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Overview of New Functionality in SolidWorks 99

This section has been designed to give you quick access to all the new features and improvements in this version of the SolidWorks software. Click a subject you are interested in to learn about how it has been improved for SolidWorks 99. Assemblies Drawings Detailing Features General Import/Export Library Features and the Feature Palette Reference Geometry Sheet Metal Sketching Look for the marker throughout the online help. It highlights new and improved functionality. Assemblies Assembly PropertyManager. As you move and rotate components in the assembly, you can use the tools on this tab to detect collisions between components. You can also use this tab to switch between Move Component mode and SmartMates mode. Assembly structure editing. You can modify the structure of an assembly while working in the top-level assembly. This makes it easy to create and redefine subassemblies, without having to leave the top-level assembly. You can: Move components from one sub-assembly to another. Create a new, empty sub-assembly, then move components into it. Select exisiting components to form a sub-assembly. Dissolve a sub-assembly to move the components up one level in the hierarchy. You can change the order of components in the FeatureManager design tree.

When you drag a part with a Mate Reference into an assembly either from the Feature Palette window or from Windows Explorer, you can infer mates automatically. Curvature display. You can display assemblies with the surfaces rendered in different colors according to their local radius of curvature. You can create many types of SmartMates between components by simply clicking or dragging the components in the graphics area. You can now insert some types of curves in assemblies. You can insert a curve through free points or from a file or a curve through reference points. For many assembly operations,you must fully resolve all the components. See Loading Additional Model Data. Detailing Bill of materials. You can now select a custom, user-defined template when you create a BOM. You can also edit the BOM properties to control which items are shown, how item numbers are assigned, how to split a long BOM table, and so on. See Editing a Bill of Materials. The FeatureManager design tree now has a Bill of Materials feature under the drawing view from which you created the BOM. You can use this feature to hide or show the BOM on the sheet.

Dimensions. You can set an option (under Tools, Options, Detailing) to override the default alignment of dimension text with respect to the leaders. You can also change the text alignment of an individual dimension by editing its properties. Ordinate dimensions automatically jog to prevent overlapping text. You can display dimensions as Inspection dimensions. You can dimension to the midpoint of a linear model edge in a drawing view.

Block. You can create, save, and insert blocks for drawing items that you use frequently. In the previous version of SolidWorks, the term custom symbol was used to describe blocks. The functionality is the same; only the name has changed. See Block . Drawings Performance. Drawing performance has been improved, especially for detail views and section views of assemblies. Performance is also better when loading large drawings, activating views, and editing sketches. Layers. You can create layers in a SolidWorks drawing document. You assign a line color, line thickness, and line style for new entities created on each layer. You can hide or show individual layers, and move entities from one layer to another. If a drawing template has layers, the layers are copied into any new drawing you create with that template. You can print drawings in color.

Section views. A new option lets you automatically scale the crosshatch pattern in detail views created from section views. See Drawings Options. Detail views. When you drag the detail circle, either to move it or to resize it, the detail view updates dynamically. There are new ways to select a model for creating a Standard 3 View, a Named View, or a Relative View. You can insert the model from a file (without opening the model document). You can select an individual part in an assembly document to create views of that part. You can select a drawing view that contains the part or assembly model, either in the same drawing document or in another drawing window. Rulers. You can turn the display of rulers on and off in the drawing window.

Design tables. If a model document uses a design table to generate multiple configurations, you can display the table in a drawing of that model. When aligning drawing views to each other, the model origins are aligned, instead of the view centers. You can rotate drawing views at any angle. You can dimension to the midpoint of a linear model edge in a drawing view. You can hide or show model sketches in individual drawing views.

Automatic inferencing lines. To improve sketching performance in a complex sketch or drawing, you can now turn off automatic inferencing lines. You can wake up only those entities from which you want to use inferencing lines.

Features New Features toolbar buttons. The Features toolbar now includes the following toolbar buttons: Loft (Use to insert a base or boss loft.)

Sweep (Use to insert a base or boss sweep.) Circular Pattern Linear Pattern Mirror Feature Variable radius fillet. You can set a default radius value for vertices that are not assigned radius values, or your can let the software calculate the radii of the vertices that are not assigned values. See Variable Radius Fillet . Edit seed feature of a pattern. You can edit the definition of the original feature of a pattern or a mirrored feature. See Edit Seed Feature . Equal spacing in circular patterns. You can specify the Total angle in which to create the pattern when you select the Equal spacing check box. See Circular Pattern. Shape. You can use a feature handle to adjust a Shape feature constrained by a vertex in a 3D sketch. See Shape Feature . Dynamic Feature Editing. Using the Move/Size Features tool, you can see a dynamic feature preview when you drag the entities of a sketch. See Dynamic Feature Editing. General Lighting. There have been many improvements in the ways that you create and modify lights. The FeatureManager design tree now includes a Lighting folder that contains the light sources. Color. You can edit the color of a part, a feature, or a face more easily, using the Edit Color tool on the Standard toolbar. You can scale the image of part and assembly documents, as well as drawing documents. See Page Setup. There is a new Tools toolbar that includes buttons for Equations, Measure, and Mass Properties. You can display the results of Measure, Mass Properties, and Section Properties in scientific notation. Sheet Metal Rips. You can create sheet metal parts with rips. See Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Rips. Conical faces. You can create sheet metal parts with conical faces. See Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Cylindrical or Conical Faces. Auto reliefs. You can automatically add Rectangular or Tear relief cuts when inserting bends. You can edit all auto reliefs or edit a single auto relief after inserting bends. See Auto Relief , Edit All Auto Reliefs, and Edit a Single Auto Relief. Sheet metal drawings. You can automatically create a flat pattern configuration of a sheet metal part when you create a drawing. Multiple collinear edges in the flat pattern configuration are merged into a single linear edge in the drawing. See Creating Drawings of Sheet Metal Parts . Sketching 3D Sketching. Now you can create a 3-dimensional sketch to use as a sweep path, as a guide curve for a loft or sweep, or a centerline for a loft. The new PropertyManager functionality provides a new way of sketching. You can select a sketch entity and then directly edit its property values for size, coordinates, angle, and so on.

Sketch Patterns. There are two new tools on the Sketch Tools toolbar for creating sketched patterns. See Linear Sketch Step and Repeat and Circular Sketch Step and Repeat . Offset sketch entities. You can now use Offset Entities to create sketch offsets from one or more selected sketch entities. Dynamic Feature Editing. Using the Move/Size Features tool, you can see a dynamic feature preview when you drag the entities of a sketch. See Dynamic Feature Editing. Curvature of sketch entities in a closed sketch. You can display the curvature value of sketch segments and curves. See. Curvature Display . Automatic inferencing lines. To improve sketching performance in a complex sketch or drawing, you can now turn off automatic inferencing lines. You can wake up only those entities from which you want to use inferencing lines. Customize Toolbars Customizes, displays, or hides toolbars: Annotations Toolbar Sketch Toolbar Assembly Toolbar Sketch Relations Toolbar Drawing Toolbar Sketch Tools Toolbar Features Toolbar Standard Toolbar Font Toolbar Standard Views Toolbar Line Format Toolbar Tools Toolbar Macro Toolbar View Toolbar Reference Geometry Toolbar Web Toolbar Selection Filter Toolbar To make toolbars visible: 1 Click Tools, Customize.

2 On the Toolbars page, click the checkboxes to select each toolbar you want to display; uncheck the toolbars you want to hide. Options: To display large size toolbar buttons, select Large Icons.

To show tooltips, select Show Tooltips. When checked, a small note pops up to identify each tool icon that you pause your cursor over. To automatically display the toolbars related to the specific type of document that is active, select Auto-activate document toolbars. This is the default 3 Click the Reset button to reverse the changes made during this session. Click OK to make the changes and close the dialog; or click Cancel.

To move a toolbar: Toolbars can be either "docked" (attached to one of the edges of the SolidWorks window) or "floating." 1 Point at the space between the buttons on the toolbar and drag the toolbar to the desired location. If you drag it to an edge of the SolidWorks window, the toolbar docks to that edge automatically. 2 To change a toolbars orientation (from horizontal to vertical), drag the toolbar near a horizontal or vertical edge of the window before placing it in the desired location. Note: The Font, Web, and Selection Filter toolbars must be docked horizontally. For more information see Customize Commands , Customize Menus , and Customize Keyboard .

Toolbars Displays, or hides toolbars. See Standard, View, Annotations, Assembly, Drawing, Features, Font , Line Format , Macro, Selection Filter , Sketch, Sketch Relations, Sketch Tools, and Web toolbars. To make toolbars visible: 1 Click View, Toolbars. 2 On the Toolbars dialog, click the checkboxes to select each toolbar you want to display; uncheck the toolbars you want to hide. 3 Click Customize to change your toolbars, commands, menus, and keyboard to suit your style of working. Note: You can also access the Toolbars menu by right-mouse clicking on the borders around the SolidWorks window. See also Customize Toolbars , Customize Commands , Customize Menus , and Customize Keyboard . Annotations Toolbar The Annotations toolbar provides tools for adding notes and symbols to a drawing, part, or assembly document. Only those annotations that are appropriate for the active document are available; the other tools are displayed in gray. Note Surface Finish Symbol Geometric Tolerance Balloon Center Mark Datum Feature Symbol Hole Callout Weld Symbols Datum Target Cosmetic Threads Assembly Toolbar The Assembly toolbar controls the management, movement, and mating of components. Show Components Change Suppression State Rotate Component Around Centerpoint Rotate Component Around Axis Move Component SmartMates Edit Part Mate Drawing Toolbar The Drawing toolbar provides tools for aligning dimensions and creating drawing views. Align Collinear/Radial Align Parallel/Concentric Detail Section Aligned Section Projection Standard 3 View Auxiliary Named View Relative to Model Drawing View Update Features Toolbar The Features toolbar provides tools for creating model features. The set of features icons is very extensive so not all of them are included on the default Features toolbar. You can customize this toolbar by adding and removing icons to suit your working style and frequent tasks. See Customize Toolbars for more information. Extruded Boss/Base Revolved Boss/Base

Extruded Cut Revolved Cut Fillet Chamfer Rib Scale Shell Draft Simple Hole Hole Wizard Dome Shape Insert Bends Flattened No Bends Insert Rip Move/Size Features Suppress Unsuppress Unsuppress with Dependents Linear Pattern Circular Pattern Mirror Feature Sweep Feature Loft Feature Font Toolbar Lets you specify the font, font style, and size for selected text, dimensions and geometric tolerances. To specify a font: 1 Click View, Toolbars and select Font. The Font toolbar is displayed when the Font option is checked. You can change the location of the toolbar by dragging it to any horizontal position in the SolidWorks window. 2 Select text, dimensions, or symbols for which you want to apply a new font. Hold the Ctrl key to make multiple selections. 3 Make selections from the following options: Font. Use the scroll arrows to select from a variety of type faces available on your system. Font Size. Use the arrows to scroll to the point size to use. The corresponding size in millimeters is displayed in the next box. You can also change the font size by selecting the value in the millimeter display box and entering a value. The font size updates when you click in the graphics area. (The metric value is interpreted as the actual height of the tallest character in the font set.) Font Style. Click the symbols for Bold, Italic, or Underlining, or a combination of these. The Font toolbar becomes inactive when you click on space in the graphics area. Line Format Toolbar The Line Format toolbar provides tools for changing the appearance of individual lines, edges, and sketch entities in a drawing. Line Color Line Thickness Line Style Layer Properties Color Display Mode Macro Toolbar The Macro toolbar controls macro recording, playback, and editing. Run Macro Stop Macro Record Macro Edit Macro Custom Macro Reference Geometry Toolbar The Reference Geometry toolbar provides tools for creating and using reference geometry.

Plane Axis Coordinate System 3D Curve Composite Curve Selection Filter To make it easier to select specific items, you can set the Selection Filter to the kind of item that you want to select: faces, edges, and vertices, reference geometry, sketch entities, or dimensions and annotations. With the filter set, the kinds of items that you specify are identified when you pass your cursor over them, making it easy for you to select only those items. To toggle the display of the Selection Filter toolbar, click on the Standard toolbar, or press F5. The first three buttons on the Selection Filter toolbar allow you to specify the behavior of the Selection Filter: Turn all the selected filters on or off. You can also press F6. Clear all selected filters. Select all of the filters. The rest of the buttons on the Selection Filter toolbar are filters. Select the filters that match the items you want to select in the graphics area. NOTE: You can customize the Selection Filter toolbar by removing (or replacing) filter buttons. See Customize Commands. As a reminder to you, while a Selection Filter is active, the selection cursor has a small filter icon attached to it. See also Selection Filter Hot Keys . Sketch Toolbar The Sketch toolbar controls selection, sketch creation, sketch modification, and the sketch grid.

Insert/Edit Sketch 3D Sketch Grid/Units Select Modify No Solve Move Sketch Relations The Sketch Relations toolbar controls dimensions and other geometric relations. If any Sketch Relations icons are not included on your default toolbar, you can customize the toolbar by adding any of the icons below. See Customize Toolbars for more information.

Dimension Add Relation Display/Delete Relations Scan Equal Sketch Tools Toolbar The Sketch Tools toolbar provides sketch entities and sketch tools to use in a sketch or a drawing. Note that the Convert Entities and Offset Entities tools are not available in drawings.

Line Centerpoint Arc

Tangent Arc 3 Point Arc Circle Ellipse Parabola Spline Rectangle Parallelogram Point Centerline Convert Entities Mirror Fillet Offset Entities Trim Extend Split Curve Linear Sketch Step and Repeat Circular Sketch Step and Repeat Standard Toolbar The Standard toolbar controls file management and model regeneration. New Open Save Print Print Preview Cut Copy Paste Undo Rebuild Redraw Edit Color Toggle Selection Filter Toolbar Web Toolbar Standard Views Toolbar Rotates the model, assembly, or sketch to one of the preset standard views. Front Back Left Right Top Bottom Isometric Normal To -- Select a plane or planar face Tools Toolbar The Tools toolbar provides tools for measuring and defining the mass properties of models and for creating equations. Measure Equations Mass Properties View Toolbar The View toolbar controls your view of the model. If any View icons are not included on your default View toolbar, you can customize the toolbar by adding any of the icons below. See Customize Toolbars for more information. View Orientation Previous View Zoom to Fit

Zoom to Area Zoom In/Out Zoom to Selection Rotate View Pan Wireframe Hidden in Gray Hidden Lines Removed Shaded Section View Perspective . Web Toolbar The Web toolbar provides support for working over the Internet. Stop Current Jump Reload/Replace Insert Hyperlink Open Internet Address FeatureManager Design Tree The FeatureManager design tree on the left side of the SolidWorks window provides an outline view of the active part, assembly, or drawing. This makes it easy to see how the model or assembly was constructed or to examine the various sheets and views in a drawing. The FeatureManager design tree and the graphics display window are dynamically linked. You can select features, sketches, drawing views, and construction geometry in either pane. The FeatureManager design tree makes it easy to: Select items in the model or assembly by name.

Identify and change the order in which features are created. You can drag and drop items in the FeatureManager design tree list to reorder them. This changes the order in which features are regenerated when the model is rebuilt. Display the dimensions of a feature by double-clicking the features name.

Rename items by slowly clicking two times on a name to select it and then entering a new name. Temporarily roll the model back to an earlier state using the rollback bar . Suppress or Unsuppress model features.

View parent/child relations by right-clicking a feature in the list, then selecting Parent/Child. Move between the FeatureManager design tree the PropertyManager, and the ConfigurationManager by selecting the tabs at the bottom of the left pane Add a new equation, edit, or delete an equation by right-clicking the Equations folder , and selecting the action you want. (The Equations folder appears when you add the first equation to model document.) Control the display of dimensions and annotations by right-clicking the Annotations folder . Add or modify light sources in the Lighting folder .

See also, FeatureManager Design Tree Conventions . For information about selecting FeatureManager options, see General Options .

FeatureManager Design Tree Conventions The FeatureManager design tree uses the following conventions: A symbol to the left of an items icon indicates that it contains associated items, such as sketches. Click to expand the item and display its contents. To collapse all expanded items at once, right-click the document name at the top of the tree, and select Collapse Items. Sketches in the FeatureManager design tree are preceded by (+) if they are over defined; they are preceded by () if they are under defined; they are preceded by (?) if the sketch could not be solved. (There is no prefix if the sketch is fully defined.) For information about sketch status, see Fully Defined Sketches . Assembly components in the FeatureManager design tree are preceded by (+) if their position is over defined; they are preceded by () if their position is under defined; they are preceded by (?) if their position could not be solved; they are preceded by (f) if their position is fixed (locked in place). Assembly mates are preceded by (+) if they are involved in over defining the position of components in the assembly; they are preceded by (?) if they could not be solved. In an assembly, each instance of the component is followed by a number in angle brackets <n> that increments with each occurrence. If a part or feature has an external reference, its name is followed by >.

See also FeatureManager Design Tree . FeatureManager Design Tree Display Provides alternate ways to view the information in the FeatureManager design tree in an assembly document. To display features or dependencies in an assembly: Click View, FeatureManager Tree, By Features/By Dependencies. By Features, displays all components, features, planes, and mategroups.

By Dependencies, displays only the top level components and mategroups. Open Opens an existing part, drawing, or assembly document. Also used to import files from other applications. To open an existing file: 1 Click or File, Open, or press Ctrl-O.

2 In the Open dialog box, browse to find the part, drawing, or assembly document, or the file from another application, that you want to open. 3 Click Open as read-only if you do not want to change or save the part.

4 Click Preview if you want to view the SolidWorks part, assembly, or drawing document without opening it. 5 Click Configure to open a specific configuration of a part or assembly.

6 Click References to see a list of the part and/or assembly documents referenced by the currently selected part, assembly or drawing. You can edit the locations of the listed files.

7 Click View-Only to open the part document only for viewing. (Only documents saved in SolidWorks 98 and later may be opened in View-Only mode.) If you are in a part or assembly document, you can change to editing mode by pressing the rightmouse button in the graphics area and selecting Edit. 8 Click Open to open the document; click Cancel to exit without opening a file.

Note: If you have changed the file extensions of part or assembly files referenced by assembly or drawing documents, the SolidWorks Open function will search for the renamed files when opening the assemblies or drawings. Part and assembly files changed from .prt or .asm to .sldprt or .sldasm respectively will open automatically without prompting. Note that the software will not search for files renamed to .prt or .asm extensions if .sldprt or .sldasm files are referenced by the assembly or drawing documents. You can open existing SolidWorks files or you can select other file types to import into SolidWorks. See also: Import File Types ACIS Files IGES Files STEP Files TIFF Files VRML Files New Creates a new document. To create a new part, drawing, or assembly document: 1 2 Click or File, New, or press Ctrl-N. Select either Part, Drawing, or Assembly from the list and click OK. Open DXF/DWG File

DXF/DWG Files Parasolid Files STL Files VDAFS Files

3 If you selected Drawing, select the template you want to use (or None) and click OK. Open File This command is available from within an assembly or a drawing; it does the following: Opens the part file or sub-assembly file of the selected component in an active assembly. Opens the part file or assembly file of the selected part or assembly in a drawing.

To open a part or assembly file: 1 2 Right-click a part or assembly, or its name in the FeatureManager design tree. Select Open File from the menu.

The part or assembly file opens for editing. Open DXF/DWG File Opens a DXF or DWG file for import. You can import the DXF or DWG file to either a Drawing or a Part. To open a DXF or DWG file: 1 Click File, Open.

2 In the Open dialog box, set Files of type to list DXF files (*.dxf) or DWG files (*.dwg). 3 Browse to the desired file, and click Open. The Open DXF/DWG File dialog box appears. SolidWorks derives information from the incoming file and reports the sheet size and the units of the imported drawing. 4 If you select Import to Drawing, modify the following options: Sheet Size list. Select the correct sheet size from the list. Units list. Select the correct units of measure.

Move entities onto sheet. Select this option to move the lower-left corner of the imported drawing to the origin of the SolidWorks drawing sheet. Note: This option is only available if SolidWorks detects that either the X or Y coordinate of the lower lefthand corner of the imported drawing is a negative value. Import to template. Select this option to place all geometry in the template instead of on the sheet. You can edit the geometry in the template. See Customize Drawing Template. The layer information (names, properties, and entity locations) that was specified in the system where the .dxf or .dwg file originated, is retained. After the drawing is imported, you can click Tools, Sketch Tools, Modify and use Translate to move the drawing to a new position. See Modify Sketch for more information about Translate. - OR If you select Import to Part, select the correct units of measure from the Units box. The imported data opens as 3D reference curves in a new part document.

Select from FeatureManager Design Tree You can select items directly from the FeatureManager design tree: You can select features, sketches, planes, and axes in the model by clicking on their names in the FeatureManager design tree You can select multiple consecutive items in the FeatureManager design tree by holding the Shift key while you select. You can select multiple non-consecutive items in the FeatureManager design tree by holding the Ctrl key while you select.

Select Lets you select items in the graphics area. To select items: 1 2 Click . Click the item that you want to select.

To select multiple items: Hold down the Ctrl key while you click the items that you want to select. - or -

If a dialog box is active, you can click in the selection box before you select the items. In this case, you do not have to hold down the Ctrl key. To drag-select: In a sketch or drawing, you can drag a selection rectangle around the items you want to select. Notice that items change color as the cursor passes over them. This dynamic highlighting helps you locate the item to select. For information about turning dynamic highlighting off or on, see Edges Options . See Also: <> Selection Filter <> Select Other <> Select Loop Select Loop You can fillet a single loop on a face. To fillet a single loop: 1 Click on a face. When you select a face, all loops on a face are selected. 2 Hold the Ctrl key and select the loop you want to fillet. 3 Click or Insert, Features, Fillet/Round. 4 Specify the fillet Radius, and click OK. Customize Commands Adds and removes command buttons to customize your toolbars. You can, rearrange the command buttons on toolbars, move buttons from one toolbar to another, duplicate buttons and place them on more than one toolbar, delete buttons that you never use.

To customize your toolbars: 1 2 3 Click Tools, Customize. Click the Commands tab. Make your changes and click OK.

Customization options: Categories. Scroll through the list of toolbars to locate the button(s) you want to move. Buttons. Click and drag a button from the dialog box to a new location on a toolbar, or to a different toolbar. To delete a button from a toolbar, click and drag the button from the toolbar to the graphics area and release the mouse button. Description. Click a button to see the description of the buttons purpose. Note: The Web, and Font, toolbars can be moved but they are not customizable. Customize Keyboard

Customizes your keyboard to suite your style of working with SolidWorks. To customize your keyboard: 1 2 Click Tools, Customize. Click the Keyboard tab.

3 Click the appropriate buttons to Assign a new shortcut key, Remove a shortcut key, or Reset All shortcut keys to their original state. 4 Make your changes and click OK.

Customization Options: Categories. Displays the list of available menus. Select the menu that contains the command you want. Commands. Displays the list of available commands. Select the command for which you want to assign or remove a shortcut key. Press New Shortcut Key. Enter a single key or a combination of keys. Current Key. Displays the current shortcut key for the selected command. Description. Displays the command description for the selected command. Customize Menus Customizes the SolidWorks menus to suite your style of working. To customize your menus: 1 2 Click Tools, Customize. Click the Menus tab.

3 Click the appropriate buttons to Rename a menu item, Remove or Add a menu item, or Reset All menus to their original state. 4 Make your changes and click OK.

Customization options: Categories. Displays the list of available menus. Select the menu that you want to change. Commands. Displays the list of available commands on the selected menu. Select the command that you want to rename, relocate, or remove. Change What Menu. Displays the code name of the menu that is selected. Position on Menu. Lets you select a position from Auto, At Top, At Bottom, or Add Below one of the listed commands. Name of Command. Displays the code name of the command that is selected. Description. Displays the description of the selected command. Customize Toolbars Customizes, displays, or hides toolbars: Annotations Toolbar Sketch Toolbar Assembly Toolbar Sketch Relations Toolbar Drawing Toolbar Sketch Tools Toolbar Features Toolbar Standard Toolbar Font Toolbar Standard Views Toolbar

Line Format Toolbar Tools Toolbar Macro Toolbar View Toolbar Reference Geometry Toolbar Web Toolbar Selection Filter Toolbar To make toolbars visible: 1 Click Tools, Customize.

2 On the Toolbars page, click the checkboxes to select each toolbar you want to display; uncheck the toolbars you want to hide. Options: To display large size toolbar buttons, select Large Icons.

To show tooltips, select Show Tooltips. When checked, a small note pops up to identify each tool icon that you pause your cursor over. To automatically display the toolbars related to the specific type of document that is active, select Auto-activate document toolbars. This is the default 3 Click the Reset button to reverse the changes made during this session. Click OK to make the changes and close the dialog; or click Cancel.

To move a toolbar: Toolbars can be either "docked" (attached to one of the edges of the SolidWorks window) or "floating." 1 Point at the space between the buttons on the toolbar and drag the toolbar to the desired location. If you drag it to an edge of the SolidWorks window, the toolbar docks to that edge automatically. 2 To change a toolbars orientation (from horizontal to vertical), drag the toolbar near a horizontal or vertical edge of the window before placing it in the desired location. Note: The Font, Web, and Selection Filter toolbars must be docked horizontally. For more information see Customize Commands , Customize Menus , and Customize Keyboard . Options Allows you to customize SolidWorks options and set default values. To set options: 1 2 Click Tools, Options. Click on the appropriate tab for the settings you want to change.

Color General Crosshatch Grid/Units Detailing Line Font Drawings Material Properties Edges Performance External References Reference Geometry 3 Change the settings and click OK. For information about copying options selections to other users, see Registry Copy Tool . Customize Macros Lets you assign your own macros to buttons on the Macros toolbar. To assign a macro to a toolbar button:

1 2

Click Tools, Customize, and click the Macros tab. Click Add. Browse to the macro file (.swb) you want, select it, and click Open.

3 Under Macro details, enter the Name that you want to display in the tooltip for the button. 4 5 Click Apply. Notice the number in the first column. Click the Commands tab, and under Categories, select Macro.

6 Drag the toolbar button with the appropriate number from the Buttons box, and drop it on a toolbar. 7 Click OK to close the Customize dialog box.

To edit a customized toolbar button: 1 2 3 4 In the first column, select the number of the button you want to edit. Click Edit. Modify the Name or Path as needed. Click Apply to accept, or Abort to cancel.

To remove the macro assigned to a button: In the first column, select the number of the button whose macro you want to remove, then click Remove. If the button is displayed on a toolbar, it becomes unavailable (gray) when a macro is no longer assigned to it. To change the order of the macro buttons: In the first column, select the number of the button you want to move, then click Move Up or Move Down to rearrange the order as needed.

Record Macro Creates a macro that records your mouse clicks, menu choices, and keystrokes to play back later. To record a macro: 1 2 3 Click or Tools, Macro, Record. Perform the steps you want to record. When you are done, click or Tools, Macro, Stop.

4 Type a name for the macro and click OK to save it. (SolidWorks automatically adds the extension to the filename.) - or Press Cancel in the Save Macro dialog to cancel the macro. See also Edit Macro , Run Macro , and Stop Macro . SolidWorks API The SolidWorks API is an OLE programming interface to SolidWorks. The API contains hundreds of functions that can be called from Visual Basic, VBA (Excel, Access, and so forth), C, C++, or SolidWorks macro files. These functions provide the programmer with direct access to SolidWorks functionality such as creating a line, extruding a boss, or verifying the parameters of a surface.

For a detailed description of the API and the syntax used to call each function, please refer to the API online help file. This help file, API_HELP.HLP is located in the ..\SAMPLES\APPCOMM\ subdirectory of your SolidWorks installation. Also included in the ..\SAMPLES subdirectory are several Visual Basic and C++ example projects. Feel free to use these projects as a reference or as a starting point for your own applications. You can also find a detailed description of the API functions on the SolidWorks web page (www.solidworks.com) under the Technical Support area. Print Prints the active part, drawing, or assembly document. To print the current document: 1 2 3 Printer Name. Select the printers name from the drop-down list. Click , or File, Print. Review the information in the Print dialog, and make changes as appropriate. Click OK.

The system provides read-only information about the printers status, type, and location. Print to file. Check this box to send this print to a file instead of the printer. A dialog box appears that lets you name the file to print to. Print Range All. Prints all pages of the document.

Pages. Prints a range of pages in your document. Enter the first and last page that you want to print. This option is only available for drawings with more than one sheet. Selection (Drawings only). Prints a selected area of a drawing sheet at scale you specify. Scale In a drawing document: To print the entire drawing sheet on the page, select the Scale to Fit check box. To scale the drawing when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). In a part or assembly document: To print the graphics area of the SolidWorks window on the page, select the Print window check box. To scale the window when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). Copies Number of copies. Select the number of copies to print from the spin box.

Page Setup Lets you control the appearance of printed documents and provides access to the Print Setup dialog. Also lets you create a header and/or footer for the active document before printing. To set the print options of a document: 1 2 Click File, Page Setup. From the Printer tab, Paper Margins. To set paper margins, you can either

Specify margin widths in the appropriate margin boxes (Top, Bottom, Left, or Right). - or Use the default margins by clicking the Use printers margins check box. Line weights. Specify the line weight in the appropriate line style boxes (Thin, Normal, Thick, and five additional line thickness settings). Page Orientation. Select either Portrait (vertical page orientation) or Landscape (horizontal page orientation). Scale.

Drawings: To print the entire drawing sheet on the page, select the Scale to Fit check box. To scale the drawing when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). Part/Assemblies: To print the graphics area of the SolidWorks window on the page, select the Print window check box. To scale the window when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). Print drawings in color. When selected, any drawing entities that have a color assigned are printed in color (if a color printer is specified in the Print Setup dialog box). See also Printing a Drawing in Color. Print Setup. Click this button to access the Print Setup dialog box. This lets you choose your printer, paper size and set other printer properties. 3 Click OK.

To create a header and footer for the current document: 1 2 Click File, Page Setup. From the Header/Footer tab,

Scroll the Header and Footer boxes to select predefined headers and/or footers, and view your selection in the Preview boxes. Click Custom Header or Custom Footer to define your own headers and/or footers. 3 Click OK.

To view the changes before printing the document, click Print Preview . Custom Header and Footer Creates a custom header or footer for every document page that you send to the printer. To create a page header or footer: 1 Place the insertion point in an edit box: Left Section, Center Section, or Right Section. 2 Click the appropriate button to insert the information that you want to appear in that section. 3 If appropriate, enter spaces or text between the selections. For example, Page &[pagenum] of &[pages] would print as Page 1 of 7 on the first page of a seven-sheet drawing. 4 5 Click the Font button to choose from a variety of font styles and sizes. Click OK and view the result in the Header Preview and Footer Preview boxes.

6 Click Apply to accept the change. You can continue to make changes and then click OK to close the dialog. or Click OK to accept the change and close the dialog.

Page number Total number of pages in the document Date of the print Time of the print Name of the file Print Preview Previews the image of the active Part, Drawing, or Assembly before you send it to the printer. To preview a print job: Click , or File, Print Preview. Print Selection Lets you specify an area of the drawing sheet to print. To select an area to print: 1 Click , or File, Print. In the Print dialog box, under Print range, click Selection, and click OK. The Print Selection dialog box appears, and a selection frame is displayed on the drawing sheet. The frame reflects the current printer settings (page size, orientation, etc.) as defined in File, Page Setup. 2 Select a scale factor to apply to the selected area. When you change the scale factor, the selection frame size changes accordingly. Model scale (1:1). The selected area is printed at actual size; a model dimension of 100mm is printed at 100mm. The default sheet scale is used to calculate the correct print size; therefore, for areas that use a scale different than the default sheet scale, you may need to use a custom scale to get the desired result. Sheet scale (n:n). The selected area is printed as it appears on the full sheet. If the drawing size and the paper size are the same, the entire sheet is printed. Otherwise, only the selected area is printed. Custom scale. The selected area is printed at a scale factor you define. Enter the values you want in the boxes, then click Apply scale. 3 Drag the selection frame to position it over the area you want to print. You can pan or zoom the view, or change the sheet while the selection frame is displayed. 4 Click OK to print the selected area. Sketch Toggles in and out of sketch mode. To create a new sketch: 1 Select a face or a plane.

2 Click or Insert, Sketch. The sketch grid appears (unless you have turned it off) and EDITING SKETCH appears in the status bar at the bottom of the SolidWorks window. 3 Use the tools on the Sketch Tools and Sketch Relations toolbars to draw and dimension the sketch. 4 When you are finished, click or Insert, Sketch to close the sketch (for use in the creation of a loft or sweep, for instance), or click one of the sketch-based feature commands (e.g., Insert, Boss, Extrude ) to create a feature from the sketch. To edit a sketch:

1 Right-mouse click the sketch you want to edit or a feature built from the sketch, either in the model or in the FeatureManager design tree. Note For features built from multiple sketches, (lofts and sweeps), right-click on the sketch name in the FeatureManager design tree. 2 Select Edit, Sketch from the right mouse menu.

3 When you are finished editing, click or Edit, Rebuild, or right-click anywhere in the sketch and select Exit Sketch from the right-mouse menu. See also Fully Defined Sketches . Edit Sketch Opens an existing sketch so you can edit it. To edit a sketch: 1 Right-click one of the following: the name of sketch you want to edit in the FeatureManager design tree,

a feature built from the sketch, either in the model or in the FeatureManager design tree, or a sketch entity in an inactive sketch.

Note For features built from multiple sketches (lofts and sweeps), right-click on the sketch in the FeatureManager design tree.) 2 Click Edit Sketch.

3 To close the sketch when you are finished editing, right-click anywhere in the sketch and click Edit Sketch or click , - or to exit the sketch and rebuild, click . Check Sketch for Feature Usage Lets you check your sketch for errors that would prevent it from being used successfully in creating a feature. For each Feature Usage type its required Contour Type is displayed. If you select a new Feature Usage type from the pull-down list, the corresponding Contour Type changes dynamically. Each Contour Type forces a different set of checks on the sketch in addition to the general checks that are common to all contour types. See also Legal Contour Types . To check a sketch: 1 With a sketch open, click Tools, Sketch Tools, Check Sketch For Feature. The Check Sketch For Feature Usage dialog appears. It has a Feature Usage pull-down list of all the ways to use a sketch in a feature. If the sketch has been successfully used to create a feature, the feature type is displayed in the Feature Usage box. If the sketch has not been used to create a feature, <none> is displayed in the Feature Usage box and the contour is checked for errors that are common to all contour types. 2 Click the Check button. The sketch is checked according to the contour type required by the feature type listed in the Feature Usage box. If the sketch passes the checks, a No problems found message is displayed. If there is an error, a message describing the error is displayed and, if appropriate, the area of the sketch containing the error is highlighted. It finds one error for each check.

3 To check your sketch for possible use in other feature types, you can select a new Feature Usage type from the pull-down list and click Check. The corresponding Contour Type changes and a new check is forced on the sketch. 4 5 Click Reset to return to the original Feature Usage type.

Click the Close button to close the dialog. Also, the dialog closes automatically when you exit the sketch, rebuild, change to a new document, etc. Cut and Paste Sketch Entities You can cut and paste, or copy and paste, multiple sketch entities from one sketch to another or within the same sketch. Select the sketch entities and drag while using the following modifier keys: To copy within the same document or different documents, press the Ctrl key while dragging. To move within the same sketch, press the Shift key.

To move between different documents, press the Ctrl key and drag the sketch into the second document. Then, release the Ctrl key, hold down the Shift key and drop the sketch. Note: A new sketch has to be open in the target document to do the drag and drop operation. Grid/Units To specify the grid and units settings for documents: 1 2 3 Grid Properties Click Tools, Options. Click on the Grid/Units tab. Change the settings and click OK.

Display Grid Dash Automatic Scaling Major Grid Spacing Minor Lines Per Major Snap Behavior

Snap to Points Snap Points Per Minor Snap to Angle Snap Only When Grid is Displayed Units Length Unit

Units Type Decimal Places Fractions Denominator Round to Nearest Fraction

Angular Unit

UnitsType Decimal Places Length Angle View System Defaults. When checked, the system default for each of the options is displayed; when not checked the option selections used by the active document are displayed. Apply To: Select an option from the pull-down list, as follows: System Defaults. Applies the selections that you made to all new documents that you create. Active Document. Applies the selections that you made to only the currently active document. All Possible. Applies the selections that you made to both the system defaults and currently active document. Edit Sketch Plane Changes the sketch plane. To change the plane of a sketch: 1 Right-mouse click the sketch in the FeatureManager design tree, and select Edit Sketch Plane. 2 Select a new plane by clicking a plane in the FeatureManager design tree or select a new face by clicking a different model face in the sketch. 3 Click Apply or click Cancel to exit without making a change. Spin Box Increments

Fillet (Sketched) Creates a tangent arc at the intersection of two sketch elements, trimming away the corner. You can select sketch entities to be filleted in the following ways: Hold the Ctrl key and click two intersecting sketch entities. Click on a corner.

You can also select non-intersecting entities to fillet if they are not dimensioned. The selected entities are extended and then the corner is filleted away. Note: You can either pre-select sketch entities or a corner, or you can select after the dialog box appears. To create a fillet in a sketch: 1 Click or Tools, Sketch Tools, Fillet. A Sketch Fillet dialog box appears.

2 In the Radius box, enter a fillet radius value or use the arrows to scroll to a new value. 3 If the corner has dimensions or relations, and you want to keep the virtual intersection point, click the Keep constrained corners checkbox. 4 If you pre-selected sketch entities, click Apply to create the fillet. - or -

If you did not pre-select, click the sketch entities or corner that you want to fillet, or select two sketch elements that would form a corner if extended. The dialog box stays open so you can continue selecting corners/sketch elements to make other fillets. Note: Consecutive fillets with the same radius are not dimensioned individually; they have an automatic Equal relation with the first fillet in the series. 5 Click Undo to cancel the last fillet, - or to remove a fillet from a corner, click the fillet and then click Undo. Click Close to close the dialog box.

With Keep constrained corners checked: Modify Sketch Allows you to move, rotate, or scale a sketch. To move or rotate a sketch: 1 Open a sketch or select a sketch in the FeatureManager design tree, and click or Tools, Sketch Tools, Modify. 2 To move the sketch geometry incrementally: In the Translate region of the Modify Sketch dialog, type incremental values in the X value and Y value boxes, and then press Enter. To move a specified point of the sketch to a specific location: In the Translate region, click Position Selected Point, and select a point on the sketch. Then type the sketch coordinates in the X value and Y value boxes, and press Enter. Note The Modify Sketch command translates the entire sketch geometry in relation to the model (including the sketch origin). The sketch geometry does not move relative to the origin of the sketch. 3 In the Rotate region of the Modify Sketch dialog, you can enter a specific rotation value, and then press Enter. - or You can use the mouse cursor to move and rotate, as follows: Press the left mouse button to move the sketch. Press the right mouse button to rotate the sketch around the black origin symbol.

Point at the end points or center of the black origin symbol to display one of three flip symbols on the right mouse button. Press the flip symbol to flip the sketch on the X axis, the Y axis, or both. Point at the center point of the black origin symbol, to display a point symbol on the left mouse button. Press the left button to move the center of rotation independently of the sketch. Note You cannot move a sketch if it has multiple external references. (The mouse cursor has a ? on the left button.) If the sketch has only one external point, you can rotate the sketch around this point. 4 Click Close to exit the dialog box.

To scale a sketch: 1 In the Scale About box select one of the following: Sketch origin - Applies a uniform scale about the origin of the sketch. - or Moveable origin Scales the sketch about the moveable origin. Type a decimal value in the Factor box, and press Enter.

Note 3

You cannot scale a sketch if it has external references. Click Close to exit the dialog box.

Aligning Views to Each Other You can change the alignment of views that are not aligned by default, or whose alignment you have broken. To align one drawing view to another: 1 Select a drawing view, and click Tools, Align Drawing View, Horizontal to Another View or Vertical to Another View. or Right-click a drawing view, and select Alignment, Align Horizontal or Align Vertical. The pointer changes to . 2 Select the view to which you want to align. The model origins are aligned along the chosen direction. The alignment is maintained if you move the reference view. To break an alignment created this way, right-click the view and select Alignment, Break Alignment , or click Tools, Align Drawing View, Break Alignment. See also Breaking and Restoring View Alignment. Reference Geometry Options To set reference geometry options: 1 2 Click Tools, Options. Select the Reference Geometry tab.

Display filters. The display filter manages the default display of the following: Planes, Axes, Temporary Axes, Origins, Coordinate Systems, and Points. To display a reference geometry item, click the items checkbox to add a check. To hide an item, make sure the items checkbox does not have a check. Note: Use the options under the View menu to set the visibility of reference geometry in the current document only. Plane default names. Lets you specify default plane names for parts and assemblies. For example, you may want to name the planes Front, Top, and Right, instead of Plane1, Plane2, and Plane3. Enter the new names in the boxes that correspond to the original plane names. To return to the original names, click Reset A Axis Creates an axis in a part or assembly. To create an axis: 1 2 Click or Insert, Reference Geometry, Axis. Select from the Options to make an axis box.

One Line/Edge/Axis. Select a sketched line, a model edge, or select View, Temporary Axes , and then select the axis that is displayed. Two Planes. Select View, Planes, and then select two intersecting construction planes.

Two points/vertices. Select two sketched points, two vertices, or a point and a vertex. Cylindrical/Conical Surface. Select a cylindrical or conical surface.

Point and Surface. Select a plane or planar surface and a sketched point or a vertex. The axis must be normal to the selected planar surface on the model. 3 Verify that the items listed in the Selected items box correspond to your selection(s). 4 Click OK.

NOTE: Axis display must be turned on (see Axes) to see the new axis. Coordinate System You can define a coordinate system for a part or assembly. Use this coordinate system with the Measure and Mass Properties tools, and for exporting SolidWorks documents to IGES, STL, ACIS, STEP, Parasolid, and VDA. To create a coordinate system: 1 Click Coordinate System or Insert, Reference Geometry, Coordinate System.

2 Select a vertex, sketched point, midpoint of an edge, or the default point of origin on a part (or component, in an assembly). The name of the entity is listed in the Origin box. 3 Click in the box for the X, Y, or Z axis, and then click an edge, face, or vertex on the part, or a sketch segment to indicate the direction of the selected axis. 4 Click another box in the Axes section and select another edge, face, or vertex to define this axis. 5 If you need to change your selections, right-mouse click in the graphics area and select Clear Selections. 6 If you need to reverse the direction of an axis, click the Flip check box under its definition. 7 When the coordinate system is defined, click OK.

To change the coordinate system definition: Right-click the coordinate systems name in the FeatureManager design tree and select Edit Definition. To translate a coordinate system to a new location: You may need to locate a coordinate system where there are no edges, vertices, or points available to control the definition of the angle or direction of an axis. In this case, you can define a coordinate system someplace on the part that does provide the entities you need. Then you can move the new origin to the desired location. 1 Click Coordinate System or Insert, Reference Geometry, Coordinate System.

2 Define the coordinate system at a location on the part that provides the entities you need to control the angle and direction of each axis. 3 Click the Origin box and then click the location to which you want to translate the origin. 4 Click OK. The new origin moves to the location that you selected.

NOTE: When you create a coordinate system, it is a good idea to give it a meaningful name to explain its purpose. Click-pause-click the coordinate systems name in the FeatureManager design tree and enter a new name. See also Default Coordinate System . Construction Geometry Converts sketched curves on a sketch or drawing to construction geometry. Construction geometry is used only to assist in creating the sketch entities and geometry that is ultimately incorporated into the part. Construction geometry is ignored when the sketch is used to create a feature. To convert lines, arcs, or circles in a drawing to construction geometry: 1 Select a sketched line, arc, ellipse, spline or circle in a drawing. - or Box-select several sketch entities (a rectangle or parallelogram) in a drawing. Select the For construction check box on the PropertyManager tab. - or Click Tools, Sketch Entity, Construction Geometry.

To convert lines, arcs, circles, ellipses or splines in a sketch or drawing to construction geometry: If you have the sketch PropertyManager enabled: 1 2 1 Select a sketch entity. Select the For construction check box on the PropertyManager tab. If you do not have the sketch PropertyManager enabled: Right-click a sketched line, arc, ellipse, spline, or circle in a sketch or drawing.

2 Select Properties, and select the For construction check box on the PropertyManager tab. To convert multiple sketch entities, or a rectangle or parallelogram, in a sketch or drawing to construction geometry: 1 2 3 Plane Creates a construction plane in a part or assembly. To create a construction plane: 1 2 Click or Insert, Reference Geometry, Plane. Select the type of plane you want to create and click Next. Box-select the entities. Right-click and select Properties. Select the For construction check box on the PropertyManager tab.

3 Select the appropriate number of vertices, faces, or edges for the type of plane you want to create. 4 Enter the required distance or angle, if any, and click Reverse Direction, if necessary. 5 Click Finish.

See also: Plane at Angle Offset Plane

On Surface Plane Parallel Plane at Point Perpendicular to Curve at Point Plane Line and Point Plane Three Point Plane Planes Toggles the display of planes on or off. To turn plane display on or off: Click View, Planes. A check mark next to the menu item means planes are visible (except for planes you have hidden individually). To hide or show individual planes: 1 2 Right-click on the plane or on its name in the FeatureManager design tree. Click Hide or Show.

Note: Individual planes always appear when you select them. Midpoint Selection for Planes You can select the midpoint of an entity for use within the Plane Wizard for the following plane types: Three Point, Line and Point, and Parallel to Plane at Point. To select the midpoint: 1 2 Right-mouse click an edge on which you want to select a midpoint. Click Select Midpoint in the menu. The midpoint appears as a plus sign (+) on the edge.

Move, Resize, or Copy Planes You can move, resize, and copy construction planes using the plane handles and edges. To display the planes handles: Click on the planes name in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area, or Click on the edge of the plane.

Using the planes handles and edges, you can do the following: Resize the plane by dragging a corner or edge handle. Move the plane by dragging the edge of the plane.

Copy the plane by selecting a plane in the graphics area. Then hold the Ctrl key and, using the edge, drag to a new location. To set the offset distance, angle, or distance between planes: - or Right-mouse click the name of the plane in the FeatureManager design tree. Select Edit Definition. Enter new values to define the plane, and click Finish. Double-click the plane to display the offset distance or angle. Double-click the dimension or angle and enter a new value in the Modify box.

Curve Through Reference Points Creates a simple 3D spline curve through points or vertices located on one or more planes. You can use this curve as a path for a sweep or as a guide curve for a loft or sweep. To create a simple curve through points: 1 With a sketch active, use (the point tool) to place points to guide the curve, or use existing vertices. 2 3 4 5 Close the sketch. Select a different plane and open a new sketch. Place additional points on the second plane and close the sketch. Click or Insert, Curve, Curve Through Reference Points. The Curve dialog box opens.

6 Click the Spline Points box, then select the points and/or vertices in the order in which you want to create the curve. You can use the arrow keys to rotate the view to assist in selecting the points. As you select, the sketch items and/or vertices are listed in the Spline Points box. 7 8 If you want to close the curve, click the Closed Curve box. Click OK to create the curve.

Projected Curve onto a Face or Faces You can project a curve onto a face (or faces) to create a path or guide curve for a swept feature or the guide curve for a lofted feature. To project a curve onto a face: 1 Create a sketch that contains a single curve (either open or closed) on a face or faces. 2 3 4 Click to close the sketch. Select the sketch. Hold down the Ctrl key and select the face where you want to project the curve.

5 Click Insert, Curve, Projected. The curve now appears in the FeatureManager design tree and on the selected face. You can Reverse the direction in which the curve is projected when the extruded face wraps around the plane of the curve. Right-click the curve icon in the FeatureManager design tree and select Edit Definition. Click Reverse to reverse the placement of the curve on the face. See also Sweep and Loft Feature Creating a 3D Curve by Projecting one Sketch onto Another You can create a 3D curve generated by curves sketched on two intersecting planes. To create a projected curve using sketches on two intersecting planes: 1 Create a sketch on each of two intersecting planes, closing each sketch when you are done. Each sketch must contain a single open curve.

Be sure to align the sketches such that when they are projected normal to their sketch plane the implied surfaces will intersect, creating the desired result. 2 3 Click to select each sketch.

Click Insert, Curve, Projected. The curve appears. (Note: In another step, a profile sketch was added for a sweep.) The following is an example of using the 3D curve to create a swept feature. To replace one of the projected curve sketches with a new sketch, see Replacing a Projected Curve Sketch . See also Sweep and Loft Feature . Split Line Projects a sketched curve onto selected model faces. It divides a selected face into multiple separate faces so that each can be selected and modified individually. The split line may be created using a sketch that is either open or closed. Split line is used: with the Parting Line option in the Draft feature to create a hold line for a Face Blend to create a Dome that rises from inside the boundary of a planar surface

To project a split line onto a planar face: 1 2 3 4 Open a sketch on the face of part and sketch a line to project as your split line. Exit the sketch. Click Insert, Curve, Split Line. On the Split Lines dialog box, select Projection and click Next.

5 On the Project Split Line dialog, click the Sketch to Project box and select the sketched line in the FeatureManager design tree. The sketch item should appear in the box. 6 Click the Faces to Split box and select all the faces around the perimeter of the part that you want the split line to pass through. The number of faces should appear in the Faces to Split box. 7 If there is an interruption in the selected face (for example, if the sketch plane of the Sketch to Project lies in the area of a cut), click Single Direction to project the curve in one direction only. Click Reverse Direction if the preview indicates that the curve projects the wrong way. 8 Click Finish.

To project a split line onto a cylindrical surface: 1 2 3 With a cylindrical part open, click Insert, Curve, Split Line. On the Split Lines dialog box, select Silhouette and click Next. Click the Direction of Pull box.

4 In the FeatureManager design tree, click any plane that projects through the silhouette. 5 Click the Faces to Split box and click on the cylinder wall(s) to split (not the circular end face).

6 . Helix

Click Finish.

Creates a helix curve in a part. The helix can be used as a path or guide curve for a swept feature, or a guide curve for a lofted feature. See also Spiral . To create a helix: 1 Open a sketch and sketch a circle. The diameter of this circle controls the diameter of the helix. 2 3 4 Close the sketch. Select the circle. Click Insert, Curve, Helix/Spiral.

5 Select a definition from the Defined by scroll box: Pitch and Revolution, Height and Revolution, or Height and Pitch. (To define a helix, you specify two values, and the third value is automatically calculated.) 6 Depending on the definition, specify values for Height, Pitch, and number of Revolutions. 7 To make a tapered helix, click the Taper Helix checkbox, specify the Angle of taper, and the direction of the taper (outward or inward). 8 9 If necessary, specify a Starting Angle for the first turn of the helix. Click Reverse to make the helix extend backward from the point of origin.

10 Click a radio button to choose the direction of the turns (Clockwise or Counterclockwise). 11 Spiral Creates a spiral curve. To create a spiral: 1 Open a sketch and sketch a circle. The radius of the sketched circle is the radius of the spiral at its start point. 2 3 4 5 Close the sketch. Select the circle. Click Insert, Curve, Helix/Spiral. In the Defined by scroll box, select Spiral. Click OK.

6 Enter a value for the Pitch. In this context, pitch is the rate of change of the radius for each revolution. Note: The Pitch value must be greater than 0.0 and not greater than 200000. 7 8 Specify the number of Revolutions. Click the Reverse box to create an inward spiral.

Specify a value in the Starting Angle box to indicate where to start the spiral.

10 Click a radio button to choose the direction of the turns (Clockwise or Counterclockwise). 11 Click OK.

Move/Size Features with Feature Handles Provides handles so you can move, rotate, and size extruded and revolved features. To display and use the feature handles: 1 Click on the Features toolbar.

2 Click the feature you want to work with, either in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area. Double-click the feature to display both the handles and the dimensions of the feature. 3 4 Drag the rotate handle or the resize handle , to rotate or resize the feature. To move a feature, you can either: Drag the feature to a new location with the move handle.

If the feature has locating dimensions or relations that restrict its movement, a message asks you if you want to delete or keep the relations or dimensions. - or Hold the Alt key as you drag to maintain the dimensions and relations on the feature. The feature is allowed to move, but only in the directions not already controlled by dimensions or relations. 5 When you are finished, click again to disable the handle display.

Note: When you drag a feature with the move handle, any child feature moves with its parent. When you Shift-drag, an attempt is made to maintain the relative position of any child feature, based on the childs dimensions and relations. However, in some cases (for example, when the child feature is under defined, or dimensioned to something other than its parent), the child may not move with the parent as expected. With the Move/size features tool disabled, you can still move a feature, by holding the Shift key and dragging one of its planar faces. See Move and Copy Features . See also Dynamic Feature Editing. Suppress Suppresses a feature or component so you can work on the model or assembly with the selected feature or component temporarily omitted. Dependents of the selected feature or component are also suppressed. To suppress a feature: 1 2 Select a feature in the FeatureManager design tree.

Click or Edit, Suppress. The feature or component disappears from the view and its icon is grayed in the FeatureManager design tree. Use Unsuppress or Unsuppress with Dependents to restore suppressed features or components. See also Suppressing vs. Hiding Components . Chamfer Feature Creates a beveled feature on selected edges or a vertex. To create a chamfer feature:

Click or Insert, Features, Chamfer.

2 On the model, select the edges, faces, loops, or vertex to chamfer. (You can also do this as the first step.) 3 Look for an arrow at the selected edge; it indicates the direction of the chamfer. If the direction is not what you want, click Flip Direction. Note: For better visibility of the arrow, deselect Shaded view mode. 4 Examine the Items to Chamfer list to make certain that you have selected the entities that you intended. If you selected an incorrect item, click it again to deselect it. 5 Select a Chamfer Type, and specify the necessary parameters.

Distance-DistanceEnter values for both distances on either side of the selected chamfer edges, or click Equal Distance and specify a single value. Angle-DistanceEnter values for distance and angle. An arrow appears that points in the direction in which the distance is measured. If necessary, select Flip Direction. Vertex-ChamferEnter distance values for the three chamfer edges. When you enter a distance value, the arrow moves to the corresponding chamfer edge on the model and indicates the direction of the chamfer. - or -Click Equal Distance and specify a single value. The vertex may be concave or convex. 6 Click OK. Hole Wizard Creates complex holes (countersunk, counterbored, tapered, holes with drill angles, and so on) and simple hole features. To create a hole: 1 2 3 Select the planar face on the model where you want to create the hole. Click or Insert, Features, Hole, Wizard. From the Hole Type list, select the kind of hole to create.

4 To change the dimensions in the Section dimensions box, slowly click a dimension two times to select it, then enter a new dimension value. 5 6 7 Select the End Condition from the list: Specify the Face, Vertex, or Offset, if the end condition requires it. Click Next.

8 Drag the hole center to the desired location or dimension the center point as required. 9 Click Finish.

Cut Extrude Creates a feature that removes material by extruding a profile for a specified distance. To create a solid or thin feature cut: 1 Create a sketch of the profile that you want to extrude, or select an existing sketch that contains a profile. The profile does not have to be closed. 2 3 Click or Insert, Cut, Extrude. Select the Type.

4 5 6

Specify the Depth. Click Reverse Direction, if necessary.

Select Flip Side to Cut if you want to remove the material surrounding the profile. Note that when extruding a cut to a non-planar face with Flip Side to Cut and Up to Next, Up to Surface, or Offset from Surface selected, all of the material outside the cut profile is removed. 7 To add a Draft angle, check the Draft While Extruding box. Enter a draft Angle and check Draft Outward, if desired. 8 If the Type you selected relies on the selection of a surface or vertex, select that item now in the graphics area. The selection displays in the Selected Items list. 9 To extrude the feature in two directions from the sketch plane using a closed profile, select Both Directions, and specify settings for Direction 2 from the Settings for box. Repeat steps 3 through 8 for the other end. To extrude the feature in two directions from the sketch plane using an open profile, you indicate the settings once because Both Directions is selected by default. 10 Specify Solid Feature or Thin Feature in the Extrude as box. If you are extruding the cut as a solid feature, skip ahead to Step 12. If you are extruding the cut as a thin feature, proceed to Step 11. 11 12 Select the Thin Feature tab at the top of the dialog box, and Select a Type. Specify a Wall Thickness. To extrude in the opposite direction, click Reverse. Click OK.

See also Loft Feature , Revolved Cut , Sweep Feature. Dome Feature You can add a dome feature to any planar model face. Also, you can use a closed split line to create a dome on a planar face, instead of using the outer boundary of that planar face. To create a dome on a planar face: 1 2 Click or Insert, Features, Dome. Select a planar face in the graphics area.

3 Specify the Height, and observe the preview. The height is measured from the centroid of the selected face. 4 Click Reverse Direction to create a concave dome (default is convex).

5 If you selected a circular or elliptical face, you can select Elliptical Dome. This creates a dome whose shape is a half ellipsoid, with a height equal to one of the ellipsoid radii.

Click OK.

To create a dome using a split line: 1 Insert a closed Split Line curve on a planar face of a model.

2 3 4 5

Click or Insert, Features, Dome. Click within the closed split line in the graphics area. Specify the Height, and observe the preview. Click OK.

Draft Creates a feature that tapers selected model faces by a specified angle, using either a neutral plane or a parting line. Note You can also apply a draft angle as part of an extruded base, boss, or cut. (See Extrude.) To draft a model face to a neutral plane: 1 2 3 Click or Insert, Features, Draft. In the Type of Draft box, select Neutral Plane. Set the Draft Angle.

4 Click the Neutral Plane box, and select a face or plane to serve as the neutral plane. The draft angle is measured perpendicular to this plane. Note: An arrow appears on the part. The arrow indicates the direction of pull away from the neutral plane, and indicates the direction of the draft angle. 5 6 If you want the draft to slant in the opposite direction, click Reverse Direction. Click in the Faces to Draft box, and select the faces to draft in the graphics area.

7 Choose an item from the Face Propagation list that describes how you want the draft to propagate across additional faces: None - Draft only the selected face.

Along Tangent - Extend the draft to all faces that are tangent to the selected face. (The faces meet with filleted corners.) All Faces - Draft all faces next to the neutral plane and extruded from the neutral plane. 8 Inner Faces - Draft all faces extruded from the neutral plane. Outer Faces - Draft all faces next to the neutral plane. Click OK.

To draft to a parting line: 1 2 3 With a part open that already has a split line , click or Insert, Features, Draft. In the Type of Draft box, select Parting Line. In the Draft Angle box specify the angle that you want.

4 Click in the Direction of Pull box and click the face toward which you want the draft angle to go. A directional arrow displays; click Reverse Direction if the arrow is not pointing in the correct direction. Note: The arrow indicates the direction of pull.

Click the Parting Lines box.

6 Select the parting line on each face of the part. Right-click and choose Select Other as necessary. A directional arrow displays; click Other Face if the arrow is not pointing at the correct face. The list of selected line segments displays in the Parting Lines box. 7 Choose an item from the list that describes how you want the draft to propagate across additional faces: face. 8 None - Draft only the selected face. Along Tangent - Extend the draft to all faces that are tangent to the selected Click OK to complete the draft of the part.

See also Step Draft . Extrude Creates a feature that adds or removes material by extruding a profile for a specified distance. You can extrude in one or two directions and add a draft while extruding. An extrusion extends the sketched profile as a solid feature, a thin feature, or a surface. To create an extruded base or boss: 1 Create a sketch and draw the profile you want to extrude, or select an existing sketch that contains a profile. The profile must be closed and cannot intersect itself. 2 3 4 Click or Insert, Base, Extrude, or Insert, Boss, Extrude. Select the Type, and specify the Depth if necessary. Click Reverse Direction, if necessary.

5 To add a Draft, select the Draft While Extruding box. Enter a draft Angle and select Draft Outward, if necessary. 6 If the Type you selected relies on the selection of a surface or vertex, select that item now in the graphics area. The selection displays in the Selected Items list. 7 To extrude the feature in both directions from the sketch plane, select Both Directions, then in the Settings For box, click Direction 2 and repeat steps 3 through 5 for the other end. 8 9 Set the Extrude As box to Solid Feature. Click OK.

To extrude a thin feature or surface: 1 2 3 4 Sketch a profile for the extrusion. This does not have to be a closed profile. Click or Insert, Base, Extrude, or click Insert, Surface, Extrude. Select the Type, and specify the Depth. Click Reverse Direction, if necessary.

5 To add a Draft to a thin feature extrusion, select the Draft While Extruding box, and enter a draft Angle.

6 If the Type you selected relies on the selection of a surface or vertex, select that item now in the graphics area. The selection displays in the Selected Items list. 7 To extrude the feature in both directions from the sketch plane, select Both Directions, then in the Settings For box, click Direction 2 and repeat the steps above. If you are creating a surface, proceed to Step 12. 8 If you are extruding a closed profile sketch, you must set the Extrude As box to Thin Feature. 9 10 11 Click the Thin Feature tab at the top of the dialog box. Select the extrusion Type, and specify the Wall Thickness. If you created a closed profile you can select the following options:

Cap Ends. Specifies that the ends of the thin feature are capped. A capped thin feature must be extruded from a closed profile sketch. When the ends are capped, all walls of the feature are closed; the center is hollow. Cap Thickness. Lets you specify the thickness of the cap. (Available only if Cap Ends is selected.) - or If you created an open profile you can select the following options: Auto Fillet. Automatically creates a round at the each edge where lines meet at an angle. 12 Fillet Radius. Specifies the inside radius of the round. Click OK.

See also Cut Extrude , Extruded Surface . Fillet/Round Creates a fillet or round feature on selected model edges. <> Click here for information about creating a Face Blend fillet. To create a fillet or round: 1 2 3 Select the edges, loops , and faces you want to fillet. Click or Insert, Features, Fillet/Round. Specify the fillet Radius.

4 The default setting Propagate To Tangent Faces will extend the fillet to all faces that are tangent to the selected faces. Deselect it, if necessary. 5 Select the Overflow Type.

6 View the Items to Fillet box to be certain that you have selected the edges, faces, or loops that you intended. 7 Click OK.

See also Variable Radius Fillet .

Loft Feature Creates a feature that adds or removes material by connecting multiple cross sections. You can also create a surface loft. To create a loft feature: 1 Set up the planes needed for the cross sections. (You can use existing faces and planes, or create new planes. The planes do not have to be parallel.) 2 Sketch each section on a different face or plane.

3 If you are creating an extruded loft, click or Insert, Base or Boss, Loft. Otherwise, click Insert, Cut, Loft or Insert, Surface, Loft. 4 Select the sketches in order, picking a corresponding point on each cross section. You do not have to select the vertices precisely; the vertex closest to the selection point is used. The sketches are listed in the Profiles box, and a preview curve connecting the selected entities is displayed. 5 If the preview curve looks wrong:

Use the Up or Down buttons to rearrange the sketches if they are in the wrong order. If the wrong vertices are connected, click the profile once to deselect it, then click again to select a different point on the profile. To clear all selections and start over, right-click in the graphics area, select Clear Selections, and try again. 6 Click Close Along Loft Direction to create a closed body along the loft direction. This connects the last sketch and the first sketch automatically. 7 Click Maintain Tangency to cause the surfaces in the resulting loft to be tangent if the corresponding segments are tangent. 8 Click Advanced Smoothing to obtain smoother surfaces. This option is available only if the loft sections have circular or elliptical arcs. 9 If you want to select a different option for Start Tangency or End Tangency, or if you want to use a Center Line to guide the loft, click the Advanced tab. 10 Click OK to create the loft, or click Cancel.

See also Guide Curve Loft , Center Line Loft , Split Line Loft, Loft Using Non-planar Profiles , Loft Tangency Options , Lofted Surface. Revolve Creates a feature that adds or removes material by revolving one or more profiles around a centerline. The feature may be either a solid, a thin wall, or a surface. To create a revolved feature: 1 Create a sketch containing one or more profiles and a centerline.

The sketch for a solid revolved feature can contain one or more closed, nonintersecting profiles. However, one profile must contain all of the other profiles for a base revolved feature containing multiple profiles. The sketch for a thin or surface revolved feature can contain only one open, or closed, non-intersecting profile.

Profiles cannot cross the centerline. If the sketch contains more than one centerline, select the centerline you want to use as the axis of the revolution.

Click one of the following: or Insert, Base, Revolve, or Insert, Boss, Revolve or Insert, Cut, Revolve Insert, Surface, Revolve

3 From the Revolve As box, select either Solid Feature or Thin Feature if creating a base, boss, or cut feature. 4 If creating a Thin Feature, click the Thin Feature tab, choose a direction from the Type box, and specify a Wall Thickness. - or If creating a Solid Feature, choose a direction from the Type box and set the desired rotation angle in the Angle box. 5 The preview shows the direction of rotation. Select the Reverse check box if you want to rotate the feature in the opposite direction. 6 Click OK.

See also Revolved Surface Rib Feature Adds a rib of a specified thickness and direction between the contour and the surrounding part. To add a rib to a part: 1 Insert a plane that intersects the part in the direction in which you want to create the rib. 2 3 Sketch the contour to use for the rib. Click or Insert, Features, Rib.

4 From the Rib dialog, select Mid Plane to extrude the rib equally in both directions from the sketch plane, or Single Side to extrude in one direction. 5 If you chose Single Side, examine the preview and select Reverse if necessary to get the results you want. Note: For better visibility of the preview, change to Isometric view and use Hidden Lines Removed , or Hidden in Gray view mode. 6 Enter the thickness of the rib, and click Next >.

7 In the Rib Options dialog, examine the preview arrow and, if necessary, select Flip side of material to reverse the direction in which material is added. 8 To add a draft, select Enable Draft and enter the draft Angle. Select Draft Outward, if necessary. 9 To create a rib with multiple contours using draft angles, click the Next Reference button until the arrow shows on the contour from which you want to start the draft angle. 10 Click Finish.

Shape Feature

Creates a deformed surface from a face on a model. The deformed surface can be expanded, constrained, and tightened. To create a deformed surface: 1 Create a model and select a face to shape.

2 Sketch one or more entities with which to constrain the shape. Create the constraining entities directly on the face or on a construction plane. Valid constraining entities are as follows: 3 4 Points (sketch points, endpoints, vertices, and so on.) Sketches Edges Reference curves Click or Insert, Features, Shape. Select the face to shape; you can only select one face.

5 Click the Constrain to box and select the entities you created to constrain the shape. 6 If desired, deselect Maintain Boundary Tangents.

Maintain Boundary Tangents, selected Maintain Boundary Tangents, deselected 7 Click Preview. Rotate the part and examine the shape from different angles. 8 9 Use the sliders on the Controls tab to adjust the shape. When you are satisfied with the shape, click OK.

Note: If you constrain the shape using a vertex of a 3D sketch, you can use a feature handle to adjust the shape. See Move/Size Features with Feature Handles . To change the shape of a deformed surface, right-click the Shape Feature in the FeatureManager design tree and select Edit Definition. Shell Creates a shell feature, removing selected faces. To create a shell feature: 1 2 3 4 Click or Insert, Features, Shell. Click on the face(s) you want to remove. Make sure the correct faces are listed in the Faces to Remove list box. Set the wall thickness in the Thickness box.

5 Select Shell Outward if you want the shell feature to increase the outside dimensions of the part. 6 Click OK. See also Multi Thickness Shell . Simple Hole Creates a hole feature.

To create a hole feature: 1 2 3 Select the planar face on the model where you want to create the hole. Click or Insert, Features, Hole, Simple. Select the Type from the pull-down list: Blind Up to Vertex Through All Up to Surface Up to Next Offset from Surface Specify the Depth or Offset, if necessary. Specify the Diameter of the hole.

4 5

6 If the Type you specified relies on the selection of a face or vertex, click that item now in the graphics area. The selection is indicated in the Selected Items box. 7 Examine the preview of the hole and select the Reverse Direction checkbox, if necessary. 8 To add a draft, select the Draft While Extruding box. Enter a draft Angle and select Draft Outward , if necessary. 9 Click OK.

To change the diameter of the hole, right-click on the holes name in the FeatureManager design tree, select Edit Definition, and change the diameter dimension. Sweep Feature Creates a feature that adds or removes material by projecting a profile along an open or closed sketched path or a model edge. You can also create a surface sweep. To create a simple sweep: 1 Sketch a closed, non-intersecting profile on a face or a plane, then close the sketch. 2 On another face or plane, sketch a non-intersecting sweep path that the profile will follow. Close the path sketch The start point of the path must lie on the plane of the profile. (You may also use an existing model edge or curve). 3 If you are creating an extruded sweep, click or Insert, Base or Boss, Sweep. Otherwise, click Insert, Cut, Sweep or Insert, Surface, Sweep. 4 In the Sweep dialog box, click the Sweep Section box, then select the section profile either in the model or in the FeatureManager design tree. 5 Click the Sweep Path box, then select the sketch, edge, or curve that you want to use as the path. 6 Under Orientation/Twist Control:

Select Follow path if you want the section to remain at the same angle with respect to the path at all times. Select Keep normal constant if you want the section to remain parallel to the beginning section at all times. 7 If you selected an edge as the path, and you want to continue the sweep along all tangent edges, click Propagate Along Tangent Edges.

8 If you want to continue the sweep profile up to the last face encountered at the ends of the path, click Align with End Faces. 9 Click OK.

See also Guide Curve Sweep , Swept Surface Circular Pattern Creates multiple instances of one or more features spaced uniformly around an axis. If you modify the original feature (seed feature), all instances in the pattern are updated to reflect the change. To create a circular pattern: 1 2 Create one or more features to replicate. Create an axis around which to pattern the features. For information about how to create an axis, see Reference Axis . Click or Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Circular Pattern. With the Items to copy box selected, click the features to pattern.

3 4

5 Click the Direction selected box, then select an axis, model edge, or an angular dimension to define the pattern. 6 Specify the Total instances of the feature.

7 Specify the distance between each instance in the Spacing box. or Select the Equal spacing check box. Then specify the Total angle in which to create the pattern. If you change Total instances, Spacing, or Total angle using the arrows, a preview of the resulting pattern is automatically displayed. If you change the values by typing in new values, click the Preview button to update the preview. 8 Click Reverse direction if you need to reverse the pattern.

9 Click Vary sketch if you want the pattern to change as it is repeated. See Vary Sketch for more information. 10 If you want to pattern only the geometry (faces and edges) of the features, rather than patterning and solving each instance of the feature, deselect Geometry Pattern . Notes: In some cases, the geometry pattern option speeds up the creation and rebuilding of the pattern. However, you cannot create geometry patterns of features that have faces merged with the rest of the part. The Instances deleted box displays deleted instances of the pattern, if there are any. You cannot add instances to delete to this box. When you create a pattern using a Shape feature, all pattern instances must be on the same face. 11 Click OK.

Pattern instances inherit the feature color of the original feature as long as: the pattern is based on one feature.

the color of the pattern or any faces on any pattern instances has not been changed. To delete pattern instances, see Pattern Deletion .

See also Linear Pattern and Edit Seed Feature. Linear Pattern Creates multiple instances of selected features along one or two linear paths. You can specify the directions, the number of instances in each direction, and the distance between them. If you modify the original feature (seed feature), all instances in the pattern are updated to reflect the changes. To create a linear pattern in one direction: 1 2 Create one or more features to replicate on a model. Click or Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Linear Pattern.

3 Click a model edge or a dimension to indicate the first direction for the pattern. The name of the edge or dimension appears in the Direction selected box. If the arrow that appears on the model is pointing in the wrong direction, click Reverse direction. 4 With the Items to copy box selected, click the features to pattern in the FeatureManager design tree or the model. 5 Set the appropriate values for Spacing and Total instances. If you change the values using the arrows, a preview of the pattern is automatically displayed. If you change the values by typing in new values, click the Preview button to update the preview.

6 Click Vary sketch if you want the pattern to change as it is repeated. See Vary Sketch for more information. 7 If you want to pattern only the geometry (faces and edges) of the features, rather than solving each instance of the feature, click Geometry Pattern . Notes: In some cases, the geometry pattern option speeds up the creation and rebuilding of the pattern. However, you cannot create geometry patterns of features that have faces merged with the rest of the part. The Instances deleted box displays deleted instances of the pattern, if there are any. You cannot add instances to delete to this box. When you create a pattern using a Shape feature, all pattern instances must be on the same face. 8 Click OK.

To create the pattern in two directions: 1 Follow Steps 1 through 7 as described above.

2 Select Second Direction, then click a different model edge or a different dimension to indicate the second direction. Notice the direction of the arrow and click Reverse direction, if necessary. 3 Set the appropriate values for Spacing and Total instances for the second direction. 4 Click OK.

Pattern instances inherit the feature color of the original feature as long as: the pattern is based on one feature.

the color of the pattern or any faces on any pattern instances has not been changed. To delete pattern instances, see Pattern Deletion . See also Circular Pattern and Edit Seed Feature. Mirror Pattern To create a mirrored copy of a pattern: 1 Click or Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Mirror Feature.

2 With the Mirror plane box selected, select a plane about which to mirror the pattern. 3 With the Features to mirror box selected, click the pattern to be mirrored. You only need to select one instance of one feature of the pattern in the model. A preview of the mirrored pattern is displayed. 4 Click Geometry pattern if you want to make an exact, geometric copy of the faces and edges of the original feature. 5 Click OK. If you modify the original feature (seed feature) of the pattern feature, the pattern feature and the mirrored pattern are updated to reflect the changes See also Linear Pattern, Circular Pattern, Mirror Feature, Mirror All, Mirror Part. and Edit Seed Feature.

Vary Sketch Use the Vary Sketch option if you want the pattern to change its dimensions as it is repeated. For example, you may want to maintain a specific distance between the edges of the base part and the patterned features. In this example, the first feature (the hole feature) is patterned three times.

When Vary Sketch is not checked, the pattern remains the same regardless of the defining geometry.

When Vary Sketch is checked, the pattern maintains its relation to the sloping edge, based on the dimensions and constraints of the first instance of the pattern. To create a variable pattern: 1 Create a sketch for the first feature in the pattern, observing the following recommendations: The feature sketch must be constrained to the boundary that defines the variation of the pattern instances. For example, in the illustrated pattern, the angled top edge of the first feature is parallel and dimensioned to the angled edge on the base part. The feature sketch should be fully defined.

2 Double-click one of the feature dimensions and click the spinbox arrow to change the dimension. This gives you a preview of the way this dimension will drive the feature when you create the pattern. Try a different dimension for a different result.

6 When you are satisfied that the dimensions are correct and the pattern will repeat as you wish, click Insert, Cut, Extrude (or Insert, Boss, Extrude) to create the first feature. 7 8 In the FeatureManager design tree, select the feature to repeat. Click Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Linear Pattern or Circular Pattern.

9 Click the dimension that you want to use to drive the pattern. Notice the preview arrow. 10 11 12 Click the Vary Sketch checkbox. Specify the values for the Spacing and Total Instances of the pattern. Click OK to create the pattern.

Mirror Feature Creates a copy of a feature (or multiple features), mirrored about a plane. If you modify the original feature (seed feature), the mirrored copy is updated to reflect the changes. To mirror a feature: 1 2 Click or Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Mirror Feature. With the Mirror plane box selected, click on a plane or a face.

3 With the Features to mirror box selected, click a feature (or features) in the model or in the FeatureManager design tree. 4 If you want to mirror only the geometry (faces and edges) of the features, rather than solving the whole feature, select Geometry Pattern . Note: The geometry pattern option speeds up the creation and rebuilding of the pattern. However, you cannot create geometry patterns of features that have faces merged with the rest of the part. 5 Click OK.

See also Mirror Pattern , Mirror All , Mirror Part , Mirror Sketch Elements , and Edit Seed Feature. Mirror All Creates a symmetrical part by mirroring an existing half around a planar face. To mirror a part around a planar face: 1 2 3 Click Insert, Pattern/Mirror, Mirror All. Select a planar face on a part. The name of the face appears in the Mirror Plane box. Click OK.

A mirror image of the original part is joined to it at the selected face to make a whole part. See also Mirror Part , Mirror Feature , Mirror Sketch Elements Planar Surface To create a bounded planar surface from a sketch:

1 2 3 4

Create a non-intersecting, single contour, closed sketch. Click Insert, Surface, Planar. Select the sketch in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area. The sketch name appears in the Bounding Entities box. Click OK to create the planar surface.

To create a planar surface bounded by a set of closed edges in a part or assembly: 1 Click Insert, Surface, Planar.

2 Select a set of closed edges in a part or assembly. (All edges in the set must be on the same plane.) The names of the edges appear in the Bounding Entities box. 3 Click OK to create the planar surface.

To edit the planar surface: If the planar surface is created from a sketch, you can edit the sketch.

If the planar surface is created from a set of closed edges, right-mouse click the surface and select Edit Definition. Extruded Surface Extrudes a surface from a sketched profile. To extrude a surface: 1 2 Sketch the profile of the surface. Click Insert, Surface, Extrude.

3 In the Extrude Feature dialog box, on the End Condition tab, choose the Type, and specify the Depth. 4 Examine the preview. If the offset is in the wrong direction, click Reverse Direction. 5 Click OK.

See also Extrude . For more about using surfaces, see Thicken Feature and With Surface . Lofted Surface Creates a surface by connecting multiple cross sections. To loft a surface: 1 Sketch the profiles (cross sections) and the guide curves (if any are needed) for the lofted surface. 2 Click Insert, Surface, Loft.

3 Click the profiles in the order in which you want them to be connected. Select corresponding segments on each profile; the vertex closest to the selection point is used to connect the profiles. 4 If you are using guide curves, click the Guide Curves box in the Loft Surface dialog, then select the guide curves. 5 Choose from the options Maintain Tangency, Close along Loft Direction, and Advanced Smoothing as desired.

Click OK.

See also Loft Feature . For more about using surfaces, see Thicken Feature and With Surface . Swept Surface Creates a surface by sweeping a profile along a path. To sweep a surface: 1 Sketch the guide curves (if any are needed) and path for the swept surface on model faces, or create planes as needed for sketching. 2 Sketch the sections of the surface, and create coincident/pierce relations between the guide curve(s) and the section. 3 4 Click Insert, Surface, Sweep. Click the Sweep Section box, then click the profile sketch.

5 Click the Sweep Path box, then click the path sketch, curve, or model edge for the path. 6 If you are using guide curves, click the Advanced tab. Click the Guide Curves box, then click the sketch, curve, or model edge for the guide curve(s). 7 Select options as desired under Orientation/Twist Control, Advanced Smoothing, and Maintain Tangency. 8 Click OK.

See also Sweep . For more about using surfaces, see Thicken Feature and With Surface . Revolved Surface Creates a surface by revolving a profile around a centerline To revolve a surface: 1 Sketch a profile and a centerline around which to revolve the profile.

2 Click Insert, Surface, Revolve. If the profile is open, you will be asked if you would you like the sketch to be automatically closed. 3 4 5 Click Yes to create a closed profile, or No to leave the profile open. Enter the value for Degrees, and click Reverse Direction if necessary. Click OK.

See also Revolve . For more about using surfaces, see Thicken Feature and With Surface . Knit Surfaces Use the Knit Surface function to combine two or more surfaces into one. The edges of the surfaces must be adjacent and not overlapping. They do not need to be on the same plane. This is an illustration of a pair of adjacent surfaces, a lofted surface and a swept surface, that have been knitted together. To knit surfaces: Click Insert, Surface, Knit, and select the surfaces to knit in the graphics area or in the FeatureManager design tree.

The result is a single surface listed in the FeatureManager design tree as Surface-Knit<n>. There is no difference in the appearance of the surfaces after knitting. See also Knit Surfaces With Seed Face Option , Thicken Knit Surfaces . Offset Surface Creates an offset surface from the selected surface on a model. To create an offset surface: 1 2 3 4 5 Click Insert, Surface, Offset. Select the model surface(s) from which to create an offset. In the Offset Face dialog box, the Items to Offset box lists the selected faces. Specify an offset value in the Offset box. A preview of the offset is displayed. If the offset is in the wrong direction, click Reverse. When you are satisfied, click OK.

For more about using surfaces, see Thicken Feature and With Surface . Radiate Surface Radiate surface works on edges, parting lines, or planar and non-planar curves. To radiate a surface: 1 Click Insert, Surface, Radiate.

2 Select a reference plane that is parallel to the direction in which you want the surface to radiate. 3 Specify the width of the surface in the Radiate distance box.

4 Click the Edges to Radiate box, then click a parting line, an edge, or a set of contiguous edges. 5 Note the arrow direction. To specify the opposite direction, click Reverse direction. 6 Select Propagate along tangent faces if the part has tangent faces and you want the surface to continue around the part. 7 Click OK.

See also Radiate Surface Using a Parting Line. With Surface Creates a cut through a solid with a surface. To cut with a surface: 1 2 3 4 Insert a surface into an active part document. Create a sketch and extrude a base around the imported surface. The surface should extend to both edges of the solid, or beyond. Select the surface and click Insert, Cut, With Surface. The arrow points in the direction of the solid to discard. If necessary, click Flip the Side to Cut Away to reverse the direction of the cut.

Click OK.

For information about creating a surface, see Extruded Surface , Revolved Surface , Swept Surface , Lofted Surface , and Offset Surface . To import a surface, see Imported Surface . Thicken Feature Thickens a selected surface. To thicken a surface: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Click the surface(s) that you want to thicken. Click Insert, Base (or Boss), Thicken. Change the Thickness value as necessary. Select either Thicken Side 1, Thicken Side 2, or Thicken Both Sides. View the preview graphic to see if your selection is correct for your purpose. When you are satisfied with your selection, click OK.

To cut an existing solid by thickening a surface: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Select the surface and the solid to be cut. Click Insert, Cut, Thicken. Change the Thickness value as necessary. Select either Thicken Side 1, Thicken Side 2, or Thicken Both Sides. View the preview graphic to see if your selection is correct for your purpose. When you are satisfied with your selection, click OK.

To change the thickened or cut feature, right-click the features name in the FeatureManager design tree and select Edit Definition from the menu. See Edit Thicken. For information about creating a surface, see Extruded Surface , Revolved Surface , Swept Surface , Lofted Surface , and Offset Surface . To import a surface, see Imported Surface . Imported Surface Imports one or more surfaces. To import surfaces: 1 2 Open a new part file. Click Insert, Surface, Imported.

3 From the Open dialog box, select the IGES, STEP, VDAFS, ACIS or VRML file to import, and click Open. The surfaces are imported, and a Surface feature is added to the FeatureManager design tree. The surfaces are positioned relative to the part origin, using the global coordinates in the file. NOTE: Wireframe geometry and curves are ignored when importing surfaces as reference geometry. See also Thicken Feature and With Surface . FeatureManager Design Tree

The FeatureManager design tree on the left side of the SolidWorks window provides an outline view of the active part, assembly, or drawing. This makes it easy to see how the model or assembly was constructed or to examine the various sheets and views in a drawing. The FeatureManager design tree and the graphics display window are dynamically linked. You can select features, sketches, drawing views, and construction geometry in either pane. The FeatureManager design tree makes it easy to: Select items in the model or assembly by name.

Identify and change the order in which features are created. You can drag and drop items in the FeatureManager design tree list to reorder them. This changes the order in which features are regenerated when the model is rebuilt. Display the dimensions of a feature by double-clicking the features name.

Rename items by slowly clicking two times on a name to select it and then entering a new name. Temporarily roll the model back to an earlier state using the rollback bar . Suppress or Unsuppress model features.

View parent/child relations by right-clicking a feature in the list, then selecting Parent/Child. Move between the FeatureManager design tree the PropertyManager, and the ConfigurationManager by selecting the tabs at the bottom of the left pane Add a new equation, edit, or delete an equation by right-clicking the Equations folder , and selecting the action you want. (The Equations folder appears when you add the first equation to model document.) Control the display of dimensions and annotations by right-clicking the Annotations folder . Add or modify light sources in the Lighting folder .

See also, FeatureManager Design Tree Conventions . For information about selecting FeatureManager options, see General Options . Edit Definition Allows you to change the current definition of a feature. To change a features definition: 1 Click on the feature or on its name in the FeatureManager design tree, then click Edit, Definition. - or Right-click the feature or its name, then click Edit Definition. 2 3 Change the Depth, Distance, Radius, or other parameters as necessary. Click OK.

Entity Property Displays the properties of faces, surfaces, or edges. To change the color of a face or surface (or multiple faces or surfaces): 1 Right-click on a face or surface,

- or To change the color of multiple faces or surfaces, hold the Ctrl key and rightmouse click the faces or surfaces. 2 3 Select Face Properties. Change the color by using one of the following methods: Change the numeric values for Red, Green, or Blue, and click OK. Click Use Part Color to use the default part color.

Click Change Color and select a color from the color blocks or the custom color palette. Then click OK. Click Advanced and use the sliders to increase or decrease advanced lighting values such as ambient, shininess, transparency, etc. 4 You can enter a name for the face in the Entity Name block, or change the name by entering a new name. 5 Click OK.

To view or change the name of an edge, face or surface: 1 2 Right-click on an edge, face or surface. Select Edge Properties or Face Properties.

3 You can enter or change a name for the edge, face, or surface in the Entity Name block, by entering a new name. 4 Click OK.

Parent/Child Displays the parents and children of a selected feature, sketch, axis, plane curve or surface. When features are built upon other features, their existence depends upon the existence of the previously-built feature. The new feature is called a child feature. For example, a hole is the child of the solid in which it is cut.) A parent feature is an existing feature upon which others depend. For example, a boss is the parent feature to a fillet that rounds its edges To display parent/child relations: 1 In the model or in the FeatureManager design tree, right-click the item whose parent/child relations you want to examine. 2 Select Parent/Child from the menu.

Note: You can only view the relations; you cannot edit them.

Measure Measures distance, angle, radius, and size of and between lines, points, surfaces, and planes in sketches, 3D models, assemblies, or drawings. When you measure the distance between two points, the delta x, y, and z distances are also displayed. When you select a vertex or sketch point, the x, y, and z coordinates are displayed. See Default Coordinate System . To use the measure tool: 1 Click or Tools, Measure. The Measure dialog box appears.

To keep the dialog box in place while you are working, click the push pin icon .

NOTE: While the Measure dialog is in place, you can switch between different documents without closing the dialog. The name of the currently active document displays near the top of the Measure dialog box. If you activate a document that has items already selected, the measurement information updates automatically. 3 In the Projection on region, click Screen to measure the projection on the screen, or click Plane/Face to measure the projection on a selected plane or planar face. 4 Select the items to measure. The selected items appear in the Selected items list, and appropriate values are displayed in the Measurements box. New measurements update dynamically when you change selections. If the combination of selected entities does not make sense for the measure function, the Measurements box is blank. 5 To delete an item from the Selected items list, click the items name in the list and press the Delete key, or click the selected item again in the graphics area. To clear all items from the Selected items list, right-click in the graphics area, and select Clear Selections. 6 To display the results based on a coordinate system that you defined, select the name from the Output coordinate system list. 7 To display the results in scientific notation or using different measurement units than the units specified for the active document, click Options . 8 To temporarily turn off the measure function, right-click in the graphics area, and choose Select from the menu. To turn the measure function back on, click inside the Measure dialog box. 9 Click Close to close the dialog box.

. Equations Creates mathematical relations between model dimensions, using dimension names as variables. When using equations in an assembly, you can set equations between parts, between a part and a sub-assembly, with mating dimensions, and so forth. When you delete a feature or dimension that is used in an equation, you have the option of deleting the equation or not. Note Dimensions driven by equations cannot be changed by editing the dimension value in the model. To add an equation: 1 2 Click or Tools, Equations. Click Add.

3 In the model or the FeatureManager design tree, double-click on the feature that contains the first dimension you want to use in the equation. 4 Click on the dimension to paste its name into the equation. (Dimension names are in the form dimension name @ feature or sketch name.) 5 Complete the equation by typing or clicking on the calculator buttons, or by clicking on other dimensions to paste their names. Equations are solved left to right (i.e., the dimension on the left is driven by the value on the right), in the order in which they appear in the equation list. For a list of supported functions, see Operators and Functions . You can also insert comments in equations .

6 Click OK. The equation appears in the Equations window, and the value of the solution is shown in the Evaluates To column. 7 Click OK, then click or Edit, Rebuild to update the model. (All equations are solved before the geometry is regenerated.) An equation folder appears in the FeatureManager design tree. Right-mouse click the folder to delete or edit existing equations or add a new equation to the document. Note: When using any trig function in an equation or dimension dialogue, the value of the angle is interpreted as radians. For example, sin(90) is evaluated as .89 (90radians) not 1.0 (90deg). To edit equations: 1 Click or Tools, Equations, and click Edit All, or right-mouse click and select Edit equation. 2 Edit the equations. Each equation must be on a separate line, and dimension names must be enclosed in quotes. 3 4 5 Click OK to close the Edit Equations window. Click OK to close the Equations window. Click or Edit, Rebuild.

. Move and Copy Features You can move or copy features by dragging them in the model. To move a feature to a new place on a model: While holding down the Shift key, drag the feature to a different location. Release the mouse button to drop the feature on a planar face of the model.

To move more than one feature at a time, hold down the Ctrl key as you select the features, then hold down the Shift key while you drag. To create a copy of the feature: Point at a planar face on the feature and hold down the Ctrl key while you drag the feature. Drop the copy on a planar face of the model. To copy a feature from one part to another part: Tile the windows, then hold down the Shift key, point at a planar face on the feature, then drag and drop the feature from one window to another. You can also use the Copy and Paste tools on the Standard toolbar. See also Move/Size Feature with Feature Handles , Dynamic Feature Editing .

Move/Size Features with Feature Handles Provides handles so you can move, rotate, and size extruded and revolved features. To display and use the feature handles: 1 Click on the Features toolbar.

2 Click the feature you want to work with, either in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area. Double-click the feature to display both the handles and the dimensions of the feature. 3 4 Drag the rotate handle or the resize handle , to rotate or resize the feature. To move a feature, you can either: Drag the feature to a new location with the move handle.

If the feature has locating dimensions or relations that restrict its movement, a message asks you if you want to delete or keep the relations or dimensions. - or Hold the Alt key as you drag to maintain the dimensions and relations on the feature. The feature is allowed to move, but only in the directions not already controlled by dimensions or relations. 5 When you are finished, click again to disable the handle display.

Note: When you drag a feature with the move handle, any child feature moves with its parent. When you Shift-drag, an attempt is made to maintain the relative position of any child feature, based on the childs dimensions and relations. However, in some cases (for example, when the child feature is under defined, or dimensioned to something other than its parent), the child may not move with the parent as expected. With the Move/size features tool disabled, you can still move a feature, by holding the Shift key and dragging one of its planar faces. See Move and Copy Features . See also Dynamic Feature Editing. Suppress Suppresses a feature or component so you can work on the model or assembly with the selected feature or component temporarily omitted. Dependents of the selected feature or component are also suppressed. To suppress a feature: 1 2 Select a feature in the FeatureManager design tree.

Click or Edit, Suppress. The feature or component disappears from the view and its icon is grayed in the FeatureManager design tree. Use Unsuppress or Unsuppress with Dependents to restore suppressed features or components. See also Suppressing vs. Hiding Components . Rollback Bar Reverts the model to an earlier state, suppressing recently added features. You can add new features or edit existing features while the model is in the rolled-back state. Rollback a part using the Rollback Bar in the FeatureManager design tree. The rollback bar is a wide yellow line which turns blue when selected. Drag the bar up or down the FeatureManager design tree to step forward or backward through the regeneration sequence. You can use the Rollback Bar to flatten sheet metal bends, or you can click to flatten. See also Bends . To revert a part to an earlier state: 1 Place your cursor over the rollback bar in the FeatureManager design tree. The cursor changes to a hand. 2 Click to select the rollback bar. The bar changes color from yellow to blue.

3 Drag the rollback bar up the FeatureManager design tree until it is above the feature(s) you want rolled back, - or Click in the FeatureManager tree and use the up and down arrow keys on the keyboard to move the rollback bar up or down. (Check Arrow key navigation in Tools, Options, General to enable this functionality.) 4 To roll forward again, drag the rollback bar to the bottom of the FeatureManager design tree. Note: The FeatureManager icons are gray after they are rolled back. See also Rollback Assemblies . Configuration Configurations allow you to create multiple design variations of a part or assembly model within a single document. Configurations provide a convenient way to develop and manage families of models with different dimensions, components, or other parameters. You can also use configurations to simplify a complex model. By suppressing or hiding some items in a configuration, the model may rebuild faster, and you may find it easier to work with internal components. To create a configuration, you specify a name and properties, then you modify the model to create the design variations you want. You can also use a design table to create configurations. Part configurations support the following variations: Features suppression, dimensions Part number to use in a bill of materials Custom properties

Assemblies configurations support these additional variations: Components suppression, visibility, referenced configurations Mates suppression, dimensions for distance or angle mates

Other assembly items (assembly feature cuts and holes, sketches, reference geometry, component patterns) suppression, dimensions <> Creating a Part Configuration <> Creating an Assembly Configuration <> Creating Configurations with a Design Table

Design Table A design table allows you to build multiple configurations of parts or assemblies by specifiying parameters in an embedded Microsoft Excel worksheet. The design table is saved in the model document and is not linked to the original Excel file. Changes you make in the model are not reflected in the original Excel file. To use design tables, it is strongly recommended that you have Microsoft Excel 97, with service pack SR-2, installed on your computer. You can control the following items in a part design table: dimensions and suppression state of features

configuration properties, including part number in a bill of materials, comments, and custom properties You can control the following parameters in an assembly design table: components - suppression state, visibility, referenced configuration assembly features - dimensions, suppression state mates - dimensions of distance and angle mates, suppression state

configuration properties - part number and display in a bill of materials (when used as a sub-assembly), comments, custom properties. You can create a design table as a separate Excel file. You can create a new, empty design table in the model. You can display a design table in the drawing. Summary Info Allows you to enter or view summary information about the part, assembly, or drawing document. To enter or display summary information: 1 Click File, Properties.

2 Enter the appropriate information in the boxes provided for: Author, Keywords, Comments, Title, and Subject. Note: If you insert a part identification number in the Title box, you can use that number automatically when you create a bill of materials in an assembly drawing that contains that part. The system provides read-only Statistics about the documents creation date, the date last saved, and the name of the person who saved the document last. See Summary Info Custom and Configuration Specific . See also Bill of Materials . Annotation Properties Lets you select the types of annotations that you want to display. To select the types of annotations to display: 1 In the FeatureManager design tree, right-mouse click the Annotations folder, , and select Details. 2 In the Annotation Properties dialog, specify a Display Filter by selecting the annotation types to display by default: Cosmetic threads Datums Datum targets Feature dimensions Reference dimensions Geometric tolerances Notes Surface finish Welds - or Click Display all types to show all kinds of annotations available for that part or view. 3 Change the values in the Text scale edit box to change the scale of the text used in the annotations.

Select from the following options:

Always display text at the same size. When checked, all annotations and dimensions are displayed at the same size regardless of zoom. Note that drawings have this option disabled and always zoom the text height. Display items only in the view orientation in which they are created. When checked, any annotation is displayed only when the model is viewed in the same orientation as when the annotation was added. Rotating the part or selecting a different view orientation removes the annotation from the display. Display annotations / Display assembly annotations. When checked, all annotation types that are selected in the Display filter are displayed. For assemblies, this includes not only the annotations that belong to the assembly, but also the annotations that are displayed in the individual part documents. Use assemblys setting for all components. When checked, the display of all annotations matches the setting for the assembly document, regardless of the setting in the individual part documents. Use this option along with Display assembly annotations to display different combinations of annotations. If you use JIS dimensioning standards, specify the JIS surface finish size (1,2,3 characters) or Scale. 2 Click OK to accept your changes; click Cancel to exit the dialog without saving the changes.

Section View of Model or Assembly Creates a section view of the model or assembly for display purposes. You cut through the model or assembly using one of the following: one or more standard planes (Plane1, 2, or 3). Note: You can pre-select a plane. If no plane is selected, Plane1 is displayed by default. one or more planes that you create for the purpose (Click Insert, Reference Geometry, Plane, and create a new plane.) one or more planar face(s) (Select any planar face(s) on the model.)

the viewing plane (The invisible plane that is parallel to the screen you are looking through. The initial position for this plane is the center of the part body bounding box.) You can view the section in one of two ways: Click the Preview box. When this is checked, the section view is updated each time the the dialog box information is changed. (If you change the settings frequently with a large part or assembly, the Preview box may not be an efficient way to view the section.) When the Preview box is not checked, click the Display button to display the section view based on the current settings. You can make additional changes to the settings and click Display again. To create a section view of the model: 1 With a part or assembly document active, click or View, Display, Section View.

2 To make a section cut using a plane or face, click on one or more planes in the FeatureManager design tree, or click one or more faces on the model. The name of each selected plane or face is displayed in the Section Plane(s)/Face(s) box. To deselect an unwanted plane click its name in the FeatureManager design tree. - or -

To use the viewing plane to make a section cut, click Use Viewing Plane in the Section View dialog box. 3 Click a plane in the Section Plane(s)/Face(s) box, then use the spinbox arrows in the Section Position box to move the plane and change the section cut. 4 Click the Flip the Side to View box to reverse the viewing direction of the section cut. (Not available if you are using the viewing plane.) 5 Click OK.

Note: You can view both the section view and the complete view of the model at the same time by splitting your screen into two windows. (Drag the split controls on the bottom or right side of the window frame.) You can revolve, size, and shade the views independently. To change the section view, click View, Modify, Section View and change the settings in the Edit Section View dialog box and/or select a different plane. Curvature Display You can display a surface, part, or assembly with the curved surfaces rendered in different colors according to their local radius of curvature. The colors are defined in Tools, Options, Color, Curvature Options . You can also display the curvature value of sketch segments and curves in a closed sketch. To render curved surfaces in colors, and to display the radius of curvature values: Click View, Display, Curvature. While the Curvature menu item remains selected, The value of the curvature radii is displayed next to the pointer when you point at curved surfaces. The curvature of the model is displayed in colors related to the radii of the curvature. To remove the curvature display, click View, Display, Curvature again (to clear the check mark). To toggle curvature display for individual faces: Right-click a curved face and select Face Curvature from the menu. NOTE: The curvature display for faces can be toggled on or off using the shortcut menu, except when Curvature is turned on with View, Display, Curvature.

To display curvature values for sketch entities in a closed sketch: 1 Click Tools, Options, Edges, and select the Dynamic highlight from graphics view check box. 2 Click View, Display, Curvature. The curvature value is displayed next to the pointer when you point at sketches or curves. Send To Sends the current part document to another system using electronic mail. To mail a part document to another computer: 1 Click File, Send To.

2 Enter your mail password, the mailing address, and any other information requested by your mail application. To send assembly or drawing documents, see Send Mail . Part Color and Lighting You can change the color of a whole part and the properties that define the way the material reacts to light. For information about changing the color of an individual face, see Entity Property. To change the color of a part: 1 2 Click Tools, Options, and select the Color tab. Under System, select Shading, then click the Edit button.

3 Choose a color from the palette, or click Define Custom Colors to specify a custom color. 4 Click OK to close the Color dialog.

5 Make sure that Apply To is set to Active Document, then click OK to close the Options dialog. To change the way a part reacts to light: 1 2 Click Tools, Options, and select the Color tab. Under System, select Shading, then click the Advanced button.

3 Use the slider controls to change the display properties. Changing these material properties can enhance or reduce the effect of the light properties. 4 Ambient. Light reflected and scattered by other objects Diffuse. Light scattered equally in all directions on the surface Specularity. Ability of a surface to exhibit highlights Shininess. A glossy, reflective surface or a dull, matte surface Transparency. Ability to pass light through the surface Emission. Ability to project light from the surface Click OK when done.

See also Lighting . Edit Color Lets you quickly change the color of a face, feature, part, or assembly when in shaded mode. To edit the color of one or more faces in a part document: Click . In the graphics area, select one or more faces. Select a color from the color palette or define a custom color. In the Apply To box, make sure Face is selected. Click OK. To edit the color used to display one or more features in a part document: 1 Click .

In the FeatureManager design tree, click the name of one or more features.

- or In the graphics area, click one or more features. 3 4 5 Select a color from the color palette or define a custom color. In the Apply To box, make sure Feature is selected. Click OK.

To edit the color used to display a part, component, or assembly: 1 Click .

In the FeatureManager design tree, click the name of the part, component or assembly. 2 In the Edit Color dialog box, select a color from the color palette or define a custom color. - or To restore the default color, click Remove. 3 Click OK.

To edit the color used to display a component in an assembly: 1 Click . 2 In the Edit Color dialog box, select a color from the color palette or define a custom color and click OK. - or To use the assemblys default color, click Use assembly, and click OK. To remove the color layers that you applied, click Undo or click Edit, Undo Edit Color. Select the component in the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area.

Lighting You can adjust the direction, intensity, and color of light in the shaded view of a model. You can add light sources of various types, and modify their characteristics to illuminate the model as needed. The properties of the light sources work in conjunction with the Material Properties of the model. Changing the material properties of the model can enhance or reduce the effect of the light properties. There are four types of lights: Ambient Light Point Light Directional Light Spot Light By default, the Lighting folder in the FeatureManager design tree contains the Ambient light. There is always exactly one Ambient light; you can turn it off, but you cannot delete it, or add another one. There is also one Directional light source by default. The maximum number lights in a document is nine (the Ambient light, plus eight others). To add a light: Right-click the Lighting folder or any existing light, and select Add Spot Light (or Directional Light or Point Light). You can also click View, Lighting, Add Spot Light (or Directional Light or Point Light). To delete a light: Click the light icon in the Lighting folder and press Delete. You can also click View, Lighting, Delete, then select the name of the light to delete.

To turn a light on and off: Edit the properties of the light (see the next section), and select or clear the On check box. To edit the properties of a light: 1 Double-click the light icon in the Lighting folder , or right-click the icon and select Properties. You can also click View, Lighting, Properties, then select the name of the light to edit. 2 Edit the properties as needed on the Basic, Position, and Advanced tabs. The properties that are available depend on the type of light you are editing.

3 Click OK. Base Part Lets you use a previously created part as the base feature for a new part. The original part becomes a single feature in the new part. You can add new features to it, but you cannot make changes to its original features. Changes made to the original part document are reflected when you rebuild the derived part. To create a derived part from another part document: 1 2 3 Create a new part document. Click Insert, Base Part.

Browse to an existing part file and click Open, or double-click the part files name. The derived part opens in a new part window. The arrow after the parts name indicates that is has an external reference to the original part. See also Using the Palette to Create a Derived Part .

External References Specifies how assembly, part, and drawing files with external references are opened and managed. Also, specifies the search path for feature palette items. To specify how SolidWorks manages references to external files: 1 2 3 Click Tools, Options. Click on the External References tab. Make any necessary changes to the options listed below.

4 Click OK to accept the changes; click Cancel to discard the changes and exit the dialog box; click Reset All to return to the installed system defaults. External References Open referenced documents with read-only access. Specifies that all referenced documents will be opened for read-only access by default. Dont prompt to save read-only referenced documents (discard changes). Specifies that when this part is saved or closed, no attempt will be made to save its referenced documents that are opened for read-only access. Allow multiple contexts for parts when editing in an assembly. You can create external references to a single part from more than one assembly context. Any individual feature or sketch within the assembly may only have one external reference, however.

Search document folder list for external references. Specifies that the document folder list is searched first to update any external references. Otherwise, the Folder list is ignored. You can define the Folder list, then enable or disable the search behavior as needed, without affecting the list. See also Searching for External References . NOTE: This option applies only to the Documents selection under Show folders for. Load referenced documents. Lets you specify whether to load referenced documents when you open a part that has external references (such as a derived part, or a part that has been edited in the context of an assembly). Never. Referenced documents are never opened. Always. Referenced documents are always opened, in a minimized window.

Prompt. Ask about loading externally referenced documents each time you open a derived part. Click Yes or No in the dialog box that appears when you open the part. If you also click Dont ask me again (before you click Yes or No), the option is updated to reflect your choice ( Yes changes the option to Always, No changes the option to Never). Folders From the Show folders for list, select the type of file you are defining the folder list for: Documents, Palette parts, Palette features, Palette forming tools, or Custom symbols. For Documents, when Search document folder list for external references is checked, folders are searched in the order in which they are listed. To add a new directory path to search order, click the Add button. In the Choose Directory dialog box, locate the path, and click OK. To delete a directory path from the search order, select the path in the Folders list, and click the Delete button. To change the search order, select a directory path in the Folders list and use the Move Up or Move Down buttons to rearrange the list. For Palette parts or Palette features, the default path for the palette directories is already listed. You can add paths to the list if you want to store palette items in other directories, or on other disk drives. For Custom symbols, the first path that you specify in the list is the default path displayed in the Open dialog box when you add a custom symbol to a drawing. Assemblies Automatically generate names for referenced geometry. (This option is off by default.) When this option is off, you can mate to parts for which you have read-only access because you are using the internal face IDs of the parts. Unless you will use component replacement, leave this option off, especially in a multi-user environment. When this option is on, you automatically create surface identifiers (for example: Face1, Face2) at the time you mate the part, therefore you need write access to the part, in most cases. Turn this option on if you intend to do component replacement using the same surface identifiers, remembering that you need write access to the parts you are using. (Rename the corresponding edges and/or faces on the replacement component to match the edge/face names on the original part.) Update component names when documents are replaced. Clear this option only if you use the Component Properties dialog box to assign a component name in the FeatureManager design tree that is different from the filename of the component. Derive Component Part Derives a new part from the selected assembly component.

The selected component becomes the first feature in a new part. You can add features to it, but you cannot change its original features while editing the derived part document. If you make changes in the original part document, those changes are reflected in any derived parts that reference the original. Parts created this way include any features that were added in the context of the assembly, such as assembly features cuts or holes, cavities, and so on. To derive a component part in an active assembly: In the FeatureManager design tree, select a component and click File, Derive Component Part. Mirror Part Creates a mirrored version of an existing part. This is a good way to create a left-hand version and a right-hand version of the same part.

If you modify the original part, the mirrored copy is updated to reflect the changes. If you add features to the mirrored copy, the original part is not updated. To create a mirror part: 1 With a part document open and saved, pick a face or plane about which to mirror the part. 2 Click Insert, Mirror Part.

A new document is created with the mirrored geometry. The arrow after the parts name indicates that it has an external reference to the original part. See also Mirror All , Mirror Feature , Mirror Sketch Elements . Layers You can create layers in a SolidWorks drawing document. You assign a line color, line thickness, and line style for new entities created on each layer. New entities are automatically added to the active layer. You can hide or show individual layers. You can move entities from one layer to another. To create a drawing layer: 1 2 In a drawing, click Layer Properties . Click New, and enter the Name of a new layer.

NOTE: If you save the drawing as a .dxf or .dwg file, the layer name may be changed in the .dxf or .dwg file as follows: 3 All characters are converted to uppercase. The name is truncated to 31 characters. All spaces in the name are converted to underscores. Specify the line format for entities on that layer. To specify the line color, click the Color box, select a color, and click OK.

To specify the line style or thickness, click the Style box or the Width box, and select the desired font. To change the active layer: Click the area to the left of the layer name. An arrow indicates which layer is active.

To hide or show a layer: 1 2 Click the yellow light bulb icon to hide the layer. The light bulb turns gray, and all entities on the layer are hidden. Click the light bulb again to turn the layer back on.

To delete a layer: Select the layer name and click Delete. To move entities to the active layer: Select the entities in the drawing and click Move.

Inserting a Model from a File You can create these types of drawing views of a model without opening the model document: Standard 3 View Named View Relative View To insert a model in a drawing from a file: 1 2 3 In a drawing, click the tool for the type of view you want to insert. Right-click in the graphics area and select Insert From File. Browse to the desired model document, and click Open.

Drawings Options Lets you set options for drawings. To set options for drawings: 1 2 3 Click Tools, Options. Click the Drawings tab. Change the options to meet your needs, and click OK.

Default sheet Sheet scale. Specifies the default drawing scale for those cases when you choose No Template from the Template to Use dialog. Type of projection Specifies either First angle or Third angle projection for those cases when you choose No Template from the Template to Use dialog. Default display for new drawing views Specifies the way models or assemblies are displayed in drawings: Wireframe All edges are displayed.

Hidden in gray Displays visible edges normally; displays hidden edges in gray. Hidden lines removed Displays only edges that are visible at the chosen angle; obscured lines are removed. If you selected Hidden in gray or Hidden lines removed, select one of the following modes for viewing tangent edges: Tangent edges visible The transition edge between rounded or filleted surfaces displays as a line. Tangent edges with font The transition edge between rounded or filleted surfaces displays as a line using the default font for tangent edges defined in Tools, Options, on the Line Font page. Tangent edges removed The transition edge between rounded or filleted surfaces and other surfaces is not displayed. Automatic placement of imported dimensions from model When checked, specifies that imported dimensions are automatically placed at an appropriate distance from the geometry in the view. Display drawing view borders When checked, displays borders around individual drawing views. This is the default. Automatic scaling of 3 view drawings If checked, when you insert a Standard 3 View drawing, the three views are scaled to fit on the drawing sheet, regardless of the paper size selected. Open existing drawings with automatic view update off When selected, drawing views are not updated when you open an existing drawing. If the model has changed, out-of-date views are marked with a crosshatch pattern. You can open drawings, especially large or complex drawings, more quickly. If Automatic view update mode was ON when the drawing was last saved, selecting this option turns it OFF. When cleared (the default), drawing views update when you open an existing drawing, if Automatic view update mode was ON when the drawing was last saved. See Drawing View Update . Set automatic drawing view update for new drawings When selected (the default), Automatic view update mode is set to ON in all new drawings. Drawing views update automatically when the model changes. When cleared, Automatic view update mode is set to OFF in new drawings, and you must update the views manually when the model changes. See Drawing View Update . Show contents while dragging drawing view When checked, the model is displayed as you drag a view. When unchecked, only the view boundary is shown while dragging. (Similar to Show window contents while dragging in Microsoft Windows.) Dynamic drawing view activation When checked, the view closest to the cursor is activated automatically. To stop the dynamic activation temporarily, you can lock a view or the sheet. Right-mouse click the view or sheet, and select Lock View Focus or Lock Sheet Focus. Then right-mouse click again, and select Unlock View Focus (or double-click another view) or Unlock Sheet Focus (or double-click any view) to return to dynamic mode. When unchecked, you double-click a drawing view to activate it, or right-mouse click the view and select Activate View. To activate the sheet, double-click a blank area of the sheet, or choose Activate Sheet from the right-mouse menu. Select hidden entities

Allows you to select hidden (removed) tangent edges and edges that you have hidden manually. When you pass the pointer over hidden edges, the edges display in phantom line font. Automatic update of BOM When checked, if a Bill of Materials exists in a drawing of an assembly it is automatically updated when relevant changes are made to the assembly. Detail view scaling Specifies the scaling for detail views. The scale is relative to the scale of the original drawing. Scale hatch patterns in detail views When checked, the crosshatch patterns in detail views of section views are scaled. The scaling factor depends on the difference in view scales between the detail view and the parent view. Detail item snapping Infer when dragging corner. When you click a corner and drag a detail item (for example, a note or dimension), the corner you clicked can infer to the corners of stationary detail items, and vice versa. Infer when dragging center. When you click the inside of a detail item (a note or dimension) and drag it, the center can infer to the center of stationary detail items, and vice versa. Print out-of-date drawing views with crosshatch Specifies what happens when you Print (or Print Preview) a drawing that contains out-ofdate views, with Automatic view update OFF. (If Automatic view update is ON, the views update automatically, and the crosshatch is removed whenever you print the drawing.) Prompt (default). Notifies you if the drawing contains out-of-date views, and asks how to proceed. When the dialog box appears, click Yes to print the drawing with crosshatch on the out-of-date views, or click No to print the drawing without crosshatch. Always. The printed drawing always includes crosshatch on out-of-date views. Never. The printed drawing never includes crosshatch on out-of-date views.

Page Setup Lets you control the appearance of printed documents and provides access to the Print Setup dialog. Also lets you create a header and/or footer for the active document before printing. To set the print options of a document: 1 2 Click File, Page Setup. From the Printer tab, Paper Margins. To set paper margins, you can either

Specify margin widths in the appropriate margin boxes (Top, Bottom, Left, or Right). - or Use the default margins by clicking the Use printers margins check box. Line weights. Specify the line weight in the appropriate line style boxes (Thin, Normal, Thick, and five additional line thickness settings). Page Orientation. Select either Portrait (vertical page orientation) or Landscape (horizontal page orientation).

Scale.

Drawings: To print the entire drawing sheet on the page, select the Scale to Fit check box. To scale the drawing when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). Part/Assemblies: To print the graphics area of the SolidWorks window on the page, select the Print window check box. To scale the window when printing, clear the check box, and enter the Scale value (in percent). Print drawings in color. When selected, any drawing entities that have a color assigned are printed in color (if a color printer is specified in the Print Setup dialog box). See also Printing a Drawing in Color. Print Setup. Click this button to access the Print Setup dialog box. This lets you choose your printer, paper size and set other printer properties. 3 Click OK.

To create a header and footer for the current document: 1 2 Click File, Page Setup. From the Header/Footer tab,

Scroll the Header and Footer boxes to select predefined headers and/or footers, and view your selection in the Preview boxes. Click Custom Header or Custom Footer to define your own headers and/or footers. 3 Click OK.

To view the changes before printing the document, click Print Preview .

Customize Drawing Template You can customize drawing templates to match your companys standard format. To edit the drawing template: 1 Right-click anywhere on the drawing sheet and select Edit Template from the menu. 2 3 Double-click the text that you want to edit.

Make any necessary changes to the text in the Note dialog box. See Linked Notes in Drawings for information about linking document properties to text in the template. 4 5 Click OK. Specify an anchor point for the Bill of Materials,

6 To add objects from other applications, such as bitmaps of your company logo, standard note text from a file, etc., click Insert, Object. 7 Edit the template format by moving, deleting, and adding lines or text in the text blocks, as needed. To add lines, click the Tools, Sketch Entity, Line or . To add text, click Insert, Annotations, Note or .

8 Create layers if desired, and assign the text and lines to the layers. When you use a template with layers, the layers are copied into the drawing.

To save the template: 1 2 Click File, Save Template.

If you want to overwrite the standard template, click OK and confirm. - or If you want to save the template to a new name, click Custom Template, and Browse to a location, and enter the new template name. (Template files have the .drt extension.) 3 Click Save.

To end editing the template and return to working with an individual sheet, click the right mouse button and select Edit Sheet. Sheet Setup Lets you change the setup of the active drawing sheet. To change the setup of a drawing sheet: 1 While in an active drawing document, click Edit, Properties, or right-mouse click the sheet, and select Properties. 2 You can make the following changes in the Sheet Setup dialog box: Enter a title in the Name box.

Select a Paper Size from the drop-down list of standard paper sizes or select UserDefined to specify a custom paper size. Displays the Height of the selected standard paper size, or lets you specify the custom paper size Height. Displays the Width of the selected standard paper size, or lets you specify the custom paper size Width. Specify the Scale. The default is 1:2. (The scale is displayed in the status line at the bottom of the drawing.) Select a standard drawing template or select Custom or None. Use the Browse button to locate and use a custom drawing template.

Select the Type of Projection that will be used if you use the Standard 3 View option on this sheet. First Angle. Orthographic views in first angle projection. Third Angle. Orthographic views in third angle projection (the default). Specify the letter of the alphabet that will be used for the next section or detail view in the Next View Label box. Specify the letter of the alphabet that will be used for the next datum symbol in the Next Datum Label box. Under Use custom property values from model shown in, select a view from the list. The properties defined for the model shown in the selected view are used to populate any notes that are linked to properties. See Linked Notes in Drawings. 3 Click OK.

Drawing View Alignment

You can arrange, align, and rotate drawing views on the sheet, using the following methods: Moving views on the sheet Breaking and restoring default view alignment Aligning one view to another Rotating views around the centerpoint Aligning views by a horizontal or vertical edge

Copying and Pasting Drawing Views You can cut, copy, and paste drawing views from one sheet to another in the same drawing, and from one drawing document to another. You can also drag views from sheet to sheet within a drawing (but not to another drawing document). To perform these operations on multiple views at once, hold down the Ctrl key as you select the views. To cut/copy/paste a drawing view: 1 2 Select the view either on the sheet or in the FeatureManager design tree. Click Cut or Copy , or click Edit, Cut or Copy.

3 Change to the target sheet, click where you want to paste the view, and click Paste or Edit, Paste. NOTE: If you want to copy a detail view or section view from one drawing to another, you must also copy the parent view from which you created it. You can either copy the parent view first, or you can copy both the parent and the detail or section view at the same time. To move or copy views by dragging: 1 Select a view on the active drawing sheet, or select the views icon in the FeatureManager design tree. 2 To move the view, hold down the Shift key, then drag the selected view or its icon, and drop it on the sheet icon for the target sheet. - or To copy the view, hold down the Ctrl key as you drag and drop.

Drawing View Display You can modify the display of drawing views on the sheet, using the following methods: Hiding and showing views Hiding and showing edges in views Hiding and showing sketches in views Displaying tangent edges Selecting the display mode

Aligned Section Creates a section view through a model, or portion of a model, that is aligned with the selected section line. To create an aligned section view: 1 Activate an existing drawing view (double-click the view, or right-click and select Activate View). 2 Click Tools, Sketch Entity, Centerline or Line, or click or from the Sketch Tools toolbar. 3 Sketch the section line. The section line should consist of two connected lines at an angle to each other. 4 view. 5 Select the segment of the sketched section line to which you want to align the

Click Insert, Make Section Line. If you are creating an aligned section view of an assembly, specify the Section Scope (which components, if any, to leave uncut). Notice the arrows, indicating the direction of the cut. If necessary, double-click on the section line to reverse the direction of the arrows. Now you can edit other section line properties that control the resulting view, if you wish. Right-mouse click the section line, and select Properties. 6 With the section line still selected, click Insert, Drawing View, Aligned Section or on the Drawing toolbar. NOTE: If you prefer to create the section line and the default aligned section view in a single step, skip Steps 5 and 6. Instead, after you select the sketched section line segment, click or Insert, Drawing View, Aligned Section. 7 Click to place the view on the sheet. See Default View Alignment .

You cannot change the angle of the line that you selected to align the view; you can change its position, however. See Modifying a Section View . Auxiliary Creates an auxiliary view, unfolded from a drawing view along a selected edge. To create an auxiliary view: 1 In a drawing view, select the edge that you want to use as the axis for unfolding the auxiliary view. (To unfold horizontal or vertical projections, use the Projection command.) 2 Click or Insert, Drawing View, Auxiliary. As you move the cursor, a preview of the view boundary is displayed. 3 Move the cursor until the view is where you want, then click to place the view. If you want to override the default alignment as you place the auxiliary view, press the Ctrl key as you move the preview around. To resume the snapping behavior while dragging, release the Ctrl key. To create a view arrow indicating the direction of projection: 1 2 3 4 Right-mouse click the auxiliary view. Select Properties. Click Display view arrow. You can enter a label for the arrow (maximum of two characters), if desired. To move the view arrow, click and drag by the handle.

Horizontal Break Creates a broken view (or an interrupted view) on the drawing of a long part that has a uniform cross-section. This makes is possible to display the part in a larger scale on a smaller size drawing sheet. You can add more than one set of break lines to a view; however, all breaks must be in the same direction. You can add and delete breaks while in a view that is broken. To create a break line in a drawing: 1 Select the drawing view and click Insert, Horizontal Break. Two break lines appear in the view. Repeat to add more than one set of breaks to a view. 2 Drag the break lines to where you want the breaks to occur.

3 Right mouse click inside the view border (green border) and select Break View from the menu. The part is displayed with a gap in the part geometry; however, the dimensional values associated with the broken area reflect the correct values. You can continue to drag the break lines to adjust them after the view is broken, if necessary. To change the shape of the break lines, right mouse click a break line and select a line style from the menu: Straight Cut, Curve Cut, Zig Zag Cut, or Small Zig Zag Cut. To specify the width of the break gap, click Tools, Options, and select the Detailing tab. Enter a value in the Break Gap box under the Break Lines option. To restore a broken view to its unbroken state: Right-click the broken view, and select Un-Break View. Click the break lines and press the Delete key. See also Vertical Break . Detail Creates a detail view in a drawing. To create a detail view: 1 Activate a drawing view. (Double-click the view, or right-click on the view and click Activate View.) 2 From the Tools, Sketch Entity menu (or the Sketch Tools toolbar), select a sketch entity to create a closed profile around the area of the drawing that you want in the detail view. 3 4 5 Click and select the closed profile. Click or Insert, Drawing View, Detail. A detail circle appears in the original view and a detail view appears. Click on the detail view and drag it to the desired location on the sheet.

6 To change the scale of the detail view, right-mouse click the detail view and select Properties. 7 Make sure Use sheets scale is not checked, and then enter a new scale ratio in the scale boxes. Note To change the detail label on the original view, double-click the label and type the new text. Click OK. See also Detail Circle . Empty View

Allows you to insert an empty view in a drawing. You can add sketch geometry to the active view that you can drag or delete as a group. You can still edit sketch entities individually. To insert an empty view in a drawing: 1 2 3 Click on the drawing sheet where you want to place the empty view. Click Insert, Drawing View, Empty. To move the view, select the view and drag the green border (not the handles).

4 Double-click the view to make it active (red border), or right-mouse click and select Activate View from the menu. Use the Sketch Entity tools to create sketch geometry; use the Relations tools for making or deleting relations; use the Dimensions tools for dimensioning. Named View Creates a drawing view with the same orientation as one of the named views in a model. To create a drawing view to match a model view: 1 Open the part or assembly document, or a drawing that contains a view of the model you want. 2 Open the drawing where you want to add the view. (If you opened a drawing in Step 1, you can add the view to the same drawing.) 3 4 Click or Insert, Drawing View, Named View. Select the model in one of these ways:

To add the views of a part, in a part window, click a face, or anywhere in the graphics area, or click the part name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly, in an assembly window, click an empty region of the graphics area, or click the assembly name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly component, in an assembly window, click a face on the part, or click the name of either the individual part or the sub-assembly in the FeatureManager design tree. In a drawing window, click a view that contains the desired part or assembly, either in the FeatureManager design tree or on the sheet. 5 Select a view from the list and click OK. You can choose the current view or any named view. 6 Click in the drawing where you want to place the view.

You can also insert the model from a file. Projection Creates a new orthographic view that is unfolded from an existing view. To create a projection view: 1 2 Open the drawing that has the view you want to project. Click on the view you want to project.

3 Click or Insert, Drawing View, Projection. As you move the cursor, a preview of the view boundary is displayed, snapped to the nearest projection.

Move the cursor until the view is where you want, then click to place the view. If you want to override the snapping behavior as you place the projection view, press the Ctrl key as you move the preview around. To resume the snapping behavior while dragging, release the Ctrl key. To create a view arrow indicating the direction of projection: 1 2 3 4 Right mouse click the projected view. Select Properties. Click Display view arrow.

You can enter a label for the arrow (maximum of two characters), if desired. To move the view arrow, click and drag by the handle. Relative to Model Creates a drawing view by selecting two orthogonal faces to define an orientation. To create the view: 1 Open the part or assembly document, or a drawing that contains a view of the model you want. 2 Open the drawing where you want to add the views. (If you opened a drawing in Step 1, you can add the views to the same drawing.) 3 4 With the drawing window active, click or Insert, Drawing View, Relative to Model. Select the model in one of these ways:

To add the views of a part, in a part window, click a face, or anywhere in the graphics area, or click the part name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly, in an assembly window, click an empty region of the graphics area, or click the assembly name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly component, in an assembly window, click a face on the part, or click the name of either the individual part or the sub-assembly in the FeatureManager design tree. In a drawing window, click a view that contains the desired part or assembly, either in the FeatureManager design tree or on the sheet. 5 Click a face in the model window that you want to have a specific orientation. The Drawing View Orientation dialog box appears. 6 Select an orientation (Front, Top, Left, etc.), and click OK.

7 Select another face, perpendicular to the first, select the orientation for this face, and click OK. 8 Activate the drawing window, and click where you want to place the view.

You can also insert the model from a file.

Section View in a Drawing Creates a cross section drawing view of the model. The view may be a straight cut section or an offset section defined by a stepped section line. The section line may also include arcs. To create a section view:

1 Activate an existing drawing view (double-click the view, or right-click and select Activate View). 2 Click Tools, Sketch Entity, Centerline or Line, or click or on the Sketch Tools toolbar. 3 Sketch a single or stepped centerline or line through the model in the active view.

4 Select the sketched centerline or line (if it is not already selected). For a stepped line, you only need to select one segment. 5 Click Insert, Make Section Line. If you are creating a section view of an assembly, specify the Section Scope (which components, if any, to leave uncut). Notice the arrows, indicating the direction of the cut. If necessary, double-click on the section line to reverse the direction of the arrows. Now you can edit other section line properties that control the resulting view, if you wish. Right-mouse click the section line and select Properties. 6 With the section line still selected, click Insert, Drawing View, Section or on the Drawing toolbar. NOTE: If you prefer to create the section line and the default section view in a single step, skip Steps 5 and 6. Instead, after you select the sketched segment, click or Insert, Drawing View, Section. 7 Click to place the view on the sheet. See Default View Alignment .

See also Modifying a Section View . Standard 3 View Creates three standard orthographic views on a drawing sheet. To create a drawing: 2 Open the part or assembly document, or a drawing that contains a view of the model you want. 2 Open the drawing where you want to add the views. (If you opened a drawing in Step 1, you can add the views to the same drawing.) 3 4 With the drawing window active, click or Insert, Drawing View, Standard 3 View. Select the model in one of these ways:

To add the views of a part, in a part window, click a face, or anywhere in the graphics area, or click the part name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly, in an assembly window, click an empty region of the graphics area, or click the assembly name in the FeatureManager design tree. To add the views of an assembly component, in an assembly window, click a face on the part, or click the name of either the individual part or the sub-assembly in the FeatureManager design tree. In a drawing window, click a view that contains the desired part or assembly, either in the FeatureManager design tree or on the sheet. The drawing window returns to the front (if necessary) and the three views are placed in the drawing. The type of projection (first or third angle) depends on the setting specified by the Sheet Setup command.

5 If necessary, drag the drawing views to position them on the sheet. The top and side views retain their alignment with the front view as you drag them; dragging the front view moves all three views. Other ways to create the Standard 3 View: Drag the model into the drawing Drag a hyperlink into the drawing Insert the model from a file

2D Sketching on a Drawing You can create drawing geometry using 2D sketched geometry only, without reference to existing models or assemblies. This sketched geometry may be controlled by relations (collinear, parallel, tangent, and so on), as well as parametric dimensions To start sketching: 1 To display a grid, right-mouse click the active drawing sheet and select Display Grid from the menu. 2 Click one of the icons on the Sketch Tools toolbar or click Tools, Sketch Entity, and select a tool. Then you can: Create geometry by selecting Line, Centerpoint Arc, Tangent Arc, 3 Pt Arc, Circle, Ellipse, Centerpoint Ellipse, Spline, Rectangle, Point, or Centerline. Reference existing geometry by selecting Convert Entities, or Offset Entities. Copy geometry about a centerline using the Pattern/Mirror tool. Modify the sketch using the Fillet and Trim/Extend tools.

When you dimension sketched geometry, the geometry automatically updates when you modify dimensions and then click Edit, Rebuild. You can move, rotate, or scale sketched geometry on a drawing by using the Modify function. Click Tools, Sketch Tools, Modify or on the Sketch toolbar. The behavior of Modify in a drawing is the same as its behavior in a sketch. For more information about adding and deleting geometric relations, see Geometric Relations and Display/Delete Relations. See also Empty View and Construction Geometry . Detailing Options Lets you set properties for detailing and dimensioning in your parts, assemblies, and drawings. To set detailing properties for all part, assembly or drawing documents: 1 2 3 Click Tools, Options. Click the Detailing tab. Change the detailing options to meet your standard detailing style, and click OK.

Dimensioning Standard Specifies the standard to use: ISO, ANSI, DIN, JIS, BSI, and GOST. Dual dimensions display. Allows the display of dimensions in two kinds of units.

Specifies the placement of the dual dimension: either On Top or On Right (on the same line).

Fixed size weld symbols

When unchecked (default), the size of the weld symbol is scaled according to the Dim Font size, and changes if the Dim Font size changes. When checked, the size of weld symbols is dependent on the selected dimensioning standard, and remains constant regardless of changes to the Dim Font size. This option is unavailable for the GOST dimensioning standard. Display datums per 1982. Click this checkbox to use the 1982 standard for the display of datums. Note: Available only if you use the ANSI dimensioning standard. Trailing zeros. Select one of three settings:

Smart Trailing zeros are trimmed for whole metric values. (Conforms to ANSI and ISO standards.) Show Dimensions have trailing zeros up to the number of decimal places specified in Tools, Options, Grid/Units . Remove All trailing zeros are removed. Specifies that metric whole dimensions have trailing zeros up to the number of decimal places specified. Note: Tolerances are not affected by this option. Alternate section display. If you are using ANSI standard, you can use Alternate section display. With this display style the section line does not display across the drawing view; the arrow ends stop at the ends of the section cut. Centerline extension -- This value controls the centerlines extension length beyond the section geometry when it is in a drawing view. The default value is set according to standards, but you can change it. Select the value in the edit box and enter a new value. When a centerline length is modified, the new length is used the next time the section is rebuilt. Notes Note Font. Lets you specify the font type and size used for notes.

Balloons . Lets you specify the balloon style, size, and text for Notes Balloons and BOM (bill of materials) Balloons. Leader Anchor. Specifies to which side of the text the leader attaches: Left, Right, or the side Closest to the attach point. Text justification. Select Left, Right, or Center.

Display notes with bent leader. Specifies whether notes are displayed with a bent leader. Bent leader length. Specifies the distance between the leader bend and the text of the note. Break lines Break gap. Specifies the size of the gap between break lines in a broken view (or interrupted view) in a drawing. Center marks Size. Specifies the size of Center marks, used with arcs and circles in drawings. Show lines. Specifies whether the center mark lines are displayed.

Witness lines Sets the Gap and Extension of witness lines.

Datum feature symbols Specify the letter of the alphabet that will be used for the next Datum Feature Symbol. The default letter is A. Successive labels are in alphabetic order.

Dimensions Dim Font. Lets you specify the font, font style and font size used for the text in dimensions. See Choose Font . Tolerance. Specifies the type of tolerance to display: None, Basic, Bilateral, Limit, Symmetric, MIN, MAX or Fit. See Dimension Tolerance Properties . Precision. Sets the dimension precision and tolerance values for Primary Units, Angular Units, and Alternate Units. Add parentheses by default. Specifies that reference dimensions in drawings are displayed within parentheses. Snap text to grid. Specifies that the placement of dimension text snaps to the grid in a drawing or a sketch. Use system separator. Specifies that the default system decimal separator is used in the display of decimal numbers. (To set the system default use Control Panel, International (or Regional Settings), Number Format, Decimal Separator.) To set a decimal separator different from the system default, click to deselect, and enter the symbol that you want to use (usually the period or the comma). Center text. Specifies that the dimension text is centered between its witness lines. Virtual Sharp. . Click this button to select the display style for virtual sharps. A virtual sharp is a sketch point at the virtual intersection point of two entities. Dimensions and relations to the virtual intersection point are retained even if the actual intersection no longer exists, such as when a corner is removed by a fillet. Arrows . Click this button to select the display options for arrows. Annotations . Click this button to specify the annotations Display Filter and set annotations properties. Leaders . Click this button to specify the alignment of dimension text with respect to the leaders. Section Font. Lets you specify the font type and size used for the letter labels on section lines, and the corresponding view labels. Detail Font. Lets you specify the font type and size used for the letter labels on detail circles, and the corresponding view labels. View System Defaults. When checked, the system default for each of the options is displayed; when not checked the option selections used by the active document are displayed. Apply To: Select an option from the pull-down list, as follows: System Defaults. Applies the selections that you made to all new documents that you create. Active Document. Applies the selections that you made to only the currently active document. All Possible. Applies the selections that you made to both the system defaults and currently active document. Insert Model Items Imports to the selected drawing view, annotations and reference geometry that currently exist in the model. You can also import annotations to all views at once. Annotations appear in the most appropriate view. Features that appear in partial views, such as Detail or Section views, are dimensioned in those views first. Inserting annotations this way reduces the effort required to clean up the drawing.

To import existing annotations or reference geometry to a drawing view: 1 To annotate a single feature or assembly component, select the item. To annotate a single drawing view, select the view. To annotate all the views at once, do not select anything. Click Insert, Model Items. From the Insert Model Items dialog, select the types of items to import:

2 3

Annotations - Cosmetic Threads, Datums, Datum Targets, Dimensions, Geometric Tolerances, Notes, Surface Finish Symbols, Weld Symbols. If you select Dimensions, you have the option of also importing Instance/Revolution Counts if those dimensions exist in the part or assembly. - or Click the All Types checkbox to import all of the annotations and reference geometry. 4 From the Import From box, select one of the following options: Entire Model. Displays all of the selected item types that exist in the model. Reference Geometry - Axes, Curves, Planes, Surfaces

Selected Component. If this drawing is of an assembly, displays the items that exist on the selected component only. Selected Feature. Displays the annotations existing on the selected feature only.

5 Change the selection of views if necessary. To import dimensions to selected views, deselect Import Dimensions into All Views, then click the desired views on the drawing sheet. The selected views are listed in the Import into Views box. Click the views again to remove them from the list; right-mouse click the drawing sheet, and select Clear selections to remove all the views from the list. Note: When Selected Feature or Selected Component is checked, annotations for the item are displayed only in the view where you selected the item. You cannot select a different view or all views. 6 To prevent the import of annotations that belong to hidden model items, deselect Include dimensions from hidden features. Annotations on features that are completely hidden by other geometry will not be imported. The import operation is slower, but the resulting views do not contain annotations that you may not want. 7 Click OK to insert the items; click Cancel to exit without making the changes. Attachment points of imported annotations can be dragged, but not re-attached to another edge, face, vertex, etc. You can toggle the visibility of individual reference geometry items. Right-mouse click the item, and select Hide or Show. Note Imported annotations display in the default Imported Annotation color; reference annotations (added in the drawing) are displayed in the default Reference Annotation color. These colors are specified in Tools, Options, on the Color tab. See Color -- Lines, Text, and Borders . Dimension Properties To modify the dimension properties: Right-click a dimension and select Properties. - or Select multiple dimensions while holding down the Ctrl key, then right-click one of the selected dimensions, and select Properties. You can view and make changes to any options that the selected dimensions have in common.

The following options are available for all dimensions: Value Name Full Name Arrow Style Arrows Units Display Precision Font Display Modify Text Tolerance Read only Display as inspection dimension Depending on the type of dimension you selected (linear, radius, reference, and so on), some of the following options may be available: Driven Display with parentheses Display as dual dimension Diameter dimension Foreshortened radius Dimension to inside of arc Display with solid leader Use document's second arrow Display second outside arrow Display as linear dimension Display as chain dimension First arc condition, Second arc condition Layer

Reference Dimensions Creates reference dimensions on drawings. Reference dimensions show measurements of the model, but cannot be used to drive the model and you cannot change their values. To add a reference dimension: 1 2 3 4 5 Select the drawing view. Click . Click the item(s) you want to dimension. (See Dimension for details.) Click to place the dimension.

Reference dimensions are shown in parentheses by default. To specify the default for all drawings, click Tools, Options and select the Detailing tab. Select Add Parenthesis by Default. See Detailing Options. Baseline Dimension Creates baseline dimensions in a drawing. To create a baseline dimension: 1 Click the Dimension tool , then press the right mouse button and select Baseline. - or Click Tools, Dimensions, Baseline.

2 3 4

Click the edge you want to use as a baseline. Click each of the edges or vertices you want to dimension.

Click to place the dimensions. The dimensions are automatically grouped, and they are spaced at the distances specified under Tools, Options, Detailing, Arrows, under Dimension offset distances. Note Baseline dimensions are reference dimensions. You cannot change their values or use them to drive the model.

Ordinate Dimension Creates ordinate dimensions in a drawing, measured from the axis you select first. The type of ordinate dimension (horizontal, vertical, or angular) is defined by the orientation of the points you select. To create ordinate dimensions: 1 With a drawing active, click and then select Ordinate Dimension from the rightmouse menu. - or - Click Tools, Dimensions, Ordinate. 2 Click the first item from which all others will be measured (the 0.0 dimension), and click again to place the dimension. 3 Click an item to dimension, then click to place its dimension. Repeat this step until all the remaining items are dimensioned. The dimension tool remains in ordinate mode until you select another mode or another tool. Newly placed ordinate dimensions automatically jog to avoid overlapping text. The size of the jog is determined by the size of the text and the potentially overlapping area of the text. To modify ordinate dimensions: You can modify ordinate dimensions using commands on the right-mouse menu. 1 Activate (double-click) the drawing view containing the dimensions you want to modify. 2 Right-mouse click an ordinate dimension, then select from these options:

Add to Ordinate Dimension. Use this option to add more dimensions later, along the same ordinate. Align Ordinate. Aligns all the dimensions along the ordinate with the 0.0 ordinate.

Jog. Bends the leader line of a dimension and allows you to reposition it (to eliminate crowding). To display as chain dimensions: 1 Right-mouse click on an ordinate dimension and select Properties from the menu. 2 Click the Display as chain dimension checkbox. (All the dimensions along the ordinate are affected when you select or deselect this option.) See also Vertical Ordinate Dimension, Horizontal Ordinate Dimension. Working with Dimensions in Drawings The topics listed here describe the many ways that you can modify the appearance and arrangement of dimensions in a drawing. These methods apply to imported model dimensions and to reference dimensions .

Align Dimensions Parallel/Concentric Align Dimensions Collinear/Radial Center Text Offset Text Hide/Show Dimensions Modify Text of Dimension Dimension Properties Changing Dimension Fonts Modifying Witness Lines Moving and Copying Dimensions

Area Hatch In a drawing, applies a crosshatch pattern to either: a selected face in an active view a closed loop of sketch entities, either on the sheet or in an active view

To add crosshatch to a model face: 1 2 3 Activate (double-click) a drawing view. Select a model face.

Click Insert, Area Hatch. The selected face is filled, using the default crosshatch pattern specified under Tools, Options, Crosshatch. To add a crosshatch area to a sketched area: 1 2 3 Sketch a closed loop. Select one entity of the loop.

Click Insert, Area Hatch. You can change the shape and size of the sketched loop as needed. The crosshatch updates to fill the modified shape. Note: If you sketch the loop and add the crosshatch pattern in an active view, the view must be active to delete or edit the pattern. Likewise, if you sketch and fill the area when the sheet is active, the sheet must be active to delete or edit the pattern. To delete the crosshatch area: 1 Select the crosshatch area. If necessary, right-click the area, and use Select Other. 2 Press the Delete key. For sketch loops, the sketch entities remain when the area hatch is deleted. To edit the crosshatch pattern: 1 Right-click the crosshatch area, and select Properties, or select the area and click Edit, Properties. 2 3 Choose a different Pattern and adjust the Scale and Angle if needed. Click OK.

Balloon Inserts balloons in drawing, assembly, or part documents. If you previously inserted a bill of materials in an assembly drawing, the balloons label the parts in the assembly and

relate them to items on the bill of materials. The balloon leader attaches to the place where you click. You can specify the default balloon style and size on Tools, Options, the Detailing tab. To insert a balloon: 1 2 Click or Insert, Annotations, Balloon.

Click on a part in a drawing view. A balloon that contains a number corresponding to the part number on the bill of material attaches to the part that you clicked. 3 To move the balloon or leader arrows, drag them with the Select tool.

To change the balloon or its contents: 1 Double-click on the balloon or right-mouse click the balloon and select Properties from the menu.

2 In the Balloon Note Text block, you may specify that the note text is an Item Number, a Quantity, or Custom text. 3 If you choose Custom text, you can do one of the following: enter text in the text box, click the Add Symbol button and select a symbol from the Symbol dialog,

click if you want to include a Hyperlink in the note. (A hyperlink is indicated when a cursor passing over the balloon dynamically changes to a hand.) click if you want to link a Custom Property to the text of the note.

4 If you select a balloon style of Circular Split Line, you may choose different note text for the Upper and Lower balloon. (See the Balloon block at the bottom of the dialog box.) 5 Select from the following leader options: Angle. Scroll to an angle for the leader display.

Leader. Options are Display with Leader and/or Display with Bent Leader. When you select these options, you may select the position of the leader anchor: Closest, Left, or Right. Arrow Style. When you select Display with Leader you can choose an arrow style. If the Smart box is checked, the arrow styles specified in Options, Detailing are used. When not checked, you can choose a style by selecting from the pull-down illustrated list. 6 In the Balloon block, you can select a balloon Style from the pull-down list: Circular, Triangle, Hexagon, Box, Diamond, Circular Split Line, Pentagon, Flag Five Sided, Flag Triangle, or None. 7 You can select a balloon Size of Tight Fit, expandable to tightly fit any custom text you type in, or of a size to accommodate from one to five characters. 8 In the Font block, you can deselect the Use Documents Font checkbox if you want a font of a different style and size. Click the Font button and make your selections from the Choose Font dialog box. 9 Make the changes in the Note dialog and click OK.

See also Bill of Materials.

Bill of Materials Lets you insert a bill of materials into the drawing of an assembly. If you add or delete components in the assembly, the bill of materials automatically updates to reflect the changes if you select the Automatic update of BOM option under Tools, Options, Drawings. Note To insert a bill of materials in a drawing, you must have Microsoft Excel 97 installed on your computer. It is strongly recommended that you have Service Release 2 for Excel. To insert a bill of materials: 1 2 BOM. With a drawing view selected, click Insert, Bill of Materials. In the Select a BOM Template dialog box, select the Excel template for the

The default BOM template is in install_folder\lang\english\Bomtemp.xls. You can customize the template by adding columns or changing the text formatting. You can also create new templates to meet your companys standards. 3 Select from the following options:

Use summary info title as part number. If you assigned a part identifier number in the title box of the Summary Info for the part, you can use that identifier in the bill of materials. Use the documents note font when creating the table. When selected, the BOM uses the text font specified for notes, under Tools, Options, Detailing, Note Font. Otherwise, the font specified in the template is used. 4 Specify the way to list sub-assemblies and their components in the bill of materials: Show parts only. Select this option to list only parts in the bill of materials. Subassemblies are not listed; their components are listed as individual items. Show top level subassemblies and parts only. Select this option to list parts and subassemblies in the bill of materials. Each subassembly type is an item; the individual subassembly components are not listed. Show subassemblies and parts in an indented list. Subassemblies are listed as items; subassembly components are shown below the subassembly to which they belong, but without item numbers. 5 Under Anchor point, select from the following options:

Use table anchor point. The standard templates supplied with the software include an anchor point for placing the BOM in a specific location on the sheet. To use the point, select this option, then select which corner of the BOM table to make coincident with the point (top right, bottom left, etc.). If you do not use the anchor point, the BOM is placed on the sheet near the selected view. See Anchor Point for Bill of Materials . Add new items by extending top border of table. New components are always added at the bottom of the table, and the rest of the table shifts upward. The last row of the table remains in the same position on the drawing sheet. This option applies only when you do not use an anchor point. 6 Click OK. A bill of materials is displayed that lists the components of the assembly.

7 To move the bill of materials on the drawing sheet, drag it to where you want to place it. See also: Editing a Bill of Materials Saving a BOM as an Excel File

Hide/Show Bill of Materials Balloon Center Mark Creates axis lines for showing center marks on circles and arcs that can be used as reference points for dimensioning in a drawing. You can also use center marks on sketch geometry in a drawing. To create a center mark: Click or Insert, Annotations, Center Mark, and click the circle or arc. To change the display attributes of individual center marks: 1 2 Right-mouse click the center mark and select Properties.

Click to uncheck Use documents defaults. You can set the default size of center marks and choose whether or not to display extended axis lines. 3 Make the changes that you want and click OK to accept the changes; click Cancel to close the dialog box without saving any changes. To set your default preferences for center marks, click Tools, Options and select the Detailing tab. Cosmetic Threads Represents threads on a part, assembly, or drawing. A cosmetic thread is different from other annotations, because it is an absorbed feature of the item to which it is attached. For example, the cosmetic thread on a hole is in the FeatureManager design tree under the hole feature, along with the sketches used to create the hole. Cosmetic threads added in a part or assembly can be imported to a drawing view. If you add a cosmetic thread while working in a drawing view, the part or assembly is updated to include the cosmetic thread feature. You can specify the line style and weight to use for cosmetic threads on the Line Font tab of the Tools, Options dialog box. To insert cosmetic threads on a part or drawing: 1 2 3 On a cylindrical feature, click the circular edge where the thread should begin. Click or Insert, Annotations, Cosmetic Thread. In the Cosmetic Thread dialog box, select the thread to apply:

Select Blind to run the thread for a specified distance, and enter the distance in the value box. 4 5 6 Select Up to Next to run the thread to the next face. Enter a value in the Minor Diameter/Major Diameter box. In the Thread Callout box, enter thread callout text, if desired. Click OK to create the thread; click Cancel to exit.

To edit a cosmetic thread: 1 In a part or assembly document, right-mouse click the Cosmetic Thread feature, and select Edit Definition. You can select it either in the graphics area, or in the FeatureManager design tree (under the feature to which it is attached).

Make the necessary changes in the Cosmetic Thread dialog box, and click OK.

To edit the thread callout on a cosmetic thread: If you only need to edit the text of the thread callout note, double-click the note (or right-click the note and select Properties) in the drawing view, and edit it as needed in the Note Properties dialog box.

Block You can create, save, and insert blocks for drawing items that you use often, such as standard notes, label positions, and so on. Blocks can include text and any type of sketch entity except points. To create a block: 1 In a drawing, click Tools, Block, New. A block editing window opens.

2 Sketch the entities that make up the block. To add text, use the Note tool . You can also insert an existing block in the block you are creating. 3 To specify the location for attaching a leader to the block, right-click a blank area, and select Make Block. The entities are grouped, and a leader attachment point is placed at the lower left corner of an imaginary rectangle that includes all the entities. If you want the leader to be attached in a different place, click the block to display the rectangle and a green handle at the default location. Hold the Ctrl key, and drag the handle to a new location. 4 To save the block, click File, Save. Blocks have the extension .sldsym. To insert a block: 1 In a drawing, click the sheet, view, or model where you want to add the block, then click Insert, Annotations, Block. 2 Locate the block file (.sldsym), and click Open. If you store your blocks in a specific folder, you can specify that folder as the default search path . The block is copied to the sheet, with the leader attachment point where you clicked. If you pre-selected a model, the block includes a leader automatically. If you did not preselect a model, you can add a leader. The block is copied to the sheet, with the leader attachment point where you clicked. If you pre-selected a model, the block includes a leader automatically. If you did not pre-select a model, you can add a leader. 3 4 5 Double-click the block, or right-mouse click the block and select Properties. Modify the leader display as desired by changing the Block Leader Properties . Click OK, then drag the block to extend the leader.

See also Editing a Block . Datum Feature Symbol Attaches a datum feature symbol to a selected location on a part, assembly, or drawing document. To insert a datum feature symbol: 1 2 With a drawing active, click or Insert, Annotations, Datum Feature Symbol. Click the surface on which you want to place a datum feature symbol.

You can place several datum feature symbols; the datum letters are assigned alphabetically (omitting I, O, Q, S, X, and Z to comply with ANSI standards). 3 To stop placing datum feature symbols, click or Insert, Annotations, Datum Feature Symbol again. To edit the datum feature symbol, right-click the symbol and select Properties from the menu. Datum Target Symbol Creates and places datum targets (points or areas) and associated symbols on a part or assembly document, or a drawing view. To create a datum target and symbol: 1 2 3 4 Click a model edge or face in a part or assembly or a drawing view. Click or Insert, Annotations, Datum Target. The Datum Target Symbol dialog appears. Select a target shape: Point, Circle, or Rectangle. If you choose Circle or Rectangle, enter the target area size in the boxes. Choose from these options:

Display target area size outside. Places the size value outside the target symbol balloon. Display target area. Displays a crosshatch area of the specified size at the selected location. Display datum target symbol. Displays a balloon containing the symbol information. 5 6 Enter up to three Datum Reference labels in the boxes. Specify the leader style that you want: Select Bent Leader, if appropriate.

Select Smart Arrow to use the default attachment arrows, or deselect the option, then choose an Arrowhead Style from the list. Select a Line Style from the list. Typically, a Solid line indicates the target is on the near side; a Dashed line indicates the target is on the far side. 7 To move the symbol to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. 8 Click OK to accept the datum target symbol that you constructed; click Cancel if you do not want to accept the symbol. To change the location of the datum target or symbol, click and drag the item. To edit the datum target or symbol, right-click on the point, area, or symbol balloon, and select Properties from the menu. The Datum Target Symbol dialog appears. In a drawing, you can dimension to the center of a datum target area. Click either the balloon symbol or the crosshatched area to add the dimension.The drawing view must be active in order to add dimensions.

Geometric Tolerance Inserts Geometric Distancing and Tolerance symbols in part, assembly, and drawing documents. To insert geometric tolerances:

Click or Insert, Annotations, Geometric Tolerance.

2 In the first Feature Control Frame area, click GCS, then select a Geometric Characteristic Symbol and click OK. Notice that as you make each selection, the information appears in the preview display box. 3 Enter a tolerance value in the Tolerance 1 box, and click if you want to include a Diameter symbol. 4 5 Click MC, to choose the material condition symbol for Tolerance 1 and click OK. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for Tolerance 2.

6 Enter tolerance values and material condition symbols for the Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary datums. 7 Repeat the process for the second Feature Control Frame, - or Click the Composite Frame check box and complete entering values and material condition symbols. 8 Click Between Two Points if the tolerance value applies to a measurement between two points or entities. 9 If you want to enter a Projected Tolerance Zone height, click the Show PTZ check box and enter a value in the Height box. The value is displayed in the first frames tolerance box. 10 To specify styles for leaders, arrows and/or fonts, click the Options button.

11 To move the symbol to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. 12 When you are finished, click OK and drag the geometric tolerance frame to the desired position on your document. If you did not pre-select an attachment point, you can attach the symbol to a model edge or a dimension later. See Geometric Tolerance Placement for more information about attaching and aligning geometric tolerance symbols. You can add multiple leaders to the symbol. Hole Callout Inserts a hole callout in a drawing view. To insert a hole callout in a drawing view: 1 2 Click a hole edge to select it.

Click or Insert, Annotations, Hole Callout. The Modify Text of Dimension dialog box appears with the dimensions of the hole already filled in. 3 Edit the callout symbol, if necessary.

4 Click OK when you are satisfied, or click Cancel. The Hole Callout tool remains active, so you can select another hole if necessary. To move the callout text to a new location, click and drag the text. To make changes to the arrow, font, dimension precision, or tolerances, rightmouse click the callout text and select Properties from the menu. Make the changes in the Dimension Properties dialog box. Insert Hyperlink Creates a hyperlink to a document on the Internet, your local network, or on your own hard drive. Selecting the hyperlink brings the user to the associated URL (document or web site).

To embed a hyperlink: 1 2 Click or Insert, Hyperlink. Enter the path (or browse) to the document to which you want to link.

3 Click Use relative path for hyperlink if you want to the specify a directory path relative to the current location instead of the full pathname. 4 Note Inserts a note into a part, assembly, or drawing document. You may create a freefloating note or a note with a leader line attached to a specific point on the document. Notes can have multiple leaders . You can select any number of attach locations and create the note. Also, you can add, remove, and move leaders of existing notes. Also used for Customizing Drawing Templates . To create a note: 1 On a document, click where you want to place the note. Note If you choose to attach a leader line, the leader will attach where you clicked. 2 Click or Insert, Annotations, Note. Click OK to accept the path.

3 Type the text into the Note text box. For a parametric note , select a dimension on the drawing. 4 5 Specify the text angle in the Angle box, or use the arrows to set the value. Modify the Text justification (Center, Left, Right) if needed.

6 If you want to use the font you selected in Tools, Options, Detailing for note text, leave the Use documents font check box selected. If you want to use a different font, clear the Use documents font check box, and click the Font button to choose from various font styles and sizes. 7 Specify the Leader display: Display with leader. Attaches the note with a straight leader line. Display with bent leader. Attaches the note with a bent leader line. Leader anchor. Choose a default position: Closest, Left, or Right.

Arrow style. When the Smart check box is selected, the arrow styles specified in Options, Detailing are used. To choose a different Arrow style, clear the check box and select a style from the list. Apply to all arrowheads. If the selected note has multiple leaders, and Smart is not selected, you can use a different arrowhead style for each individual leader. To apply a change to all of the arrowheads of the selected note, select this check box. 8 Specify the Balloon display: Style. Specifies the shape of the balloon, or None.

Size. Specifies either Tight Fit to the text, or a fixed size to accommodate a specified number of characters. 9 To add a symbol to the note text, click the pointer in the Note text box where you want the symbol to appear and click Add Symbol. Select a library from the Symbol library list, then select a symbol name from the list, and click OK.

(The symbols name is displayed in the text box, but the actual symbol appears in the note.) 10 11 12 13 To move the note to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. Click if you want to include a Hyperlink in the note. Click if you want to link a note to a document property. Click OK.

Surface Finish Symbol Attaches a surface finish symbol to the selected surface in a part, assembly, or drawing document. To add a surface finish symbol to a part surface: 1 2 Click where you want to place the symbol. Click or Insert, Annotations, Surface Finish Symbol.

3 Construct the symbol that is appropriate for the selected surface by selecting values from the options in the Surface Finish Symbol dialog box: Symbol. Select a symbol type from Basic, Machining Required, or Machining Prohibited. Direction of lay. Select the direction of the surface pattern from the list.

Roughness. Define the Maximum, and Minimum height deviation from the mean plane of the surface, and the Spacing between peaks and valleys that form the texture of the surface. Special requirements. Define any necessary requirements such as: Production method/treatment, Sampling length, or Other roughness values. Material removal. Specify the Allowance (the amount of stock to be removed by machining). Leader.

Select Show to display the symbol with a leader. Select Bent leader to allow the leader to have a bend. Select Smart to use the default Arrow style (specified in Tools, Options, Detailing) for the type of item the symbol is attached to. To select a different Arrow style, clear this check box. 4 Click Rotated if you want the symbol rotated 90 degrees.

5 To move the surface finish symbol to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. 6 Click OK when you are satisfied with the surface finish symbol that you defined. To edit the surface finish symbol, right-click the symbol and select Properties from the menu, or double-click the symbol. Make changes to the Surface Finish Symbol dialog box. You can add multiple leaders to the symbol.

Weld Symbols When you create a weld bead in an assembly, a weld symbol is created automatically on the Weld Bead component, representing the parameters you specified. You can edit this symbol to add more information to it.

You can also construct weld symbols independently in any SolidWorks document. You can add multiple leaders to the symbol. To create a weld symbol: 1 2 3 Click an edge on the part or assembly where you want to indicate a welded joint. Click or Insert, Annotations, Weld Symbol. In the Dimension boxes, enter the values for the weld dimensions.

4 Click the Weld Symbol button and select a symbol type from the list of standard symbols. 5 Choose other options as needed, such as Symmetric, Peripheral, Field or site weld, or Contour. 6 To specify the welding process, click Indication of welding process and enter the text in the box. To enclose the text in a box, check the Reference option. This indicates that the text references a table on the drawing. (Used by DIN standards) 7 Choose a Leader Anchor style. The symbol is displayed in the preview box as you select symbols and add appropriate dimensions and values. 8 To move the symbol to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. 9 Click OK.

To edit a weld symbol: Right-click the weld symbol, and select Properties. Edit as needed, and click OK. See also GOST Weld Symbol . Library Feature A library feature is a feature, or combination of features, that you create once, then save as a special type of part, for future use. Library features can contain one or more features. Most types of features are supported, some with certain restrictions. To create a new library feature: 1 In a new part file, create a base and one or more features. Dimension the features to the base if you want to use the dimensions to locate the library feature when you place it on the target part. 2 Select the features that you want to save as the library feature. To select multiple features, hold down the Ctrl key as you select. If you are including a pattern feature (linear, circular, or mirror) in the library feature, be sure to select the original feature as well as the pattern feature. Note: Library features usually consist of features built on a base feature, but not the base feature itself. If the library feature must include the Base, you may only add it to an empty part. 3 Click File, Save As.

4 In the Save As dialog box, select Lib Feat Part Files (*.sldlfp) from the Save as type list. 5 Enter a name for the part and click Save. The icon beside the part name in the FeatureManager design tree changes to the library feature icon, and each feature that is included is marked with a letter L. To create a library feature from an existing part:

1 2 3

Open the part. Select the features that you want to include in the library feature.

Click File, Save as and save as a library feature part (*.sldlfp). If the part has additional features that you did not select to include in the library feature, you may be asked if you want to simplify the library feature. To edit a library feature: In the library feature part document (.sldlfp), you can change which features are included in a library feature. To add another feature, right-click the feature to add, and select Add To Library. To remove a feature, right-click the feature, and select Remove From Library.

You can edit the individual features of a library feature after adding it to the target part. After a library feature is added to a part, there is no link between the target part and the original library feature part; if you edit one, the other does not change. See Inserting a Library Feature and Feature Palette Window Feature Palette Window The Feature Palette window gives you quick access to the parts and library features you use most often. The Feature Palette window has several default folders. Each folder contains a group of palette items, displayed as thumbnail graphics. Palette items can include parts (.sldprt files), sheet metal forming tools (.sldprt files), and library features (.sldlfp files). To display the Feature Palette window: Click Tools, Feature Palette. The palette stays open, and on top of the SolidWorks window, while you work. If the palette is displayed when you exit the SolidWorks software, it will be displayed when you start the SolidWorks software the next time. You can display the folder icons and the thumbnail graphics of palette items in two sizes. To change the size, right-click a blank area of the Feature Palette window, and select View, Large Icons or Small Icons. To dismiss the palette, click the X in the upper right corner of the Feature Palette window, or click Tools, Feature Palette again to remove the check mark from the item in the menu. To navigate in the Feature Palette window: When you display the Feature Palette window, it opens at the top level, or Palette Home. To specify the folders that appear at Palette Home, see External References. To open a folder, double-click it. The window controls include a dropdown history list of the last folders opened (up to 16), and these buttons (similar to the controls in Internet Explorer): Go Backward Back up through the list of folders Go Forward Go ahead through the list of folders Reload Refresh the palette window after changing the contents Home Return to Palette Home Related topics: Creating Palette Items Working with Palette Items (copying, deleting, and so on) Understanding Palette Features (comparison of library features and palette features) Organizing Palette Items (setting up the folders and their contents) Using the Feature Palette window:

Adding a Palette Feature to a Part Adding a Palette Part to an Assembly Applying Forming Tools to Sheet Metal Parts Using the Palette to Create a Derived Part

Sheet Metal Sheet metal parts are generally used as enclosures for components or to provide support to other components. You can design a sheet metal part on its own without any references to the parts it will enclose, or you can design the part in the context of an assembly containing the enclosed components. First you create a part of uniform thickness, then you insert the bends. You can create sheet metal parts using any of the following methods: Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Sharp Bends Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Round Bends Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Cylindrical or Conical Faces Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Rips

Auto Relief The software automatically adds relief cuts wherever needed when inserting bends if you select Use auto relief. The software supports two types of relief cuts: Rectangular Tear

If you want to automatically add Rectangular reliefs, you must specify the Relief ratio. Tear reliefs are of the minimum size required to insert the bend and flatten the part. Relief Ratio: The distance d represents the width of the Rectangular relief cut and the depth by which the side of the Rectangular relief cut extends past a bend region, expressed as a ratio of material thickness. d = (relief ratio) * (part thickness) (The shaded area represents the bend region.) The value must be between 0.05 and 2.0. The higher the value, the larger the size of the relief cut added during insertion of bends. You can edit a Rectangular relief cut to specify different width and depth dimensions. See Edit a Single Auto Relief . See also Edit All Auto Reliefs. Bends You insert bends in parts of uniform thickness to create sheet metal parts. You can insert the following types of bends: Sharp Bends

Round Bends

Bend Allowance Options Select from the following bend allowance options: Use Bend Table Use K-Factor Use Bend Allowance Creating a Sheet Metal Part Using Sharp Bends To create a sheet metal part with sharp bends: 1 2 Create a part by sketching the part profile, then extruding a thin-feature part. Click or Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends.

3 On the model, select the fixed face. The fixed face remains in place when the part is flattened. The name of the face is displayed in the Fixed edge or face box. 4 Enter the Default Bend Radius.

5 Select from the following bend allowance options: Use Bend Table , Use KFactor , or Use Bend Allowance . 6 If you select K-Factor or Bend Allowance, enter a value.

7 If you want relief cuts added automatically, make sure that Use auto relief is selected, then choose the type of relief cut. If you choose Rectangular, then you must specify a Relief ratio. Note: The options and values you specify for bend radius, bend allowance, and auto relief are shown as the default settings for the next new sheet metal part that you create. 8 Click OK.

A bent sheet-metal part is created whose dimensions in the flattened state reflect the specified bend allowance and radius values. See also Adding Walls Flatten Sheet Metal Part , Extruding Tabs on a Sheet Metal Part , and Adding Bends When Flat . Creating a Sheet Metal Part Using Round Bends To create a sheet metal part using round bends: 1 Create a thin feature part.

2 Select the Auto Fillet option in the Thin Feature tab of the Extrude Thin Feature dialog box. 3 4 Specify the Fillet Radius (inner bend radius). Click or Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends.

5 On the model, select the fixed face. The fixed face remains in place when the part is flattened. The name of the face is displayed in the Fixed edge or face box. 6 Set the Default Bend Radius to zero (0).

7 Select from the following bend allowance options: Use Bend Table , Use KFactor , or Use Bend Allowance . 8 If you select K-Factor or Bend Allowance, enter a value.

9 If you want relief cuts added automatically, make sure that Use auto relief is selected, then choose the type of relief cut. If you choose Rectangular, then you must specify a Relief ratio. Note: The options and values you specify for bend radius, bend allowance, and auto relief are shown as the default settings for the next new sheet metal part that you create. 10 Click OK.

See also Adding Walls ,Flatten Sheet Metal Part, Extruding Tabs on a Sheet Metal Part , and Adding Bends When Flat . Creating Sheet Metal Parts with Cylindrical or Conical Faces To create a sheet metal part with cylindrical or conical faces: 1 Create a thin feature part with one or more cylindrical or conical faces: Any adjacent planar and cylindrical or conical faces must be tangent.

At least one end face of any cylindrical or conical face must have at least one linear edge. 2 Click or Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends.

3 On the model, select a linear edge on an end face of a cylindrical or conical face as the fixed edge. The fixed edge remains in place when the part is flattened. The name of the edge is displayed in the Fixed edge or face box. 4 Set the Default Bend Radius to zero (0).

5 Select from the following bend allowance options: Use Bend Table , Use KFactor , or Use Bend Allowance . Note: If creating a sheet metal part with one or more conical faces, you must select KFactor as the type of bend allowance. 6 If you select K-Factor or Bend Allowance, enter a value.

7 If you want relief cuts added automatically, make sure that Use auto relief is selected, then choose the type of relief cut. If you choose Rectangular, then you must specify a Relief ratio. Note: The options and values you specify for bend radius, bend allowance, and auto relief are shown as the default settings for the next new sheet metal part that you create. 8 Click OK.

See also Adding Walls ,Flatten Sheet Metal Part, Extruding Tabs on a Sheet Metal Part , and Adding Bends When Flat . Creating Sheet Metal Parts Using Rips You can rip selected model edges of adjacent planar faces in a sheet metal part so that you can flatten the part. To create a sheet metal part using rips: 1 Create a part of uniform thickness with adjacent planar faces that form one or more linear edges or a chain of linear edges. Chained edges must be adjacent to a common planar face. 2 Click or Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends.

3 On the model, select the fixed face. The fixed face remains in place when the part is flattened. The name of the face is displayed in the Fixed edge or face box. 4 Enter the Default bend radius.

5 Select from the following bend allowance options: Use bend table , Use k-factor , or Use bend allowance . 6 If you select k-factor or bend allowance, enter a value.

7 To automatically add relief cuts wherever needed, make sure that Use auto relief is selected, then choose the type of relief cut. 8 If you choose Rectangular, then you must specify the Relief ratio. Note: The options and values you specify for bend radius, bend allowance, and auto relief are shown as the default settings for the next new sheet metal part that you create. 9 10 Click the Rip tab.

On the model, select the inside linear edges to rip. Note the arrows that appear on each selected edge. By default, rips are inserted in both directions. To insert a rip in only one direction, click the name of the edge listed under Edge selection, and click Change direction. Click Change direction again to insert the rip in the opposite direction. 11 Click OK.

Both Directions:

One Direction:

12 See also Adding Walls, Flatten Sheet Metal Part, Extruding Tabs on a Sheet Metal Part , and Adding Bends When Flat .

Adding Walls to a Sheet Metal Part Important: All walls must be in place before the Sheet-Metal feature adds the bends. It is recommended that you add all the walls as described here, before inserting bends. However, if necessary, you can rollback the model to the last feature before the SheetMetal feature to add a wall. Or, if parent-child dependencies allow, you may be able to re-order a wall before the Sheet-Metal feature. Note: You cannot add walls to cylindrical or conical faces on sheet metal parts. To add a wall to a sheet metal part: 1 Open a sketch on the face of the part where the new wall will be attached.

2 Select a linear edge of a planar face on the model to attach the wall to, and click or Tools, Sketch Tools, Convert Entities. 3 Drag the vertices near existing bends a small distance away from the bends to allow for the bend radius. 4 5 6 Click or Insert, Boss, Extrude, then set the Type to Blind and specify the Depth. On the Thin Feature tab, set the Wall Thickness to be the same as the base part. Click OK.

Click or Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends.

See also Flatten. Extruding Tabs on a Sheet Metal Part To extrude a tab on a flattened part: 1 2 3 Click a face on the flattened part and open a sketch. Sketch a profile with one side coincident with a model edge. Click or Insert, Boss, Extrude.

4 Click Link to Thickness to ensure that the boss is the same thickness as the base. 5 6 Observe the extrusion preview, and click Reverse Direction, if necessary. Click Flattened to rebuild the part.

The part rebuilds with the new feature in place. Flatten Sheet Metal Part Flattens a sheet metal part in which bends have been inserted. If you want to add features such as holes, slots, or bend reliefs to a part with bends, you must rollback the part to the flattened state and then open a sketch on the face of the part. To flatten a part with bends: Click to flatten or, in the FeatureManager design tree, drag the rollback bar above Process-Bends. The part flattens, revealing the bend lines. The software calculates the correct overall length of the flat sheet, compensating for the bend radius and bend allowance. To restore bends to the part: Click again to restore the bends or, in the FeatureManager design tree, drag the rollback bar down to the end of the FeatureManager design tree. To flatten a sheet metal part that contains features added after Process-Bends: Click to flatten. The part flattens, revealing the bend lines. The software calculates the correct overall length of the flat sheet. Click again to restore the bends. For information about making changes to the bends that you added, see Edit Bends . See also Reorder Bends and Rollback Bar. Adding Bends to a Flattened Sheet Metal Part To add bends to a flattened sheet metal part: 1 In the FeatureManager design tree, click the + sign next to a Process-Bends item to expose the Flat-Sketch item beneath it in the design tree. 2 Right-click on Flat-Sketch and select Edit Sketch.

3 Click and sketch one or more lines across the face of the part where you want to make a bend. 4 Click to close the sketch and rebuild the part.

The part rebuilds with the new bend(s) in place. Bends Across Multiple Tabs You can now sketch a single bend line to create bends on multiple tabs. To create a bend across multiple tabs: 1 In an existing sheet metal part that has several tabs, click + next to the ProcessBends feature. 2 3 4 5 Right-mouse click the sketch and select Edit Sketch. Sketch a line to define the bend across the tabs. Exit the sketch. The part bends on the sketched line, using the default radius and angle.

6 To edit the bend to give it radius and angle values suitable for a hem, right-click the FlatBend feature and select Edit Definition. 7 8 Enter new values for Radius and Angle. Click OK. The bend returns to the folded state using the new values.

Cut Across Sheet Metal Bends You can make cuts across bend lines. To cut across sheet metal bends: 1 In an existing sheet metal part, click .

2 Open a sketch on the flat face of the part and sketch a shape for the cut extrusion that extends across the bend line. 3 4 5 Click or Insert, Cut, Extrude. For the End Condition dialog box, click Link to Thickness and click OK. Click to restore the part to the folded state.

Sheet Metal Hems You can make hems of various types in sheet metal parts. SolidWorks supports open, closed, double, and tear-drop hems. To create a hem: 1 2 3 4 In an existing sheet metal part, click the + beside a Process-Bends feature. Right-mouse click the sketch and select Edit Sketch. Sketch a line to define the fold of the hem. Exit the sketch.

5 The part folds on the sketched line, using the default radius and angle. You need to edit the bend to give it radius and angle values suitable for a hem. 6 7 Right-click the FlatBend feature and select Edit Definition.

Enter new values for Radius and Angle. Note: The bend radius should allow for a small gap between overlapping faces so that they do not touch. 8 Click OK. The hem returns to the folded state using the new values.

No Bends Rolls back all bends from a sheet metal part in which bends have been inserted so that you can make additions, such as adding a wall. (All walls must be in place before the Sheet-Metal feature adds the bends.) To rollback all bends from a sheet metal part: Click to rollback the bends up to SheetMetal. The bend radius and bend allowance are rolled back. (The part is not flattened.) To restore all bends to the part: Click again to restore the bends.

Tips for Designing Sheet Metal Parts The order in which you add features is key to getting the desired results. The recommended approach for designing sheet metal parts is as follows: Design the part in the bent-up state, if possible. Add Insert, Features, Sheet Metal, Bends only after the functional design is complete; that is, add all the features before inserting bends. If some features such as bend reliefs and additional walls need to be added after inserting bends, add these features after doing a Rollback to the Process-Bends feature. This step will rollback the model to the flattened state. If you do not want certain features to be visible in the flattened state (features such as holes that are drilled after the sheet metal part is bent), add these features after the Process-Bends feature. To ensure that the part has uniform thickness, use the Link to Thickness features in the Extrude dialog box. Edit Bends You can edit bend information by using the Edit Definition option from the right-mouse menu. The scope of the changes depends upon which feature is edited. For more information, select from the following. <> Edit a single bend. <> Edit bends for an entire part. <> Edit bends listed under Flatten-Bends. <> Edit bends listed under Process-Bends. Notes: 1) You cannot change the bend angle for sharp bends because this is calculated from your model. 2) You cannot change the bend angle and radius for round bends. The bend angle is calculated from the model and the bend radius is specified in the sketch or in the fillet.

Edit Bend Definition For any individual Bend From Round, Bend From Sharp, or Bend From Flat: 1 2 3 Enter a new value for the bend Radius, or select Use Default. Enter a value for the bend Angle. Enter a value to indicate the bend Order.

Note: This number specifies the order in which the bends are made in the final fabrication of the part. The value is not used by SolidWorks, but is for your documentation purposes only. 4 Click Bend Down to reverse the direction of the bend.

5 In the Bend Allowance region, deselect Use Default if you want change the following options: Use Bend Table , Use K-Factor , or Use Bend Allowance . If you selected K-Factor or Bend Allowance, enter a value. 6 Click OK to exit the dialog and rebuild the part.

Reorder Bends You can reorder the bends in a sheet metal part in which bends have been inserted. To reorder bends in relation to each other: 1 2 Right-mouse click on Process-Bends in the FeatureManager design tree. Select Reorder Bends from the menu.

3 Click a bend name in the list box and then click the Move Up or Move Down button to move the item up or down the list, into the position you want. Repeat step 3 to move additional bends. 4 Click OK to accept the new order; click Cancel to close the dialog without reordering. Edit Auto Reliefs You can edit relief cuts in sheet metal parts. For more information, select from the following: <> Edit a single auto relief . <> Edit all auto reliefs . Note: You cannot edit relief cuts in sheet metal parts created in versions prior to SolidWorks 99. Creating Drawings of Sheet Metal Parts You can create drawings of sheet metal parts using either one of the following methods: Automatically create the flat pattern configuration of the sheet metal part when you create the drawing. Multiple collinear edges in the flat pattern configuration are merged into a single linear edge in the drawing. Manually create the flat pattern configuration of the sheet metal part, then create the drawing.

Automatic To create a drawing of a flat pattern that the software creates automatically: 5 6 7 Create a new drawing document . Click Named View or Insert, Drawing View, Named View. Change to the part window and click anywhere.

8 Select the Flat pattern view from the Drawing View Named View dialog box, and click OK. The software creates a flat pattern configuration automatically. 9 Return to the drawing window and click to place the flat pattern view. The bend lines are automatically shown in the flat pattern view; the bend region lines are not shown.

Manual To create a drawing of a flat pattern that you create manually: 1 2 3 Create a part configuration of a flat pattern. Create a new drawing document. Click Named View or Insert, Drawing View, Named View.

4 Change to the part window and click anywhere. Then select the desired view from the Drawing View Named View dialog box, and click OK. 5 Return to the drawing window and click to place the view on the sheet.

To show bend lines in flat pattern view: 1 In the drawing window, expand Drawing View in the FeatureManager design tree to show the part s Flatten-Bends and Process-Bends features. Then expand both of these features. 2 Right-click Sharp-Sketch and click Show, then right-click Flat-Sketch and click Show.

To remove the display of the bend region lines: 1 In the drawing window, right-click Drawing View in the FeatureManager design tree, or right-click the drawing view in the graphics area. 2 Select Tangent Edge, Tangent Edges Removed.

To change the configuration in the drawing view: 1 Right-click the drawing view in which you want to change the configuration, and select Properties. 2 In the Use named configuration box, select a different configuration and click OK.

Right-click the drawing view again, and select Update View, if necessary.

Creating a Sheet Metal Flat Pattern Configuration You can create a flat pattern configuration of a sheet metal part to use in a drawing. To create a flat pattern configuration: 1 2 Create and name a new part configuration. Select the last Process-Bends feature in the model and all of the features after it.

3 Click Edit, Suppress. You can also right-click the Process-Bends feature, select Properties, and select the Suppressed check box. 4 Save the part.

You should create the flat pattern configuration after the entire design of the part is completed. This ensures that all features are shown in the flat pattern. See also Sheet Metal, Creating Drawings of Sheet Metal Parts.

Forming Tools Forming tools act as dies that bend, stretch, or otherwise form sheet metal. (See Sheet Metal.) You can create forming tools using many of the same steps you use to create any SolidWorks part. You apply forming tools to sheet metal parts to create such form features as louvers, lances, flanges, and ribs. Forming tools can only be used from the Feature Palette and can only be applied to sheet metal parts. The SolidWorks software includes some sample forming tools to get you started. They are stored in this directory: install_directory\data\Palette Forming Tools\folder_name. Examine the sample forming tools before creating your own. You may find that by editing a sample forming tool, you can create a forming tool that meets your needs. See Creating Forming Tools , Applying Forming Tools to Sheet Metal Parts , and Feature Palette Window . Creating Forming Tools Forming tools act as dies that bend, stretch, or otherwise form sheet metal. (See sheet metal bends.) To create a forming tool: 1 2 Open a new part document. Open a sketch on the horizontal plane. By default, the horizontal plane is Plane2.

3 To create the base feature, sketch a profile, and extrude the profile above the horizontal plane. 4 To create the boss feature, select the bottom face of the base feature, or select the horizontal plane, and open a sketch.

The horizontal plane is the stopping surface of the forming tool. To strike and deform sheet metal using a forming tool, the direction of travel of the forming tool must be along the vertical axis. The entire forming tool must lie below the stopping surface. 5 Sketch a profile centered on the origin. The origin determines where on the sheet metal face to drop the forming tool when applying the forming tool to a sheet metal part. 6 Dimension the profile, then extrude the profile below the stopping surface. The boss can be extruded or revolved. Add features such as cuts, fillets, chamfers, and so on, to the boss to shape the forming tool. NOTE: The minimum radius of curvature of the forming tool must be greater than the thickness of the sheet metal part to which it will be applied. To find out the minimum radius of curvature of the forming tool, click Tools, Check. See Check Entity. 7 Remove the base feature of the forming tool.

TIP: To remove the base feature of the forming tool, select the bottom face of the base feature, open a sketch, and click Convert Entities . Click Extruded Cut and add a Through All cut. 8 9 10 Indicate which faces of the forming tool create openings on sheet metal parts. Create a positioning sketch, if desired. Save the part document (.sldprt).

See also Forming Tools , Adding Forming Tools to the Feature Palette , Applying Forming Tools to Sheet Metal Parts, and Organizing Palette Items . Create a Positioning Sketch for Forming Tool To edit the position of a form feature on a sheet metal part, you can create a positioning sketch on the top face of the forming tool. When you apply the forming tool to the sheet metal face, you use the positioning sketch to locate the form feature on the face of the sheet metal part. To create a positioning sketch for a forming tool: 1 2 Select the top face of the boss feature of the forming tool. Open a sketch.

3 Create a profile to locate the form feature on the sheet metal part. Close the sketch, and rename the sketch if desired. TIP: To create a profile to locate the form feature, you can select the top face of the forming tool, open a sketch, click Convert Entities , and close the sketch.

4 To hide the positioning sketch so that it does not appear in the thumbnail graphic of the forming tool displayed in the Feature Palette, right-mouse click the sketch in the FeatureManager design tree, and select Hide.

Adding Forming Tools to the Feature Palette Add a forming tool to the Feature Palette using one of these methods:

Move or copy the forming tool part document to the desired Palette Forming tools directory using Windows Explorer utilities. The default Palette forming tools directory path is install_directory\ data\Palette Forming Tools\folder_name. Click Tools, Feature Palette, then navigate to the desired forming tools folder. Drag the part icon from the FeatureManager design tree of the forming tool part, and drop it on the Feature Palette window. See also Forming Tools, Creating Forming Tools, Applying Forming Tools to Sheet Metal Parts, and Organizing Palette Items .

Applying Forming Tools to Sheet Metal Parts You can only apply forming tools through the Feature Palette window, and you can only apply forming tools to a part that has sheet metal features. You must have already inserted bends in the part before you attempt to apply a forming tool. To apply a palette forming tool to a sheet metal part: 1 With a sheet metal part open, click Tools, Feature Palette, and navigate to the folder that contains the forming tools. 2 To apply forming tools to the sheet metal part in a flattened state, drag the rollback bar above the Process-Bends feature. 3 Drag the forming tool from the Feature Palette window to the face you want to deform. The face where you apply the forming tool corresponds to the stopping surface of the tool itself. By default, the tool travels downward. The material is deformed when the tool strikes the face where it is dropped. To toggle the direction of travel, and strike the opposite side of the material, press the Tab key. Observe the preview as you toggle the direction. 4 Drop the feature where you want it to be applied. If the forming tool includes an optional positioning sketch, that sketch is displayed when you drop the tool on the face. 5 Use Dimension or Modify Sketch to position the feature. As you add dimensions, the positioning sketch moves as a single entity. The absorbed sketch in the feature controls only the location of the feature, not its dimensions. See Dimension Access for information about changing the dimensions of a forming tool after applying it. 6 Click Finish. The forming tool is applied to the face, and the feature is added to the FeatureManager design tree, with the name of the forming tool. For more information about creating sheet metal parts, see Sheet Metal. See also Forming Tools and Creating Forming Tools . Weld Bead Adds a weld bead to components. To add a weld bead to components in an assembly: 1 2 Mate the components. Click Insert, Assembly Feature, Weld Bead.

3 In the Weld Bead Type dialog box, select the desired weld bead type from the list. Notice the symbol and the illustration for the selected type. (See either Weld Bead Types - ISO or Weld Bead Types - ANSI .) 4 Click Next.

5 6

In the Weld Bead Surface dialog box: In the Surface Shape box, select the desired surface shape. In the Top Surface Delta box, enter the desired top surface delta. If you selected Backing Run type, enter the Bottom Surface Delta . If you selected Fillet type, enter the Radius of the weld. Click Next.

7 In the Weld Bead Mate Surfaces dialog box, select faces as follows: (required selections depend on the Weld Bead Type you chose.) Click in the Contact Faces box. Select the faces of the components where you want the weld bead to be added. Click in the Stop Faces box. Select the faces (usually four faces) where you want the weld bead to start and stop. Click in the Top Faces box. Select the faces from which to measure the Top Surface Delta . 8 Click Next.

9 In the Weld Bead Part dialog box, accept the default weld bead part name (bead1.sldprt, for example) or rename the part as desired. Click Browse if you want to save the weld bead part to a different directory. 10 Click Finish. The new bead component is created and added to the assembly.

To change the weld bead parameters: 1 2 3 Expand the bead component in the FeatureManager design tree. Right-click the Weld Bead feature and select Edit Definition. Repeat Steps 3 through 10 making changes as desired.

Weld symbols are automatically generated by the system when you create a weld bead. See Weld Symbols . Weld Bead Types - ISO You can add a variety of weld bead types to an assembly. Weld Type Illustration Butt Square Butt Single V Butt Single Bevel Butt Single V Butt with Root Single Bevel with Root Single U Butt Single J Butt Backing Run Fillet Seam Weld Bead Types ANSI You can add a variety of weld bead types to an assembly. Weld Type Illustration

Square Scarf V Groove Bevel U Groove J Groove Flare-V Flare-Bevel Fillet Seam Back or Backing Flange-Edge Flange-Corner Weld Symbols When you create a weld bead in an assembly, a weld symbol is created automatically on the Weld Bead component, representing the parameters you specified. You can edit this symbol to add more information to it. You can also construct weld symbols independently in any SolidWorks document. You can add multiple leaders to the symbol. To create a weld symbol: 1 2 3 Click an edge on the part or assembly where you want to indicate a welded joint. Click or Insert, Annotations, Weld Symbol. In the Dimension boxes, enter the values for the weld dimensions.

4 Click the Weld Symbol button and select a symbol type from the list of standard symbols. 5 Choose other options as needed, such as Symmetric, Peripheral, Field or site weld, or Contour. 6 To specify the welding process, click Indication of welding process and enter the text in the box. To enclose the text in a box, check the Reference option. This indicates that the text references a table on the drawing. (Used by DIN standards) 7 Choose a Leader Anchor style. The symbol is displayed in the preview box as you select symbols and add appropriate dimensions and values. 8 To move the symbol to a different layer, select the name of the layer under Layer. 9 Click OK.

To edit a weld symbol: Right-click the weld symbol, and select Properties. Edit as needed, and click OK. See also GOST Weld Symbol . SolidWorks API The SolidWorks API is an OLE programming interface to SolidWorks. The API contains hundreds of functions that can be called from Visual Basic, VBA (Excel, Access, and so forth), C, C++, or SolidWorks macro files. These functions provide the programmer with direct access to SolidWorks functionality such as creating a line, extruding a boss, or verifying the parameters of a surface. For a detailed description of the API and the syntax used to call each function, please refer to the API online help file. This help file, API_HELP.HLP is located in the ..\SAMPLES\APPCOMM\ subdirectory of your SolidWorks installation. Also included in

the ..\SAMPLES subdirectory are several Visual Basic and C++ example projects. Feel free to use these projects as a reference or as a starting point for your own applications. You can also find a detailed description of the API functions on the SolidWorks web page (www.solidworks.com) under the Technical Support area. Microsoft Office Compatible SolidWorks is a Microsoft Office Compatible product. This means that the SolidWorks toolbars, menus, and accelerator keys are similar to the ones used by the Microsoft Office suite of applications, including Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and PowerPoint. If you already know how to use Microsoft Office, you will find that you already know how to do many of the similar tasks in SolidWorks. SolidWorks and Microsoft hope that these many similarities will make it easier for you to use our products together and with other Microsoft Compatible products. Look for the Microsoft Office Compatible logo when you select new software to purchase. For more information about the Microsoft Office Compatible program, and for a complete list of Microsoft Office Compatible products, in the United States, call Microsoft Customer Service at 1-800-426-9400 - or outside the United States, contact your local Microsoft office. See also: <> SolidWorks and Microsoft Office Compatible Features <> SolidWorks Interaction with Microsoft Office SolidWorks and Microsoft Office Compatible Features The following are some of the many SolidWorks features that are compatible with Microsoft Office: Toolbars and Menus SolidWorks has toolbars that are similar to Microsoft Office toolbars, containing many of the same functions and arranged in the same order. The toolbar buttons graphically describe the task they are associated with. For example, you can click the pair of scissors to cut a region of selected text. The SolidWorks toolbars provide Tooltips. When you pause your mouse cursor over a toolbar button, a small note pops up to identify the button. If you wish to disable Tooltips, click View, Customize and uncheck the Show Tooltips option on the Toolbars tab. You can customize your toolbars, menus, and keyboard by selecting Customize from the Tools pull-down menu. You can move and hide the SolidWorks toolbars in the same ways that you can move and hide the toolbars in many Microsoft Office products. Additional Features SolidWorks uses drag and drop action with the mouse cursor, as well as dragging to change the size of both windows and sketch entities. You can choose how you want to view your open documents by tiling or cascading windows, as with other Windows compatible products. SolidWorks Interaction with Microsoft Office SolidWorks interacts with Microsoft Office tools: Using Microsofts OLE, you can link or embed SolidWorks part, assembly, or drawing documents in Microsoft products such as Word, Microsoft Excel, and PowerPoint.

You can use Microsoft products such as Microsoft Excel to insert data into SolidWorks documents. You can send SolidWorks part, assembly, or drawing documents over the network using Microsoft s mail application, as well as other Microsoft Office compatible mail products. Object Embeds an OLE object from another program into the active document. You can either open another program from within SolidWorks and create a new object or insert an existing file. To create a new OLE Object: 1 2 Click Insert, Object. Click Create New.

3 In the Object Type box, click the type of document you want to create (for example, Microsoft Excel Worksheet.) Only documents from OLE-compliant applications that are installed on your computer appear in the list. 4 Select the Display as Icon check box if you want the new object to appear as an icon in your document. 5 Click OK. A new document will appear inside your active document. The toolbars and menus for this new document will appear in place of the SolidWorks toolbars and menus. (If you chose Display as Icon, an icon will appear in your SolidWorks document, and the parent application will open in another window.) 6 Edit the object as though you were working in the parent application.

7 When you are finished editing, click in the SolidWorks document window anywhere outside the embedded object. The SolidWorks toolbars and menus will become available again. (If you chose Display as Icon, click File, Close or File, Close and Return in the parent application.) To insert an existing file as an OLE object: 1 2 3 Click Insert, Object. Click Create from File. Click Browse, locate the file you want to insert, and click Open.

4 Select the Display as Icon check box if you want the new object to appear as an icon in your document. 5 By default, the contents of the file are saved as part of your SolidWorks document. Select the Link check box if you want to insert a picture of the file contents into your SolidWorks document. The picture will be linked to the original document, and changes made to the original file will be reflected in your document. To change the display of the OLE object, click Edit, Display as Icon , Display Content , or Reset Size . To delete an OLE object, select the object and click Edit, Delete, or press the Delete key. You can undo the deletion of any OLE object that is inserted into a SolidWorks drawing, assembly, or part document. Press or click Edit, Undo Delete. Object Linking vs. Embedding When using OLE, you can link or embed files.

Linking Files When you link a file: The file remains in its original location. Anything you change in the original file affects all the files to which it is linked.

When you double-click on a SolidWorks image in a Word document, the SolidWorks application launches allowing you to edit the original file (if you have SolidWorks installed on your PC). For example, if you edit a SolidWorks assembly document that is linked to several Microsoft Word documents, the changes you make are reflected in both the original SolidWorks file and all the Word documents. Embedding Files When you embed one file in another: The original file becomes part of the file in which you embedded it.

Any changes you make to the embedded SolidWorks document affect only that document. Likewise, any changes you make to the original SolidWorks file do not affect the document embedded in the Word file. If you embed a SolidWorks document in a Word document, and if the SolidWorks application is loaded on the PC, double-clicking the image on the Word document page opens the SolidWorks application with the document active. Embedding is useful if you want discrete control over the data. OLE Object Property Lets you specify the size and scale of the OLE object inserted in a SolidWorks document. To set the size or scale of an OLE object: 1 Right-click the OLE object in the document and select Properties.

2 Type a decimal value for the Width, Height, or Scale into the corresponding boxes. 3 Click OK.

ACIS Files You can export or import SolidWorks part or assembly documents to ACIS files. ACIS files are designated by .sat at the end of the file name. For import, if the units of measure are not explicitly specified in the ACIS file, a dialog box gives you the opportunity to specify the units. Files created in earlier versions of the ACIS modeler do not contain information about the units of measure.

To edit an imported ACIS document, see Edit Imported Features. To export an ACIS file, see Save As. To import an ACIS file, see Open.

To import an ACIS surface, see Imported Surface. To set the ACIS export options, see Export. To set the ACIS import options, see Import.

DXF/DWG Files You can export SolidWorks drawing documents to a DXF or DWG file. The sheet scale of the drawing is used for the new file. If you use DXF/DWG Mapping, entities are mapped according to the layer definitions from the Map Entities tab. Entities that are not mapped go to layer 0. If you do not use DXF/DWG Mapping, entities are mapped according to the layers in the drawing for entities that are assigned to a layer. All other entities go to layer 0. You can import a DXF or DWG file to either a part or drawing document. In a drawing document, you can import the geometry to the drawing sheet or the drawing template.

To attach dimensions to the imported DXF/DWG geometry, see Attach Dimensions. To export a DXF/DWG file, see Save As. To import a DXF/DWG file, see Open DXF/DWG File. To insert the DXF/DWG entities from a drawing document into a sketch in a part document, see Sketch from Drawing To map selected entities to different layers or colors, see DXF/DWG Mapping. To set the DXF/DWG export options, see.DXF/DWG Export Options .

IGES Files You can export part and assembly documents to IGES format. Parts and surfaces exported to IGES format retain their part or surface color and display in color when in Shaded mode. You can import IGES files to part or assembly documents. You can import surface and wireframe geometry. If there is wireframe geometry in the file, the SolidWorks software reads the IGES data and forms curves for the IGES wireframe entities. The 2D geometry on the XY plane is imported into a sketch rather than imported as reference curves.

To edit an imported IGES document, see Edit Imported Features. To export an IGES file, see Save As. To import an IGES file, see Open. To import an IGES surface, see Imported Surface. To set the IGES export options, see IGES Export Options.

To set the IGES import options, see Import.

Parasolid Files You can export SolidWorks part or assembly documents to Parasolid text files or binary files. Binary files are smaller than text files, but binary files are not supported in some target applications. Select the type supported by the target application. You can import Parasolid files to part or assembly documents. Some other systems use the .xmt_txt extension for Parasolid text files and the .xmt_bin extension for Parasolid binary files. Rename the extension to .x_t or .x_b prior to import. Data exported to or imported from Parasolid format retains its color when displayed in Shaded mode. Component names in assemblies are retained for both import and export. Curve or point data is not supported for import or export.

To export a Parasolid file, see Save As. To import a Parasolid file, see Open. To set the Parasolid export options, see Export. STEP Files You can export or import SolidWorks part or assembly documents to STEP files. STEP Application Protocol AP203, Conformance Class 6, is supported for export. STEP Application Protocol AP203 is supported for import.

- Conformance Classes 1, 4, 5, and 6 of AP203 are fully supported. - Conformance Class 2 of AP203 is partially supported. STEP Application Protocol AP214 is supported for import only.

- Only the body geometry and topology information is imported from an AP214 STEP file. The remaining AP214 information in the STEP file is discarded. You can import design configuration data for a part or assembly document from a STEP file. The configuration data is stored in the part's or assembly's custom properties. To view the custom properties, click File, Properties.

To edit an imported STEP document, see Edit Imported Features. To export a STEP file, see Save As. To import a STEP file, see Open. To import a STEP surface, see Imported Surface. To set the STEP import options, see Import.

STL Files The STL file format is intended for transfer to rapid prototyping machines. You can export SolidWorks part or assembly documents to STL format.

The SolidWorks software cannot import STL files.

To export a STL file, see Save As. To set the STL export options, see STL.

TIFF Files You can save any SolidWorks document as a TIFF image.

You can import a TIFF image and use it as the background of a part or assembly document.

To export a TIFF file, see Save As. To import a TIFF file, see Open. To insert, delete, replace or toggle the display of a TIFF image, see Picture. To set the TIFF export options, see TIFF.

VDAFS Files You can export or import SolidWorks part documents to VDAFS files.

To edit an imported VDAFS document, see Edit Imported Features. To export a VDAFS file, see Save As. To import a VDAFS file, see Open. To import a VDAFS surface, see Imported Surface. To set the VDAFS import options, see Import.

VRML Files You can export or import SolidWorks part or assembly documents to VRML files. VRML files are primarily intended for displaying 3D graphics over the Internet. The import of a VRML file is intended as a last resort for importing data into the SolidWorks software. When you save a SolidWorks document as a VRML file (.wrl), the View Section option is taken into account. If View Section is on, only the visible geometry is output to the .wrl file. Appropriately, this is different from the way the software behaves when you save to an IGES, STEP, Parasolid, or ACIS file. To edit an imported VRML document, see Edit Imported Features. To export a VRML file, see Save As. To import a VRML file, see Open.

To import a VRML surface, see Imported Surface. To set the VRML export options, see Export. Import File Types You can import files to SolidWorks using a number of formats from other applications. Use the File, Open function from the main menu to open the file into SolidWorks. You can import part documents using: IGES (.igs, .iges) Parasolid text files (.x_t) ACIS (.sat) STEP AP203/214* (.step, .stp) DXF (.dxf) DWG (.dwg) VRML (.wrl) You can import assembly documents using: IGES (.igs, .iges) Parasolid text files (.x_t) ACIS (.sat) STEP AP203/214* (.step, .stp) You can import drawing documents using: DXF (.dxf) DWG (.dwg) Parasolid binary files (.x_b) VDAFS (.vda)

Parasolid binary files (.x_b) VRML (wrl)

*Note: SolidWorks only imports the body geometry and topology information from an AP214 STEP file. The remaining AP214 information in the file is discarded. See also Open . Import Diagnosis You can diagnose and repair any gaps or bad faces on imported features. Use import diagnosis when you have: an imported solid body that has rebuild errors. an imported surface that was not able to knit into a solid body.

To run an import diagnosis and to repair an imported feature: 1 Right-click the Imported feature in the FeatureManager design tree, and select Import Diagnosis. The Import Diagnosis dialog box appears. 2 Under Gaps, any existing gaps and gap edges are listed.

Click Gap or Gap edge, then click Previous or Next to view the gaps or gap edges. Click Close All Gaps to repair the gaps.

If all of the gaps are closed, "No gap found," appears in the dialog box. 3 Under Faces, any existing bad faces are listed. Select a face in the list to highlight the face in the graphics area. Click Remove Faces to remove the bad faces and to create gaps in the feature. Click Fix Faces to fix the bad faces.

If all of the bad faces are repaired, "No bad faces found," appears in the dialog box. 4 Click OK.

Import

Specifies the default response to make when importing files of other formats. The import options only affect the surface-based translators: IGES, ACIS, STEP, and VDAFS. To set options for importing files: 1 2 3 Click File, Open. In the Files of type list, click the desired format. Click Options. The Import Options dialog box appears.

4 Error resolution. Select the default method that you want the software to use to resolve problems. The solutions for Surface Errors, Surface Flaws , and Significant Digits (IGES import only) are: Prompt (ask for a solution each time a problem occurs) Try to knit into solid Try to form reference surfaces Cancel operation

The solutions for Blanked Surfaces (IGES import only) are: NOTE: Surface errors occur when a surface cannot be imported. Surface flaws occur when a surface can be imported but has some sort of defect. Significant digits problems occur when the data contains low precision data. Blanked surfaces are invisible surfaces included in a file, typically for reference purposes. 5 Try forming solid model(s) from surfaces. When the check box is cleared, surfaces are automatically grouped into one or more reference surfaces (named Surface 1, 2, ). 6 After you select the default responses, click OK. Prompt Ignore blanked surfaces Do NOT ignore blanked surfaces Cancel operation

See also Import File Types for a list of import types available for part, assembly, and drawing documents. Open Opens an existing part, drawing, or assembly document. Also used to import files from other applications. To open an existing file: 1 Click or File, Open, or press Ctrl-O.

2 In the Open dialog box, browse to find the part, drawing, or assembly document, or the file from another application, that you want to open. 3 Click Open as read-only if you do not want to change or save the part.

4 Click Preview if you want to view the SolidWorks part, assembly, or drawing document without opening it. 5 Click Configure to open a specific configuration of a part or assembly.

6 Click References to see a list of the part and/or assembly documents referenced by the currently selected part, assembly or drawing. You can edit the locations of the listed files. 7 Click View-Only to open the part document only for viewing. (Only documents saved in SolidWorks 98 and later may be opened in View-Only mode.) If you are in a part or assembly document, you can change to editing mode by pressing the rightmouse button in the graphics area and selecting Edit. 8 Click Open to open the document; click Cancel to exit without opening a file.

Note: If you have changed the file extensions of part or assembly files referenced by assembly or drawing documents, the SolidWorks Open function will search for the renamed files when opening the assemblies or drawings. Part and assembly files changed from .prt or .asm to .sldprt or .sldasm respectively will open automatically without prompting. Note that the software will not search for files renamed to .prt or .asm extensions if .sldprt or .sldasm files are referenced by the assembly or drawing documents. You can open existing SolidWorks files or you can select other file types to import into SolidWorks. See also: Import File Types ACIS Files IGES Files STEP Files TIFF Files VRML Files Save As Saves the active document to disk with a new name or saves it in a different format for export to another application. To save a document with a new filename or format: 1 2 Click File, Save as. The Save as dialog box appears. Type the new filename. Open DXF/DWG File

DXF/DWG Files Parasolid Files STL Files VDAFS Files

3 Click Save as copy to save the document to a new filename without replacing the name in the active session. Documents that reference the active document will continue to reference the original file. 4 list. To save the file in another file format, select a format from the Save as file type Part Documents: You can save parts as: SolidWorks part files (.sldprt) ACISTM files (.sat) IGES files (.igs) STEP AP203 files (.step) Parasolid Text files (.x_t) TIFF files (.tif) Parasolid Binary files (.x_b) VRML files (.wrl) STL files (.stl) VDAFS files (.vda) Library Feature Parts (.sldlfp) Assembly Documents: You can save assemblies as:

SolidWorks assembly files (.sldasm) ACISTM files (.sat) Parasolid Text files (.x_t) STEP AP203 files (.step) Parasolid Binary files (.x_b) TIFF files (.tif) STL files (.stl) VRML files (.wrl) IGES files (.igs) Drawing Documents: You can save drawings as: SolidWorks drawing files (.slddrw) TIFF files (.tif) DWG files (.dwg) See also Export File Types Export Specifies how SolidWorks files are translated for export. See Export File Types for a list of export format types available for part, assembly and drawing documents. To set options for exporting files: 1 2 Click File, Save As. Select from the options on the Save As dialog box, or click Options. DXF files (.dxf)

For more information, see IGES Export Options, DXF/DWG Export Options, STL Export Options, or TIFF Export Options. Parasolid (.x_t, .x_b) Version. Select the type supported by the target system: .x_t, or x_b.

Flatten Assembly Hierarchy. . Select this check box to flatten the assembly to one level of only part bodies. A flattened file contains a top-level assembly and a series of parts that contain imported features. ACIS (.sat) Version. Select the type supported by the target system. Units. Select the default units of measure to use for ACIS files.

VRML (.wrl) Save all components of an assembly in a single file. Select this option to include each assembly and sub-assembly component in one file. See also Save As for more information about saving SolidWorks documents to other file formats. Export File Types You can export SolidWorks files to a number of formats for use with other applications. Use the File, Save As function from the main menu to save the active document to disk with a different format. You can save part documents as: IGES (.igs) Parasolid text files (.x_t) Parasolid binary files (.x_b) STL (.stl) ACIS (.sat) STEP AP203 (.step) TIFF (.tif) VRML (.wrl) VDAFS (.vda) You can save assembly documents as: IGES (.igs) Parasolid text files (.x_t) Parasolid binary files (.x_b) STL (.stl) ACIS (.sat) STEP AP203 (.step) TIFF (.tif) VRML (.wrl) You can save drawing documents as: DXF (.dxf) DWG (.dwg) TIFF (.tif)