrfdump messages Description A number that indicates the type of the call trace message: s 1 = locate request. s 2 = stop message. s 3 = three-sector cell locate reply. s 6 = six-sector cell locate reply. s 7 = Hand-Off and Setup at Optimum Power Level (HSOPL) cell analog mode locate reply. s 8 = HSOPL cell TDMA mode locate reply. s 9 = Group 1 Neighbor List data. s 10 = Mobile-Assisted Handoff (MAHO) List data. s 15 = CDMA RF Call Trace Request. s 16 = CDMA RF Call Trace Reply. s 17 = CDMA six-way Soft Handoff RF Call Trace Reply. The date and time that the message was logged, in the format mmddyyhhmmss (month/day/year/hour/minute/second). The ID of the cell that is sending the message. In a locate request message, the cell eld contains all cell sites that are included in the call trace session.

time cell

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Table 5-36. DN tag vrg ra SAT DVCC chnl ant

Fields in FTrfdump messages The 1-to-14-digit DN on which the call trace is to be performed. A unique name of up to eight characters that identies a specic call trace. The Voice Radio Group (VRG) for the radio that is serving the call. The number of the radio that is serving the call. The Supervisory Audio Tone (SAT) for the radio that is serving the call. The Digital Verication Color Code (DVCC) of the TDMA radio that is serving the call. The radio channel number that is serving the call. The antenna face that is serving the call, where s 0 = omni. s A = alpha. s B = beta. s G = gamma. s D = delta. s E = epsilon. s Z = zeta. s I = invalid. The physical antenna face that serves the call, where s 0 = omni. s 1 = alpha. s 2 = Beta. s 3 = gamma. s 4 = delta. s 5 = epsilon. s 6 = zeta.

paf

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Table 5-36. laf

Fields in FTrfdump messages The logical antenna face as a hexadecimal number, where s Bit 3 is the server group. s Bits 0 through 2 are is the face, where 0 = omni. 1 = alpha. 2 = beta. 3 = gamma. 4 = delta. 5 = epsilon. 6 = zeta.

sg DCS

The logical server group that is serving the call. The Digital Cellular Switch (DCS) that is serving the call.

DCS X, tg Y, and mem Z identify the speech handler (that is, the frame selector) for the call. tg The cell site trunk group (TG) that is serving the call.

NOTE:

DCS X, tg Y, and mem Z identify the speech handler (that is, the frame selector) for the call. mem The cell trunk member that is serving the call.

NOTE:

DCS X, tg Y, and mem Z identify the speech handler (that is, the frame selector) for the call. poll valid1 The signal poll count for the call trace session. A ag that indicates whether some of the data is invalid. s 0 = invalid. s 1 = valid. A ag that indicates whether the call was in a handoff during the signal measurement period. s 1 = the call was in a handoff. s 0 = the call was not in a handoff.

NOTE:

handoff

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Table 5-36.

Fields in FTrfdump messages A character that indicates the units. The cell signal measurements are made in the following formats: s R = RSSU. s I = IS-54B. s d = dBm. The Station Class Mark (SCM). The TDMA Microcell ID. This value may range from 1 to 6. The TDMA carrier number (for TDMA Microcell only). This value may range from 1 to 2. The SDMAC. The error status of SDMAC. The error status is one of the following: s 0 = the measurement is valid. s 1 = the Signal Strength Estimate is invalid. s 2 = did not receive SDMAC from Voice Radio. s 3 = errors 1 and 2 occurred. The signal strength measurement for the logical face. The signal strength as measured by the serving analog radio. The number of MAHO neighbors of the serving face and server group. Repeat the list within the brackets. The cell ID of a neighbor cell. The neighbor antenna face, where s A = Alpha. s B = Beta, and so forth. The DCS ID of the Extended System ID (MAHO List, fci form). The ECP ID of the Extended System ID (MAHO List, fci form). The System ID of the Extended System ID (MAHO List, fci form). The raw signal strength of a setup channel or MAHO beacon, as measured by a mobile unit in TDMA mode. The signal strength, as measured by a mobile unit in TDMA mode. The bit error rate, as measured by a mobile unit in TDMA mode. The signal strength as measured by the serving Digital Radio Unit (DRU).

measurement

SCM mcell carr sdmac sderr

omni0, alpha0... vrcusse nnbrs [...] ncell nant

dcsid ecpid sid mahomeas mobsse mobber drusse

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Table 5-36. druber drufer nsg mfa hobias cscode

Fields in FTrfdump messages The bit error rate as measured by the serving DRU. The frame error rate as measured by the serving DRU. The Neighbor Subgroup (Group 1 Neighbor List, fci form). Multiple Faces Allowed (Group 1 Neighbor List, fci form). Handoff bias (Group 1 Neighbor List, fci form). Cell code (MAHO List, fci form). Server Group 0 and Server Group 1 MAHO handoff biases (MAHO List, fci form. Server Group 0 and Server Group 1 Voice Mobile Attenuation Codes (MAHO List, fci form). Server Group 0 and Server Group 1. The primary cell site number in a CDMA handoff (hard, soft, semisoft, or softer). The value may range from s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier The secondary cell site number in a CDMA soft handoff (secondary 1 or 2). Valid cell values are s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier If no secondary cells are involved in the soft handoff, the value is 0.

sg0bias,sg1bia s sg0vmac,sg1vma c dth0,dth1 dth0,dth1

sec_cel

valid2

A ag that indicates whether some of the data is invalid. s 0 = valid data. s 1 = invalid data. An indicator that a handoff occurred during the current polling interval. CDMA channel (16 bits).

HO freq

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Table 5-36. rsn

Fields in FTrfdump messages The reason that some data is invalid: _ = all data is valid. s 0x00 = data not validerror. s 0x01 = some data may be valid. s 0x02 = all data is collected and valid. s 0x04 = mobile handoff trigger (HOTRIG) data is missing. s 0x08 = mobile PARMS data is missing. s 0x10 = primary Channel Element (CE) data is missing. s 0x20 = secondary #1 CE data is missing. s 0x40 = secondary #2 CE data is missing. s 0x80 = radio frequency call trace (RFCT) receivednot TALK state. s 0x100 = secondary #3 CE data is missing. s 0x200 = secondary #4 CE data is missing. s 0x400 = secondary #5 CE data is missing.

seq ctype

CDMA trafc sequence number (4 bits). The CDMA voice coder/decoder (vocoder) type: s 0 = 8kbps/voice. s 1 = 13kbps/voice. s 2 = EVRC/voice. s 3 = 8kbps/markov. s 4 = 13kbps/markov. s 5 = 9.6Kbps/Async. s 6 = 14.4Kbps/Async. s 7 = 9.6Kbps/Fax. s 8 = 14.4Kbps/Fax. s 9 = 8kbps/CMLT. s 10 = 13kbps/CMLT. s 999 = invalid. The vocoder services type. s 0 = 8k voice. s 1 = 13k voice.2 = EVRC voice. s 3 = 8k Markov. s 4 = 13k Markov. s 5 = invalid SOR.

Vo_type

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Table 5-36. tic

Fields in FTrfdump messages CDMA tick ID (GPS time reference) (16 bits).

The CDMA tick ID refers to the system time that corresponds to the current forward sequence number of a frame from the speech handler. Tick ID and sequence numbers are used at the cell to synchronize the same frame of data from the speech handler that arrives at all cells that are involved in a call. In the context of RF call trace, the tick ID that is specied in the tic eld shown represents the system time that corresponds to when the cell processed the Pilot Strength Measurement message. tic_hi tic_lo gain CDMA Tick ID (GPS time reference). High order 32 bits in decimal of the tick. CDMA Tick ID (GPS time reference). Low order 32 bits in decimal of the tick. CDMA primary digital gain (8 bits). The average raw digital gain that is applied to primary over-the-air transmissions.

NOTE:

This value represents a snapshot of the raw digital gain that is applied to the forward trafc channel on the simplex/primary leg. This value is not averaged. The spapshot is taken when the Pilot Strength Measurement message is processed at the cell site. This message is part of the RFCT data collection that occurs every time that an RFCT request is processed. elapsed #_of_pn ECPID ps The CDMA elapsed time (in seconds). The number of pilot data records that follow. Value ranges from 0 to 8. The ECP identication number. The pilot sets (PS): s P = primary antenna face. s S1 = rst secondary antenna face. s S2 = second secondary antenna face. s S3 = third secondary antenna face. s S4 = fourth secondary antenna face. s S5 = fth secondary antenna face. s C = candidate antenna face. s RC = remaining candidate. The pilot pseudonoise (PN) (9 bits). The pilot PN offset relative to the zero offset pilot PN sequence for the forward CDMA channel in units of 64 PN chips.

NOTE:

pn

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Table 5-36. p_grp

Fields in FTrfdump messages Priority Group (2 bits). The priority group of pilots that are not in the active set.

This eld is a 2-bit value that is set to the priority group value of a neighbor pilot in the active set pilot neighbor list. The priority range is from 0 to 2 (the lower the number, the higher the priority). This eld is set to a default value of 3 for pilots in the active set or for pilots that are not found in any neighbor list. If the pilot strength (p_str) for all active cells is the same, then priority group is used to determine which cell to use as the primary cell. chn_elm p_str The channel element (CCC-CCU-CE). The pilot strength (6 bits). The strength of the pilot as measured at the mobile unit.

NOTE:

The mobile unit computes this value by adding the ratios of received pilot energy per chip to the total received spectral density (noise and signals) of at most k usable multipath components, where k is the number of demodulating elements that the mobile unit supports. Pilot strength is reported in decibels (dB). trp_dly The round-trip delay (16 bits). This value is the time that a radio signal takes to travel from a cell to the mobile unit and back.

NOTE:

This value indicates how far a mobile unit is from a given cell site. In the context of RF call trace, the round-trip delay is between the base station from which the trafc channel is transmitted to the mobile unit and back. This value does not include inherent cell delay (for example, a delay of 23ms in transmit and a delay of 14ms in receive). This is true as long as those values are appropriately set in the ECP database via the RC/V subsystem. Round-trip delay is reported in units of 1/8 chips (1/8 chip = 100ns). eb_no Eb/No (16 bits). The energy per bit over noise level in dB.

NOTE:

This value is the ratio of energy per bit to the noise power spectral density. Eb/No is calculated for a specied reverse leg. This value is averaged over 100 frames and reported to the RFCT. Energy from all ngers in lock on a given reverse path are used to sum the energy. Eb/No is reported in decibels (dB).

NOTE:

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Table 5-36. keep

Fields in FTrfdump messages The keep indicator: s 0 = no. s 1 = yes.

If the handoff drop timer that is associated with the given pilot has not yet expired, the mobile unit sets this 1-bit eld to 1. If the given pilot has expired, the bit is set to 0. m_ftt The mobile forward trafc tick ID (GPS time reference) (16 bits).

NOTE:

These tick IDs are used to correlate the cell statistics and mobile statistics during post-call data analysis. This eld is displayed for the Markov-Phase 2 call type only. m_ftf c_stat Mobile forward trafc frame count (32 bits). Cell forward trafc frame statistics for full-, half-, quarter-, and eighthrate frames transmitted, and blank-and-burst and dim-and-burst signaling frame counts (16 bits).

NOTE:

This eld is displayed for the Markov-Phase 2 call type only. m_rtt The mobile reverse trafc tick ID (GPS time reference) (16 bits).

NOTE:

These tick IDs are used to correlate the cell statistics and mobile statistics during post-call data analysis. This eld is displayed for the Markov-Phase 2 call type only. m_rtf full_wo_err Mobile reverse trafc frame count (32 bits). The full rate without errors for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

NOTE:

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells, and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell (16 bits). full_w_err The full rate with bit errors for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

NOTE:

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells, and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell (16 bits).

NOTE:

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Table 5-36. bad_qual

Fields in FTrfdump messages An indicator that quality is insufcient for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells, and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell (16 bits). 1/2_frm Half-rate frames for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

NOTE:

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell. 1/4_frm Quarter-rate frames for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

NOTE:

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells, and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell (16 bits). 1/8_frm Eighth-rate frames for the cell reverse trafc frame statistic.

NOTE:

One for the Bfr-Frm-Sel of the primary cell and all secondary cells, and one for the Aftr-Frm-Sel for the primary cell (16 bits). [data] An indicator that the data in the brackets is repeated several times, including one time for each entry in the neighbor list (#_of_nbr) or pilot list (#_of_prn).

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the FTrfdump command: To print all AMPS/TDMA call-trace records for a recent cell site release (Releases 5.1 or later) for DN 312-867-5309 from the default log les in real-time mode when the call trace is running, enter FTrfdump -x -d 3128675309 -F NOTE: When you use the -x option, FTrfdump prints all data for Cell Releases 5.1 and later. To print all call trace records for DN 3128675309 from the default log les in real time when the call trace is running, enter FTrfdump -d 3128675309 -F

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To print all call trace records for DN 312-867-5309 and send the output to the le dump.out, enter FTrfdump -d 3128675309 -o dump.out To print all call trace records for DN 312-867-5309 that have a tag of tracetst, enter FTrfdump -d 3128675309 -t tracetst To print all AMPS/TDMA call trace records for Cell Releases 5.1 or later for DN 312-867-5309 that have a tag of tracetst with SDMAC and SCM, enter FTrfdump -x -d 3128675309 -t tracetst To print all call trace records for DN 312-867-5309 from the binary le /tmp/ logfile and return the signal strength measurements in dBm, enter FTrfdump -f /tmp/logfile -D -d 3128675309

Associated commands and/or les


The following commands are associated with the FTrfdump command: FTrfstop FTrfdump FTrftrace FTrfdump output will be in the following directory: /omp-data/logs/rfct/FTRFTRACE*

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FTrfstop
Name
FTrfstopstop part or all of any radio frequency (RF) call trace session.

Description
When the CDMA Multiple Directory Number (DN) Feature Activation File (FAF) is not active, the FTrfstop command halts the running RF call trace session and creates an entry in the log le to indicate the time that the call trace was stopped. When the CDMA Multiple DN FAF is active, the FTrfstop command can stop call traces on one or more DNs selectively. You may use either the tag or the DN to specify the DNs on which the trace is to be stopped. To examine the status of traces in progress, use the FTrftrace -s command. Execute the FTrfstop command on the OMP shell.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the FTrfstop command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTrfstop command is unavailable.

Synopsis
When the CDMA Multiple DN FAF is active, FTrfstop has the following syntax: FTrfstop (-A | -t tag | -d dirnumbers) [-h] When the CDMA Multiple DN FAF is inactive, FTrfstop has the following syntax: FTrfstop [-h]

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Options
The options for the FTrfstop command are descrbed in Table 5-37 on page 5-177. Table 5-37. Option -A FTrfstop command options Description Stop the traces for all DNs in the current session.

! CAUTION:

The -A option stops traces for all users who share the current session. Therefore, use the -A option cautiously.

-t tag -d DN1 [DN2...]

Stop call traces for all DNs that are associated with the specied tag. Stop the traces for the specied DNs.

You may specify up to ten space-separated DNs. -h Print the online help for FTrfstop.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the FTrfstop command: To stop three DNs from a CDMA Multiple DN RF call trace session, enter FTrfstop -d 7085551212 630555121212 567891 To stop all DNs for a specied tag mytag from a CDMA Multiple DN RF call trace session, enter FTrfstop -t mytag To stop traces on all DNs from a CDMA Multiple DN RF call trace session, enter FTrfstop -A To stop a running call trace session when the CDMA Multiple DN FAF is not active, enter FTrfstop

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FTrftrace
Name
FTrftracestart or add directory numbers (DNs) to a radio frequency (RF) call trace.

Description
The FTrftrace command allows service providers to make power-level measurements. When the Multiple DN Feature Activation File (FAF) is active (CDMA/Analog mode), you can use FTrftrace to
s s s

start a new trace add up to ten Mobile Directory Numbers (MDNs) to an existing session determine the available bandwidth and the status of current traces

The Multiple DN FAF is available in only CDMA cell sites (APXDx.xx) to trace calls in CDMA or analog mode. You may also use the FTrfstop command to delete individual MDNs from an active session. On an active call in analog mode, each cell site in the -c cells list in the FTrftrace command line makes measurements. On an active call in TDMA/AMPS mode, if you use the -c option, mobile measurements are collected if
s s

the mobile unit is on an ECP Release 5.1 or later and that cell site is in the -c cells list

Otherwise, no measurements are made. The Mobile-Assisted Handoff (MAHO) list for the serving cell site is used to determine which radio channels to measure. In TDMA mode, using the -c and -f options together is equivalent to using the -n option. The -f option forces measurements to be taken from cell sites that are not listed in the -c cells list. The -n option causes the use of Group 1 neighbors for the list of cell sites that are to be traced. For active calls in CDMA mode, the measurement request is sent to the primary cell site and two secondary cell sites. The primary cell site sends the ECP a reply message that contains the measured pilot strength. That message contains the CDMA neighbor list, which includes up to 12 measurements for each serving cell site. For CDMA calls, the -c, -f, and -n options are ignored. If the cell site is in the middle of a CDMA-to-analog handoff, hard handoff, or primary transfer and cannot get a measurement, no measurement is recorded. The cell site may respond with either

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a CDMA measurement response with the eld valid=FALSE and measurement data invalid or no CDMA measurement response

Each measurement is stored in binary form in the FTRFTRACE1 and FTRFTRACE0 log les in the /omp-data/logs/rfct directory. FTRFTRACE1 is always the active le. When FTRFTRACE1 reaches a tunable maximum size, FTRFTRACE1 is moved into the FTRFTRACE0 le. The default maximum size is currently 6 MB. To dump the data to the standard output device, use the FTrfdump command. To tune the maximum allowable size of the log le, edit the value in the /ompdata/user/etc/rfct.ini le. The opmadmin users have write permission to that le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the FTrftrace command is in the / omp/bin directory. NOTE: The FTrftrace command is valid up to ECP Release 11.0 and beyond.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the FTrftrace command is unavailable.

Synopsis
FTrftrace (-d dirnumbers | -m dnfile) [-c cells] [-i interval] [-p period] [-t tag] [-n] [-f] FTrftrace -s

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Options
The options for the FTrftrace command are described in Table 5-38 on page 5-180. Table 5-38. Option -d dirnumbers FTrftrace command options Description Where dirnumbers is a single mobile directory number (MDN) or a space-separated list of up to ten MDNs.

If you use the -d option, you must specify at least one MDN. Each MDN must be 1 to 14 digits. To trace more than one MDN in a session requires the Multiple DN FAF to be active. This feature is currently supported for the CDMA cell release (APXDx.xx). If you specify a non-10-digit MDN that does not appear in the Home Location Register (HLR) database or Visitor Location Register (VLR) database, the trace is not performed. -m dnfile Where dnfile is an ASCII le that contains a list of up to ten MDNs, with one MDN on each line.

NOTE:

If you use the -m option, you must specify at least one MDN. If you specify a non-10-digit MDN that does not appear in the HLR database or VLR database, the trace is not performed. -c cells Where cells is a space-separated list of up to eight cellsite IDs on which to perform the trace.

NOTE:

If you use the -c option, you must specify at least one cell ID. If you use neither the -c nor the -n option, FTrftrace defaults to the -n option. -i interval Where interval is the number of minutes that the trace is to run.

NOTE:

Minimum value = 15. Maximum value = 240. Default value = 30.

NOTE:

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Table 5-38. Option

FTrftrace command options Description Where period is the polling period in seconds.

-p period

Minimum value = 2. Maximum value = 60. Default value = 30. To limit the message trafc, bandwidth is dened as the allowable combination of the number of MDNs and polling periods. The bandwidth is dened by the formula. To obtain the available bandwidth at any time, execute the command FTrftrace -s, which is expressed as the minimum period that is supported for an additional MDN. As a guideline, when the periods are the same for all MDNs that are to be traced, the period versus MDNs is the following: s 2-second polling interval = 1 to 4 MDNs. s 3-second polling interval = 5 to 6 MDNs. s 4-second polling interval = 7 to 8 MDNs. s 5-second polling interval = 9 to 10 MDNs. All analog calls in an MDN RF call trace session must have the same polling period. If any analog call has a polling period that differs from the polling period of any other analog call, the following results occur: s Errors may result for all analog MDNs in the session. s All subsequent call-trace request records for analog calls indicate that the data may be invalid. This data is formatted for printing by the FTrfdump command: ** WARNING!! Analog DNs using different polling periods.** **Data may be invalid!!** -t tag Where tag is an eight-character tag to identify the trace.

NOTE:

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Table 5-38. Option -n

FTrftrace command options Description Use the Group 1 neighbors for the list of cells that are to be traced for analog mode. Use the MAHO neighbors for the list of mobile measurements.

If you use the -n option, the -f and -c options are ignored. If you use neither the -c nor the -n option, FTrftrace defaults to the -n option. -f -s Force measurements to be made even if a call is not on a cell in the -c cells list. Report the status of the traces in progress.

NOTE:

The available bandwidth is displayed as the minimum polling period that is supported for an additional MDN. The -s option is available only when the CDMA Multiple DN feature is activated.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the FTrftrace command: FTrftrace FTrftrace FTrftrace FTrftrace FTrftrace FTrftrace -c -s -c -c -c -n 24 26 25 2 -d 12345678901 -t mytag -i 20 -p 45 10 2 106 -d 12345678901234 7085551234 12 14 9 -d 1234567890 -i 5 -o -r > file& 200 1 77 267 -d 123 -i 15 -p 60 -f -m dnfile -i 15 -p 60

Associated commands and/or les


The following commands and les are associated with the FTrftrace command.

Associated commands
FTrfstop FTrfdump FTrfclear

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Associated les
/omp-data/logs/rfct/FTRFTRACE0 /omp-data/logs/rfct/FTRFTRACE1 /omp-data/user/etc/rfct.ini /omp-data/logs/rfct/.rfct_roster

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fafprint
Name
fafprintprint the Feature Activation File (FAF).

Description
The fafprint command displays active FAF entries.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the fafprint command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the fafprint command is in the /1apx10/ testbin directory.

Synopsis
fafprint [-b] [-f filename] [-h]

Options
The options for the fafprint command are described in Table 5-39 on page 5-184. Table 5-39. Option -b -f filename -h fafprint command options Description Check the Backup FAF (BFAF) instead of the FAF. Check the FAF information in the le filename. Display online help for fafprint.

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Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the fafprint command: To display FAF entries, enter fafprint To display BFAF entries, enter fafprint -b

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getdp
Name
getdplist the different dialing plan numbers that are stored in the Dialing Plan Database (dplandb).

Description
The getdp command outputs a list of the current populated dialing plans.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the getdp command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the getdp command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
getdp [-d] [-f]

Options
The options of the getdp command are described in Table 5-40 on page 5-186. Table 5-40. Option -d -f getdp command options Description Produce the list with only dialing plan numbers. Print the output to the le /1apx10/dbdata/tg/ dplan.num.

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Examples
To produce a list of dialing plan numbers that are stored in the dplandb database, enter getdp

Error messages
Because getdp runs on the backup databases, to execute getdp on the OMP, you must rst copy the databases from the ECP to the OMP. Failure to copy the databases from the ECP to the OMP causes the following error message when getdp is executed on the OMP: Cannot Open Dialing Plan Database for Sequencing.

See also
For more information about getdp, see 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

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hrtkrp
Name
hrtkrpa shell script that is called by the trkreport command.

Description
The hrtkrp command is a shell script that is automatically executed by the cron daemon every hour. The hrtkrp command gets the current time and calculates the date and time of the last hour and then calls the trkreport command. Results are printed on the Receive Only Printer (ROP).

Availability UNIX RTR


The hrtkrp command is in the /1apx10/expbin directory.

Synopsis
hrtkrp

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Examples
Example: Execute hrtkrp manually. hrtkrp

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PCcmprs
Name
PCcmprscompress CP failure messages to send the messages to the Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) subsystem and AutoPACE server.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PCcmprs command is in the /omp/bin directory.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PCcmprs command is in the /user/ pace/bin directory.

Description
The PCcmprs command compresses CP failure messages to send the messages to the PACE subsystem and AutoPACE server.

Synopsis
PCcmprs [-l ROP-log-dir] [-e extension] [-D output-dir] [h] [date-stamp]

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Options
The options for the PCcmprs command are described in Table 5-41 on page 5-190. Table 5-41. Option -l ROP-log-dir PCcmprs command options Description

ROP-log-dir = the full path name of the directory that contains the Receive-Only Printer (ROP) logger le. extension = the extension of the ROP logger le. The default extension is APX. output-dir = the full path name of the directory in which to place the le that the PCcmprs command outputs. The output le is named YYMMDDHH.cph, where s YY = the last two digits of the year. s MM = the two digits of the month. s DD = the two digits of the day. s HH = the two digits of the hour.
The PCcmprs.errlog and temporary YYMMDDHH.cpf le are also placed in the userspecied output-dir directory. The temporary le is removed when the PCcmprs command completes. If the -D option is not specied, the default value is the current directory.

-e extension

-D output-dir

-h

Display online help about the PCcmprs command.

date-stamp

date-stamp = the date and time previous to which to collect all CP failure messages. Specify date-stamp in the format YYMMDDH, where s YY = the last two digits of the year. s MM = the two digits of the month. s DD = the two digits of the day. s HH = the two digits of the hour.
If date-stamp is not specied, the default is the current date and hour.

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Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the PCcmprs command: To compress the failure messages that were generated in the previous hour, enter PCcmprs

Exit status and/or error messages


The PCcmprs command is feature-activated on the OMP. If the OMP data links are down, the Feature Activation File (FAF) may not be received and the PCcmprs command will not execute because the FAF information cannot be obtained.

Associated commands and/or les


The following les are associated with the PCcmprs command:
s s

/omp-data/pace/mtce (This le contains the output of PCcmprs.) /omp-data/logs/rm (This directory contains data les that are read by PCcmprs.)

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PCgettrx
Name
PCgettrxschedule a Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) database dump.

Description
The PCgettrx command schedules a database dump. The PCgettrx command calls the UNIX at command to invoke the PCruntrx command, which extracts the database information at 3:10 a.m.

Availability UNIX RTR


The PCgettrx command is in the /user/pace/bin directory.

Synopsis
PCgettrx [now]

Options
The options for the PCgettrx command are described in Table 5-42 on page 5-192. Table 5-42. Option PCgettrx command options Description Run the database dump immediately.

now

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the PCgettrx command: To schedule a database dump, enter PCgettrx

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To extract information from the database now, enter PCgettrx now

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PCgetvcsa
Name
PCgetvcsacollect Voice Channel Selection Activity (VCSA) data to begin a VCSA study.

Description
The PCgetvcsa command is a Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) command that collects VCSA data to begin a VCSA study. As PCgetvcsa executes, it prompts the user for information. At the end of each prompt, the range of valid values for that prompt appears in parentheses, and the default value for that prompt appears in square brackets. The PCgetvcsa command collects any number of VCSA studies on different cells until the user enters q (quit) for the cell. A maximum of two log les are created in the /etc/log directory: OPVCSLOG0 and OPVCSLOG1. The data is stored in these log les through the following process: 1. The OPVCSLOG0 le is created. 2. Data is stored in OPVCSLOG0 until OPVCSLOG0 is lled to maximum capacity. 3. The OPVCSLOG1 le is created. 4. Data is stored in OPVCSLOG1 until OPVCSLOG1 is lled to maximum capacity. 5. Data is stored in OPVCSLOG0 until its maximum capacity is reached. At that point, any data in OPVCSLOG0 is overwritten. 6. Data is stored in OPVCSLOG1 until its maximum capacity is reached. At that point, any data in OPVCSLOG1 is overwritten. To avoid loss of data when the log les are overwritten, save the data that is stored in the log les to another le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PCgetvcsa command is unavailable.

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UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PCgetvcsa command is in the /user/ pace/bin directory.

Synopsis
PCgetvcsa

Options
The PCgetvcsa command has no options.

Prompts
The prompts that the PCgetvcsa command displays, the range of valid values for each prompt, and the default value of each prompt are described in Table 5-43 on page 5-195. Table 5-43. Prompt Hour for starting data collection Quarter hour for starting data collection Hour for stopping data collection Quarter hour for stopping data collection PCgetvcsa command prompts (Page 1 of 3) Valid values 00 to 23 0 to 3 00 to 23 0 to 3 Default value 00 0 00 2

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Table 5-43. Prompt

PCgetvcsa command prompts (Page 1 of 3) Valid values To specify s a single VCSA event category, enter a single letter, such as m s multiple VCSA event categories, enter a series of letters that are separated by commas, such as a,c,d,f a range of letters that are separated by a hyphen, such as a-m s all VCSA event categories, enter all Default value d,e,f

VCSA event categories If you specify event category a, the command asks the following additional question: Directional Setup (DS) activated? If you respond y to that prompt, you must enter the face number (1 through 6). To specify all faces, enter 0 (zero).

Instantaneous count interval Carrier number Directory number (aaabbbcccc) for single MIN VCSA Cell number (q to quit) Any valid directory number in the format

120 1 Not applicable

aaabbbcccc
Valid cell values are s 1 through 384 in ECP Releases 17.0 and later s 1 through 222 in ECP Releases 16.1 and earlier q to quit Run PCvfilt on completion of the study? y or n y Not applicable

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Table 5-43. Prompt

PCgetvcsa command prompts (Page 1 of 3) Valid values User-specied lename of up to eight characters. The .vcs extension is added to the lename by default. 1 to 300 Default value Not applicable

Base name of the output file (up to 8 char)

Interval Time

Not applicable

The Interval Time is the time between instantaneous counts and is required only for Event Category m. The interval time is specied in seconds. Enter time at which to clear the OPVCSLOG files Enter one of the following: s a four-digit military time, such as 2325 s now for immediately s d not to clear the les 2325

NOTE:

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the PCgetvcsa command: 1. To begin a VCSA study, enter PCgetvcsa Result: The command returns output such as the following: VCSA Data Collection Scheduler WARNING: VCSA data collection WILL affect system performance ---- VCSA data collections pending or in progress: A REPT APXSHL TERMINAL IN SERVICE NG (code 3) REPT APXSHL EOF ENCOUNTERED

---- VCSA data collections scheduled via /user/pace/ bin/PCgetvcsa:

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Hour for starting data collection (00-23) [00] ? 2. Enter a value between 00 and 23 to specify the hour to start data collection. For example: 23 Result: The command returns the following prompt: Quarter hour for starting data collection (0-3) [0] ? 3. Enter a value between 0 and 3 to specify the quarter hour to start data collection. For example: 2 Result: The command returns the following prompt: Hour for stopping data collection (00-23) [00] ? 4. Enter a value between 00 and 23 to specify the hour to stop data collection. For example: 23 Result: The command returns the following prompt: Quarter hour for stopping data collection (0-3) [2] ? 5. Enter a value between 0 and 3 to specify the quarter hour to stop data collection. For example: 3 Result: The command returns the following prompt: Multiple VCSA event categories can be entered separated by commas (e.g a,b,f). Legal values are a thru m or all. VCSA event categories [d,e,f] ? 6. Enter one or more values from a to m to specify the VCSA event categories. For example: m Result: The command issues the following prompts: Instantaneous count interval [120] ? Carrier number [1] ? Directory number (aaabbbcccc) for single MIN VCSA [ ] ?

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7. Enter the directory number for single MIN VCSA. For example: 8476679921 Result: The command issues the following prompt: Cell number (q to quit) [q] ? 8. Enter a value between 1 and 384 to specify the cell number. For example: 116 Result: The command reissues the following prompt: Cell number (q to quit) [q] ? 9. Enter another cell number or, to quit the Cell number prompt, enter q. For example, enter q Result: The command displays a list of jobs and the following prompt: job 940134300.a at Sat Dec 16 23:25:00 1999 job 940134360.a at Sat Dec 16 23:26:00 1999 Run PCvfilt on completion of the study (y or n) [y] ? 10. To run the PCvfilt command when the VCSA study completes, enter y. Result: The command displays the following prompt: Base name of the output file (up to 8 char) (The .vcs extension will be added to it) [] ? 11. Enter the filename of the file to which you want to direct the output of PCgetvcsa. The filename may contain up to eight characters. For example: example1 Result: The command displays the following information and prompt: Clearing the OPVCSLOG log files destroys any old data and data from studies currently running. Enter time at which to clear the OPVCSLOG files ('now' for immediately, 'd' for don't clear) [2325] ? 12. Enter the time at which the OPVCSLOG files are to be cleared. For example: 2325

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Result: The command returns a list of jobs and the times at which the jobs are to be executed and the le in which the output is to be redirected. For example: job 940134301.a at Sat Dec 16 23:25:00 1999 job 940135800.a at Sat Dec 16 23:50:00 1999 Output will be in example1.vcs after 2355. 1. To begin a VCSA study, enter PCgetvcsa Result: Output such as the following displayed: VCSA Data Collection Scheduler WARNING: VCSA data collection WILL affect system performance ---- VCSA data collections pending or in progress: A REPT APXSHL TERMINAL IN SERVICE NG (code 3) REPT APXSHL EOF ENCOUNTERED

---- VCSA data collections scheduled via /user/pace/ bin/PCgetvcsa: Hour for starting data collection (00-23) [00] ? 2. Enter the hour for starting data collection. For example: 23 Result: The command issues the following prompt: Quarter hour for starting data collection (0-3) [0] ? 3. Enter the quarter hour for starting data collection. For example: 2 Result: The command issues the following prompt: Hour for stopping data collection (00-23) [00] ? 4. Enter the quarter hour for stopping data collection. For example: 23 Result: The command issues the following prompt: Quarter hour for stopping data collection (0-3) [2] ?

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5. Enter the quarter hour for stopping data collection. For example: 3 Result: The command issues the following information and prompt: Multiple VCSA event categories can be entered separated by commas (e.g a,b,f). Legal values are a thru m or all. VCSA event categories [d,e,f] ?

6. Enter the VCSA event categories. For example: m Result: The command issues the following prompts: Instantaneous count interval Carrier number [1] ? [120] ?

Directory number (aaabbbcccc) for single MIN VCSA [ ] ? 7. Enter the directory number for single MIN VCSA. For example: 8476679921 8. The command issues the following prompt: Cell number (q to quit) [q] ? 9. Enter the cell number. For example: 116 Result: The command reissues the following prompt: Cell number (q to quit) [q] ? 10. Enter another cell number or, to quit the Cell number prompt, enter q. For example, enter q Result: The command displays a list of jobs such as the following and the following prompt: job 940134300.a at Sat Dec 16 23:25:00 1999 job 940134360.a at Sat Dec 16 23:26:00 1999 Run PCvfilt on completion of the study (y or n) [y] ? 11. To run the PCvfilt command when the VCSA study completes, enter y.

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Result: The command displays the following prompt: Base name of the output file (up to 8 char) (The .vcs extension will be added to it) [] ? 12. Enter the filename of the file to which the output of PCgetvcsa is to be redirected. The filename may contain up to eight characters. For example: example Result: The command displays the following information and prompt: Clearing the OPVCSLOG log files destroys any old data and data from studies currently running. Enter time at which to clear the OPVCSLOG files ('now' for immediately, 'd' for don't clear) [2325] ? 13. Enter the time at which the OPVCSLOG files are to be cleared. In this example, press the Return key to enter the default value of 2325. Result: The command returns a list of jobs and the times at which the jobs are to be executed and the le in which the output is to be redirected. For example: job 940134301.a at Sat Dec 16 23:25:00 1999 job 940135800.a at Sat Dec 16 23:50:00 1999 Output will be in example.vcs after 2355.

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PCmtcron
Name
PCmtcronexecute the PCcmprs command every hour.

Description
A crontab entry is set up to execute the PCmtcron command every hour. Therefore, there is no manual page for PCmtcron.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PCmtcron command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PCmtcron command is in the /user/ pace/bin directory.

See also
PCcmprs

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PCruntrx
Name
PCruntrxcollect Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) data.

Description
The PCruntrx collects PACE information from all of the databases or a list of databases. Each time that PCruntrx is executed, PCruntrx creates les in which the extracted data is placed. These les are created in the current directory. The names of the les are DATE.trx and DATE.tra, where DATE is an eightdigit number of the current date. If no arguments are specied, PCruntrx collects PACE data for all of the following databases: celldb rdtkdb tmrdtkdb ceqdb fcidb ecpdb cgsadb dcchdb tmdcchdb reseldb trunkdb dlcdb iundb netdb

fafdb ivcdb ivtdb tgldb netmscdb nnbrdb apdb rcslinkdb bsdb modcelldb cdmeqpdb fcsdb findb

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cdhfldb cdhnldb

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PCruntrx command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PCruntrx command is in the /user/ pace/bin directory.

Synopsis
PCruntrx [-hbc] [database]

Options
Table 5-44. Option -h -b -c PCruntrx command options Description Display the help message for the PCruntrx command. Collect PACE data from the backup copies of the databases. Compress Date.trx and DATE.tra les and convert to hexadecimal format. The database for which to collect PACE data.

database

Examples
To collect information from all databases, enter PCruntrx To collect information from the celldb and fcidb databases, enter PCruntrx celldb fcidb

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PCstpvcsa
Name
PCstpvcsastop all VCSA studies.

Description
The PCstpvcsa command stops all VCSA studies or a study on a specic cell.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the PCstpvcsa command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the PCstpvcsa command is in the /user/pace/bin directory.

Synopsis
PCstpvcsa [cell_number]

Options
There are no options used with this command.

Examples
Example: Stop all VCSA studies. PCstpvcsa Example: Stop the VCSA study for cell 210. PCstpvcsa 210

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PCvlt
Name
PCvfiltlter Performance Analysis and Cellular Engineering (PACE) data.

Description
The PCvfilt command deletes non-ASCII characters from log les, outputs the ltered log-le data to a user-specied le, and adds PACE header information to the output le. By default, the PCvfilt command reads the following les, which are generated by the Voice Channel Selection Activity (VCSA) study:
s s

/etc/log/OPVCSLOG0 /etc/log/OPVCSLOG1

To lter PACE data that is stored in les other than those two default log les, use the vcsa_logfile option. By default, PCvfilt displays the ltered log-le data on the terminal screen. Alternatively, the user may redirect the ltered data to a le.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PCvfilt command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PCvfilt command is in the /user/ pace/bin directory.

Synopsis
PCvfilt outfile.vcs [vcsa_logfile]

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Options
The options for the PCvfilt command are described in Table 5-45 on page 5-208. Table 5-45. Option PCvlt command options Description The le to which to output the ltered log-le data. Lucent Technologies recommends that users add the .vcs extension to the lename of the output le. The le that is to be ltered. Use this option to lter les other than the default log les (/etc/log/OPVCSLOG0 and /etc/log/OPVCSLOG1).

outfile.vcs

vcsa_logfile

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the PCvfilt command: To lter the default log les and redirect the output to the le PACEdata1, execute PCvfilt PACEdata1.vcs

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PFcpfail
Name
PFcpfailcollect call-processing failures.

Description
The PFcpfail command collects call processing failures. The counts are taken from each CDN and totaled.

Availability UNIX RTR


The PFcpfail command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
PFcpfail [ -afhlrst ]

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Options
Table 5-46. Option a f h i l r s t PFcpfail Command Options Description Display all failure data Display fade data per cell Display usage message Display the failure index data Display the failure location Retrieve formatted failure data from the CDN Reset CDN failure counts to zero Retrieve raw failure data from the CDN

Examples
Example: Display all failures. PFcpfail -c Example: Display the failure locations. PFcpfail -l

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PFhodisp
Name
PFhodispdisplay a handoff (HO) matrix study.

Description
The PFhodisp command collects data from an HO study. Messages are sent to all active CDNs to stop the study and collect the HO data.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system on the OMP, the PFhodisp command is in the directory /omp/bin.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system on the ECP, the PFhodisp command is no longer available.

Synopsis
PFhodisp [-f] [-v] [-D DIRECTORY] [-o OUTPUT_FILE ] [ -e ERROR_FILE ]

Options
The options for the PFhodisp command are described in Table 5-47 on page 5-211. Table 5-47. Option D DIRECTORY PFhodisp command options Description Specify name of output directory.

Default directory is $HOME/pace/home. e ERROR_FILE Specify the name of the error log le

NOTE:

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Table 5-47. Option f

PFhodisp command options Description Formats the output for PACE. Specify the name of the output le

o OUTPUT_FILE

Output is sent to standard output if an output le is not specied. v Print verbose cell and face information instead of the default cell data.

NOTE:

Examples
Example: Print the cell and face information in the test1.homatrix le. PFhodisp -v -o test1.homatrix Example: Print the cell data in PA&CE format and place the output in the /user/tmp/ test1.homatrix le. Place error information in the /user/tmp/test1.err le. PFhodisp -f -D /usr/tmp -e test1.err -o test1.homatrix

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PFhostaton
Name
PFhostatondisplay a handoff matrix study.

Description
The PFhostaton command begins a handoff study. Messages are sent to all active CDNs to clear the buffers and start the collection of handoff data.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PFhostaton command is in the /omp/bin directory. NOTE: The PFhostaton is valid in ECP Releases 12.0 and later.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PFhostaton command is unavailable.

Synopsis
PFhostaton [-t MIN] [-s STUDY] [-w TECH_TYPE] [-D DIRECTORY] [-e ERROR FILE]

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Options
Table 5-48. Option D DIRECTORY PFhostaton command options Description Specify the name of the output directory.

The default output directory is $HOME/pace/home. e ERROR_FILE s STUDY Specify the name of the error log le. Specify type of handoff to collect (1-1023)

NOTE:

NOTE: STUDY is a bit wise study type that is dened as follows:


s s s s s s s s s s s 0 = AMPS to AMPS. 1 = AMPS to TDMA. 2 = TDMA to AMPS. 3 = TDMA to TDMA. 4 = CDMA to CMDA hard handoff. 5 = CDMA to AMPS hard handoff. 6 = CDMA semisoft handoff. 7 = CDMA soft handoff (primary transfer). 8 = CDMA soft handoff (secondary add). 9 = CDMA soft handoff (secondary drop). 10 = TDMA to TDMA semisoft handoff.

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Table 5-48. Option

PFhostaton command options Description Collect handoff information for each handoff type for a specied technology type. Unlike the -s option, the -w option counts the various handoff types for a given technology individually. The allowable types are AMPS, TDMA, or CDMA. The AMPS option produces the following handoff matrix data: s AMPS to AMPS The TDMA option produces the following handoff matrix data: s AMPS to AMPS s AMPS to TDMA s TDMA to AMPS s TDMA to TDMA s TDMA to TDMA semi-soft The CDMA option produces the following handoff matrix data: s AMPS to AMPS s CDMA to CDMA hard handoff s CDMA to AMPS hard handoff s CDMA Primary Transfer (semisoft) s CDMA Primary Transfer (soft) s CDMA Secondary Add (soft) s CDMA Secondary Drop (soft)

-w TECH_TYPE

o OUTPUT_FILE

Specify the output le.

If you do not specify an output le, the output is sent to standard output. t MIN Specify the duration of the study in minutes.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the PHhostaton command: To collect CDMA to AMPS hard handoff statistics for 2 hours, enter

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PFhostaton -t120 -s5 To print cell data in PACE format, put the output in the le /user/tmp/ test1.homatrix, and put error information in the le /user/tmp/test1.err, enter PFhodisp -f -D /usr/tmp -e test1.err -o test1.homatrix

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PFmtodisp
Name
PFmtodispdisplay statistics on mobile originations and terminations.

Description
The PFmtodisp command generates a report on mobile originations and terminations. NOTE: To gather mobile origination and termination statistics, use the PFmtostat command. Use the PFmtodisp command only with 10-digit dialing plans with NPA/NXX.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the PFmtodisp command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the PFmtodisp command is in the directory /1apx10/testbin.

Synopsis
PFmtodisp {-o|-t[1]|-ot[1]|-n|-on} NOTE: You must specify -o, -t, -ot, -n, or -on.

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Options
The options for the PFmtodisp command are described in Table 5-49 on page 5-218. Table 5-49. Option -o -t -n PFmtodisp command options Description Collect data on mobile originations. The -o option may be combined with the -t option. Collect data on mobile terminations. The -t option may be combined with the -o option. Collect data for mobile terminations by logical representation of the Network Operating Center (that is, npanxx).

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the PFmtodisp command. To display the number of mobile originations, enter PFmtodisp -o

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PFmtostat
Name
PFmtostatcollect mobile origination and termination statistics.

Description
NOTE: The PFmtostat command gathers statistics regarding mobile origination and termination. Use the PFmtodisp command only with 10-digit dialing plans with NPA/NXX.

Availability UNIX RTR


The PFmtostat command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
PFmtostat [ -o | -t | -ot ] [ -d time ] [ -u ]

Options
The options for the PFmtostat command are described in Table 5-50 on page 5-219. Table 5-50. Option d time PFmtostat command options Description Specify the collection time in minutes.

The valid range for time is 1 to 1440 minutes. If this option is omitted, the default collection time is 60 minutes. o ot Collect mobile originations in terms of cell site by Trunk Group Number (TGN) Collect mobile originations and terminations in terms of cell site by TGN

NOTE:

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Table 5-50. Option t u

PFmtostat command options Description Collect mobile originations and terminations in terms of cell site by TGN by ofce codes NXX Force a collection of data even if an out-of-service CDN is detected

Examples
Example: Collect mobile originating and termination data for 2 hours. PFmtostat -ot -d 120

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PFpgstats
Name
PFpgstatscollect paging statistics.

Description
The PFpgstats command collects and reports the total paging statistics.

Availability UNIX RTR


The PFpgstats command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
PFpgstats [ -s [ -t minutes ] ] [ -e ] [ -r [ -S ] [ -A ] ] [ -R ] [ -c cell ] [ -h ] [ -T ]

Options
The options for the PFpgstats command are described in Table 5-51 on page 5-221. Table 5-51. Option A c cell e h R r S s PFpgstats command options Description Gather all paging information. Collect paging data for the cell. End the collection. Display usage message. Retrieve raw paging data. Retrieve formatted paging data. Display short version; that is, dont display the histogram. Start the collection.

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Table 5-51. Option T

PFpgstats command options Description Gather secondary treatment information. Duration of collection in minutes.

t minutes

Examples
Example: Collect all paging information. PFpgstats -A Example: Begin gathering of paging statistics. PFpgstats -s Example: End gathering of paging statistics. PFpgstats -e

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patdiff
Name
patdiffgenerate a set of dialing patterns equivalent to the difference between two input patterns.

Description
The patdiff command is an interactive program that generates a set of dialing patterns equivalent to the difference between two input patterns. The user is prompted for the two patterns, one larger and one smaller; the set of phone numbers specied by the smaller must be entirely contained within the set specied by the larger. For example, if the larger pattern is XX and the smaller is 12, the difference set consists of two patterns: [0,2-9]X and 1[0-1,3-9]. [0,2-9]X covers all of XX except 1X, whereas 1[0-1,3-9] covers all of 1X except 12. Together the two patterns in the difference set cover all of the phone numbers specied by the larger pattern except those also specied by the smaller. The number of patterns in a difference set is equal to the number of positions where the two input patterns differ. Two patterns are generated in the above example because XX and 12 differ in two positions (that is, X vs. 1 and X vs. 2). A brief help message is given if you enter ?, h, or H as a pattern. To exit patdiff, enter any of the following as a pattern: q, Q, e, E, b, or B. Entering < as the smaller pattern returns to the prompt for the larger pattern. Entering < for the larger pattern exits the program. The patterns in the difference set are displayed in standard form. An error message is returned when any of the following conditions occurs:
s s s

Either input pattern contains a syntax error. Either input pattern contains a plus sign (+). The larger pattern is not a superset of the smaller pattern.

The input patterns specify different length phone numbers

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Availability UNIX RTR


The patdiff command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
patdiff

Options
The patdiff command has no options.

Examples
For example, suppose a safety net dialing plan is to route calls destined for home area codes to vacant code announcements (the assumption being that calls to valid exchanges in the home areas were explicitly routed in a primary dialing plan) and route calls to foreign area codes to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) for further screening. Suppose the home area codes are 312 and 708. Patterns in the safety net plan would be: Pattern Comment ------------------------------------------------------30X NXX X(4) Route to PSTN 31[0-1,3-9] NXX X(4) Route to PSTN [2,4-6,8-9]PX NXX X(4) Route to PSTN 71X NXX X(4) Route to PSTN 70[0-7,9] NXX X(4) Route to PSTN 312 NXX X(4) Route to vacant code announcement 708 NXX X(4) Route to vacant code announcement The difference set (the rst ve patterns above) was calculated using patdiff as follows: Example: patdiff Enter larger pattern: NPX NXX XXXX Enter smaller pattern: 312 NXX XXXX

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Difference Pattern Set: [2,4-9]PX NXX X(4) 30X NXX X(4) 31[0-1,3-9] NXX X(4) Example: patdiff Enter larger pattern: [2,4-9]PX NXX XXXX Enter smaller pattern: 708 NXX XXXX Difference Pattern Set: [2,4-6,8-9]PX NXX X(4) 71X NXX X(4) 70[0-7,9] NXX X(4) Two different operations were done above. 312 was rst subtracted from NPX, and then 708 was subtracted from the result (that is, 708 was subtracted from [2,4-9]PX; since 30X and 31[0-1,3-9] are not supersets of 708, subtracting 708 from them was not necessary).

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ptresync
Name
ptresyncresynchronize pattern tree (ptree) les.

Description
Pattern tree (ptree) les contain data that is also in the Dialing Plan Database (dplandb). If a ptree data le for a dialing plan and the dplandb database records for that dialing plan become unsynchronized, execute the ptresync command to regenerate the ptree le from the dplandb database. During the resynchronization, if a dplandb database record is found to contain a syntax error or an overlapping pattern, the ptresync command asks the user whether to delete the questionable record from the dplandb database. The resynchronization either continues or terminates, depending on the users response. If the user responds yes the user responds no then... the resynchronization completes. a copy of the record is written to a ptdplan.err le, where dplan is the dialing plan number, for the users information. The resynchronization terminates immediately and does not complete.

Because no valid ptree le is available for the given dialing plan, this method is the only way to delete bad records from the dplandb database. If a valid ptree le does not exist, any attempt to use the RC/V subsystem to delete a dplan form fails. Ideally, the ptresync command is never used. If the ptree data le for a dialing plan becomes unsynchronized with the records for that dialing plan in the dplandb database, the ptree le is locked until you execute the ptresync command. While the ptresync command executes, the dplandb database and the ptree le for the specied dialing plan are locked. Locking the ptree le prevents other users from inserting, deleting, or updating patterns until the ptree data le is resynchronized.

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Correcting an unsynchronized condition


If a telephone disconnect occurs inadvertently during a dial-up RC/V session that involves modication of the dplandb, the ptree le for the given dialing plan and the dplandb database records for that dialing plan may become unsynchronized. After such a disconnect, rerun the RC/V program and use the query by pattern (qbypat) key to determine whether the changes that you made during the interrupted RC/V session are retained. If the changes... appear to be lost then most likely... the dplandb database is correct but the ptree le is unsynchronized. Execute ptresync and again determine whether the changes are retained. the changes are actually lost and must be reentered.

still appear to be lost

Refusing to delete a record


If ptresync asks whether to delete a record and you are unsure of what to do, reply no and use the RC/V program to view the questionable records. To do this, use the pattern number as the only optional key at the dplan form. (The ptresync command provides detailed information about the overlapping pattern numbers and/or syntax error.) If you decide that the record can be deleted (and possibly reinserted by using the RC/V subsystem), rerun ptresync and reply yes when ptresync asks whether to delete the record. To retain that record but delete or correct another record, contact Customer Technical Support (CTS). NOTE: Remember that changing the dplandb database does not affect the digit tables at the Call Processing and Database Node (CDN) until a table generation is done.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the ptresync command is in the /1apx10/ ecbin/sparc directory.

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UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the ptresync command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
ptresync -d dplan [-b]

Options
The options for the ptresync command are described in Table 5-52 on page 5-228. If you execute ptresync with no options, the command returns usage information. Table 5-52. Option -b -d dplan ptresync command options Description generate a ptree le based on the backup copy of dplandb.

dplan = the number of the dialing plan that is to be resynchronized. The value of dplan may range from 1 to 255.

Examples
The following example illustrates execution of the ptresync command: To resynchronize Dialing Plan 26, enter ptresync -d 26

Associated les
The following les are used with the ptresync command: dplandb ptree data les, including ptdplan (ptree data le) podplan (pattern output le) ptdplan.err (ptree data error le)

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ptdplan.lock (ptree data lock le) ovrlap.dpdplan (pattern overlap le)

See also
For more information about the ptresync command, see 401-661-030, Digit-byDigit Feature Users Guide.

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Rmon
Name
Rmonmonitor Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network resources.

Description
The Rmon command monitors Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network resources.

Availability UNIX RTR


The Rmon command is in the /1apx10/testbin directory.

Synopsis
Rmon -all | -okp | cdn | csn | dln | [ -period secs ] [alarm] [-log file] [-bg] [-rop]

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Options
Table 5-53. Option alarm all bg Rmon Command Options Description Report alarms only. Display system status on all network elements. Run Rmon in the background.

Rmon -bg is equivalent to Rmon -alarm -log cdn csn dln log file period secs rop Monitor a specic CDN. Monitor a specic CSN. Monitor a specic DLN. Place output in file. Specify Rmon duration in seconds. Send alarm output to the ROP.

NOTE:

Examples
To run Rmon for 3 minutes for all Flexent/AUTOPLEX network elements, enter Rmon -all -period 180

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saptree
Name
saptreesearch and verify dialing patterns.

Description
The saptree command provides two operations, Search and Verify, which can be used to
s s

Find the pattern number for a particular dialing pattern (Search). Determine whether or not a particular pattern overlaps/intersects with any other patterns in a given dialing plan (Verify). Remember a pattern which is known to exist but whose exact format has been forgotten. This is accomplished by doing a Verify operation on a specic phone number that is known to overlap with the forgotten pattern or by doing a Search operation trying to match a specic pattern to a general pattern (for example, specic: 357-1234 matching general NXX-XXXX).

Check a particular pattern for syntax errors (this may be done by a Search operation on the given pattern; an error message is returned if the pattern contains a syntax error). NOTE: A Verify operation on a very general input pattern may take a long time and produce a large amount of output if done on a large dialing plan (that is, one with many patterns). For example the pattern NPX NXX X(4) is likely to overlap with most of the patterns in a typical dialing plan. If errors occur while a ptree operation is being performed, the error messages printed are the same as if the error had occurred during RC/V of the dplandb. The wording of some error messages may be slightly confusing because of this. As currently implemented, saptree operates only the ptrees that are associated with the master copy of the dplandb database. That is, saptree expects to nd the dplandb database in /1apx10/dbdata/dplandb and to nd the ptree les in /1apx10/dbdata/ptree. For more information about saptree, see 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

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Availability UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the saptree command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
saptree

Options
The saptree command has no options.

Examples
In the following example, Dialing Plan 1 contains only two patterns:
s s

#1 is 708 979 X(4). #2 is 708 879 X(4).

saptree Enter ? for help. Dialing Plan #? 1 Request? help Recognized commands are as follows: s,S Search pattern tree for specified pattern. Pattern number of specified pattern is returned if found. Otherwise, next free pattern number is returned. Verify that pattern does not overlap any existing patterns; if there is overlap, pattern(s) and corresponding pattern number(s) are returned. Display this help message.

v,V

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l,L b,B e,E q,Q Request? s

Display legal pattern format. Exit program. Exit program. Exit program.

Pattern? 708 979 xxxx Input pattern matches pattern#=1 Request? s Pattern? 708 979 1234 Input pattern matches pattern#=1 Request? s Pattern? 708 N79 XXXX Pattern not found. Next free pattern #=3 Request? v Pattern? 708 979 XXXX Ptree Error (dplan)... Pattern < 708 979 X(4) > overlaps with pattern #1 < 708 979 X(4) > This error message also recorded in file ovrlap.dp1 Request? v Pattern? NPX NXX XXXX Ptree Error (dplan)... Pattern < NPX NXX X(4) > overlaps with 2 pattern(s) See file ovrlap.dp1 for overlapping patterns Request? < Dialing Plan #? q

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systat
Name
systatmonitor specied elements in the network.

Description
The system status (systat) command monitors the status of specied processors in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX system. It returns the following information about each specied processor:
s s s

basic performance capacity overload

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the systat command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the systat command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
systat [-all|-ecp|-dcs|-cdn|-csn|-dln|-occ|-cdma_ho] [-db] [-period mins] [-l file] [-b bytes]] [-aht]

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Options
The options for the systat command are described in Table 5-54 on page 5-236. Table 5-54. Option -all systat command options Description Display the system status of all elements in the Flexent/ AUTOPLEX wireless network.

Executing systat without options is equivalent to executing systat -all. -ecp -dcs -cdn -occ -cdma_ho -db -period mins -l file -b bytes -a -h -t Monitor the specied ECP. Monitor the specied Digital Cellular Switch (DCS). Monitor the specied Call Processing and Database Node (CDN). Show the breakdown of Processor Occupancy (PO) (CDN). Show CDMA handoff counts (CDN). Print database statistics. Execute systat for mins number of minutes. The value of mins may range from 1 to 60. Write the output to the specied log le file. Maximum size in bytes of the log le that is specied in the -l option. Report actual counts for each CDN and DCS. Display usage message for systat. Display totals only.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate use of the systat command: To gather system performance data for 60 minutes on all ECPs and write output to the le /tmp/ecpstats, enter systat -ecp -period 60 -l /tmp/ecpstats

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To gather system performance data for all Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network elements for 10 minutes, enter systat -period 10 or systat -period 10 -all To display totals for all elements in the Flexent/AUTOPLEX wireless network, enter systat -t

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testpat
Name
testpattest dialing patterns.

Description
The testpat command tests dialing patterns.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the testpat command is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the testpat command is in the /1apx10/ ubin directory.

Synopsis
testpat -d # [-i filename] [-r #] [-s #] -t db|filename

Options
The options for the testpat command are described in Table 5-55 on page 5-238. Table 5-55. Option -d # -i filename testpat command options Description Specify dialing plan number #. Specify input le.

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Table 5-55. Option -r # -s #

testpat command options Description Repeat the analysis # times Specify random number generator number #. Specify the digit table input source, which can be either a database or a lename.

-t db|filename

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the testpat command: To test the dialing patterns of (630) 555-1234, enter testpat -d 6305551234 -t sub To test the dialing patterns of (630) 555-1234 and repeat the analysis ve times, enter testpat -d 6305551234 -t sub -r 5

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TIpdunix
Name
TIpdunixmake a UNIX terminal emulate a craft terminal.

Description
The Tipdunix command makes a UNIX terminal emulate a craft terminal. The user is placed in the craft shell environment, and all craft commands are available. To exit and return to UNIX, press [Ctrl-d].

Availability UNIX RTR


The Tipdunix command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
Tipdunix

Options
The Tipdunix command has no options.

Examples
Example: Start a craft shell from a UNIX terminal Tipdunix

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tg
Name
tggenerate digit tables for the specied dialing plan.

Description
The tg command generates digit tables for a specic dialing plan. The DBsanity process then downloads the generated digit tables to the Call Processing and Database Nodes (CDNs) for use by call processing.

Reexecuting tg before DBsanity nishes downloading the digit table databases that were generated by a previous execution of tg may adversely affect calls. Do not reexecute tg before the DBsanity process has nished downloading the digit table databases that were generated by a previous execution of tg. The download is triggered when DBsanity detects that tg has updated the digit table databases at the ECP disk. Calls are affected when the rst set of digit table databases is not completely downloaded before the second execution of tg changes the databases. (The second execution of tg reuses the free space in the digit table records, but the head pointer at the CDN expects the information in the free space area not to be changed.) After the download completes, calls are no longer affected by this condition. The download of digit table databases to the CDNs is generally transparent to existing call processing. When the -v option is used, in rare cases calls that are undergoing digit analysis during the approximately 45-sec digit table download may be misrouted. A call may be misrouted if the following conditions are all true: s Digit analysis for the call is in progress during the download of the digit table databases to the CDN. s The dialed digits would hit the -v (vacant) treatment. s The treatment that results from the reanalysis is undesirable. In many cases, such as using the -v option where previously none was used, the effect is harmless because the call merely receives the new vacant treatment when otherwise the call would not receive the new vacant treatment.

CAUTION:

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If tg terminates abnormally due to one or more overlapping patterns, the pattern tree for the dialing plan on which tg is being executed is probably unsynchronized with the Dialing Plan Database (dplandb). In that case, execute the ptresync command for that dialing plan.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the tg command is not available.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the tg command is in the /1apx10/ubin directory.

Synopsis
tg -d # [-i filename] -o db|file [-p] [-r] -t db|file [-v #] [-x]

Options
The options for the tg command are described in Table 5-56 on page 5-242. Table 5-56. Option -d # -i filename -o db -o file -p tg command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Build digit tables for the specied dialing plan number (#). The value of # may range from 1 to 255. Read pattern information from the specied le (filename) instead of from the dplandb database. Put output in the digit table databases. Put output in the digit table le. Print deleted (freed) digit tables.

Use the -p option only when you are changing an existing dialing plan. Output is sent to the dptblnum le.

NOTE:

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Table 5-56. Option -r

tg command options (Page 1 of 2) Description Print a report to the digtab.report le. This report is similar to an ofce record and contains all of the used digit tables for all dialing plans. Get input to the command from the digit table databases (db). If input is obtained from digit table databases, the databases must exist but need not be populated (created by DBapxcrt). Get input from the digit table le. If the input is from les, the les must exist and must have been created by the dtclr command or a previous execution of tg. Set vacant code treatment to a second dialing plan. If digit analysis cannot match a given dialed number with any pattern in the digit tables for the dialing plan that is specied in the -d option, the dialed number is reanalyzed using the digit tables for the dialing plan that is specied in the -v option. The -v option is used to link dialing plans, to provide either dialing plan modularity or safety net dialing plans. The value of # may range from 1 to 255. The value of # in the -d option may not equal the value of # in the -v option. Delete digit tables. The -x option removes a dialing plan from the digit tables, presumably after the dpdelete command is executed.

-t db

-t file

-v #

-x

The -x and -v options are incompatible.

NOTE:

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the tg command: To generate digit tables for Dialing Plan 16 that are not downloaded to the CDNs, enter tg -d 16 -t db -o file To generate digit tables for Dialing Plan 200 using the output of the last execution of tg (above), not download the CDNs with the digit table databases, and generate a report, enter tg -d 200 -t file -o file -r

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To generate tables for Dialing Plan 150 and send vacant codes to Dialing Plan 22, enter tg -d 150 -t db -o db -v 22

See also
For more information about tg, see 401-661-030, Digit-by-Digit Feature Users Guide.

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trkreport
Name
trkreportprint the trunk report.

Description
The trkreport command prints the les in the /etc/log/OPDCSLOG directory in ASCII format.

Availability Solaris operating system


In the Solaris operating system, the trkreport is unavailable.

UNIX RTR operating system


In the UNIX RTR operating system, the trkreport command is in the directory /1apx10/expbin.

Synopsis
trkreport [-a] [-d dcsnum] [-e] [-f file] [-h] [-t mmddhhn] [-u] [-R rsn] [-T type]

Options and arguments


The options and arguments for the trkreport command are described in Table 5-57 on page 5-245. Table 5-57. Argument -a -d dcsnum -e -f file trkreport command options and arguments Description Print all DCS failure reasons. Print failure reasons for DCS number dcsnum only. Print extended failure data. Print failures from the log le file.

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Table 5-57. Argument -h

trkreport command options and arguments Description Print online help for the trkreport command. Print failures that match the timestamp mmddhhnn, where s s s s

-t mmddhhnn

mm = the month in two digits. dd = the day of the month in two digits. hh = the hour of the day in two digits. nn = the minute of the hour in two digits.

-u -R rsn -T type

Print failures in unsorted (chronological) order. Print only DCS failures of the reason rsn, where rsn is a decimal value. Print only DCS failures of the type type, where type is a decimal value.

Examples
The following examples illustrate execution of the trkreport command: To display all messages that were logged on February 22, enter trkreport 0222 To display all messages that were logged on February 22 and sort the messages in chronological order, enter trkreport 0222 s To display all messages that were logged on September 14 at 3:15 p.m. and sort the messages in chronological order, enter trkreport 09141515 s

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History of Revisions

Reasons for reissues


This appendix identies new and changed information that was provided in recent issues of this FLEXENT/AUTOPLEX Wireless Networks UNIX Users Guide.

Issue 7 (December 2000)


Issue 7 (December 2000) provided the following additions and changes to Issue 6 (May 2000).

Changes to Chapter 4, UNIX Commands


In Chapter 4, UNIX Commands, the descriptions of the following commands have been added or updated:

s compress s cut s date s falloc s file s fmove s fsize

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Changes to Chapter 5, Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands


In Chapter 5, Flexent/AUTOPLEX Wireless Network Commands, the descriptions of the following commands have been added or updated:

s apxsub s DBapxvcr s DBend s DBllitest s DBretune s DBsubdel s DBsubrehome s DBsubsum s DBsurvey s dpdelete s dtreport s dxdroute s FTlistcol s FTlisttrace s FTplmstart s FTplmstop s FTrfclear s FTrfdump s FTrfstop s getdp s PCmtcron s PCruntrx
s PFhostaton The descriptions of the following commands have been updated to support the 15-Digit Directory Number (15-DDN) feature: s amasearch. In the amasearch command, only the -m option has changed.

s apxhome

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Deleted manual pages


The manual pages for the following commands are deleted: s DBsubsearch. In ECP Releases 15.0 and later, the DBsubsearch command is replaced by the DBsubquery command. s PCfilt. The PCfilt command is superseded by the Watchmark software product. s PCxfer. The PCxfer command is superseded by the Watchmark software product. s Swing_unload. The Swing_unload command is not supported as of ECP Release 13.0, Software Update 99-0005.

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Index

Index
C
case statement, 3-16 3-16,3-23 3-233-24 case-sensitivity, 1-16 1-16 Change directories, how to one directory at a time, 1-10 change directories, how to by specifying full path, 1-11 1-11 one directory at a time, 1-10 to the parent directory, 1-11 1-11 character file, 1-6 1-6 command line delimiter, 1-18 1-18 maximum length of, 1-16 1-16 options, 4-2 4-2 syntax, 4-2 4-2 command line arguments, 4-2 commands. see UNIX RTR Commands or Solaris Commands continue statement, 3-16 3-16, 3-28 3-28 Conventions used in this document, xxviii

Symbols
.sh_history, 3-8 3-8 .Z files, 4-47 4-47 :, 1-19 1-19 ;, 1-18 1-18, 4-61 4-61 <, 1-17 1-17 >, 1-17 1-17 >>, 1-18 1-18 [], 4-2 4-2 |, 3-23 3-23,4-2 4-2, 5-2 5-2 , 1-18

Numerics
3B21D, 2-1 2-1

D A
About this document comments, xxxii xxxii training, xxxii xxxii absolute path See path. dash, 4-2 4-2,4-62 4-62,4-63 4-63, 4-64 4-64, 5-2 DBsubrehome, 5-88 5-88 Dialing plan delete (dpdelete) command, 5-109 Dialing Plan Search (dpsrch), 5-113 Dialing Plan Vacant (dpvacant), 5-118 Digit Table Report (dtreport), 5-121 5-121 directory current directory, 1-8 group ID of, 1-12 1-12 parent directory, 1-9 permission levels of, 1-15 1-15 directory structure, 1-8 1-8, 2-3 2-3, 3-5 Documentation, related, xxx dpdelete command, 5-109 5-109 dpsrch, 5-113 5-113 dpvacant, 5-118 5-118 dtreport, 5-121 5-121 DxD List (dxdlist), 5-125 5-125 DxD Phone (dxdphone), 5-132 5-132 DxD Route (dxdroute), 5-134 5-134

B
block file, 1-6 1-6 break statement, 3-16 3-16, 3-27 3-27

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dxdcount, 5-123 5-123 dxdlist, 5-125 dxdphone, 5-132 5-132 dxdroute, 5-134

E
ed editor, 1-28 1-28,2-7 2-72-12 2-12, 3-42 $ significance, 2-9 2-9 append text, 2-9 2-9 change line content, 2-8 command mode, 2-8 insert mode, 2-8 2-8 insert text, 2-9 2-9 invoking, 2-9 2-9 print line, 2-8 2-8 quit, 2-8 2-8 return to command mode, 2-8 subsitute pattern, 2-8 write file to disk, 2-8 2-8 editor defintion of, 1-28 1-28 ed, 1-28 1-28 vi, 1-28 1-28 emacs editor, 3-42 3-42 Error Messages login incorrect, 1-4 1-4

F
File Name maximum length, 2-2 2-2, 3-4 file system mounted versus unmounted, 1-12 file system, definition of, 1-11 File Types contiguous, 2-3 2-3 determining, 1-6 1-6 directory, 1-6 1-6 iop, 2-3 2-3 multi-extent, 2-3 2-3 pipe, 2-3 2-3 record, 2-3 2-3

symbolic link, 4-129 4-129 files categories of, 1-5 directory, 1-5 ordinary, 1-5 1-5 special, 1-5 1-5 executable, 1-15 1-15 file types block file, 1-6 1-6 character, 1-6 1-6 regular file, 1-6 1-6 symbolic link, 1-6 1-6 group ID of, 1-12 1-12 owner of, 1-12 1-12 permissions levels of, 1-14 1-14 Filesystem autoplex, 2-4 2-4, 3-5 3-5 default, Solaris, 3-5 3-5 default, UNIX RTR, 2-4 Filesystems /, 2-4 2-4, 3-5 3-5 /1apx10, 2-4 2-4 /1apx10/celgens, 2-5 /1apx10/dbbackup, 2-5 /1apx10/dbdata, 2-5 2-5 /cdmp, 2-4 2-4 /database, 2-4 2-4 /etc, 2-4 2-4 /etc/log, 2-4 2-4 /home, 3-5 3-5 /opt, 3-5 3-5 /tmp, 2-4 2-4 /update, 2-4 2-4 /user, 2-4 2-4 /usr, 3-5 3-5 /var, 3-5 3-5 function statement, 3-16 3-16, 3-30 3-30

G
Get Dialing Plan Numbers (getdp), 5-186 getdp, 5-186 5-186 gmacs editor, 3-42 3-42 group ID of file or directory, 1-12 groups, Autoplex on OMP, 3-6

Lucent TechnologiesProprietary See notice on rst page

IN-2

Issue 8

June 2001

Index

I
if statement, 3-16 3-16,3-19 3-193-23 if statement, 3-19 3-19

K
keyboard shortcuts, 3-10 3-10 Ksh Programming Language, 3-15 3-153-30 comment, 3-19 3-19 conditions, 3-19 3-19 constructs, 3-16 3-16 keywords, 3-17 3-17 syntax rules, 3-17 3-17 variable, 3-19 3-19

L
log in to the UNIX operating system, how to, 1-2 login IDs. See user login IDs., 1-2 login to the system, 1-3 Loops for, 3-16 3-16,3-26 3-263-27 3-27 until, 3-16 3-16,3-25 3-253-26 3-26 while, 3-16 3-16,3-24 3-243-25 3-25

M
mounted file system, 1-12 1-12

patdiff, 5-224 5-224 path definition of, 1-9 1-9 delimiter in path names, 1-9 full path, 1-10 1-10 relative path, 1-10 1-10 path, definition of path, full, 2-10 2-10,3-32 3-32, 3-46 3-46, 3-48 3-48 path, relative, 2-10 2-10, 3-46 3-46, 3-49 3-49 Pattern Difference (patdiff), 5-224 5-224 Pattern Tree Resync (ptresync), 5-228 Permissions, 2-5 2-5, 3-6 3-6 group, 4-2 4-2, 4-129 4-129 group ID, 4-28 4-28 group, not on ECP (UNIX RTR), 2-5 , 2-6 owner, 4-2 4-2, 4-129 4-129 permissions, 1-12 1-12 definition of, 1-5 1-5 of "world" or "other", 1-13 1-13 of directories, 1-15 1-15 of group, 1-12 1-12 of owner of file or directory, 1-12 priivileges. See permissions. print command, standard, 1-29 printing, 3-50 3-503-52 3-52 printing, UNIX RTR, 2-12 2-12 privileges. See permissions. process types, Solaris, 3-41 3-41 Processes daemon, 3-40 3-40 daemons, 4-56 4-56 kernel, 2-6 2-6 supervisor, 2-6 2-6, 2-7 2-7 system, 3-40 3-40 user, 3-40 3-40 processes background, 1-18 1-18, 1-26 1-26 foreground, 1-26 1-26 kill, how to, 1-27 1-27 list running, how to, 1-26 1-26 prompt, 1-4 1-4 PS1 shell variable, 1-4 1-4 ptresync, 5-228 5-228

P
parent directory, 1-9 passwords requirements of, 4-159 4-159

R
read statement, 3-16 3-16, 3-29 3-29

Lucent TechnologiesProprietary See notice on rst page

Issue 8

June 2001

IN-3

401-610-048

regular file, 1-6 1-6 regular user, 1-4, 2-2, 3-3 regular user login ID, 1-4 root directory, 1-8, 2-3, 3-5 root user, 1-8

S
Safety labels in this document, xxvii security, system definition of, 1-12 1-12 Shell craft shell, 1-16 1-16 definition of, 1-16 1-16 Types csh, 3-16 3-16 ksh, 3-8 3-8, 3-16 3-16 rsh, 2-6 2-6 sh, 2-6 2-6 Variables, 3-8 3-83-9 COLUMN (ksh only), 3-8 EDITOR, 3-10 3-10 EDITOR (ksh only), 3-8 ENV (ksh only), 3-8 3-8 FCEDIT (ksh only), 3-8 HISTFILE (ksh only), 3-8 HISTSIZE (ksh only), 3-9 LINES (ksh only), 3-9 OLDPWD (ksh only), 3-9 PPID (ksh only), 3-9 PWD (ksh only), 3-9 VISUAL (ksh only), 3-9 shell characteristics of, 1-16 1-16 scripts, 1-26 1-26 shell script, 3-15 3-15 variables, 1-18 1-181-25 delimiter of, 1-19 1-19 determining the value of, 1-20 1-201-21 HOME, 1-19 1-19 PATH, 1-19 1-19 PS1, 1-19 1-19 PS2, 1-19 1-19 setting the value of, 1-22 1-221-26 SHELL, 1-19 1-19 TERM, 1-19 1-19 shell characters, 1-7

to append a file, 1-18 1-18 to delete a command line, 1-17 to redirect output, 1-17 shell scripts, 3-15, 3-18, 3-19, 3-30 shell variables PS1, 1-4 1-4 Solaris, xxv xxv Solaris Commands at, 4-10 4-104-14 4-14 banner, 4-16 4-16 cat, 4-22 4-22 chgrp, 4-2 4-2,4-28 4-284-29 4-29 chown, 4-38 4-38 clear, 4-2 4-2, 4-41 4-41 cmp, 4-44 4-44 compress, 4-46 4-46, 4-47 4-47 crontab, 4-3 4-3,4-56 4-564-59 ctrmkrmt, 5-44 5-44 cut, 4-61 4-61,4-61 4-614-67 4-67 date, 4-68 4-68 DBllitest, 5-52 5-52 DBretune, 5-57 5-57 DBsubdel, 5-60 5-60 DBsubquery, 5-64 5-64 DBsurvey, 5-93 5-93 dd, 4-76 4-764-78 4-78 diff, 4-83 4-834-86 4-86 echo, 4-89 4-894-90 4-90 file, 4-3 4-3,4-97 4-97,4-97 4-974-98 4-98 find, 4-100 4-1004-102 4-102 FTlistcol, 5-136 5-136 FTlisttrace, 5-143 5-143 head, 4-3 4-3, 4-111 4-111 kill, 4-117 4-1174-120 4-120 lp, 3-50 3-50 ls, 4-125 4-1254-130 4-130 man, 4-4 4-4,4-131 4-1314-132 4-132 mesg, 4-135 4-135 more, 4-4 4-4,4-140 4-1404-141 4-141 nohup, 4-152 4-152 passwd, 4-159 4-159 PCgetvcsa, 5-194 5-194 rm, 4-180 4-1804-181 4-181 sdiff, 4-186 4-1864-188 4-188 sleep, 4-189 4-189 sort, 4-193 4-1934-194 4-194 split, 4-196 4-1964-197 4-197 stty, 4-201 4-2014-202 4-202 su, 4-204 4-2044-205 4-205 tail, 4-209 4-2094-210 4-210

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IN-4

Issue 8

June 2001

Index

time, 4-213 4-213 tty, 4-218 umask, 4-220 uname, 4-226 uncompress, 4-5, 4-222 4-223 wc, 4-229 who, 4-2324-233 write, 4-2344-235 Solaris operating system, 1-1 Solaris, runs on, 3-1 subdirectory definition of, 1-8 superuser, 2-2, 3-3 superuser. See root end user. system login ID, definition of, 1-4

T
Table Generation (tg), 5-242 5-242 tg, 5-242 5-242 tilde, 3-9 3-9 to determine file type of a file, 1-7 to log in to the UNIX operating system, 1-3 1-31-4 Training, related, xxxi xxxi

U
UNIX commands for system administration activities, xxvi UNIX RTR Commands admin, 4-2 4-2 apxhome, 5-17 5-17 at, 4-2 4-2,4-10 4-104-14 4-14 banner, 4-2 4-2 batch, 4-2 4-2 cat, 4-2 4-2 cd, 4-2 4-2 chmod, 4-2 4-2,4-31 4-314-35 4-35 chown, 4-2 4-2 cmp, 4-3 4-3 compress, 4-3 4-3, 4-46 4-46 cpio, 4-3 4-3,4-51 4-514-54 4-54 ctrmkrmt, 5-44 5-44

cut, 4-3 4-3, 4-61 4-61 date, 4-3, 4-68 DBllitest, 5-52 DBretune, 5-57 DBsubdel, 5-60 DBsubquery, 5-64 DBsubsearch, 5-89 DBsurvey, 5-93 DBvlrquery, 5-99 dd, 4-3 df, 4-3 4-3 diff, 4-3 du, 4-3 echo, 4-3 4-3,4-89 4-894-91 4-91 env, 4-3 falloc, 4-3 4-3 find, 4-3 4-3,4-100 4-1004-102 4-102 fmove, 4-3 4-3, 4-103 4-103 fsize, 4-3 4-3, 4-105 4-105 FTlisttrace, 5-143 5-143 getdp, 5-186 5-186 grep, 4-3 4-3,4-107 4-1074-109 4-109 id, 4-3 4-3 kill, 4-4 4-4,4-117 4-1174-119 4-119 logdir, 4-4 4-4 lpr, 2-12 2-12,4-4 4-4, 4-123 4-123 ls, 4-4 4-4 mesg, 4-4 4-4, 4-134 4-134 mkdir, 4-4 4-4 mv, 4-4 4-4 news, 4-4 4-4 nice, 4-4 4-4 nohup, 4-4 4-4 od, 4-4 4-4,4-155 4-1554-158 4-158 passwd, 4-4 4-4 PCgetvcsa, 5-194 5-194 PCmtcron, 5-203 5-203 PCruntrx, 5-204 5-204 pg, 4-4 4-4,4-162 4-1624-165 4-165 pr, 4-4 4-4,4-166 4-1664-171 4-171 ps, 4-4 4-4,4-172 4-1724-176 4-176 pwd, 4-4 4-4 rm, 4-4 4-4 rmdir, 4-4 4-4 sdiff, 4-4 4-4 sleep, 4-4 4-4 sort, 4-5 4-5,4-191 4-1914-194 4-194 split, 4-5 4-5, 4-195 4-195 stty, 4-5 4-5 su, 4-5 4-5

Lucent TechnologiesProprietary See notice on rst page

Issue 8

June 2001

IN-5

401-610-048

sum, 4-5 4-5,4-206 4-206, 5-147 5-147 tail, 4-5 4-5,4-208 4-2084-211 4-211 time, 4-5 4-5, 4-212 4-212 touch, 4-5 4-5, 4-215 4-215 tty, 4-5 4-5 umask, 4-5 4-5 uname, 4-5 4-5, 4-225 4-225 wc, 4-5 4-5 who, 4-5 4-5,4-231 4-2314-233 4-233 write, 4-5 4-5,4-234 4-2344-236 4-236 UNIX RTR operating system, 1-1 UNIX RTR shells, 2-6 UNIX RTR, runs on, 2-1 user login IDs types of, 1-4 1-4

V
vi editor, 3-42 3-423-49 3-49 command mode, 3-42 3-42 insert commands, 3-45 3-45 insert mode, 3-42 3-42 invoking, 3-46 3-46, 3-48 3-48 miscellaneous commands, 3-45 navigational commands, 3-43 quit, 3-44 3-44 search commands, 3-44 3-44 syntax, 3-42 3-42 tilde, 3-45 3-45 write file to disk, 3-44 3-44

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IN-6

Issue 8

June 2001

Lucent Technologies Wants Your Opinion


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