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Into The Future

Becoming A 21st Century Learning System

Hoke County Schools

High School Planning Guide 2013-2014

DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT

Hoke County Schools Becoming a 21st Century Learning System

Dr. Freddie Williamson Superintendent

Hoke County Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, religion, national origin, socioeconomic status, disability, age, or marital status.

TABLE OF CONTENT
GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 3 High School Registration ....................................................................................................... 4 Steps for Using the Planning Guide ....................................................................................... 5 COURSE REQUIREMENTS Graduation Requirements Checklist ....................................................................................... 6 NC Career and College Promise ............................................................................................ 12 Advanced Placement Program ............................................................................................... 16 Special Recognition Graduation Requirements/Honor Graduates........................................... 20 NC Scholars Program ............................................................................................................ 21 Hoke County Schools Graduation Requirements ................................................................... 22 Credit Recovery/NC Virtual Public School ............................................................................ 23 Grading Policy ...................................................................................................................... 24 OTHER INFORMATION NC Athletic Association Requirements .................................................................................. 27 Co-Curricular Activities and Athletics ................................................................................... 28 Attendance Policy ................................................................................................................. 29 Checklist for Career and College Readiness ........................................................................... 32 NC Career Clusters ................................................................................................................ 35 HIGH SCHOOL OPTIONS Hoke County High School ..................................................................................................... 55 Turlington Alternative School ............................................................................................... 56 SandHoke Early College High School ................................................................................... 62 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS English .................................................................................................................................. 68 Foreign Language .................................................................................................................. 75 Mathematics .......................................................................................................................... 79 Science .................................................................................................................................. 84 Social Studies ........................................................................................................................ 89 Fine Arts ............................................................................................................................... 97 Career-Technical Education.................................................................................................. 107 Health & Physical Education ................................................................................................ 129 JROTC ................................................................................................................................. 133 Exceptional Education.. ................................................................... .139 Special Course Offerings .................................................................................................... 151

INTRODUCTION
The Hoke County High Schools Mission Statement is All Hoke County Schools students will graduate from high school globally competitive for the world and post-secondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century. Our mission embraces the definition of College and Career Readiness as defined by ACT, Inc. College and Career Readiness is the acquisition of the knowledge and skills a student needs to enroll in and succeed in credit-bearing first-year courses at a postsecondary institution (such as a two- or four-year college, trade school, or technical school) without the need for remediation. Remediation means that a student may be required by a college to take courses to acquire skills that he or she should have learned in high school. We are proud to implement Governor Purdues Career and College Pro mise Program, College Readiness Assessments (EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT and WorkKeys), Advanced Placement opportunities, the 3Rs; Rigor, Relevance, Relationships and more. The planning guide will provide you with a comprehensive menu of information that is needed to prepare you for high school and beyond. We are excited that you are moving into the most rewarding experience of your educational career. For the next four to five years, you will attend one of our high schools. Our school system offers three different choices: Hoke County High School, Turlington Alternative School and SandHoke Early College. High School is the next step of preparing you for your future career. The high school experience will provide you with an opportunity to select rigorous academic courses, to experience job readiness skills and to develop peer and adult relationships. Our administration and staff are looking forward to teaching and equipping you with the necessary skills to become productive citizens in the 21st Century. The choices you make will impact your future education and future job opportunities. This planning guide is designed to help you, the student, plan your program of study from the variety of courses offered at Hoke County High Schools. Regardless of whether you plan to pursue a college degree, attend technical school, join the military, enter an apprenticeship program or join the workforce immediately after high school, the courses you choose in high school will have a definite impact upon your success once you graduate. Ask for assistance from parents, counselors and teachers as you consider the various options. They can be very helpful to you so that you make the most of your high school years. Please take time to review the curriculum guide, and depending upon your post-high school goal(s), chart the courses you might possibly need to take during all four years of high school. For those of you who will be in the 10th, 11th, or 12th grade next year, its not too late to plan your remaining time. But , do it now! For those of you who are entering 9th grade now is the perfect time to plan ahead. Do you need help in making a decision? Talk to your parents, counselors, teachers and other adults who work in various occupations. Explore these online resources www.careercruising.com, http://www.f4k.org/ and www.CFNC.org. If you have not completed the interest inventory and a learning style assessment in Career Cruising, please make plans to do so within the next five days. The more knowledge you have of options, the better planning you can do. Sounds like a lot of work. Maybe, but the payoff is having a better idea of where you might be headed and how to get there. It can be fun too! Were glad you are a student in the Hoke County School System. Please let us know how we can assist you. For general guidelines, you may contact the school counselor.

HIGH SCHOOL REGISTRATION

The Hoke County Schools Planning Guide contains information needed for you to register for high school. It is designed to help you and your parents or your guardians make the best choices for your high school education. You will find several exciting options for you as a high school student in the guide. Please read it carefully with your parents or your guardians. Beginning in the spring semester, counselors and teachers will assist students in the selection of courses for the following year. Parents are encouraged to contact their childs counselor to assist in this process. Students may select courses from: English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Fine Arts, Career Technical Education, Health and Physical Education, Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) and Exceptional Education. Following completion of registration and development of the master schedule, parents will be provided with a copy of the courses selected by the student. Please note that courses will only be available if enrollment is sufficient. If any course is cancelled, students will be notified and an alternate course scheduled. The administration has designated June 28, 2013 as the last date for adding or dropping courses. There will be absolutely no changes after this date, unless initiated by the counselor or principal for the following reasons: 1. The student failed a pre-requisite for the course, or 2. The student needs the course to complete graduation requirements, or 3. The student has taken and successfully completed the course. Students must complete all courses, credits and test requirements of at least one Course of Study to earn a high school diploma. The Courses of Study are designed to prepare students for postsecondary opportunities from entry-level career options to highly technical fields, from community colleges to colleges and universities. Students are encouraged to pursue the most challenging Course of Study in which they can be successful.

ONLINE REGISTRATION
The Online Registration Tool known as the Course Planner Module is a feature within the Futures for Kids Program. Futures for Kids (F4K) is an online tool that allows the student a safe and fun way to explore and find careers that match their unique interest and abilities. The website features online mentoring, interactive career counseling, newsletters, skill and career matching support. It links to a wide assortment of educational opportunities and powerful search engines to help students and their families easily navigate the information and make good decisions. Freshman through juniors must schedule a minimum of eight courses. Students may register for eight courses, including P.E., to take advantage of the numerous course offerings at Hoke County High School and to better prepare for the future. Students who move into the district must complete the enrollment process at the school. The parent must accompany the student at the time of enrollment. Proof of residency, health record, and birth certificate will be required. Official record can be brought by the parent at the time of enrollment or requested by the registrar. Until this information is received, a student will not be officially enrolled in Hoke County High School.

STEPS FOR USING THIS PLANNING GUIDE

Review North Carolina Course and Credit Requirements Checklist on pages 6 11 to determine the courses needed to meet the minimum promotion and graduation requirements. Read the NC Career Clusters sections beginning on page 35. Select courses based on the list of offerings at your school and the descriptions of those offerings beginning on page 66. Consult with school counselors and other school personnel for assistance and answers to questions. Have your parents or guardians double check your selections to make sure you have registered for the courses you need in order to meet graduation and college/university requirements. Sign all registration documents and ask your parents or guardians to do the same.

HOKE COUNTY
PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM

HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

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HOKE COUNTY SCHOOLS WILL CONTINUE THE STANDARD AS A LOCAL POLICY THAT STUDENTS SCORE A LEVEL III OR ABOVE ON EOG AND EOC TESTS (OR MSL) AS ONE MEASURE IN DETERMINING PROMOTION FROM ONE GRADE LEVEL TO ANOTHER OR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

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All students, no matter where they live, must graduate with the skills they need for a career, two-or four-year college or technical training. Gov. Bev Perdue

Gov. Perdues Career & College Promise


In todays global economy, successful careers could require a two - or four-year degree, a diploma or a nationally-recognized job credential. Gov. Bev Perdues Career & College Promise offers North Carolina high school age students a clear, focused and affordable path to future success. Qualified North Carolina high-school age students can begin their two- or four-year college work, tuition free, while they are in high school allowing them to get a head start on their workplace and college preparation. The program is free to all students who maintain a B average and meet other eligibility requirements. Career & College Promise provides three pathways to help advance eligible students post high school success: College Transfer Earn tuition-free course credits toward a four-year degree through North Carolinas community colleges. Students who complete a 44 -hour credit program will be able to transfer all of their credit to all UNC institutions and many of NCs Independent Colleges and Universities. Technical Career Earn tuition-free course credits at an NC Community College toward an entry-level job credential, certificate or diploma in a technical career. Innovative High Schools (limited availability) Begin earning tuition-free college credits as a high-school freshman by attending a Cooperative Innovative High School. For more information, visit www.careercollegenc.org.

http://www.careercollegenc.org/docs/CareerCollegePromise.pdf

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Career & College Promise Pathway Descriptions and Eligibility Requirements


College Transfer Pathway Career Technical Education Pathway Earn tuition-free course credits at an NC Community College toward an entry-level job credential, certificate or diploma in a technical career. Includes applied academic skills needed for workplace success. Cooperative Innovative High School Pathway Provides innovative educational opportunities for students in grades 9-12 Emphasis on first-generation college students Enables students to complete a high school diploma and two years of college credit in four-to-five years Prepares students for future learning in the workplace or in higher education

Earn college transfer credits that transfer seamlessly to any public or participating private college or university (Students must complete 44 hours to ensure credit transfer). Reduced cost for a two- or four-year degree. Accelerated completion of a diploma, associate degree or four-year degree. Develops skills for success at the next level.

Eligibility: Be a high school junior or senior as of January 2012 or later. Enter the program with a weighted 3.0 GPA and maintain a 2.0 on college coursework after completing two courses. Continue to make progress toward high school graduation. Demonstrate college readiness I English, reading and mathematics on an approved assessment or placement test (visit careercollegenc.org for details). Select a program of study.

Eligibility: Be a high school junior or senior as of January 2012 or later. Enter the program with a weighted 3.0 GPA (or have a principals recommendation) and maintain a 2.0 on college coursework after completing two courses. Continue to make progress toward high school graduation. Demonstrate career and college readiness through career pathway prerequisites. Take PLAN assessment while in grade 10. Select a program of study.

Eligibility: Be a high school student in grades 9 to 12 with access to a cooperative innovative high school approved by the State Board of Education. Meet the eligibility requirements established by the local board of education and higher education partner as required in GS Chapter 115C-238.50

http://www.careercollegenc.org/docs/CareerCollegePromise.pdf

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How to apply for NC Career & College Promise Program


Contact your school counselor about applying for Career & College Promise during your usual course registration time Document eligibility with your school counselor o Grade Point Average o Prerequisites Complete College Application Include your Career & College Promise course selections on your high school's course selection process Eligible students must take the Career & College Promise courses as a pair. The courses are offered on alternate days College Transfer Pathway Who is eligible? High school juniors and seniors as of January 2012 or later Students with at least a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 weighted scale Students who have demonstrated college readiness on an approved assessment or placement test College Readiness Benchmarks on Diagnostic Assessment Tests COMPASS Asset Test PLAN PSAT (NCCCS Cut (NCCCS Cut Score) Score) English Reading 15 17 49 50 50 41 Writing 41 Reading 41 Numerical Skills and 41 Int. Algebra 70 Writing 81 Reading

Accuplacer (NCCCS Cut Score) 86 Sentence Skills 80 Reading

Mathematics 19

47 Pre-Algebra and 55 Arithmetic and 75 66 Algebra Elem. Algebra

In addition to the diagnostic assessments, colleges may use the following SAT and ACT scores as benchmarks for college readiness: SAT Mathematics Critical Reading Writing 500 500 500 Mathematics Reading English ACT 22 21 18

Technical Career Pathway Who is eligible? High school juniors and seniors as of January 2012 and later Students interested in pursuing one of the 16 high school Career and Technical Education career clusters Students with at least a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 weighted scale OR upon principal recommendation Students who have demonstrated college readiness by meeting course prerequisites http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ccpromise/students/apply/ 14

Cooperative Innovative High School Who is eligible? High school students in grades 9 to 12 with access to an approved cooperative innovative high school Special emphasis and preference given to first-generation college students Additional eligibility requirements set by local board of education and partner community college or university

http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ccpromise/students/apply/

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HOKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM EXPECTATIONS Advanced Placement Courses Expectations and Student Accountability
Congratulations for considering the challenges and opportunities that Advanced Placement (AP) courses offer. Research has shown that students who participate in AP courses outperform others in college, particularly in grades and graduation rates. Hoke County Schools believes that all children deserve access to the rigor of advanced coursework and can be successful with the appropriate support. The purpose of this document is to better prepare students and parents for AP courses. We want to provide our students and parents with information to assist them in determining which AP courses will be most beneficial for the student.

'If you can change your mind, you can change the world.'
Joey Reimer

Why Take Advanced Placement Courses? Taking the College Challenge with the AP Program:
AP courses are comparable to first-year college-level courses in a wide variety of subject areas that students can take while still in high school. AP courses are usually more demanding than regular high school courses. They are not easy, but they arent impossible either. They offer students challenging course work and a taste of what college classes are like. Research consistently shows that students who score a 3 or higher on an AP Exam typically experience greater academic success and increased college graduation rates than students who do not take AP courses.

What the AP Program can do for You:


Confidence AP courses help students develop better study habits, improve writing skills and sharpen problem-solving skills giving students the confidence to tackle academic challenges they can expect in college. Credit Most four-year colleges in the United States and colleges in more than 60 other countries give students credit, advanced placement or both on the basis of AP Exam scores. By entering college with AP credits, students will have the opportunity to move into upper level courses, pursue a double-major or study abroad.

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College Success Research consistently shows that students who are successful in AP courses typically experience greater academic success in college. Scholarships Taking AP courses increases a students eligibility for scholarships. Thirty-five (35) percent of colleges and universities consider a students AP experience when making decisions about which students will receive scholarships. College Admission Eighty-five (85) percent of selective colleges and universities report that a students AP experience favorably impacts admissions decisions.

Expectations of AP Courses
Intense reading and writing assignments Additional research and study necessary to analyze all the material covered in the course Students desire and ability to work independently and strive to reach his or her highest academic and intellectual levels Engagement in the study of subject matter beyond just learning facts; in-depth analysis and synthesis of material is required Requirement that students take the AP test at the end of the year with the expectation the exam will be taken seriously Listed below are specific subject area course expectations that students will be required to meet:

English read and respond to works of fiction and non-fiction analytically and critically; develop a writing voice with an understanding of audience and purpose; read and analyze texts from various genres Global Studies construct a logical historical argument; read, analyze, and interpret primary resources; develop a historical perspective in both written and verbal format; understand and explain the reasons for different points of view Math problem-solve; demonstrate abstract and analytical reasoning; use logic, inductive, and deductive reasoning to draw conclusions and solve problems; translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric, tabular, and verbal representations of functions and relations Sciences demonstrate an analytical approach to material; design and conduct scientific investigations and produce high-level lab reports

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AP Exams At the conclusion of an AP course, students will be required to take the corresponding
AP Exam. AP Exams are two-to-three-hour exams, administered in May. They are made up of multiplechoice and free-response (essay) questions which are scored by college faculty and AP teachers. They use scoring standards and rubrics developed by college and university faculty who teach the corresponding college courses. AP scores signify how qualified students are to receive college credit and placement. The final score is reported on a 5 point scale:

5 = extremely well qualified 4 = well qualified 3 = qualified 2 = possibly qualified 1 = no recommendation The composite score for each AP Exam is converted to a score of 5, 4, 3, 2 or 1. An AP Exam score of 5 is equivalent to an A in the corresponding college course; a score of 4 is equivalent to grades of A-, B+ and B; a score of 3 is equivalent to grades of B-, C+ and C.

AP Exam Fees
The fee for each exam is $87. The exam fee(s) are paid by Hoke County Schools Academically/Intellectually Gifted Program for any student taking an AP Exam.

AP Coursework Grades and the Impact on High School GPA


Advanced Placement courses are weighted with + 2 GPA quality points

Numeric Mark=Quality Points Advanced placement weighted Course


Mark
100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91

QP
6.0000 6.0000 6.0000 6.0000 6.0000 5.8750 5.7500 5.6250 5.5000 5.3750

Mark
90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81

QP
5.2500 5.1250 5.0000 4.8750 4.7500 4.6250 4.5000 4.3750 4.2500 4.1250

Mark
80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71

QP
4.0000 3.8750 3.7500 3.6250 3.5000 3.3750 3.2500 3.1250 3.0000 3.0000

Mark
70 69 0

QP
3.0000 .0000 .0000

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Outside Assignments
Students may be required to complete certain pre-class assignments in Advanced Placement courses. AP Contract A student registering for any AP class must complete a Student Advanced Placement (AP) Contract. The contract must be signed by the student, parent/guardian and the AP teacher of that course.

Advanced Placement Scholars Awards Programs


Each year, the College Board recognizes high school students who have demonstrated college-level achievement through Advanced Placement courses and exams. Recipients receive an award certificate and notation is made on AP Grade Reports sent to colleges the following fall (Students do not receive any monetary award from the College Board). AP Scholar Awarded to students who receive grades of 3 or higher on three or more AP exams. AP Scholar with Honor Awarded to students who receive an average grade of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and grades of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. AP Scholar with Distinction Awarded to students who receive an average grade of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and grades of 3 or higher on 5 or more of these exams. AP State Scholar Awarded to the one male and one female student in each U.S. state and the District of Columbia with grades of 3 or higher on the greatest number of AP exams, and then the highest average grade (at least 3.5) on all AP Exams taken. National AP Scholar Awarded to students in the U.S. who receive an average grade of at least 4 on all AP Exams taken, and grades of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams.

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SPECIAL RECOGNITION GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

HONOR GRADUATES
Honor graduates may be designated by the principal on the basis of criteria established by the superintendent. Students may also choose to participate in the North Carolina Academic Scholars Program. Successful completion of the requirements of the program entitles a student to receive a North Carolina Academic Scholars Seal that will be affixed to his/her diploma.

The Academic Scholars program is a rigorous program of courses that exceeds State Board requirements. Students who complete the requirements for an academically challenging high school program will be named NC Academic Scholar. The following criteria must be met: Complete all of the NC Graduation Requirements for the Future Ready Core Have an overall four-year unweighted grade point average of 3.50% Must demonstrate computer proficiency

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NORTH CAROLINA ACADEMIC SCHOLARS PROGRAM


The following designated number of credits per subject area listed below must be taken in grades 9-12:
2003-2008 Credits The following designated number of credits per subject area listed below must be taken in grades 9-12. English I, II, III, IV Mathematics (Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and a higher level math course with Algebra II as prerequisite OR Integrated Mathematics, I, II, III, and a higher level mathematics course with Integrated Mathematics III as prerequisite) Science (a Physics or Chemistry course, Biology, and an Earth/Environmental Science course) Social Studies (World History, Civics/Economic, and U.S. History) Healthful Living Languages other than English (two credits of the same language) Credits 2009-2010 Future-Ready Core Course of Study

4 4

4 4

English I, II, III, IV Mathematics (should include Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and a higher level math course with Algebra II as a prerequisite OR Integrated Mathematics I, II, III, and a higher level mathematics course with Integrated Mathematics III as prerequisite) Science (a Physics or Chemistry course, Biology, and an Earth/Environmental Science course) Social Studies (World History, Civics/Economic, and U.S. History) Health and Physical Education Two (2) elective credits in a second language required for the UNC System Four (4) elective credits constituting a concentration recommended from one of the following: Career and Technical Education (CTE), JROTC, Arts Education, Second Languages, any other subject area

1 2

1 6

Career and Technical Education

1 5

Arts Education (Dance, Music, Theatre Arts or Visual Arts) Elective credits to include at least two second-level or advance courses (examples of electives include JROTC and other courses that are of interest to the student)

Higher level courses taken during junior and/or senior years which carry 5 or 6 quality points such as: -AP-IB-Dual or college equivalent course On-line courses-Other honors or above designated courses Higher level courses taken during junior and/or senior years which carry 5 or 6 quality points such as : -AP- IB- Dual or college equivalent course Advanced CTE/CTE credentialing course On-line courses-Other honors or above designated courses and completion of The North Carolina Graduation Project.

OR 2

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24 or 23+ NCGP

High School Graduation Requirement

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HOKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

From the time you enter kindergart en, youre getting ready for high school graduation. To make sure you are on track, remember that every Hoke County high school student must meet the Course and Credit requirements, successfully complete the Hoke County Schools 21st Century Readiness Project, demonstrate proficiency on the End of Course Tests, demonstrate Computer Skills Proficiency, and meet all Local requirements. Please refer to pages 63 to 145 for specific details for your childs Course of Study. Your school counselor is available to answer questions you may have about what you need to reach your goal of high school graduation.
Course and Credit Requirements

Listed in the Course of Study and Credit Requirements Checklists on pages 6 - 11 and organized according to the year a student first entered high school.
End-of-Course Assessments & Measure of Student Learning

Score proficient on the three essential end-of-course assessments (Hoke County Schools Board of Education Policy): Algebra I, Biology, English I, English II and Career and Technical Education Post Assessments.
Local Requirements Meet

any additional requirements adopted by the Hoke County Board of Education. (Total of 28 Credits to Graduate)
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Century Readiness Project Successfully complete the Hoke County Schools 21 Century
st

st

Readiness Project. The 21 Century Readiness Project is an English-embedded project in grades 9-12 that prepares students for success in post-secondary environments. In conjunction with the Common Core State Standards and Essential Standards, students in each grade level will complete a research project that emphasizes the following 21 st Century skills: Research-Based Papers, Multi-Media Presentations, Oral Presentations, Project Based Learning.

GRADE CLASSIFICATIONS Sophomore Junior Senior Earn 6 units, including English I Earn 13 units, including English I and II Earn 20 units, including English I, II, and III

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CREDIT RECOVERY
The State Board of Education defined Credit Recovery as a block of instruction that is less than the entirety of the Standard Course of Study for that course. Credit recovery, therefore, delivers a subset of the Standard Course of Study or Blueprint of the original course in order to address specific deficiencies in a students mastery of the course and target specific components of a course necessary for completion. The purpose of credit recovery is to recover credit.

NC VIRTUAL PUBLIC SCHOOL

The Hoke County Schools provide online instruction in partnership with the NC Virtual Public school. Currently, these courses are available for students in grades 9-12. Please contact your schools counselor for more information or to register for a course.

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Grading Policy
For purposes of determining graduation requirements, each student is assigned to a graduating class upon initial enrollment in ninth grade. In order to graduate from high school, the student must meet the HCHS graduation requirements for that particular class. This provision applies to a student who graduates before or after the graduating class to which the student was assigned upon entering the ninth grade. Grades are standardized measurements of varying levels of comprehension within a subject area. Grades can be assigned in letters (for example, A, B, C, D, or F) or as a range (for example 4.01.0). Grade Point Average (GPA): the average of a students grades over a set period of time, such as four years of high school. It is measure of the students academic performance. Grade Point Average is a calculation of the average of all of a students grades for all semesters and courses completed up to a given academic term. An unweighted GPA is the average of all class grades based on a 4.0 scale. A weighted GPA is the average of honors and advanced placement class grades based on additional quality points. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is the measure of a students academic performance. The GPA is potentially used by employers and post-secondary institutions to assess and compare applicants.

I. Weighted Grade Point Average


Many schools in the United States, including Hoke High, utilize weighted grade point averages in order to encourage students to take more rigorous courses such as Honors and Advanced Placement courses. In calculating the weighted grade point average, one (1) additional quality point is added to the earned quality points for Honors courses and Career and College Promise courses. Two (2) additional points are added for Advanced Placement courses. For example: Course AP English IV AP Biology HNS Pre-Calculus Visual Arts II Quality Point Total Final Grade 84 79 89 95 Unweighted Points 2.500 1.875 3.125 3.875 11.375 Weighted Points 4.500 3.875 4.125 3.875 16.375

Unweighted Grade Point Average Total Unweighted Points divided by Number of Courses Attempted = Unweighted GPA 11.375 divided by 4 = 2.8438 Weighted Grade Point Average Total Weighted Points divided by Number of Courses Attempted = Weighted GPA 16.375 divided by 4 = 4.0938

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It is important to remember that a student s grade point average is cumulative, including all courses taken beginning with the 9th grade. Therefore, students should attempt to do their very best in all courses taken throughout high school. All coursework taken in grades 9-12 for which final grades are earned will be used in calculating a student s grade point average. Final grades will earn quality points according to the above chart as approved by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. The grade point average is determined by dividing the sum total of all earned quality points by the number of courses attempted. For example: Course English I Algebra I World History Health/PE Quality Point Total Final Grade 93 85 88 99 Quality Points 3.625 2.625 3.000 4.000 13.250

Total Quality Points divided by Number of Courses Attempted = Grade Point Average 13.250 divided by 4 = 3.3125 Final Course Grade ACADEMIC COURSE LEVEL Standard Honors/college courses identified in Comprehensive Articulation Agreement Advanced Placement/ higher-level college courses identified in Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (Weighted) 6 5 4 3 0

A B C D F

TOTAL QUALITY POINTS (Unweighted) (Weighted) 4 5 3 4 2 3 1 2 0 0

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II. Class Rank


I. A. Rank in Class Students Eligible to be Ranked 1. All students enrolled in school at the time class ranks are calculated will be included in the class ranking. 2. In order to be eligible to be Valedictorian or Salutatorian a student must be enrolled at Hoke County High School for at least two full *terms prior to the grade averaging deadline to be considered. The Valedictorian and Salutatorian are determined by using all coursework from grades nine through the end of the second semester of the senior year. 3. In order to be eligible to be a Junior Marshal a student must be enrolled at Hoke County High School for at least two full *terms prior to the grade averaging deadline to be considered. The Junior Marshals are determined by using all coursework from courses taken in grades nine through the first nine weeks of the second semester of the junior year. B. Computation and Schedule for Determining Class Rank 1. Class rank is determined by ranking all students numerically by weighted GPA. The student with the highest average will be assigned a rank of number one (1) in the class. 2. Class rank is run for grades 9th through 12th: At the end of first semester At the end of second semester At the end of summer school *A Term is defined as a school year. Classing Rankings Hoke County Board of Education policy (3450)

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OTHER INFORMATION

NORTH CAROLINA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION REQUIREMENTS A student, upon enrolling, is eligible to participate in competitive sports during the fall term. Students enrolling in tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades are required to meet local promotion standards to participate in a fall sport. They must have passed three (3) of the four (4) courses the previous term. To participate in a spring sport, all students must have passed three (3) of the four (4) courses the first term. For a complete list of the eligibility rules, please see your school counselor or athletic director.

Students must be in Attendance 85% of the previous semester. COLLEGE ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS College Freshman Athletic Eligibility Requirements for NCAA Division I and II institutions are on a sliding scale for GPA on core courses and for SAT/ACT scores. Students interested in athletic participation at the college level should see their school counselor and athletic coach for a detailed interpretation of the eligibility rules.

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND ATHLETICS

STUDENT CLUBS

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

SkillsUSA Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) Association of Marketing Students (DECA) Future Teachers of America (FTA) Health Occupations Student Association (HOSA) Marching Band Future Farmers of America (FFA) Family, Community, Career Leaders of America (FCCLA) Students Against Drunk Drivers (SAAD) Monogram/Antler Club Thespian/Forensics Clubs Science Club Men of Distinction Ladies of Total Image Key Club National Technical Honor Society National Honor Society BETA Club Chess Club Fellowship of Christian Athletes AIM Club (Action, Inspiration, Motivation) 4 H Club Student Council Association Chorale TRU (Tobacco Reality Unfiltered) Club The Leadership Council Brilliant Bucks Drama Club Native American Student Association (NASA) History Club ROTC (Rile/Raider/Drill Teams) Dance Club Step Team

JROTC/Raiders JROTC/Staff JROTC/Color Guard JROTC/Drill Team Wrestling Interscholastic Athletes Football (Varsity, JV, 9th) Volleyball (Varsity, JV, 9th) Cross Country Softball (Varsity, JV, 9th) Baseball (Varsity, JV, 9th) Basketball (Male, Female) Varsity, JV (9th) Track & Field (Male, Female) Indoor Track Soccer (Male, Female) Tennis (Male, Female) Golf (Male, Female) Bowling (Male, Female)

Hoke County Schools are committed to providing educational activities outside of the classroom instruction which allow all students opportunities to pursue a variety of interests. Each of these extracurricular activities carries academic, attendance and behavior requirements of their own student participation. These clubs/organizations may vary at each high school campus.

28

ATTENDANCE POLICY
Attendance in school and participation in class are integral parts of academic achievement and the teaching-learning process. Through regular attendance, students develop patterns of behavior essential to professional and personal success in life. Regular attendance by every student is mandatory. The State of North Carolina requires that every child in the State between the ages of 7 (or younger if enrolled) and 16 attend school. Parents and legal guardians are responsible for ensuring that students attend and remain at school daily. A. ATTENDANCE RECORDS School officials shall keep accurate records of attendance, including accurate attendance records in each class. Attendance records will be used to enforce the Compulsory Attendance Law of North Carolina. B. EXCUSED ABSENCES When a student must miss school, a written excuse signed by a parent or guardian must be presented to the students teacher on the day the student returns after an absence. An absence may be excused for any of the following reasons. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Personal illness or injury that makes the student physically unable to attend school. Isolation ordered by the State Board of Health. Death in the immediate family. Medical or dental appointment. Participation under subpoena as a witness in a court proceeding. A minimum of two days each academic year for observance of an event required or suggested by the religion of the student or the students parents. The student will have the opportunity to make up any tests or other work missed due to the excused absence for a religious observance. Participation in a valid educational opportunity, such as travel or service as a legislative or Governors page, with prior approval from the principal. Pregnancy and related conditions or parenting, when medically necessary.

7.

8.

In addition, a student whose parent or legal guardian (a) is an active duty member of the uniformed services, as defined by policy 4050, Children of Military Families; and (b) has been called to duty for, is on leave from, or has immediately returned from deployment to a combat zone or combat support posting will be granted additional excused absences at the discretion of the superintendent or designee to visit with his or her parent or legal guardian. Absences due to extended illnesses generally require a statement from a physician.

29

ATTENDANCE POLICY
In the case of excused absences and short-term out-of-school suspensions, the student will be permitted to make up his or her work. (See also policy 4351, Short-Term Suspension.) The teacher will determine when work is to be made up. The student is responsible for finding out what assignments are due and completing them within the specified time period. C. SCHOOL-RELATED ACTIVITIES All classroom activities are important and difficult, if not impossible, to replace if missed. Principals shall ensure that classes missed by students due to school-related activities are kept to an absolute minimum. The following school-related activities will not be counted as absences from either class or school: 1. 2. Field trips sponsored by the school; job shadows and other work-based learning opportunities, as described in G.S. 115C47(34a); school-initiated and -scheduled activities; athletic events that require early dismissal from school; Career and Technical Education student organization activities approved in advance by the principal; and in-school suspensions.

3. 4. 5.

6.

Assignments missed for these reasons are eligible for makeup by the student. The teacher will determine when work is to be made up. The student is responsible for finding out what assignments are due and completing them within the specified time period. D. EXCESSIVE ABSENCES Class attendance and participation are critical elements of the educational process and may be taken into account in assessing academic achievement. Students are expected to be at school on time and to be present at the scheduled starting time for each class. Students who are excessively tardy to school or class may be suspended for up to two days for such offenses. The principal shall notify parents and take all other steps required by G.S. 115C-378 for excessive absences. Students may be suspended for up to two days for truancy. If a student is absent from school for five or more days in a semester, the principal or a committee established by the principal shall consider whether the students grades should be reduced because of the absences. The principal or committee shall review other measures of academic achievement, the circumstances of the absences, the number of absences, and the extent to which the student completed missed work. A committee may recommend to the principal and the principal may make any of the following determinations:

30

ATTENDANCE POLICY
1. 2. 3. 4. The student will not receive a passing grade for the semester; The students grade will be reduced; The student will receive the grade otherwise earned; or The student will be given additional time to complete the missed work before a determination of the appropriate grade is made.

Students with excused absences due to documented chronic health problems are exempt from this policy. Legal References: G.S. 115C-47, -84.2, -288(a), -375.5, -378 through -383, -390.2(d), -390.5, -407.5; 16 N.C.A.C. 6E .0102, .0103; State Board of Education Policies TCS-L-000 through -003 Cross References: Education for Pregnant and Parenting Students (policy 4023), Children of Military Families (policy 4050), Short-Term Suspension (policy 4351) Adopted: June 11, 1991 Revised: July 13, 1997; August 9, 1994; April 10, 2002; April 14, 2011; July 18, 2011

31

Your Checklist for College and Career Readiness


9th Grade
Take courses that challenge you Concentrate on making good grades Meet with your school counselor about your 4-year plan Visit a college informally to provide you with an idea of what college life is like Create a FREE College Foundation of North Carolina account at www.cfnc.org Explore career interests Research ways to save and pay for college Make a commitment to an extracurricular activity and community service

10th Grade
Continue to pursue extracurricular interests such as dance, sports, clubs, or community service Review your goals for the future with your counselor Update your CFNC planner Start using the Free SAT and ACT test prep at www.CFNC.org Take the PSAT for practice Start exploring what you might like to study in college (check on CollegeConfidential.com) Talk with your family and friends about their educational and/or career experiences Tour colleges online at CFNC.org Register for AP, honors, and advance courses

11th Grade
Meet with your counselor to review your academic record, financial aid, and college/career options Get schedules for college entrance exams and placement tests Use the free SAT and ACT test prep at CFNC.org Take PSAT in October in order to qualify for National Merit Scholarships Check entrance requirements for colleges that interest you Keep your CFNC planner updated Attend College and Career Fairs Attend Workshops on financial aid Visit colleges, request information packets, view websites, talk to alumni, friends, family and/or an admissions representative Research scholarships, grants and loans available Talk with coaches about college sports and scholarship eligibility Register to take the SAT, ACT, and/or AP Tests Narrow down your list of college and/or career interests Find a summer job or internship in your field of interest

32

12th Grade Fall


Review courses, graduation requirements, and scholarship opportunities with your counselor Update your CFNC planner Select three to five colleges or careers to focus on Track application deadlines for colleges and financial aid Take the first SAT or ACT offered in the fall Write, edit, proofread, and rewrite your admissions essays early Ask teachers, counselors, or other references to write letters of recommendation Attend a college and/or a career day Participate in College Application Week Complete online college applications on CFNC.org before the deadlines Send in supplemental materials with application such as entrance exam scores, admissions essay, letters of recommendation, transcript, etc. Check with college financial aid offices for school specific scholarship information and applications Take a visit to a local industry in a career field that you are interested in Take Advantage of Job Shadow opportunities Student athletes send transcripts to NCAA Clearinghouse for eligibility certification Parents need to plan to prepare tax information soon after January 1 for financial aid applications

12th Grade Spring


Complete and submit FAFSA at www.fafsa.gov as soon as possible after January 1 For help with your FAFSA, sign-up at CFNC.org for a February FAFSA Day near you Compare admission acceptance letters and financial aid packages Apply for educational loans, if needed Make sure your final transcript is sent to your college of choice Send in any early college credit courses (community college, etc.) Take exams for any AP or college-level courses completed For community college admission, take the ASSET, COMPASS, or ACCUPLACER test If entering into the workforce, take the WORKKEYS test

Its never too early to start planning for life after graduation. Whether your goal is to attend a postsecondary institution or enter into the workforce, we are here to help you find all the college and career planning tools and materials you will need to be successful.

33

34

NC CAREER CLUSTERS

Career Clusters, Pathways, and Courses North Carolina Career and Technical Education

Click on a logo to hyperlink to a specific cluster worksheet. To return to the cover page, click on the

icon at the far left, lower region of Excel and then the "Cover" tab. Please see the FAQ worksheet tab for Frequently Asked Questions.

Revised 11-14-2012

35

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I use this document?

This document contains all of the NC Career and Technical Education courses approved by the NC State Board of Education representing all Career Clusters and Pathways. LEAs should edit this document to publish a local guide reflecting its own Career Clusters, Pathways, and courses. The Local document may also include any approved Local Course Offerings. What does the ^ mean? The ^ indicates the courses uses materials from third-party providers. What does the * mean? The * indicates a completer course. What is a completer course? A completer course is the second or third course in a series that builds upon skills acquired in the previous course(s). A completer course has a prerequisite. What is a concentrator? A concentrator is a student who has earned four or more technical credits in a Career Cluster, at least one of which is a completer course. The student may earn all four credits from foundation courses or three from foundation and one from enhancement courses for the Career Cluster. What is a foundation course? A foundation course provides fundamental knowledge and skills needed for student success in secondary and postsecondary education and careers in the Career Cluster. What is an enhancement course? An enhancement course augments related knowledge and skills developed in foundation courses and provides for success in postsecondary education and careers in the Career Cluster. What is the difference between a Career Cluster and a Career Pathway? Career Clusters are groupings of occupations used as an organizing tool for curriculum design and instruction. Career pathways are sub-groupings of occupations within a Career Cluster. Occupations are grouped into pathways based on the set of common knowledge and skills required for career success. What is the National Academy Foundation? The National Academy Foundation provides industry-focused curricula in four themes: Finance, Hospitality & Tourism, Information Technology, and Engineering. For more information on NAF, please visit www.NAF.org. What is the NC Career & College Promise? The NC Career & College Promise offers North Carolina high school age students a clear, focused and affordable path to future success. Qualified North Carolina high-school age students can begin their two- or four-year college work, tuition free, while they are in high school allowing them to get a head start on their workplace and college preparation. The program is free to all students who maintain a B average and meet other eligibility requirements. For more information on the NC Career & College Promise, please visit www.careercollegenc.org . Is Cooperative Education still available? Yes. Cooperative Education is a method of instruction for students, 16 and older, where technical classroom instruction is combined with paid employment directly related to the classroom instruction. The two experiences must be planned and supervised by the school and the employer so that each contributes to the student's career objective/major and employability. What are the current graduation requirements for a student in North Carolina? For the most current graduation requirements, please visit www.ncpublicschools.org/gradrequirements

36

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Agribusiness Systems

6810 Agriscience Applications

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Animal Systems

6810 Agriscience Applications

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Food Products & Processing Systems 7045 Foods I 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS & MEE)

Natural Resources Systems

6810 Agriscience Applications

Plant Systems 6841 Horticulture I 6842 Horticulture II *

6810 Agriscience Applications

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 7120 Introduction to Culinary Arts & Hospitality 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Power, Structural & Technical Systems

6810 Agriscience Applications

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways
6828 Exploring Biotechnolgy in Agriculture

Environmental Service Systems

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications 6829 Exploring Agricultural Science 7018 Exploring Life Skills

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

37

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


7722 Carpentry II * ^ 7721 Carpentry I ^ 7962 Drafting II Architectural * 7963 Drafting III Architectural 7723 Carpentry III ^

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Construction

7700 Core and Sustainable Construction ^ 7921 Drafting I

8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS & MEE) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Design/Pre-construction

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 6631 Fashion Merchandising 7035 Apparel I 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

Additional Pathways Maintenance/Operations

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

7018 Exploring Life Skills

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

38

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Audio & Video Technology & Film 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design (BFIT & T&I) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Printing Technology

6621 Marketing ^ 7035 Apparel I (FACS & MEE) 7036 Apparel II-Enterprise* (FACS & MEE) 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE)

6631 Fashion Merchandising (FACS & MEE)

6145 Career Management 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Visual Arts

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Performing Arts

Journalism & Broadcasting

Additional Pathways

Telecommunications
7018 Exploring Life Skills

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

39

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


8710 Business Management * ^ 8717 Entrepreneurship II ^ (BFIT & MEE)

Cluster Enhancement Courses

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 6215 Business Law * 6311 Accounting I 8716 Entrepreneurship I * ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

General Management

6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Administrative Support Operations Management

Business Information Management

Additional Pathways

Human Resources Management

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

40

Cluster Enhancement Courses Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

LEAs may use locally developed courses to provide opportunities for students in this Career Cluster. 8595 CTE Advanced Studies is an appropriate foundational course in this cluster.

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

None

6158 Exploring Career Decisions 7018 Exploring Life Skills

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

41

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 6312 Accounting II * 6311 Accounting I 6215 Business Law 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE)

Business Finance

8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE)

6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

National Academy Foundation Academy of Finance ^ 8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Career & College Promise

Additional Pathways Insurance


7018 Exploring Life Skills

Banking Services

Securities and Investments

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses 6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

42

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Governance

National Security

Foreign Services

Planning

LEAs may use locally developed courses to provide opportunities for students in this Career Cluster. 8595 CTE Advanced Studies is an appropriate foundational course in this cluster.

Revenue and Taxation

Regulation

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Public Management and Administration 8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Career & College Promise

Additional Pathways

None

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship 7018 Exploring Life Skills

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

43

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


7243 Nursing Fundamentals ^ (2 credits)

Cluster Enhancement Courses

7200 Biomedical Technology

Therapeutic Services

Diagnostic Services 7240 Health Science I 7242 Health Science II *

Health Informatics

Support Services

7210 Health Team Relations

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Biotechnology Research & Development

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 7045 Foods I 7065 Parenting and Child Development 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways

None

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

7018 Exploring Life Skills 7205 Exploring Biotechnology in Health Science

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

44

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


7120 Introduction to Culinary Arts & Hospitality 7121 Culinary Arts & Hospitality I (1 credit) 7122 Culinary Arts & Hospitality II * (2 credits)

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Restaurants & Food/Beverage Service 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8717 Entrepreneurship II ^ (BFIT & MEE)

7045 Foods I

Travel & Tourism

6621 Marketing ^

8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE)

8595 CTE Advanced Studies Academy of Hospitality & Tourism ^

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

National Academy Foundation

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways

Lodging

Recreation, Amusements & Attractions


6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship 7018 Exploring Life Skills

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

45

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Early Childhood Development & Services 7065 Parenting & Child Development 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 7111 Early Childhood Education I 7112 Early Childhood Education II *

8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE)

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE)

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 7045 Foods I 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways Consumer Services

Counseling & Mental Health Services Personal Care Services

Family & Community Services

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

7018 Exploring Life Skills

Middle School Courses 6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

46

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County High School

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Programming & Software Development

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE)

6419 Microsoft Excel and Access ^

Web & Digital Communications 6414 Multimedia & Webpage Design (BFIT & T&I) 6415 e-Commerce I * 6416 e-Commerce II

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Information Support & Services


7991 Computer Engineering Technology I (BFIT & T&I

7992 Computer Engineering Technology II * (BFIT & T&I)

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6419 Microsoft Excel and Access ^

Network Systems

National Academy Foundation

Academy of Information Technology ^

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways

None
6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

47

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Emergency & Fire Management Services 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Law Enforcement Services

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Corrections Services Legal Services

Law Enforcement Services

Additional Pathways

Security & Protective Services

Middle School Courses

6158 Exploring Career 8201 Technology Design & Innovation Decisions

6207 Computer Skil s and Applications


48

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


7663 Welding Technology III (1 credit) 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Production

7661 Welding Technology I

7662 Welding Technology II * (1 credit)

Manufacturing Production Process Development

7661 Welding Technology I

Maintenance, Installation, and Repair 7631 Electronics I ^ 7632 Electronics II * ^

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE)

7633 Electronics III ^

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6621 Marketing ^ 7921 Drafting I 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Quality Assurance

Additional Pathways

Health, Safety & Environmental Assurance

Logistics & Inventory Control


6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

49

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


8717 Entrepreneurship II ^ (BFIT & MEE) 6622 Marketing Management * ^ 8716 Entrepreneurship I * ^ (BFIT & MEE)

Cluster Enhancement Courses

8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE)

Marketing Management

6621 Marketing ^ 8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Merchandising 6622 Marketing Management * ^

6631 Fashion Merchandising (FACS & MEE)

8716 Entrepreneurship I * ^ (BFIT & MEE)

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

Professional Sales 6622 Marketing Management * ^

6621 Marketing ^

8716 Entrepreneurship I * ^ (BFIT & MEE)

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6512 Business Law 6911 Agribusiness Management, Trends & Issues I 7035 Apparel I 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) XXXX Microsoft SharePoint ^ XXXX Virtual Enterprises ^ 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways

Marketing Communications

Marketing Research
6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications

50

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County High School


7973 Drafting III Engineering 7972 Drafting II Engineering * 7921 Drafting I 8595 CTE Advanced Studies 8212 Engineering Design * ^

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Engineering & Technology

Science & Mathematics

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6145 Career Management 6414 Multimedia and Webpage Design 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 6841 Horticulture I 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE) 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career & College Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways

None
8201 Technology Design & Innovation 8203 Technological Systems

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

Middle School Courses 6207 Computer Skills and Applications

8056 PLTW Gateway to Technology

51

Pathways Cluster Foundation Courses for Hoke County Schools


7512Automotive Brakes ^ (1 credit) 7511 Automotive Service ^ 7514 Automotive Electrical ^ (1 credit) 7515 Automotive Advanced Electrical * ^ (1 credit) 7513 Automotive Computer System Diagnostics * ^ (1 credit)

Cluster Enhancement Courses

Facility & Mobile Equipment Maintenance

Logistics Planning & Management Services 6622 Marketing Management * ^ 8716 Entrepreneurship I ^ (BFIT & MEE)

6621 Marketing ^

8595 CTE Advanced Studies

6145 Career Management 6417 Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher ^ 6419 Microsoft Excel & Access ^ 8721 Principles of Business & Finance (BFIT & MEE) 8726 Personal Finance (BFIT, FACS, & MEE) 8596 CTE Apprenticeship 8597 CTE Internship

Career & College Promise

8598 and 8599 * Career College & Promise Career Technical Education Pathway

Additional Pathways Sales and Service

Health, Safety, & Environmental Management

Transportation Systems/Infrastructure Planning, Management, and Regulations

Transportation Operations

6158 Exploring Career Decisions

6208 Exploring Business, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship

Middle School Courses

6207 Computer Skills and Applications 8201 Technology Design & Innovation

52

53

HIGH SCHOOL OPTIONS

HIGH SCHOOLS
Hoke County High

THEME
Traditional

GRADES
9-12

Turlington

Alternative

9-12

SandHoke Early College

Early College

9-13

Hoke County Schools offer a variety of options for high school study. Students who are innovative or students who are interested in the sciences, students who want to begin their college study early, and students who enjoy small learning environments can all find a place designed just for them. The next few pages of this book outline the different schools and programs available to our students. For more information talk with your school counselor or go to the web: www.hcs.k12.nc.us

54

Hoke County High School


505 South Bethel Road Raeford, NC 28376 (910) 875-2156

Administration Mr. Roger Edwards, Principal

Mr. Travis Stroud, Assistant Principal Mr. Heriberto Corral, Assistant Principal Mr. Joel Brewington, Assistant Principal Ms. Stephanie Burney, Assistant Principal Mr. Tommy Jacobs, Assistant Principal Counselors Ms. Lorraine Mosley Mr. Kevin Davis Ms. Annette Jones Mr. Russell Duncan Mr. Antonio Covington, College and Career Coordinator

HOKE HIGH SCHOOL MISSION STATEMENT Through collaborative efforts all students will graduate with 21st Century Skills. HOKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS VISION STATEMENT Empowered High Achievers in a Safe Environment

55

JW TURLINGTON SCHOOL 116 West Prospect Avenue


Raeford, North Carolina 28376 (910) 875-2583

Administration Dr. Krista Friedrich, Principal

Counselor Ms. Bridget Hunt

Titan Pride!
VISION STATEMENT

We Care, We Share, We Dare


We care enough to encourage our children to break out of their cocoon and become the beautiful butterfly that they are, to reach for their stars, and to rise to the challenge. We share through collaboration, compassion and knowledge in deciding what is best for our students and we dare to venture outside the box to make things work.

56

JW TURLINGTON

JW Turlingtons primary mission is to equip students with the necessary skills to function and remain in school. This mission is accomplished by utilizing individual learning plans, parental participation, and school and community services for each student to meet the academic attendance and behavior terms of the Turlington School contract in a small class setting. This effort, along with the students personal responsibility for attendance, behavior, and academic progress, will help each student meet the exit requirements from Turlington School. The goals of J.W. Turlington are: to continue the students education with individualized instruction; behavioral improvements for all students enabling them to return to base school to increase school/ community interaction to reduce the school dropout rate the development of a personalized education and career plan. Turlington attempts to keep a low teacher/student ratio. Maintaining a low teacher/student ratio is critical to the success of the alternative program.

57

ADMITTANCE AND EXIT PRODECURES FOR TURLINGTON SCHOOL ADMITTANCE PROCEDURES FOR REGULAR ENROLLMENT 1. Students will be referred by base school, through the Superintendent of Hoke County Schools. 2. Students may be assigned to Turlington for various reasons. 3. Prospective student and parent(s)/guardians must meet with the Principal and Guidance Counselor of Turlington School. 4. Student, parent(s)/guardian(s) sign a contract with the principal at Turlington School. Student and parent(s) must agree that the student will follow the Turlington dress code. Student will not be permitted to attend class if not in proper uniform. Parent(s) agree to check on the student progress weekly. 5. Upon student enrollment all student records are delivered to Turlington School. 6. Information packet must be completed prior to the student attending class. ADMITTANCE PROCEDURES FOR TRANSITIONAL ENROLLMENT

Upon notification from base-school principal that the student is awaiting a hearing, the student will enroll in JW Turlington in a transitional status. The following will apply to all students classified as transitional students: 1. Transitional students will be subjected to all requirements that apply at JW Turlington, except the requirement to wear their school uniform. 2. Transitional students will be permitted to attend class at JW Turlington at the discretion of the schools principal until admittance procedures are completed. 3. Transitional students will remain on the rolls at their base school. Transitional coordinator will manage attendance reporting. 4. Parents of transitional students will be responsible for providing transportation to school on the morning of the start of the first day of attendance at JW Turlington. 5. If long-term suspension is recommended and approved, the student will be withdrawn from the rolls of the base school and enrolled at JW Turlington as a regular student. At this time, the student will be required to wear the regular school uniform. 6. If long-term suspension is not recommended or approved, the student will return to their base school based upon the Superintendents decision.

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EXIT PROCEDURES

1. Students must attend Turlington School for at least one complete reporting period. 2. Student must pass 3 subjects and be absent no more than 7 days. 3. The Principal of JW Turlington School reviews student progress in all areas: length of time at JW Turlington School, discipline, attendance, grades and principal recommends exit from JW Turlington School to the Superintendent of Hoke County Schools. 4. Student is referred to the Guidance Department at base school and records are delivered. Note: The Turlington School Principal may recommend any student for return to their home school if it is in the best interest of the student.

ELIGIBILITY AND ADMITTANCE PROCEDURE

1. The Admission committee is composed of the following: Principal of Alternative School Guidance Counselor

2. Base School administrators will be notified at the beginning of each semester of returning students. 3. Students will re-enter the base school only at the beginning of a semester.

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TURLINGTON / COURSE SELECTION


ENGLISH MATHEMATICS SCIENCE SOCIAL STUDIES

English I English II English III English IV Publications

Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Advanced Functions and Modeling

Physical Science Environmental / Earth Science Biology

Civics / Economics World History United States History Sociology Minorities Contemporary Law and Justice

BUSINESS & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION


Microsoft ITA Word, Powerpoint and Publisher Microsoft ITA Access and Excel Multimedia and Web Page Media Design

Visual Arts
Visual Art I Visual Art II Visual Art III Visual Art IV

CAREER DEVELOPMENT ED.


Career Management

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


Health & Physical Education Physical Conditioning I Physical Conditioning II Lifetime Sports Fall Spring

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION

GENERAL INFORMATION
Resource Lab Occupational Preparation I Occupational Preparation II Occupational III Occupational Preparation IV OCS Mathematics I OCS Algebra I OCS Financial Management OCS Applied Science OCS Biology Occupational Social Studies I Occupational Social Studies II OCS English I OCS English II OCS English III OCS English IV Individual Curriculum Lab

61

SANDHOKE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL


1110 E. Central Avenue Raeford, North Carolina 28376 (910) 878-5806 Administration Ms. Colleen Pegram, Principal Counselors Ms. Kimberly Conyers Mrs. Shenika Ward

62

SANDHOKE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL

SandHoke Early College High School


The Hoke County School System and Sandhills Community College partnered to implement an early college high school in 2006 with the purpose of providing students an opportunity to earn a high school diploma and a two-year college degree. The five-year program focuses on developing students college readiness skills through a rigorous accelerated course of study and building strong relationships. Due to SandHoke Early College High Schools limited enrollment capacity, rising 9 th grade students are required to apply for the program. The school seeks to serve students who are potential first generation college students in their family and may not see college as an option. The schools primary recruitment goal is to embrace a true representation of the demographics of the district. Students attend courses at the Hoke Campus satellite site through the first three years, and then transition to Sandhills Community College main campus beginning in their 4 th year. The five-year program is tuition free for the student to include course fees, textbooks, and college student fees. SHECHS encourages all rising 9th grade students to consider SHECHS as their high school. Beginning the fall of 2013, students will be allowed to participate in athletics hosted at Hoke High School. For more information on sports, review the policy in the SHECHS Handbook. This is an excellent opportunity to become an athletic scholar.

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SANDHOKE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL


COURSE SEQUENCE
Courses Freshman English Advanced Inquiry English I Math Algebra I Algebra II Science Earth & Environmental Science Social Studies World History Physical Ed. Health, Freshman Seminar, & Success 101

Sophomore

English II English III

Geometry

Biology

Civics & Economics

College Course(s) Foreign Language

Junior

English IV

H.S. PreCalculus/ College Math

H.S. Chemistry

American History 1/American History 2

College Course(s)/ Foreign Language

Senior

College English 111/112

College Math 140/171&172

College Biology & Lab/College Natural Science & Lab

College Course(s) Humanities

College Course(s) Senior Seminar

Super Senior

College Course

College Course

College Course

College Course

College Course/Super Senior Seminar

*All required high school courses are Honors level. *Elective courses are designated as Honors or regular. 64

SANDHOKE EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL


YEAR FRESHMAN ALL H.S. Courses ELECTIVE CREDITS SOPHOMORE HIGH SCHOOL COURSE FALL Algebra I / Algebra II or Geometry World History/Earth & Environmental Science Advanced Inquiry Seminar Algebra II/Geometry/PreCal American History I English II Biology Select 2 (Depends on Math) English IV Civics or Chemistry Foreign Language I Select two face-to-face college courses Senior (SCC Main Campus) ENG 112 Natural Science MAT 172 12 MIN REQUIRED CREDIT HOURS SUPER SENIOR (12 Minimum credit hours per semester) TOTAL HOURS Elective Choice (Science or Arts) PED (Fulfill H.S. Req.) Students choice Based on Degree Path Social Science Physical Education 64 SPRING Algebra II or Geometry World History/Earth & Environmental Science English I Health/Success 101 PreCal American History II English III Biology Select 2 ENG 111 and MAT 1471 or Math 140* Civics or Chemistry Foreign Language II Select two face-to-face college courses ENG 131/ENG 231 Natural Science Humanities (Student Choice) Elective Requirements (Science or Arts)

College Courses (12 Semester HRS) JUNIOR

12 semester hours minimum required each semester** Elective

*Students must score on the Accuplacer, PLAN, ACT or a combination of the tests to qualify for ENG 111, MAT 140 and MAT 171 prior to enrollment in these courses. *Students must be enrolled in a high school course throughout the enrollment of the program. Seminar is the high school course for 4th and 5th year students. **Students must enroll in 12 semester hours to be considered full-time. Additionally, SHECHS requires these 12 hours to be face-to-face courses. Online courses may be taken in addition to the 12 hours. The only waiver to this policy is in the spring semester of the fifth year. Students are required to take only the courses they need for graduation.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

66

67

SUGGESTED ENGLISH COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

ENGLISH I

ENGLISH I HONORS

ENGLISH I HONORS

ENGLISH II

SOPHOMORE

ENGLISH II HONORS

ENGLISH II HONORS

ENGLISH III

JUNIOR

ENGLISH III HONORS

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LANGUAGE

ENGLISH IV

SENIOR

ENGLISH IV HONORS

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LITERATURE

ENGLISH ELECTIVES Advanced Honors Broadcast Media Productions Cinema Studies Creative Writing Debate Journalism II Honors Journalism II
Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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ENGLISH

103821-ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 12

102121 - ENGLISH I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9

PREREQUISITE: None The purpose of this course is to introduce non-English proficient students to the English language. It will provide students with basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through a whole language approach. Cultural similarities as well as differences are studied. Student assessment will determine eligibility.

PREREQUISITE: None This course includes elements of listening, speaking, and study skills while exploring and understanding various kinds of literature, such as: short stories, poetry, drama literary nonfiction, informational text, novels, and US documents. Grammar and composition will be taught together using the writing process to develop paragraphs and longer compositions in the major modes such as: narration, argumentation, and explanatory/information Instruction is geared to prepare the student for the demands of continued study. Additionally, students will complete the 9th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 3-5 page teacher-guided research paper, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation.

103822 - ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 12

PREREQUISITE: ESL I This course is a continuation of ESL I. It provides limited English proficient students with intermediate skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Increased progress in communication skills, vocabulary development, grammatical structure, literature, and culture are emphasized. Placement will be based on a students mastery of skills in ESL I.
103823 - ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) III

102151 -HONORS ENGLISH I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9

PREREQUISITE: Proficient in 8th grade reading. Students in the honors course will explore textual analysis of literature and composition more widely and deeply in the ways that audience, purpose, and context shape oral communication, written communication, media, and technology. Honors courses will require students to work as independent and reflective learners, in groups, and in selfdirected activities. Additionally, students will complete the 9th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 3-5 page teacher-guided research paper, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 12 PREREQUISITE: ESL II This course is a continuation of ESL II. It provides limited English proficient students with intermediate skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Increased progress in communication skills, vocabulary development, grammatical structure, literature, and culture are emphasized. Placement will be based on a students mastery of skills in ESL II.

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ENGLISH
102222 - ENGLISH II

continued

102323 - ENGLISH III

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11

PREREQUISITE: English I World Literature Selections of various cultures and historical periods (Americans, Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Oceania and Middle East Students will study short stories, informational text, poetry, drama, literary nonfiction, novels and influential U.S. documents. Students will develop writing compositions in the major modes such as: narration, argumentation, and explanatory/information. Speaking and listening skills will be integrated into the forgoing areas of study. Semantics, word study, and viewing skills are included in this curriculum in addition critical and to analytical reading skills. Additionally, students will complete the 10th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 5-7 page persuasive research paper, multimedia presentation, and an oral presentation.

PREREQUISITE: English I and II This course focuses primarily on analysis and interpretation of American literary nonfiction and literature, its movements, and its historical periods from the 17th century through the early 20th century. Students will study other various selections such as: short stories, informational text, poetry, drama and novels. Students are taught to compose thought in an appropriate medium. Students will learn to locate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of sources, as well as apply practical grammar and language mechanics to written responses. Additionally, students will complete the 11th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 8-10 page argumentative research paper, multi-media presentation, and oral presentation.

102252 - HONORS ENGLISH II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10

102353 -HONORS ENGLISH III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11

PREREQUISITE: English II PREREQUISITE: English I The content of the English II curriculum will be taught more widely and deeply in the exploration of World Literature, development of grammar and composition, vocabulary, speaking, and listening skills. Honors courses will require students to work as self-directed and reflective learners, both independently and in groups as leaders and collaborators. Additionally, students will complete the 10th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 5-7 page persuasive research paper, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation. The English III curriculum requires students to explore American Literature and Composition. Honors courses will require students to work as self-directed and reflective learners, both independently and in groups as leaders and collaborators. Additionally, students will complete the 11th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, 8-10 page argumentative research paper, multi-media presentation, and oral presentation.

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ENGLISH
102424 - ENGLISH IV

continued

1033700S - ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMP 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11

PREREQUISITE:

English I, II and III PREREQUISITE: English II Eleventh grade AP English Language and Composition is a college-level course designed to teach students to read critically and to analyze rhetorical devices. The objectives for this course will focus on the evolution of American Literature and Writing. Additionally, students will complete the 11th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. Requirements include a community service project, a 5-7 page argumentative research paper, multi-media presentation, and oral presentation. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements. 1034700S - ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LIT AND COMP 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

Students will develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills by exploring and analyzing, European Literature (Western, Southern, and Northern), influential U.S. documents, informational text, poetry, drama, short stories, literary nonfiction and novels. Using these skills, students understand how literature shapes and reflects the philosophical, religious, social, economic, and political climate of its time. Additionally, students will complete the 12th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. The requirements include an 8-10 page research paper that explores a social change, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation to be presented to the community on 21st Century Readiness Night. Students will also use this evening as a chance to showcase their Service Learning experience and learning portfolios to the community. 102451 - HONORS ENGLISH IV

PREREQUISITE:

English III PREREQUISITE: English III 12th Grade AP English Literature and Composition is a college-level course designed to teach students to analyze and evaluate Literature. The objectives for this course will focus on the evolution of European Literature from oral tradition to Modern Literature. Additionally, student will complete the 12th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. The requirements include an 8-10 page research paper that explores a social change, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation to be presented to the community on 21st Century Readiness Night. Students will also use this evening as a chance to showcase their Service Learning experience and learning portfolios to the community. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

Students will explore European literature, composition, grammar and mechanics, oral, listening, and speaking skills. Honors courses will require students to work as self-directed and reflective learners, both independently and in groups as leaders and collaborators. Additionally, students will complete the 12th grade requirements of the 21st Century Readiness Project. The requirements include an 8-10 page research paper that explores a social change, a multi-media presentation, and an oral presentation to be presented to the community on 21st Century Readiness Night. Students will also use this evening as a chance to showcase their Service Learning experience and learning portfolios to the community.

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ENGLISH
1025500S - HONORS CREATIVE WRITING

continued

103121 - JOURNALISM I (NEWSPAPER)

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-12 PREREQUISITE: English I This course will be genre free and focus on creative writing prose, poetry, short stories, etc.. Students will do intense writing in and out of class. Enrollment is limited to 15-20 students. PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

101820 - DEBATE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-11

Students will master the basic principles of newspaper journalism and the basic elements of news by reading and analyzing news stories, gathering information and photos and writing articles in various styles and formats. Students will receive instruction in preparing copy, designing layouts, organization of individual sections and production of a school newspaper. Grades are determined by successful and timely accomplishment of assigned tasks, copy production, consistent attendance, and participation in class assignments.

PREREQUISITE: None This course will focus on elocution, four-man team debate, Lincoln-Douglas debate, diction, group communication and team building. Class members will be required to participate in Local and State Competitions.

103220 - JOURNALISM II (NEWSPAPER)

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

103224 - JOURNALISM II - 1st SEM (1 Credit) 103225 - JOURNALISM II - 2nd SEM (1 Credit) Must take both courses for 2 credits

PREREQUISITE: Journalism I Students in Journalism II will explore the elements of news including: development of leads and the style and structure of news stories. Students will read and analyze news stories to enhance their understanding of the elements of news, and learn to gather and report news stories in various formats. Students will work together as a team to delegate staff assignments, establish deadlines, and organize various sections, in order to produce the school newspaper. Students in Journalism II may serve in Senior Editorial positions and/or assist Journalism I students with gathering photos and developing articles for the school newspaper. Grades are determined by successful and timely accomplishment of assigned tasks, copy production, consistent attendance, and participation in class assignments.

2 CREDITS GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation from English teacher and annual staff sponsor interview. The basic principles of yearbook journalism will be studied with individualized instruction in preparing copy, in designing layouts, in the organizing of individual sections and the selling of advertisements and yearbooks. GRADES are determined by sales, deadlines, staff assignments after school, and consistent attendance in class. This class will publish the school yearbook, THE EKOH.

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ENGLISH
10325 - HONORS JOURNALISM II (NEWSPAPER)

continued

10295002 - HONORS BROADCAST MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of Journalism I and Teacher Selection/Approval Students in Honors Journalism II are selected by the Journalism teacher to serve in leadership positions in order to produce the school newspaper. These students will develop leadership, organization and writing skills as they assist with delegating staff assignments, establishing deadlines, and organizing the various sections of the school newspaper. Grades are determined by successful and timely accomplishment of assigned tasks, copy production, consistent attendance and participation In classroom assignments. 102922 - CINEMA STUDIES

PREREQUISITE: English I

Cinema Studies and Proficient in

This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of broadcasting and its influence in the world around us. Students will learn the historical background of both radio and television, and working to produce a daily news program to be broadcast to the Hoke High community. Students will learn how to write, produce, direct, film, edit and ultimately distribute their own shows and programs. In addition, students will work with the latest technology which will make them competitive and marketable in our 21st century global economy.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

10295003 - ADVANCED HONORS BROADCAST MEDIA/PRODUCTIONS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: English I Students will view films to develop skills in criticism and develop and understanding of classic and contemporary films, gaining insight to the role of film in society. Students will advise their writing skills by researching and writing about film and it role in contemporary society. PREREQUISITE: Cinema Studies and Proficient in Honors Broadcast Media Productions Advanced Honors Broadcast Media/Productions continues upon the skills acquired in Broadcast Media/Productions. Student will discuss in-depth the role television and the internet play in modern society. Additionally, students will work with Final Cut Pro and I-Movie to continue to write, anchor, and produce a daily news broadcast on Hoke County High Schools news channel, WHKE News. Students will also examine the rules and regulations of the Federal Communications Commission to gain a better idea of the governance behind television, radio and the internet. Also, students will coordinate live remotes and online specials for Hoke County High School activities and events to be streamed live online over the latest industry software. Lastly, student will acquire and use skills of event planning to aid them in coordinating and producing shows and webcasts.

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74

SUGGESTED FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

Spanish I

Spanish I Native Speakers

Spanish II

SOPHOMORE

Honors Spanish II Native Speakers

JUNIOR

Spanish III Honors

Advanced Placement Spanish Language

SENIOR

Spanish IV Honors

75

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Continued

105122 - SPANISH I

105454 - HNS - SPANISH IV

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12 PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: Spanish III This course is geared toward conversation with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Spanish language while acquiring cultural knowledge.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

Emphasis is placed on the ability to demonstrate and use language and patterns that are appropriate to real life situations. Students will be able to read advanced materials dealing with culture and literature. 10557 ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LANGUAGE

105222 - SPANISH II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Spanish I This course is a continuation of the skills taught in Spanish I, with a greater emphasis on grammatical structure of the language. 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 PREREQUISITE: Spanish IV Students at this advanced language level are expected to demonstrate greater and more sophisticated use of the four skills of listening, speaking reading and writing. Literature, history and culture are taught primarily through the active use of the second language. Those content/skill areas which are outlined for the Advanced Placement Test by the College Board form the basis for the course of study. At the completion of this course, students may take the Advanced Placement Test and may receive college credit based upon their scores and requirements of the college of their choice. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

105353 - HNS SPANISH III

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Spanish I and Spanish II.


The third level of Spanish emphasizes greater and more sophisticated use of the four skills of listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Students are taught to demonstrate and use language and patterns of behavior appropriate to real life situations.

76

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
140120 SPANISH I NATIVE SPEAKERS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

Continued

PREREQUISITE: None for Native/heritage Speakers Spanish I and Spanish II for NonNative Speakers This course is designed specifically for native/heritage speakers of Spanish who already have some oral language proficiency. The purpose of this course is to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in Spanish. The course will allow students to explore the cultures of the Hispanic world including their own and it will enable students to gain a better understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. 14025 HONORS SPANISH II NATIVE SPEAKERS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Spanish for Native Speakers I for Native/heritage Speakers Spanish I and Spanish II for Non- Native Speakers This course is designed specifically for native/heritage speakers of Spanish who already have some oral language proficiency. The purpose of this course is to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in Spanish. The course will allow students to explore the cultures of the Hispanic world including their own and it will enable students to gain a better understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. Note: The objectives for Spanish for Native Speakers II are equivalent to Honors Spanish III as a foreign language.

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78

SUGGESTED MATHEMATICS COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

Algebra I

Honors Geometry

SOPHOMORE

Geometry/ Honors Geometry

Honors Algebra II

JUNIOR

Algebra II/ Honors Algebra II

Honors Pre-Calculus

SENIOR

Fourth Mathematics Course

Advanced Placement Calculus AB

Fourth Mathematic Courses: Honors Pre-Calculus, Honors Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Placement Statistics, Advanced Placement Calculus AB, Advanced Placement Calculus BC, Advanced Functions and Modeling Honors Mathematic Courses: Honors Algebra II, Honors Geometry, Honors Pre-Calculus, Advanced Placement Calculus AB, Advanced Placement Calculus BC, Honors Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Placement Statistics Honors mathematic courses are available to all students.
Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

79

MATHEMATICS
202327 - ALGEBRA I 202452 - HONORS ALGEBRA II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Algebra I / Geometry This course consists of a more in-depth study of the topics covered in Algebra II (202422) with emphasis on independent study/projects. 203025 GEOMETRY

Major topics include: number and quantity: real number system, quantities; algebra: structure in expressions, polynomials and rational expressions, reasoning with equations and inequalities; functions: interpreting and building functions, linear, quadratic, exponential models; geometry: congruence, geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension; statistic and probability: interpreting categorical and quantitative data. Graphing calculators used.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 PREREQUISITE: Algebra I Major topics include: geometry: congruence, similarity, right triangles, trigonometry, circles, proof, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension; statistic and probability: interpreting categorical and quantitative data, using probability to make decisions. Graphing calculators used. 203050 HONORS GEOMETRY

202422 - ALGEBRA II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra I

Algebra II extends concepts learned in Algebra I. Topics include: number and quantity: complex number system, vector and matrix quantities; algebra: structure in expressions, polynomials and rational expressions, reasoning with equations and inequalities; functions: interpreting and building functions, linear, quadratic, exponential models; statistics and probability: interpreting categorical and quantitative data, using probability to make decisions. Graphing calculators used.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10

PREREQUISITE: Algebra I

This course consists of a more in-depth study of the topics covered in Geometry 203025.

80

MATHEMATICS continued
20667 -- ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS

207050 - HONORS PRE-CALCULUS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: HNS Pre-Calculus An introduction to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: a.) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns; b.) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study; c.) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation; d.) statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Course syllabus is College Board approved. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry. Topics covered are functions, sequences, conics, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, limits, and data analysis. (Graphic calculator used).
207670 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: HNS Pre-Calculus Advance Placement Calculus develops the students understanding of the concepts of calculus (functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, and integrals) and provides experiences with its methods and applications. The course encourages the geometric, numerical, analytical, and verbal expression of concepts, results, and problems. Course syllabus is College Board approved. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

205050 - HONORS DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry Discrete Mathematics introduces students to the mathematics of networks, social choice, and decision making. The course extends students application of matrix arithmetic and probability. Applications and modeling are central to this course of study. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

81

MATHEMATICS continued
20777 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 PREREQUISITE: Advanced Placement Calculus AB Calculus BC is an extension of calculus AB. This course teacher topics associated with functions, graphs, and limits; derivatives and integrals; and polynomial approximations and series. The course encourages the geometric, numerical, analytical and verbal expression of concept, results, and problems. Course syllabus is College Board approved. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universalities AP credit policy requirements.
202520 ADVANCED FUNCTIONS AND MODELING

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry Advanced Functions and Modeling provides students and indepth study of modeling and applying functions. Home, work, recreation, consumer issues, public policy, and scientific investigations are just a few of the areas from which applications should originate. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment. *Prior approval by the school administrator

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83

SUGGESTED SCIENCE COURSES SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN
EARTH SCIENCE HONORS EARTH SCIENCE HONORS EARTH SCIENCE

SOPHOMORE

BIOLOGY

HONORS BIOLOGY

HONORS BIOLOGY/ ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY

JUNIOR

PHYSICAL SCIENCE / CHEMISTRY

HONORS CHEMISTRY / HONORS PHYSICS

HONORS CHEMISTRY / ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY

SENIOR

SCIENCE ELECTIVES

SCIENCE ELECTIVES

SCIENCE ELECTIVES

SCIENCE ELECTIVES
Chemistry Honors Chemistry Honors Anatomy & Physiology Honors Marine Science Honors Physics Advanced Placement Biology Advanced Placement Chemistry Advanced Placement Environmental Science Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics

* Honors science courses


are available to all students

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SCIENCE
301022 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE 302021 BIOLOGY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra I A traditional approach to the principles, concepts, and processes of science dealing with matter and energy. Topics include the atom, periodic table, chemical reactions, motion, forces, and energy, heat energy, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light. Students need a basic calculator. NO EOC 303821 EARTH/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 PREREQUISITE: Earth/Environmental Science A study of principles, concepts, and processes involving organisms and their environment. Topics include: the nature of life; the continuity of life, organisms, behavior of living things, biology of humans, ecology, and the dynamics of biology to people. This course has an EOC. 302050 - HONORS BIOLOGY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: None An introductory course dealing with the study of principles, concepts, and processes involving the environment with special emphasis on the Sandhills area. Topics include air, water, soil, plants, animals and mans influence upon each area. 303850 HONORS EARTH/ ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 PREREQUISITE: Earth / Environment Science An in-depth study of principles, concepts, and processes involving organisms and their environment. Topics include: the nature of life; the continuity of life, organisms, behavior of living things, biology of humans, ecology, and the dynamics of biology to people. This course has an EOC.

302170 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: Honors Biology PREREQUISITE: None An introductory course dealing with the study of principles, concepts, and processes involving the environment with special emphasis on the Sandhills area. Topics include air, water, soil, plants, animals and mans influence upon each area. This course will be taught at a faster pace and in greater depth.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

This course provides an in-depth study of the three broad areas of the biological sciences: molecular and cellular biology, organismal biology, and populational biology. College-level textbooks will be used, and laboratory experiments and observations will be an integral part of the course. Students must be willing to devote six hours of outside study and preparation time a week. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SCIENCE Continued
305021 - CHEMISTRY 302350 - HONORS ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra II & Biology A laboratory course in which chemical nomenclature, measurements and laboratory techniques are emphasized. Students study the periodic table, chemical reactions, energy relationships, atomic theory and chemical bonding. Students need scientific calculators and a lab notebook. 305051 - HONORS CHEMISTRY 306051 - HONORS PHYSICS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Algebra II and Biology A laboratory course for the serious science student. This course covers material in Chemistry and additional topics in chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and nuclear chemistry. Students use scientific calculators and a lab notebook. 305170 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY PREREQUISITE: Biology PREREQUISITE: Biology

Anatomy and Physiology is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in the health sciences. Emphasis will be placed on study of the function and structure of the human body. Laboratory investigations will be used to study important concepts.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12

A mathematical approach to physics with components which include the study of forces in motion, electromagnetic wave theory, thermodynamics and electricity.

30445 - HONORS MARINE SCIENCE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Honors Chemistry This course is the equivalent of an introductory college chemistry course. Students cover topics in chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Emphasis is placed on advanced laboratory techniques. An advanced text is used. This course is taught at a faster pace and is designed to prepare students for Advanced Placement Chemistry Test. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements. Prerequisite: Biology

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

This course is intended for students who are interested in learning about the oceans of the world and the organisms that live in them. Laboratory activities and field trips will be an integral part of the course. Students will study marine plants, invertebrates, ecology, sand beaches, dunes and marine biomes.

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SCIENCE Continued

30427 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

30647 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C: MECHANICS

1 CREDIT GRADE 10 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Honors Biology AP Environmental Science provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the natural world. Students will evaluate environmental problems and evaluate risks associated with these problems. There are six interdisciplinary environmental concepts that provide the foundation for this course. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

PREREQUISITE: Honors Physics or Honors Chemistry Physics C: Mechanics will provide instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinetics; Newtons laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Students will spend a minimum of 20 percent of instructional time engaged in hands-on laboratory experiments. This course is designed to prepare student for the Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics Test.

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SUGGESTED SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

CIVICS AND ECONOMICS

HONORS CIVICS AND ECONOMICS/

SOPHOMORE

WORLD HISTORY

HONORS WORLD HISTORY or ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY

JUNIOR
US HISTORY ADVANCED PLACEMENT US HISTORY or HONORS US HISTORY AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOV/ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCH

SENIOR

ELECTIVES

9TH GRADE ELECTIVES


African American Studies Twentieth Century Civil Liberties and Civil Rights Law and Justice Minority Studies Native American Studies AP GOVERNMENT, AP PSYCHOLOGY, AP WORLD HISTORY, AP EUROPEAN HISTORY OR ELECTIVE

10TH-12TH GRADE ELECTIVES


AP Human Geography African American Studies Twentieth Century Civil Liberties and Civil Rights Community Law and Justice Minority Studies Native American Studies Psychology Sociology Turning Point in American History World Humanities

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SOCIAL STUDIES REQUIRED COURSES

405222 - CIVICS AND ECONOMICS

402420 - WORLD HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: None The essential standards of this course are organized under three strandsCivics and Government, Personal Financial Literacy and Economics. The Civics and Government strand is framed to develop students increased understanding of the institutions of constitutional democracy and the fundamental principles and values upon which they are founded, the skills necessary to participate as effective and responsible citizens and the knowledge of how to use democratic procedures for making decisions and managing conflict. The Economic ad Personal Financial Literacy strands are framed to provide students with an understanding of the role economic factors play in making economic decisions. 405252 - HONORS CIVICS AND ECONOMICS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics Students taking this will study major turning points that shaped the modern world. The learning standards of this course have been written to focus around a basic core of chronologically organized periods and events in history in order to have a set of learning standards that can be reasonably taught and learned with some depth and not just memorization of facts.

402450 - HONORS WORLD HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics Students taking this will study major turning points that shaped the modern world. The learning standards of this course have been written to focus around a basic core of chronologically organized periods and events in history in order to have a set of learning standards that can be reasonably taught and learned with some depth and not just memorization of facts. 402120 - UNITED STATES HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: None The essential standards of this course are organized under three strandsCivics and Government, Personal Financial Literacy and Economics. The Civics and Government strand is framed to develop students increased understanding of the institutions of constitutional democracy and the fundamental principles and values upon which they are founded, the skills necessary to participate as effective and responsible citizens and the knowledge of how to use democratic procedures for making decisions and managing conflict. The Economic ad Personal Financial Literacy strands are framed to provide students with an understanding of the role economic factors play in making economic decisions.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics / World History This course will begin with the European exploration of the new world through Reconstruction. Students will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States from the European exploration and colonial settlement to the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. Students will learn about the important political and economic factors that contributed to the development of colonial America and the outbreak of the American Revolution as well as consequences of the Revolution, including the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution.

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SOCIAL STUDIES REQUIRED COURSES

402150 -HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics / World History This course will begin with the European exploration of the new world through Reconstruction. Students will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States from the European exploration and colonial settlement to the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. Students will learn about the important political and economic factors that contributed to the development of colonial America and the outbreak of the American Revolution as well as consequences of the Revolution, including the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

401121 - AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

4044200S - CONTEMPORARY LAW AND JUSTICE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12 PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: None Students will examine how African Americans have made significant contributions to the economic, political, social, and cultural developments of the United States. Through this course, students discover how African Americans have always been an integral part of the American experience; however, African Americans have also been a viable force unto themselves with their own experiences, culture, and aspirations. African American history cannot be understood except in the broader context of the United States history. This course examines the criminal justice system of the United States. Students study the history, philosophy, and organization of our criminal justice system, focusing on significant historical developments, contemporary issues, and understanding. Mock trials, small group exercises, and guest lectures are used to address crime in America, policing, adjudication, corrections, and special issues. 406020 SOCIOLOGY

401222 - AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11- 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12 PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: None American Indian Studies introduces students to the diverse history and culture of American Indians beginning with life prior to Columbus. Important issues American Indians have faced from prehistoric societies to present-day contemporary society are discussed. Students immerse themselves in Americas oldest and continuous civilizations and cultures with a focus on American Indians of North Carolina. 41032 TWENTIETH CENTURY CIVIL LIBERTIES AND CIVIL RIGHTS Students of sociology engage in an exploration of the social science devoted to studying individuals and their group interaction. Students will examine behavior and how group involvement shapes individual and group behavior. Students will analyze the rules, organizations, and value systems that enable people to live together. Students of sociology acquire information from a variety of sources: written, visual, oral, and through interviews and surveys. They use information to plan their work, to solve both hypothetical and real problems and to reach decisions about preferred courses of action. 400920 MINORITY STUDIES

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-12 PREREQUISITE: None America is a multi-ethnic, diverse place to live. This class will examine the history, struggles, success and similarities of diverse groups of 20th century Americans who protested on behalf of civil liberties and civil rights. PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

America is a multi-ethnic, diverse place to live. There were many ports of entry and many people entered, thus bringing their cultures, attitudes, values, heritages, interests and behaviors. This course will focus on the many people and their contributions as well as the treatment they received upon coming to America.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES continued


41022 TURNING POINT IN AMERICAN HISTORY

4080201S - PSYCHOLOGY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-12 PREREQUISITE: None

PREREQUISITE: None In this historical study of key turning points in American history, students will examine the operations, policies, institutional growth, and administrative and technological developments from colonial times to the recent past. Students will assess the impact of various turning point in American History and how they have shaped our nation today.

Psychology engages students in the understanding, articulation, and dissemination of psychology as a science. Students are introduced to psychology, with a focus on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, and personality. It emphasizes the empirical examination of behavior and mental processes and it infuses perspectives fostering students growth, development, and understanding of cultural diversity. Students of psychology acquire information from a variety of sources, use information as they make decisions and evaluations, and solve problems. The study of psychology enables students to recognize and cope with uncertainty and ambiguity in human behavior. 41052 WORLD HUMANITIES

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12

PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics / World History World Humanities is an integrated study of the various ways in which people, from every time period, and across the world, proves and document the human experience. Students will examine enduring human problems and become more culturally sensitive to all humanity.

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SOCIAL STUDIES AP COURSES


40327 ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 402371 ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: 402171 - AP U.S. History PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics Advanced Placement Human Geography course is a college level survey course that will introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earths surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements. 402171-ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY Advanced Placement European History is a college-level survey course that covers the time period from approximately 1450 until the present. The course will cover economic, social, cultural, intellectual, political, and diplomatic theme in European history. Students will be expected to develop analytical thinking and persuasive writing skills in dealing with historical evidence and interpretation. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements. 40717 ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12 PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics / World History This course takes a chronological approach beginning with the colonial period and ending with contemporary problems facing the United States. Students will get a thorough grounding in the relevant facts, but should be able to go from these facts to examine their significance. Outside reading will be emphasized as a student analyzes historical material through detailed essay questions. Emphasis is also on interpreting primary source materials.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics Advanced Placement World History is a college-level survey course that covers the time period from prehistory until present. The course will cover economic, social, cultural, intellectual, political, and diplomatic themes in World history. Students will be expected to develop analytical thinking and persuasive writing skills in dealing with historical evidence and interpretation.

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SOCIAL STUDIES AP COURSES continued


40807 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 400470S ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-12

PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics PREREQUISITE: Civics and Economics / World History Advanced Placement Psychology is a college-level survey course that engages students in the understanding, articulation, and dissemination of psychology as a science. Students are introduced to psychology, with a focus on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, and personality. It emphasizes the empirical examination of behavior and mental processes and it infuses perspectives fostering students growth, development, and understanding of cultural diversity. Students of psychology acquire information from a variety of sources, use information as they make decisions and evaluations, and solve problems. The study of psychology enables students to recognize and cope with uncertainty and ambiguity in human behavior. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements. Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics will provide students an intellectual foundation for observing, analyzing, and understanding national politics in the United States. Using primary and secondary source documents, as well as analysis of specific examples, students will examine and evaluate the institutions of American government , political parties and elections, mass media, political behavior, public policies, and the development of individual rights and liberties and their impact on citizens. The content of this course is the equivalent to that of an introductory college course in U.S. government and politics.

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SUGGESTED FINE ARTS COURSE SEQUENCES


VOCAL MUSIC (Beginning) Chorus I VOCAL MUSIC (Beginning) Chorus II

FRESHMAN

VISUAL ARTS (Beginning) I

THEATRE ARTS I (Beginning)

SOPHOMORE

VISUAL ARTS (Intermediate) II

THEATRE ARTS (Intermediate) (Studio Theatre) II

VOCAL MUSIC (Intermediate) CONCERT CHOIR I VOCAL MUSIC (Intermediate) CONCERT CHOIR II

JUNIOR

HONORS VISUAL ARTS III (Proficient)

HONORS THEATRE ARTS (Proficient) T/A III

HONORS VOCAL MUSIC (Proficient) ENSEMBLE IFALL III HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (Proficient) ENSEMBLE ISPRING III

SENIOR

HONORS VISUAL ARTS IV (Advanced)

HONORS THEATRE ARTS (Advanced) T/A IV

Advanced Placement Studio Art: 2-D Design Advanced Placement Music Theory

HONORS VOCAL MUSIC (Advanced) ENSEMBLE IIFALL IV HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (Advanced) ENSEMBLE IISPRING IV

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

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SUGGESTED FINE ARTS COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

BAND (Beginning) FALL I BAND (Beginning) SPRING I

JAZZ ENSEMBLE I

SOPHOMORE

BAND (Intermediate) FALL II BAND (Intermediate) FALL II

JAZZ ENSEMBLE II

JUNIOR

HONORS BAND (Proficient-Fall III) HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (Proficient) BANDSpring III

JAZZ ENSEMBLE III

SENIOR
HONORS BAND (Advanced-Fall IV) HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (Advanced) BANDSpring IV

JAZZ ENSEMBLE IV

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FINE ARTS
523020 VOCAL MUSIC (BEGINNING) CHORUS I 523121 VOCAL MUSIC (INTERMEDIATE) CONCERT CHOIR I

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 12 PREREQUISITE: None Chorus I is a choir of mixed voices. Its primary objectives are to develop the vocal instrument and sight-reading skills. Emphasis is placed on choral development through the study of vocal anatomy and the sight reading of music through the use of solfege syllables. Members are REQUIRED to attend ALL CONCERTS. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading. 523022 VOCAL MUSIC (BEGINNING) CHORUS II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 12

PREREQUISITE: Audition and approval of Choral Director Concert Choir I is a choir of mixed voices. Its primary objectives are to develop an advanced vocal instrument and sight-reading skills. Emphasis is placed on choral development through the study of vocal anatomy and the sight reading of music through the use of solfege syllables. Members are REQUIRED to attend ALL CONCERTS. Students will receive instruction on advanced aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading. Particular emphasis is placed on performing unaccompanied music. This class will require occasional performances outside of the school environment (i.e. contests, competitions, etc.) 523122 VOCAL MUSIC (INTERMEDIATE) CONCERT CHOIR II

PREREQUISITE: None Chorus II is a choir of mixed voices. Its primary objectives are to develop the vocal instrument and sight-reading skills. Emphasis is placed on choral development through the study of vocal anatomy and the sight reading of music through the use of solfege syllables. Members are REQUIRED to attend ALL CONCERTS. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading. 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 12

PREREQUISITE: Audition and approval of Choral Director Concert Choir II is a choir of mixed voices. Its primary objectives are to develop an advanced vocal instrument and sight-reading skills. Emphasis is placed on choral development through the study of vocal anatomy and the sight-reading of music through the use of solfege syllables. Members are REQUIRED to attend ALL CONCERTS. Students will receive instruction on advanced aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading. Particular emphasis is placed on performing unaccompanied music. This class will require occasional performances outside of the school environment (i.e. contests, competitions, etc.)

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FINE ARTS continued

523251 - HONORS VOCAL MUSIC (PROFICIENT) ENSEMBLE I - FALL III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

523352 - HONORS VOCAL MUSIC (ADVANCED) ENSEMBLE II - FALL IV

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Audition, superior vocal quality, previous participation in concert choir I, II, and superior music reading skills. Students must have and approval of the choral director. Membership is limited to 16 students (4 soprano, 4 alto, 4 tenor, 4 bass) Vocal ensemble members will be selected by the director. Students are required to participate in all adjudicated trips, all evening or added rehearsals, and many scheduled concerts. Maximum dedication to the group is expected. Each choir student is required to meet with the director four times per marking period for personal or small group vocal instruction. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading.

PREREQUISITE: Audition, superior vocal quality, previous participation in concert choir I, II, and superior music reading skills. Students must have and approval of the choral director. Membership is limited to 16 students (4 soprano, 4 alto, 4 tenor, 4 bass) Vocal ensemble members will be selected by the director. Students are required to participate in all adjudicated trips, all evening or added rehearsals, and many scheduled concerts. Maximum dedication to the group is expected. Each choir student is required to meet with the director four times per marking period for personal or small group vocal instruction. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading.

521850 - HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (PROFICIENT) ENSEMBLE I - SPRING III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

521951 - HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (ADVANCED) ENSEMBLE II - SPRING IV

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Audition, superior vocal quality, previous participation in concert choir I, II, and superior music reading skills. Students must have and approval of the choral director. Membership is limited to 16 students (4 soprano, 4 alto, 4 tenor, 4 bass) Vocal ensemble members will be selected by the director. Students are required to participate in all adjudicated trips, all evening or added rehearsals, and many scheduled concerts. Maximum dedication to the group is expected. Each choir student is required to meet with the director four times per marking period for personal or small group vocal instruction. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading.

PREREQUISITE: Audition, superior vocal quality, previous participation in concert choir I, II, and superior music reading skills. Students must have and approval of the choral director. Membership is limited to 16 students (4 soprano, 4 alto, 4 tenor, 4 bass) Vocal ensemble members will be selected by the director. Students are required to participate in all adjudicated trips, all evening or added rehearsals, and many scheduled concerts. Maximum dedication to the group is expected. Each choir student is required to meet with the director four times per marking period for personal or small group vocal instruction. Students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal technique and sight-reading.

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525520 - BAND (BEGINNING) FALL I 525621 BAND (INTERMEDIATE) SPRING II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: Band (Beginning) Fall I PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed for students who have successfully completed eighth grade band. Emphasis is on furthering basic skills while exploring and performing music that is on a Grade III/IV level. All performances are required and will be graded. Emphasis is on furthering skills while exploring and performing music that is on a Grade IV level. All performance are required and will be graded. 521851 HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (PROFICIENT) BAND-SPRING III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed for students who have successfully completed eighth grade band. Emphasis is on furthering basic skills while exploring and performing music that is on a Grade III/IV level. All performances are required and will be graded. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Band (proficient) 3. Emphasis is on refining performance skills and techniques while performing music that is on a Grade IV/V level. All performances are required and will be graded.

525521 - BAND (BEGINNING) SPRING I

PREREQUISITE: Band (Beginning) I, Band (Intermediate) II

525620 - BAND (INTERMEDIATE) FALL II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 12

PREREQUISITE:

None

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed 525520 and 525521. Emphasis is on furthering skills while exploring and performing music that is on a Grade IV level. All performances are required and will be graded.

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FINE ARTS continued


521950 - HONORS MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (ADVANCED) BAND-SPRING IV

526520 - JAZZ ENSEMBLE I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Band I PREREQUISITE: Fall Band IV Emphasis is on refining performance skills and techniques while performing music that is on a Grade V/VI level. All performances are required and will be graded. This course will explore the jazz idiom of music, with emphasis on jazz styles, improvisation skills, theory and ear training. Graded performances during and after the school day will be required.

525750 - HONORS BAND (PROFICIENT) FALL III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

526521 - JAZZ ENSEMBLE II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Jazz Ensemble I PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Band I, II and be in marching band during the same academic year. This course is designed for more advanced players. The emphasis will be on refining performance skills and techniques while performing music literature on a Grade VI level. Students will be required to complete out of class assignments and attend all performances. This course will explore the jazz idiom of music, with emphasis on jazz styles, improvisation skills, theory and ear training. Graded performances during and after the school day will be required.

525850 - HONORS BAND (ADVANCED) FALL IV

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of525750 and be in marching band during the same academic year. High school director approval. This course is designed for more advanced players. The emphasis will be on refining performance skills and techniques while performing music literature on a Grade VI level. Students will be required to complete out of class assignments and attend all performances.

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FINE ARTS continued


526522 - JAZZ ENSEMBLE III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 541622 - VISUAL ARTS (INTERMEDIATE) II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Jazz Ensemble II This course will explore the jazz idiom of music, with emphasis on jazz styles, improvisation skills, theory and ear training. Graded performances during and after the school day will be required. PREREQUISITE: Visual Arts I Successful completion of Visual Arts I is necessary for enrollment in this class. This course is designed for the interested and talented student on a selected basis. Emphasis will be placed on the same areas as Visual Arts I, only on a more sophisticated level.

526523 - JAZZ ENSEMBLE IV 54185 - HONORS VISUAL ARTS (ADVANCED) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Jazz Ensemble III This course will explore the jazz idiom of music, with emphasis on jazz styles, improvisation skills, theory and ear training. Graded performances during and after the school day will be required. PREREQUISITE: Honors Visual Arts (Proficient) Successful completion of Visual Arts III is necessary for enrollment in this course. This course is a continuation of the objectives learned in previous levels of visual art with much more sophistication. Instruction is geared to helping the individual student reach his/her maximum potential and prepare for continuation on a college level.

541521 - VISUAL ARTS (BEGINNING) I

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

54175 - HONORS VISUAL ARTS (PROFICIENT)

PREREQUISITE: None Art I is a course in which the student will develop positive attitudes about her/himself, about others, and about art. The student will develop the concepts and skills necessary for understanding and producing art. These include elements, principles, creativity, personal perception, and evaluation processes. They also include drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and fine craft processes. The development of a knowledge and appreciation of art in the past and present, along with the awareness of art as a vocation and profession, will also be included.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Visual Arts (Intermediate II) Successful completion of Visual Arts II is necessary for enrollment in this course. Emphasis will be placed on the same areas as Visual Arts I and II only on a much more sophisticated level. Students will have a greater concentration in selected media, designed to meet specific needs and individual abilities.

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FINE ARTS continued


531521 - THEATRE ARTS I (BEGINNING) INCLUDES TECHNICAL THEATRE 531753 - HONORS THEATRE ARTS (PROFICIENT) T/A III

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 PREREQUISITE: Audition

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Theatre Arts I and II

This course is an overview focused on the areas of acting, play writing, directing, voice and articulation, theatre history, and improvisation. Participation, self-discipline, and self-motivation are required for successful completion of this course. Student involvement and performance is a daily to weekly event. This course also gives students an opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of theatre history by researching in depth world history and cultures identifying plays, playwrights, dramatic styles and historical facts. Students are required to read one one-act play. Writing and vocabulary skills are strengthened through daily journal writings, script writing and the study of theatre terms. The ability to work in a group is essential.

531622 - THEATRE ARTS (INTERMEDIATE) STUDIO THEATRE II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Theater arts I and audition for theatre arts teacher. Reading of 2 one-act plays required. Studio theater will revolve around the production of plays for public viewing, videotaping, and traveling to community functions and competition. Students will perform both printed plays from scripts, and student-written works. Improvisation will be a standard in the class. Acting will be studied from three viewpoints: for stage, for television, and for film. Creative movement and voice will be blended with this course to produce a total theatre approach. This class necessitates after school assignments and projects which will involve after school rehearsals and performances for the public.

Theatre Arts III follows Theatre Arts II and is for students who wish to continue to study and develop their knowledge of theatre arts on a more challenging level. This course involves the applied study of theatre vocabulary, reading and writing of theatre literature, acting, and technical theatre. Acting experience in Theatre Arts III continues and refines the exploration of the concepts of self, body and voice work, improvisation, acting techniques, and reading and writing. Reading requirement: 3 full-length plays from varied time periods. In addition, students begin to practice individual analysis and critiquing of student work to develop a personal understanding of theatre arts by utilizing the knowledge base gained in previous study. Theatre study at this level places a greater emphasis on the execution of skills, ensemble work, and collaboration with other student artists. Students use a wider variety of theatre literature and styles from theatre history and various cultures in forms of theatre and theatre related media through informal and formal productions. Students continue to add to their portfolio or collection of work and related activities to illustrate their growing understanding of accomplishments in theatre arts. This class necessitates after school assignments and projects which will involve after school rehearsals and performances for the public. 54612 - VISUAL ARTS SPECIALIZATION (BEGINNING) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-12

PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed to establish an understanding of art, to develop an appreciation for the relation between art and man, and to study the cultural and historical contexts of artistic production and reception.

104

FINE ARTS continued


531854 - HONORS THEATRE ARTS (ADVANCED) T/A IV 52162 - MUSIC SPECIALIZATION (BEGINNING)

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Theatre arts I, II and III Theatre Arts IV follows Theatre Arts III and is for students who wish to complete the broad-based study of theatre arts. Through more independent study and increased production responsibilities, study in Theatre Arts IV involves the application of expertise prepared for and acquired in previous theatre arts studies. Analysis of theatre processes, self-motivation, personal discipline and more demanding projects in directing, design, and writing are emphasized. The acting experience in Theatre Arts IV concludes the exploration of the concepts of self, body and voice work, improvisation, acting techniques, and reading and writing. Reading requirement: 4 full-length plays from varied time periods. Independent work in this course develops commitment, helps students form aesthetic judgments and refine artistic choices. Students finish and evaluate their portfolio, or collection of their work and related activities, to illustrate their learning, experiences, accomplishments and growth in theatre arts. This class necessitates after school assignments and projects which will involve after school rehearsals and performances for the public. PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed to engage students in the development of knowledge and understanding of music. Emphasis given to the forms of music found in different periods and the relationship of music to general cultural development.

52157 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-12

PREREQUISITE: Prior Music Experience & Approval of Principal upon Teacher Recommendation Advanced Placement Music Theory is an advanced level music course. Students in this class will work towards a deeper understanding of the various building blocks of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, meter, texture and form. Students will seek to develop music writing skills through analysis, composition and notation. They will improve their musicianship through listening skills, sight-singing and harmonization at the keyboard and by singing. The work in this class is equivalent to a first year college music theory class and culminates with the AP exam. The students ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to this course and the student must have adequate performance skills in either voice or an instrument.

54537 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART: 2-D DESIGN 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-12

PREREQUISITE: None Students will create a portfolio of artwork where student demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery through a concentration. They will maintain a sketchbook to work out ideas and to show growth. They will also participate in individual and group activities. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Hoke County Schools will pay the fee for the AP exams. College credit may be given to students who score a 3 or higher on the AP examination. College credit is granted based on individual colleges and universities AP credit policy requirements.

105

106

SUGGESTED CAREER-TECHNICAL ED. COURSE SEQUENCES


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION BUSINESS, FINANCE and INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Principles of Business & Finance (10 - 12) Microsoft: Word, PowerPoint, and Publisher (9 - 10) CAREER DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION FAMILY and CONSUMER SCIENCE EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION

Agriscience Applications (9 - 10)

Career Management (9 - 10)

Foods I (9 - 10)

Health Team Relations (9 - 10)

Horticulture I (10 - 11)

Parenting and Child Development (9 or 10)

Biomedical Technology (9 - 10)

HNS Horticulture II (11 - 12)

Microsoft: Excel and Access (9 - 10) Multimedia and Webpage Design 10 - 12 Accounting I (10 - 11) HNS Accounting II (11 - 12) HNS E-Commerce I (11 - 12)

Fashion Merchandising (10) Apparel I (10 or 11)

Health Science I (10)

Health Science II (11)

Apparel II Enterprise (11 or 12) Personal Finance (11-12)

Nursing Fundamentals (12)

Introduction Culinary Arts & Hospitality (11 or 12) Culinary Arts & Hospitality I (11 or 12) Culinary Arts & Hospitality II (12) Early Childhood Ed. I (11) HNS Early Childhood Ed. II (12)

Business Law (10 - 12)

Business Management (11 - 12)

107

SUGGESTED CAREER-TECHNICAL ED. COURSE SEQUENCES

MARKETING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

Principles of Business & Finance (10 - 12)

Core & Sustainable Construction (9 - 10) Carpentry I ( 10 - 11)

Automotive Services (10 - 11)

Drafting I (9 - 10)

Electronics I (10 - 11)

Marketing (10 - 11)

Automotive Brakes (11 -12)

Drafting II Architecture Honors (10 - 12) Drafting III Architecture Honors (11 - 12) Drafting II Engineering Honors (10 or 12) Drafting III Engineering Honors (11 - 12)

HNS Electronics II (10 - 11)

Marketing Management (11 - 12)

Carpentry II ( 10 - 12)

Automotive Computer System Diagnostics (11 - 12) Automotive Electrical (11 12)

Electronics III (11 - 12)

Entrepreneurship I (10 - 11)

Carpentry III ( 12)

Entrepreneurship II (11 or 12)

Automotive Electrical Advance (11 12)

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

Cosmetology I (11)

Welding Technology I (10 or 11) Welding Technology II (11 or 12) Welding Technology III (11 or 12)

Computer Engineering Technology I (10 or 11) Computer Engineering Technology II (11 or 12)

Cosmetology II (12)

108

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


681021 AGRISCIENCE APPLICATIONS 684255 -HNS HORTICULTURE II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-10

PREREQUISITE: None This course focuses on integrating biological/physical sciences with technology as related to the environment, natural resources, food production, science, and agribusiness. Topics of instruction include agricultural awareness and literacy, employability skills and introduction to all aspects of the total agricultural industry. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 684121 HORTICULTURE I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10-11

PREREQUISITE: Horticulture I This course covers instruction that expands scientific knowledge and skills to include more advanced scientific computations and communication skills needed in the horticulture industry. Topics include greenhouse plant production and management, bedding plant production, watering systems, light effects, basic landscape design, installation and maintenance, lawn and turf grass management, and personal development. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

PREREQUISITE: None This course provides instruction on the broad field of horticulture with emphasis on the scientific and technical knowledge for a career in horticulture. Topics in this course include plant growth and development, plant nutrition, media selection, basic plant identification, pest management, chemical disposal, customer relations, and career opportunities. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, mentorship, schoolbased enterprise, job shadowing, and supervised agricultural experience. FFA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

109

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION BUSINESS, FINANCE AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
631121 - ACCOUNTING I 64172 MICROSOFT WORD, POWERPOINT, AND PUBLISHER 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10

PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of the accounting cycle. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and recording of business transactions, preparation, and interpretation of financial statements, accounting systems, banking and payroll activities, basic types of business ownership, and an accounting career orientation. Mathematics is reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 63125 HONORS ACCOUNTING II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: None Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from worldclass Microsoft curriculum and software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. In the first part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft Word interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, share and create complex documents, and publish them. In the second part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft PowerPoint interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, and deliver presentations. In the last part, students will learn to use the basic features of the newest version of Publisher to create, customize, and publish a publication. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, internship, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. This course can help prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) in Word and/or PowerPoint, http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/ mos.aspx.

PREREQUISITE: Accounting I This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge of accounting procedures and techniques utilized in solving business problems and making financial decisions. Emphasis includes departmental accounting, corporate accounting, cost accounting, and inventory control systems, managerial accounting and budgeting, and further enhancement of accounting skills. Mathematics is reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

110

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION BUSINESS, FINANCE AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
64192 MICROSOFT EXCEL AND ACCESS 64142 MULTIMEDIA AND WEBPAGE DESIGN

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 PREREQUISITE: None Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from worldclass Microsoft curriculum and cutting-edge software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. The first part of the class is designed to help you use the newest version of Microsoft Excel interface, commands, and features to present, analyze, and manipulate various types of data. Students will learn to manage workbooks as well as how to manage, manipulate, and format data. In the second part of the class, students will learn how to create and work with a database and its objects by using the new and improved features in newest version of Microsoft Access. Students will learn how to create, modify, and locate information as well as how to create programmable elements and share and distribute database information. Mathematics is reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, internship, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. This course can help prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) in Excel and/or Access, http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/ mos.aspx. .

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Microsoft Word, Powerpoint and Publisher or Microsoft Excel and Access This course focuses on desktop publishing, graphic image design, computer animation, virtual reality, multimedia production, and webpage design. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced through software applications. English language arts and arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, internship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 64155- HONORS E-COMMERCE I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Multimedia and Webpage Design This course is designed to help students master skills in the design and construction of complex web sites for conducting business electronically. Emphasis is on skill development in advanced web page construction and entrepreneurial applications of conducting business electronically as well as economic, social, legal, and ethical issues related to electronic business. Students learn through project-based applications as they plan, design, create, publish, maintain, and promote an e-commerce website. Art is reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. FBLA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

111

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION BUSINESS, FINANCE AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
87212 - PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS AND FINANCE 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: Principles of Business and Finance This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. English language arts, social studies, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Cooperative education is not available for this course. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) and Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. This course expands student understanding of management, including customer relationship management, human resources management, information management, knowledge management, productdevelopment management, project management, quality management, and strategic management. Economics, finance, and professional development are also stressed throughout the course. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 87102 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

621520 - BUSINESS LAW

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Principles of Business and Finance This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic legal principles common to all aspects of business and personal law. Business topics include contract law, business ownership including intellectual property, financial law, and national and international laws. Personal topics include marriage and divorce law, purchasing appropriate insurance, renting and owning real estate, employment law, and consumer protection laws. Social studies and English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, internship, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

112

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION


703521 - APPAREL I 704522 - FOODS I

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 PREREQUISITE: None In this course students are introduced to clothing production in the areas of preparation for clothing construction, basic clothing construction techniques, consumer decisions, textiles, historical perspectives and design, and career opportunities. Emphasis is placed on students applying these construction and design skills to apparel and home fashion. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and Cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10

This course examines the nutritional needs of the individual. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of diet to health, kitchen and meal management, food preparation and sustainability for a global society, and time and resource management. English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

703622 - APPAREL II - ENTERPRISE

71202 - INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS and HOSPITALITY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: Apparel I In this course students are introduced to advanced clothing and housing apparel development skills. The use of fibers and fabrics is combined with design and construction techniques to develop and produce clothing or housing apparel products. A real or simulated apparel business enterprise and FCCLA activities allow students to apply instructional strategies and workplace readiness skills to an authentic experience and to develop a portfolio. Mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: None (Foods I is recommended as preparation for this course) In this course, basic safety and sanitation practices leading to a national industry-recognized food safety credential are introduced. Commercial equipment, smallwares, culinary math, and basic knife skills in a commercial foodservice facility are taught. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

113

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION


712121 - CULINARY ARTS and HOSPITALITY I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 663120 - FASHION MERCHANDISING

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 PREREQUISITE: None In this course students are introduced to the fashion and merchandising industries. Students acquire transferable knowledge and skills among the concepts of the business of fashion, fashion promotion events, the evolution and movement of fashion, the fashion industry, career development, merchandising of fashion, and the selling of fashion. Mathematics and science are reinforced. Workbased learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) and Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality This course focuses on basic skills in cold and hot food production, baking and pastry, and service skills. Art, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply instructional competencies and workplace readiness skills to authentic experiences. 712222 CULINARY ARTS and HOSPITALITY II

2 CREDITS GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Culinary Arts and Hospitality I This course provides advanced experiences in cold and hot and food production, management (front and back of the house), and service skills. Topics include menu planning, business management, and guest relations. Art, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing. Family, Career and Community leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

114

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION


711121 - EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION I 711252 - HNS EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION II

2 CREDITS GRADE: 11

2 CREDITS GRADE: 12 PREREQUISITE: Early Childhood Education I Students must be 16 by October 1 This two-credit course provides advanced experiences in working with children from infancy to age 12 in early education and child care settings. Areas of study include program planning and management, developmentally appropriate practice, procedures and strategies for working with special groups of children, and career development and professionalism. An internship makes up 50 percent of instructional time. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include internship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Cooperative education and apprenticeship are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Because they intern in early childhood centers that must meet NC Child Care General Statute 110.91, Section 8, students must be 16 years of age prior to October 1 to enroll in this course.

PREREQUISITE: Students must be 16 by October 1 This two-credit course prepares students to work with children in early education and child care settings. Areas of study include personal and professional preparation, child development from birth to age 12, techniques and procedures for working with young children, and history, trends and opportunities in this field. An internship makes up 50 percent of instructional time. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include internship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Cooperative education and apprenticeship are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Parenting and Child Development is recommended as preparation for this course. Because they intern in early childhood centers that must meet NC Child Care General Statute 110.91, Section 8, students must be 16 years of age prior to October 1 to enroll in this course.

115

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION


706524 - PARENTING AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 87262 - PERSONAL FINANCE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

This course introduces students to responsible nurturing and basic applications of child development theory with children from infancy through age six. Areas of study include parenthood decisions, child care issues, prenatal development and care, and development and care of infants, toddlers, and children three through six. Emphasis is on responsibilities of parents, readiness for parenting, and the influence parents have on children while providing care and guidance. Art, English language arts, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs. The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

116

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION


72402 - HEALTH SCIENCE I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 721021 - HEALTH TEAM RELATIONS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9-10 PREREQUISITE: None This course is designed to assist potential health care workers in their role and function as health team members. Topics include terminology, the history of health care, health care agencies, ethics, legal responsibilities, careers, holistic health, human needs, change, cultural awareness, communication, medical math, leadership, and career decision making. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning, field trips, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. English language arts and social studies are reinforced in this course. Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills to authentic experiences. 720020 - BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10

PREREQUISITE: None This course focuses on human anatomy, physiology and human body diseases and disorders, and biomedical therapies. Students will learn about health care careers within the context of human body systems. Projects, teamwork, and demonstrations serve as instructional strategies that reinforce the curriculum content. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Biology is recommended as preparation for this course. 72422 - HEALTH SCIENCE II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 PREREQUISITE: Health Sciences I This course is designed to help students expand their understanding of financing and trends of health care agencies, fundamentals of wellness, legal and ethical issues, concepts of teamwork, and effective communication. Students will learn health care skills, including current CPR and first aid training. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include internship, mentorship, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. *Class enrollment limited to 20 to establish a foundation of knowledge critical to the application of patient care skills.

PREREQUISITE: None This course challenges students to investigate current medical and health care practices using technology and advances in health care research. Topics include ethics, forensic medicine, infectious diseases, organ transplants, cell biology and cancer, and biomedical research. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

117

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION


72432 - NURSING FUNDAMENTALS 2 CREDITS GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: 7242 Health Science II This course is designed for students interested in medical careers where personal care and basic nursing skills are used. This course is an enhanced adaptation of the North Carolina Divisions of Health Service Regulation (DHSR) Nurse Aide I (NAI) curriculum and helps prepare students for the National Nurse Aide Assessment (NNAAP). Students who pass the NNAAP become listed on the NC NAI Registry. English language arts, mathematics, and science, are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include a required clinical internship in a long-term care agency. Healthcare agencies may require testing for tuberculosis and/or other diseases and a criminal record check for felonies related to drugs. Cooperative education is not available for this course. HOSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

118

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION MARKETING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION


662121 MARKETING 662220 MARKETING MANAGEMENT

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: None In this course, students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. Mathematics and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school.-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experience.

PREREQUISITE: 662121 Marketing or 663120 Fashion Merchandising In this course, students acquire an understanding of management environments of marketing concepts and functions. Topics include human resources, marketing information, products/services, distributing, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business decisions. English language arts and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

119

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION MARKETING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION


87162 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP I 87172 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: 662121 Marketing; 87262 Personal Finance; or 87212 Principles of Business and Finance

PREREQUISITE: 87162 Entrepreneurship I In this course, students develop an understanding of pertinent decisions to be made after obtaining financing to open a small business. Students acquire in-depth understanding of business regulations, risks, management, and marketing. Students develop a small-business management handbook. English language arts and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) and Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

In this course, students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. English language arts and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students) and Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

120

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


751121 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 751323 - AUTOMOTIVE COMPUTER SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12

PREREQUISITE: None PREREQUISITE: 751222 Automotive Brakes This course introduces basic automotive skills and job opportunities in the auto repair industry. Topics include engine theory, automotive service preventive maintenance, brake repair, electrical systems troubleshooting, safety, test equipment, and measuring. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.
75142 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL

This course is based upon the use of computer system diagnostic tools to read and diagnose computer codes in a variety of automotive types. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

75152 - AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL ADVANCED

1CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12

PREREQUISITE: 75142 Automotive Electrical PREREQUISITE: 7511 Automotive Service This course emphasizes automotive electrical/electronics and is basic for electrical/electronic automotive preparation. Basic inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of automotive electrical/electronic systems will be included in this course. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification in electrical/electronics. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplacereadiness skills through authentic experiences. 751121 Automotive Service is recommended as preparation for this course. This course emphasizes advanced electrical/electronics. Advanced inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of automotive electrical/electronic systems will be included in this course. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification in electrical/electronics. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to applyessential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

121

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDSTRIAL EDUCATION


751222 - AUTOMOTIVE BRAKES 799222 - COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY II

1 CREDIT GRADE:11-12 PREREQUISITE: 7511 Automotive Service This course teaches installation, inspection, and troubleshooting of automotive brake systems. Automotive Service Technology programs in North Carolina are National Automotive Technician Education (NATEF) certified. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, and job shadowing. 7511 Automotive Service is recommended as preparation for this course. This course helps prepare students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification in brakes. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 PREREQUISITE: 799121Computer Engineering Technology I This course includes advanced computer hardware, software, applications, troubleshooting, and customer service as integral parts of the course requirements. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for the CompTIA A+ credential. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 772121 - CARPENTRY I

799121 - COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

PREREQUISITE: 77002 Core and Sustainable Construction This course covers basic carpentry terminology and develops technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of introductory skills. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

PREREQUISITE: None This course introduces the essential hardware competencies for an entry-level PC service technician. This course focuses on the CompTIA A+ Core Hardware exam objectives. Students demonstrate basic knowledge of installing, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, and repairing microcomputer systems. The work-based strategy appropriate for this course is job shadowing. Hands-on experiences and SkillsUSA leadership activities provide many opportunities to enhance classroom instruction and career development.

122

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


772222 - CARPENTRY II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 77002 - CORE AND SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 PREREQUISITE: None This course covers the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) Core certification modules required for all of the NCCER curriculum-area programs, and an additional Green module. The course content includes: basic safety, introduction to construction math, introduction to hand tools, introduction to power tools, introduction to blueprints, material handling, basic communication skills, and basic employability skills, and Your Role in the Green Environment. The additional Green module has been added to provide students with instruction in the green environment, green construction practices, and green building rating systems. Also it will help students better understand their personal impacts on the environment and make them more aware of how to reduce their carbon footprint. English Language Arts and Mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for additional National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) Core certification. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

PREREQUISITE: Carpentry I This course covers additional technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of intermediate skills. The course content includes floor systems, wall and ceiling Framing, roof framing, introductions to concrete, reinforcing framing, roof framing, introductions to concrete, reinforcing materials and forms, windows and exterior doors, and basic stair layout. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this courseinclude apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for NationalCenter for ConstructionEducation andResearch (NCCER) certification. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.*Due to potentially hazardous processes and equipment a maximum enrollment of 20 is recommended. 772320 - CARPENTRY III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Carpentry II This course develops advanced technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of skills. The course content includes roofing applications, thermal and moisture protection, exterior finishing, cold formed steel framing and drywall installations. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps preparestudents for National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace.

123

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


8599U114 - SALON II 8598U111 - COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS I 2 CREDITS GRADES: 12

2 CREDITS GRADES: 11 PREREQUISITE: Salon I PREREQUISITE: None This course introduces basic cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, first aid, sanitation, bacteriology, anatomy, diseases and disorder, hygiene, product knowledge, chemistry ethics, manicures, and other related topics. Upon completion, student should be able to safely and competently apply cosmetology concepts in the salon setting.

This course provides experience in a simulated salon setting. Topics include basic skin care, manicuring, nail application, scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, chemical restructuring, pressing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate these salon services.

8598U112 - SALON I

792121 - DRAFTING I

2 CREDITS GRADES: 11 PREREQUISITE: None

1 CREDITS GRADE: 9 - 10

PREREQUISITE: None This course introduces basic salon services. Topics include scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, permanent waving, pressing relaxing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completing, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate salon services.

8599U113 - COSMETOLOGY CONCEPTS II 2 CREDITS GRADES: 12

PREREQUISITE: Cosmetology Concepts I This course covers more comprehensive cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, product knowledge, chemistry, manicuring, chemical restructuring, and hair coloring. Upon completing, students should be able to safely and competently apply these cosmetology concepts in the salon setting.

This course introduces students to the use of simple and complex graphic tools used to communicate and understand ideas and concepts found in the areas of architecture, manufacturing, engineering, science, and mathematics. Topics include problem-solving strategies, classical representation methods such as sketching, geometric construction techniques, as well as computer assisted design (CAD), orthographic projection, and 3-D modeling. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

124

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


797252 -HNS DRAFTING II - ENGINEERING 797353 - HONORS DRAFTING III - ENGINEERING

1 CREDITS GRADE: 10 - 12

1 CREDITS GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: 792121 Drafting I This course focuses on engineering graphics introducing the student to symbol libraries, industry standards, and sectioning techniques. Topics include coordinate systems, principles of machine processes and gearing, and the construction of 3-D wireframe models using computer assisted design (CAD). English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

PREREQUISITE: 797252 Drafting II - Engineering This course introduces the student to advanced engineering concepts using computer assisted design (CAD) tools. Topics studied include descriptive geometry, geometric tolerancing, and advanced engineering design concepts such as surface and solid modeling. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

796252-HONORS DRAFTING II - ARCHITECTURE 796353-HONORS DRAFTING III-ARCHITECTURE 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: 792121 Drafting I PREREQUISITE: 796252 Drafting II - Architectural This course focuses on the principles, concepts, and use of complex graphic tools used in the field of architecture, structural systems, and construction trades. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer assisted design (CAD) tools in the creation of floor plans, wall sections, and elevation drawings. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. This course introduces students to advanced architectural design concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer assisted design (CAD) tools in the design and execution of site and foundation plans as well as topographical information and detail drawings of stairs and wall sections. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

125

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


763121 - ELECTRONICS I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 763320 - ELECTRONICS III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: None This course covers electronic practices and fundamentals, roles of electronics in communications and industry, and career development based upon the Electronic Technicians Association (ETA) areas of digital and direct current. Topics include safety, tools, schematics, soldering, measuring electricity, Ohms/Watts/Kirchhoffs Laws, power, and circuits. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for ETA certification in Digital and Direct Current. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Algebra I is recommended as good preparation for this course. 763252- HONORS ELECTRONICS II

PREREQUISITE: HNS Electronics II This course is based upon the Electronic Technicians Association (ETA) areas of Comprehensive Basics. Topics include soldering, desoldering, tools, electrical conductors, AC power distribution, circuit protection, circuit controls, generators, motors, interfacing of electronics products, and technician work procedures. Mathematics, science, and English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course can help prepare student for ETA certification in Comprehensive Basic. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Algebra I is recommended as preparation for this course. 766121 - WELDING TECHNOLOGY I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

PREREQUISITE: Electronics I This course covers advanced practices, principles, and special equipment and materials based upon the Electronic Technicians Association (ETA) areas of analog and alternating current. Topics include safety, alternating current, inductive/capacitive/RCL circuits, semiconductor devices, rectifiers/ filter circuits, and bipolar transistors. English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for ETA certification in Analog and Alternating Current. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Algebra I is recommended as good preparation for this course.

PREREQUISITE: None This course covers basic industrial and construction welding practices, occupation characteristics, and employment opportunities. Topics include safety, tools, print reading, measurement, thermal cutting processes, base metal preparation and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). Arts, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

126

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


766222 - WELDING TECHNOLOGY II

CAREER DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION


614529 - CAREER MANAGEMENT 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 12 PREREQUISITE: Welding Technology I This course introduces advanced welding and cutting practices used in industry and construction and emphasizes hands-on experience. Topics include weld fit-up and testing, metal properties, gas metal (GMAW), flux cored (FCAW), and shielded metal (SMAW) arc welding. Arts, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course. PREREQUISITE: None

766323 - WELDING TECHNOLOGY III

This course prepares students to locate, secure, keep, and change careers. Emphasis is placed on self-assessment of characteristics, interests, and values; education and career exploration; evaluation of career information and creation of a career plan. Based on the National Career Development Guidelines, skills learned in this course include, but are not limited to communications, interpersonal skills, problem solving, personal management and teamwork. English language arts are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include business/industry field trips, internships, job shadowing, and service learning. Student participation in Career and Technical Student Organization, (CTSO) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

1 CREDITS GRADE: 11 12 PREREQUISITE: 766222 Welding Technology II This course is designed to continue the development of advanced welding and cutting practices used in industry and construction and emphasizes hands-on experience. Further emphasis is placed on topics covered in Welding Technology II such as a weld fit-up and testing, metal properties, gas metal (GMAW), flu cored (FCAW), and shielded metal (SMAW) arc welding. Arts, English language arts, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, and job shadowing. SkillsUSA competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. Geometry is recommended as preparation for this course.

127

128

SUGGESTED HEALTH & PHYSICAL ED. COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

Health/PE

Intro to Physical Conditioning

SOPHOMORE

Physical Conditioning

Basic Athletic Training

Sports

JUNIOR

Physical Conditioning

Basic Athletic Training

Sports

SENIOR

Physical Conditioning

Basic Athletic Training

Lifetime Sports

Sports Officiating & Scorekeeper

129

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


STUDENTS MAY TAKE NO MORE THAN ONE PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE PER TERM
901528MF - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING MAINTENANCE PROGRAM FALL TERM ONLY 901120- HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

PREREQUISITE: Continue from spring program PREREQUISITE: None Health and Physical Education is a required course that is needed for graduation from high school in North Carolina. Four and one half weeks of each 9 weeks will be spent in the classroom where Health Education will be the primary objective. Four and a half weeks of each 9 weeks will be spent in Physical Education Fundamentals. The instructor will select sports from the following areas: flag football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, softball, track, recreational sports and cardiovascular conditioning. Sports videos will be shown periodically. This course stresses body development through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program through the use of weight training equipment.

901529MS - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING BIGGER FASTER STRONGER PROGRAM SPRING TERM ONLY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

901524IPC - INTRO TO PHYSICAL CONDITIONING PREREQUISITE: Health and Physical Education 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 Emphasis placed on gaining strength. This course stresses body development through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program through the use of weight training equipment.

PREREQUISITE: Health & PE Weightlifting techniques will be taught and proper conditioning program will be introduced. This course stresses body development through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program through the use of weight training equipment. 901525FS - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING SPRING TERM ONLY 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 11

PREREQUISITE: Health and Physical Education This course stresses body development through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program through the use of weight training equipment.

130

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION continued


901527FF - PHYSICAL CONDITIONING FALL TERM ONLY 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 953020 - SPORTS MED / ATHLETIC TRAINING

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Health and Physical Education This course stresses body development through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program through the use of weight training equipment. 901521LTS - LIFETIME SPORTS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 PREREQUISITE: Interest in sports medicine, athletic training physical therapy or a medical related career - basic anatomy This course is designed to introduce the career choice of Athletic Training and Sports Medicine to those interested in pursuing it as a career. This course will cover basic anatomy, common sports injuries, evaluation and treatment of those injuries and rehabilitation. Other aspects of this class would include designing an athletic training facility, designing a budget and assessing importance of supplies. Administrative aspects such as medical files, insurance documentation and daily organizational issues in the training room are discussed. Forty hours of hands-on practical experience will be a requirement for the semester at various sporting events. CPR certification and field trips to college or university athletic training facility may also be possible.

PREREQUISITE: Health and Physical Education and supply personal equipment for some sports This course is designed to accommodate students with the background and skill of activities that one can engage in despite the age, skill level, or athletic ability. An in-depth study will include the following: golf, track and field, badminton, ping-pong, aerobics, tennis, horseshoes and croquet.

901526SPT - SPORTS 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 11

901523OFF - SPORTS OFFICIATING & SCOREKEEPING COACHING TECHNIQUES & STRATEGIES (FALL TERM ONLY) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Health and Physical Education This course is designed to include the development of personal fitness, and active participation in sports such as basketball, soccer, flag football, volleyball, and softball. This course includes the history, rules, and terminology with an emphasis in skill development of the various sports.

PREREQUISITE: Health & Physical Education. Interest in sports & supply personal rule books Emphasis will be placed on officiating team sports, such as football, volleyball, basketball, soccer, baseball, softball, and wrestling. Mechanics, techniques of officiating and scorekeeping will be taught. Videos and field trips will be part of the class.

131

132

SUGGESTED JROTC COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

JROTC I - Fall

JROTC I - Spring

SOPHOMORE

JROTC II - Fall

JROTC II - Spring

JUNIOR

JROTC III - Fall

JROTC III - Spring

SENIOR

JROTC IV - Fall

JROTC IV - Spring

133

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS - JROTC A CADET MUST MAINTAIN A PASSING GRADE IN ALL SUBJECTS TO ENROLL AND REMAIN IN THE JROTC PROGRAM
950120 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS I (LET I) (Fall Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE:9 - 12 950121 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS I (LET I) (Spring Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Physically fit and at least 14 years of age This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction in the history, customs, traditions and purpose of Army JROTC. It contains the development of basic leadership skills to include leadership principles, values and attributes. Development of core skills students should master, an appreciation for diversity, and active learning strategies are integrated throughout the course. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

PREREQUISITE: Physically fit and at least 14 years of age This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the communication skills and conflict management and resolution curriculum taught in LET 1 1st Semester. Emphasis is placed on writing skills and oral communications techniques. Financial planning is introduced. Physical fitness, diet, nutrition, healthy lifestyles and awareness of substance abuse and prevention and basic first aid measures are additional content areas. An overview of geography and the globe are incorporated. Also included in the course is a study of the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, responsibilities of U.S. citizens and the federal justice system. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

134

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS - JROTC


950222 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS II (LET II) (Fall Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12 950223 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS II (LET II) (Spring Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 - 12

PREREQUISITE successful completion of JROTC LET 1, JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subjects This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on skills taught in LET I. This course introduces equal opportunity and sexual harassment. It provides instruction on leadership styles and practical time to exercise leadership theories as well as the basic principles of management It provides self assessments that help students determine their skill sets and opportunities to teach using accepted principles and methods of instruction. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of JROTC LET1, JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subjects This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the skills taught in LET 2 1st Semester. It emphasizes community projects to assist in drug prevention efforts, includes dietary guidelines and fitness and introduces map-reading skills. It discusses the significant events that helped shape and develop the Constitution and government and teaches the role of political parties in the election process. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

135

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS - JROTC


950323 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS III (LET III) (Fall Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12 950324 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS III (LET III) (Spring Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of JROTC LET2, JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subjects This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the skills taught in LET 1 - 2. This course allows cadets to investigate the interrelationships of the services while it continues to build their leadership development and decision-making skills. It includes negotiation skills and management principles. It emphasizes staff procedures and provides opportunities to handle various leadership situations. The research, identification, planning, and execution of service learning activities are included. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of JROTC LET 2. JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subjects This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the skills taught in LET 1 - 2 and LET 3 1st Semester. This course gives cadets the opportunity to apply basic concepts of career exploration strategies and planning. Instructs on the creation of career portfolios and plans for college or work. Financial management principles including investing, credit, and insurance are studied in depth. Skills for orienteering and/or land navigation are developed. Includes studies in the federal judicial system and how historical events shaped social systems. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

136

JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS - JROTC


950425 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS IV (LET IV) (Fall Term) 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 950426 - JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS IV (LET IV) (Spring Term)

1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of JROTC LET 3, JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subject This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the skills taught in LET 1 - 3. It focuses on creating a positive leadership situation, negotiating, decision-making, problem solving, planning, team development, project management, and mentoring. It provides the opportunity to demonstrate leadership potential in an assigned command or staff position within the cadet battalion organizational structure. It includes how to use emotional intelligence in leadership situations as well as developing a positive attitude, preventing violence and managing anger. It provides instruction on etiquette, daily planning, financial planning, and careers. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of JROTC LET 3, JROTC annual physical fitness test, passing grade in all subjects This course includes classroom and laboratory instruction expanding on the skills taught in LET 1- 3. It includes requirements for the practical application of leadership duties. Included are exercises in writing skills. It emphasizes physical fitness through healthy individual and group competition. The interactions between groups of people and how they affect the areas cultural, economic, and political characteristics are discussed. It explores various methods on determining distance, direction, and locations as well as environmental issues. Concepts of democracy and freedom and how to influence local governments are discussed. The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service.

137

138

SUGGESTED EXCEPTIONAL ED. COURSE SEQUENCES

FRESHMAN

OCS English I

OCS Mathematics I

OCS Applied Science

OCS Social Studies I

SOPHOMORE

OCS English II

OCS Algebra I

OCS Biology

OCS Social Studies II

OCS English III JUNIOR

OCS Financial Management

Elective

Elective

SENIOR

OCS English IV

Elective

Elective

Elective

FRESHMAN

Occupational Preparation I

Occupational Preparation I

Health & PE

Career Management

SOPHOMORE

Occupational Preparation II

Occupational Preparation II

Elective

Career Technical Ed. Course

JUNIOR

Occupational Preparation III

Occupational Preparation III

Elective

Career Technical Ed. Course

SENIOR

Occupational Preparation IV

Occupational Preparation IV

Elective

Career Technical Ed. Course

139

EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION

994190 - RESOURCE LAB 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

92410 - OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION II 1 CREDIT GRADE: 10

PREREQUISITE: Special Ed. Teacher recommendation This course offers assistance to students in their regular education classes with concentrated work in specific areas of weakness.

PREREQUISITE: Occupational Preparation I OCS Prep II is designed to allow students to develop skills generic to all career majors: resource management, communication, interpersonal relationships, technology, stamina, endurance, safety, mobility, motor skills, teamwork, sensory skills, problem solving, cultural diversity, information acquisition/management, and selfmanagement. The course content is focused on providing students with a repertoire of basic skills that will serve as a foundation for future career application. Students will expand their school-based learning activities to include oncampus jobs and work-based learning activities. Job seeking skills will also be refined. Students will finish completing their 300 school based hours. 92420 - OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION III

924001 - OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team OCS Prep I is designed to introduce students to the fundamental attitudes, behaviors, and habits needed to obtain and maintain employment in their career choice and make career advancements. Students will participate in school-based learning activities including work ethic development, job skill training, decision-making skills, and self-management. Students will be involved in on-campus vocational training activities as school factories, work-based enterprises, hands-on vocational training in CareerTechnical Education courses and the operation of small businesses. Formal career planning and development of knowledge regarding transition planning begins in this course and continues throughout the strand of Occupational Preparation courses.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 PREREQUISITE: Occupational Preparation II

OCS Prep III is designed to allow students to continue the development and begin the application of skills learned in Occupational Preparation I and II. Work-based learning activities are provided, including community-based training, job shadowing, job sampling, internships, situational assessment, cooperative education, and apprenticeships. These work-based activities allow students to apply employability skills to competitive employment settings and demonstrate the effectiveness of their work personality. Multiple opportunities for leadership development and selfdetermination are provided. Students will begin their 240 hours of work based volunteering.

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92430 - OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION IV 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12

92210 - OCS ALGEBRA I (HS MATH A)

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10

PREREQUISITE: Occupational Preparation III OCS Prep IV is designed to give students the opportunity to synthesize all the skills in previous Occupational Preparation courses and apply them to their personal career choice. This course allows the student to solve work-related problems experienced in competitive employment, practice self-advocacy skills, and master theoretical and practical aspects of their career choice. Students finish completing 360 hours of integrated competitive employment in a community setting required for the successful completion of the Occupational Course of Study. Students will also develop a job placement portfolio that provides and educational and vocational record of their high school experience.

PREREQUISITE: OCS Mathematics I OCS Algebra I is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The student will understand the real number system, quantities, structure in expressions, arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions, creating equations, reasoning with equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations, interpreting functions, interpreting functions that arise in applications in terms of the context, analyzing functions using different representations, building functions, building new functions from existing functions, linear, quadratic, and exponential models, interpreting expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model, congruence, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, interpreting categorical and quantitative data, how to summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables and interpreting linear models. The End-Of-Course Assessment will be the Extend II Algebra I EOC Test.

922001 - OCS MATHEMATICS I 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9

922203 - OCS FINANACIAL MANAGEMENT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team OCS Mathematics I is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The student will understand, rational numbers, apply mathematical operations with rational numbers to solve problems, apply ratios, proportions and percents to solve problems, apply time and management skills to solve problems, apply Algebraic properties to solve problems, understand patterns and relationships, and understand data in terms of graphic displays, measures of center and range.

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 or 12

PREREQUISITE: OCS Algebra I OCS Financial Management is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The student will understand personal financial planning, appropriate methods for personal financial management and independent living, personal and state income tax, wages and compensation, the use of credit, different types of insurance in terms of their ability to meet personal needs and applying math skills to consumer spending.

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923100 - OCS APPLIED SCIENCE 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 10 923202 - OCS BIOLOGY

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 PREREQUISITE: OCS Applied Science / OCS Special Interest Science OCS Biology is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The North Carolina Science Essential Standards maintain the respect for local control of each Local Education Authority (LEA) to design the specific curricular and instructional strategies that best deliver the content to their students. The student will understand the relationship between the structures and functions of cells and their organelles, analyze the cell as a living system, analyze the interdependence of living organisms within their environments, understand the impact of human activities on the environment (one generation affects the next), explain how traits are determined by the structure and function of DNA, understand how the environment, and/or the interaction of alleles, influences the expression of genetic traits, understand the application of DNA technology, explain the theory of evolution by natural selection as a mechanism for how species change over time, understand how classification systems are developed based upon speciation, understand how biological molecules are essential to the survival of living organisms and analyze the relationships between biochemical processes and energy use. The End-Of-Course Assessment will be the Extend II Biology EOC Test. 924501 - OCS SOCIAL STUDIES I

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team OCS Applied Science is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The North Carolina Science Essential Standards maintain the respect for local control of each Local Education Authority (LEA) to design the specific curricular and instructional strategies that best deliver the content to their students. Nonetheless, engaging students in inquiry-based instruction is a critical way of developing conceptual understanding of the science content that is vital for success in the twentyfirst century. The process of scientific inquiry, experimentation and technological design should not be taught nor tested in isolation of the core concepts drawn from physical science, earth science and life science. A seamless integration of science content, scientific inquiry, experimentation and technological design will reinforce in students the notion that "what" is known is inextricably tied to "how" it is known. A well-planned science curriculum provides opportunities for inquiry, experimentation and technological design. Students should have opportunities to engage in "hands-on/minds-on" activities which are exemplars of scientific inquiry, experimentation and technological design. Students should understand force and motion, energy and its conservation, electricity and magnetism; properties of matter, use and danger of common chemicals and how humans can have positive and negative effects on the environment and the human body. 30800000S - OCS SPECIAL INTEREST SCIENCE

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team OCS Social Studies I is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The student will understand basic economic, government, and political knowledge they need to become responsible citizens and consumers. It covers the historical background of the United States, including the Constitution and amendments, the three branches of government, and major laws that affect citizens. The course also covers state and local government roles and jurisdictions, and issues of personal citizenship.

OCS Special Interest Science is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The students will develop a basic understanding of Biology and key terms. This is a prerequisite to OCS Biology. A MSL will be developed for this course.

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION Continued


924602 - OCS SOCIAL STUDIES II 921102 - OCS ENGLISH II

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10 PREREQUISITE: Occupational Social Studies I OCS Social Studies II is based on the NC Essential Standards and Common Core (National) Standards. The student will understand concepts and skills related to selfadvocacy and self-determination, which are essential for achieving independence and successful adult outcomes. The course strands are presented in the following natural progression: Self-concept, Communication, and Assertiveness, problem solving and Self-Advocacy. The student will learn skills that build on one another, to ensure retention. The student will engage in participatory methods such as role-playing and learn to generalize skills to application in various environments. All curriculum strands emphasize self-regulatory skills such as setting, managing, and monitoring goal performance. PREREQUISITE: OCS English I

1 CREDIT GRADE: 10

OCS English II is based on the NC Essential Standards, Common Core (National) Standards and NC Standard Course of Study for English II. Students will express reflections and reactions to print and non-print text and personal experiences. They will explain meaning, describe processes, and answer research questions to inform an audience. They will examine argumentation and develop informed opinions. They will create and use standards to demonstrate understanding of various literary genres, concepts, elements, apply conventions of grammar and usage when writing or speaking. They will write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. The End-Of-Course Assessment will be the Extend II English II EOC Test.

921001 - OCS ENGLISH I 921203 - OCS ENGLISH III 1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 1 CREDIT GRADE: 11

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP team OCS English I is based on the NC Essential Standards, Common Core (National) Standards and NC Standard Course of Study for English I. Students will express reflections and reactions to print and non-print text and personal experiences. They will explain meaning, describe processes, and answer research questions to inform an audience. They will examine argumentation and develop informed opinions. They will create and use standards to demonstrate understanding of various literary genres, concepts, elements, apply conventions of grammar and usage when writing or speaking. They will write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. PREREQUISITE: OCS English II OCS English III is based on the NC Essential Standards, Common Core (National) Standards and NC Standard Course of Study for English III. Students will understand literary and informational texts, use appropriate communication skills in employment, post secondary education/training and independent settings, create written products using templates or forms, apply reading and comprehension strategies to informational texts found in employment, post-secondary education/training and independent living domains, carry out a problem-solving process as it relates to personal life situations, apply knowledge of cause and effect relationships to decisionmaking and problem solving, summarize the importance of forming a viewpoint in situations related to adult living and critique informational products for use in employment, postsecondary education/training, and independent living domains. Students will integrate relative information into their career portfolio graduation requirement.

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LIFE SKILLS COURSES
921304 - OCS ENGLISH IV 1 CREDIT GRADE: 12 9311002Y - LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH II

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: OCS English III OCS English IV is based on the NC Essential Standards, Common Core (National) Standards and NC Standard Course of Study for English IV. The student will apply information from literary and informational texts to carry out adult living tasks and activities, evaluate communication between various audiences, construct written products without reliance on templates or forms, apply reading and comprehension strategies in informational texts found in employment, post-secondary educational/training, and independent living domains, produce products to solve problems that occur in various domains of adult life, attribute the impact of cause and effect on a given real life situation generate a viewpoint based on the analysis of current events, written texts, and/or personal life experiences and create informational products for use in employment, post-secondary education/training and independent living domains. Students will complete their required career portfolio.

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students the opportunity to further develop reading and writing strategies. Students will learn to write sentences to form paragraphs and use proper grammar and learn to read and comprehend information found in a variety of printed material. Students will use basic word processing skills for written assignments.

9312003Y - LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH III

1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students the opportunity to further develop reading and writing strategies. Students will identify main concepts and supporting information from printed and non-printed materials. Students will expand proficiency in basic sentence and paragraph writing as applied to a variety of functional, independent living, and employment tasks.

9310001Y - LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH I

1 CREDIT

9313004Y - LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH IV PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course dealing with the basic principles of applied reading and writing strategies to interpret and express factual, functional information. Life Skills English students will learn to write complete sentences, read functional vocabulary terms and employ accurate letter formation. 1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students the opportunity to use written communication for explanatory argumentative, self-advocacy, and social purposes. Students will expand comprehension of functional vocabulary to include legal, medical, tax, and insurance terms. Read and comprehend directions and other printed materials for living and employment tasks. Produce and complete personal portfolios and resumes.

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LIFE SKILLS COURSES
9320001Y - LIFE SKILLS MATH I 9323004Y - LIFE SKILLS MATH IV

1 CREDIT

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course dealing with the basic principles of mathematics to include computation and understanding of whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percents. Students will be introduced to basic financial management skills, time, measurement, independent living and technology. These skills will be acquired through hands on approaches and cooperative learning within the classroom and community. The application of these skills is necessary for independent living and employment.

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course emphasizes the application of skills previously learned in Life Skills Math courses. In this course, students demonstrate application of the skills in the community and places of employment.

9331001Y - LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE I

1 CREDIT 93210002Y - LIFE SKILLS MATH II PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course dealing with the basic principles of the sciences, to include environmental science, physical science, human life skills and biology as it relates to work and daily living situations. This course teacher students the principles of matter, energy and the conservation of our resources.

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course continues from LifeSkills Math I, the study of computation and the application of these skills for independent living and employment. Emphasis is placed on application and problem solving in the areas of financial management, interpreting schedules, time and measurement. 93220003Y - LIFE SKILLS MATH III 1 CREDIT

9332002Y - LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE II

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course continues from LifeSkills Math II, the study of computation and the application of these skills for independent living and employment. Emphasis is placed on independent living using technology, hands on approaches and cooperative learning. This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire higher level skills in the area of safety, health/medical issues, relationships and human anatomy. Students will also continue to develop basic principles of the sciences, to include environmental science, physical science, human life skills and biology as it relates to work and daily living situations.

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION continued


LIFE SKILLS COURSES
1029003Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNICATION SKILLS III

9333003Y - LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE III

1 CREDIT 1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire higher level skills in the area of matter, energy and the conservation of our resources. Students will also continue to develop basic principles of the sciences, to include environmental science, physical science, human life skills and biology as it relates to work and daily living situations.

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students with the opportunity to examine the speaking skills expected in a variety of settings and demonstrate effective oral communication in each. Students will develop effective interviewing skills, learn, to correctly complete employment applications and effectively compose resumes. Student will employ communication skills to locate and research information.

1029001Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNICATION SKILLS I 1 CREDIT

9011001Y - LIFE SKILLS ADAPTIVE HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course dealing with oral language strategies to communicate effectively in both formal and informal situations. Student will expand basic telephone skills for work and home, take and support positions of self-advocacy, and exhibit ethical behavior in the use of computer technology. This course introduces students to health related issues on an individual basis to include diet, exercise, anatomy, reproduction, drug and alcohol awareness. Students will receive instruction in physical conditioning and proper techniques.
9340001Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNITY TRAINING I

1029002Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNICATION SKILLS II

1 CREDIT 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze and employ effective communications strategies in both daily living and employment settings, give and request verbal directions, demonstrate appropriate communication skills when addressing peers, and expand self-advocacy skills. This course is designed to provide students with the basic economic, government, and political knowledge they need to become responsible citizens and consumers. It covers the history of the United States, the constitution, and the different branches of the government and how they relate to us in our daily lives. Students will learn the importance of individual contributions to the historical background of the development of the United States.

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION continued


LIFE SKILLS COURSES
9520001Y - LIFE SKILLS RECREATION/LEISURE I

9341002Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNITY TRAINING II

1 CREDIT

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course is designed to provide further knowledge to students with the basic economic, government, and political knowledge they need to become responsible citizens and consumers. This course emphasizes responsibilities as a citizen including voting, jury duty, abiding laws, democracy, citizenship and supporting governments. Diverse ethnic and minority groups are explored and interpreted.
9342003Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNITY TRAINING III

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course provides students the opportunity to acquire skills needed to participate in age appropriate recreational and leisure activities in the home, school and community. Students will learn personal hygiene, diet and nutritional value, and the benefits of exercise.

9520002Y- LIFE SKILLS RECREATION/ LEISURE II

1 CREDIT 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course is designed to provide further knowledge to students with the basic economic, government, and political knowledge they need to become responsible citizens and consumers. This course is a citizens in an interdependent world. Students will examine money, banking, business law, labor market, economics and supply and demand. This course stresses body development, anatomy and physiology through daily exercise and activities in a planned conditioning program.

9520003Y- LIFE SKILLS RECREATION/ LEISURE III

1 CREDIT
9343004Y - LIFE SKILLS COMMUNITY TRAINING IV

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team 1 CREDIT This course is designed to accommodate students with the background and skill of activities that one can engage in despite the age skill level or ability. An in-depth study will include the following: aerobics, tennis, golf, horseshoes, biking, swimming.

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course allows students to engage in studying individuals and their group interaction. Students will examine behavior and how group involvement shapes individual and group behavior. Students will analyze rules, organizations, and value systems that enable people to live together. Students will learn to solve both hypothetical and real problems and reach decisions about preferred courses of action.

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION continued


LIFE SKILLS COURSES

9520011Y- FUNCTIONAL LIFE SKILLS I

9561002Y- LIFE SKILLS CAREER TRAINING II

1 CREDIT 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course is designed to allow students to develop skills generic to all career majors: communication, interpersonal relationships, technology, endurance, safety, mobility skills, motor skills, teamwork, sensory skills, problem solving, diversity, and self management. The focus is on proving students with basic skills that will serve as a foundation for future career application.
9561003Y- LIFE SKILLS CAREER TRAINING III

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course designed to prepare students to locate, secure, keep and change careers. Strategies for this course include teamwork, technology, problem-solving, decisionmaking, goal-setting and self-management. The following careers will be explored: agricultural education, business, information technology, family and consumer sciences education, health occupations education, marketing, trade and industry. JROTC involvement will also be explored.
9520013Y- FUNCTIONAL LIFE SKILLS III

1 CREDIT 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course is designed to implement the skills learned in Functional Life Skills I and II, allowing students to locate, secure, keep and change career. The following careers will be explored: agricultural education, business, information technology, family and consumer sciences education, health occupations education, marketing, trade and industry. JROTC involvement will also be explored.
9561001Y- LIFE SKILLS CAREER TRAINING I

This course is designed to allow students to develop and begin the application of skills learned in Life Skills Career Training I and II. Learning activities that are provided include job shadowing, job sampling, internships and apprentices.
9561004Y- LIFE SKILLS CAREER TRAINING IV

1 CREDIT

1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course dealing with the fundamental attitudes, behaviors, and habits needed to obtain and maintain employment in their career choice and make career adjustments. Students will participate in activities including work ethic development, job seeking skills, decision making skills and self management. Formal career planning and development of knowledge regarding transition planning begins in this course and continues throughout the Life Skills Career Training course. This course is designed to allow students to develop and begin the application of skills learned in Life Skills Career Training I, II and III and apply them to their personal career choice. This course teaches students to solve work related problems. Students will develop a job placement portfolio/resume of their personal qualifications.

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION continued


LIFE SKILLS COURSES

523001 - LIFE SKILLS MUSIC I

5416022Y - LIFE SKILLS ART II

1 CREDIT

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course in which students will receive instruction on all aspects of vocal techniques and sight reading. Students will develop an appreciation of music as a vocation and profession.
523100 - LIFE SKILLS MUSIC II

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course allows students to acquire a higher level of understanding and producing art including drawing, painting, print-making, and sculptures. Students will develop an appreciation of art as a vocation and profession.

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team This course allows students to acquire a higher level of understanding of music and technique. Student will develop an appreciation of music as a vocation and profession.

541501 - LIFE SKILLS ART I

1 CREDIT

PREREQUISITE: Recommendation of IEP Team An introductory course in which students develop the concepts of skills necessary for understanding and producing art including drawing, painting, print-making, and sculptures. Students will develop an appreciation of art as a vocation and profession.

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SPECIAL COURSE OFFERINGS


9513502Y - HONORS TEACHER CADET II 952023 - PEER HELPING

2 CREDITS GRADE: 12 PREREQUISITE: Senior Standing and Successful Application The Teacher Cadet Course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the field of education. Intentions are to grow North Carolinas future educators. It is a rich curriculum providing opportunities for introspection as a person, as a learning, and a community member through the unit entitled, The Learner. The cadet has a class experience and learns methodologies to help in the classroom during the first portion of the course. Unit two is The School; and the objective is to help students develop a greater understanding of the history of education in our state and nation as well as insights into the structure and functions of our schools and school systems. The Teacher and Teaching, unit three, acquaints the student with the teacher as both a person and a professional. It includes a field experience. The final unit, Culminating Activities affords time for the cadet to reflect on the experience and appreciate their growth and discovery during the Teacher Cadet Program. Observations, writing journals, reading educational literature, and teaching are a few of the skills sets utilized by the cadet. It is a demanding curriculum and the final component is a portfolio.

2 CREDITS GRADE: 11-12

PREREQUISITE: By application Peer helping is a class for those students interested in helping fellow students who might need assistance in the following areas: listening, questioning, communicating, problem solving, and tutoring skills. The students in the class will be trained to use the skills and act as an effective support system for students experiencing those problems. A selection process is used to decide class membership from those who apply for this class.

9520201S - DEVELOPING LEADERS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 9 - 12

PREREQUISITE: None This class is for student that have shown an ability to lead, an interest to lead, and/or are already leading at school or in the community. The curriculum used in this course is Rising to the Challenge. The course is dedicated to the idea that positive leadership can be learned. This curriculum seeks to help students develop their own unique understanding of the concept of leadership and to discover the tools necessary for them to effect a positive change in their lives and communities. Instruction incorporates traditional classroom learning models, including class discussions, and research projects. Alternative learning practices, including active learning, off-site learning and service learning opportunities will also be an expectation of students.

95102 - SAT PREP: MATH, VERBAL & WRITING

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11 - 12

PREREQUISITE: Algebra II or a higher Math English II This course is only offered through the North Carolina Virtual Public High School. SEE YOUR COUNSELOR FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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XXXXXX - HONORS ADVANCE DEVELOPING LEADERS

1 CREDIT GRADE: 11-12 PREREQUISITE: Developing Leaders This honors level course is dedicated to the idea that positive leadership can be learned. This curriculum seeks to help young adults develop their own unique understanding of the concept of leadership and to discover the tools necessary for them to effect a positive change in their lives and communities. To accomplish this goal, this semesterlong study of leadership incorporates traditional classroom learning models, including class discussions, worksheets and research projects, the course also makes use of some alternative learning practices, including active learning, offsite learning and service learning opportunities. The students will be trained in Peer Mediation so that they will be able to mediate on campus and at the middle school level. It is the goal to incorporate this class in mentoring middle school students to help them adjust to the high school setting.

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Hoke County Board of Education


310 Wooley Street Raeford, North Carolina 28376 Phone: (910) 875-4106 Fax: (910) 875-3362 Website: http://www.hcs.k12.nc.us