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K A R A M A E B R O W N English Dept. Main Office: 617-373-4540 Virtual Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday 2:00 3:00 PM via Google Chat on our Google+ page You are welcome to chat with me anytime that my avatar is lit green and available Email: km.brown@neu.edu C OURSE D ESCRIPTION
Advanced Writing in the Disciplines (AWD) Online is a course that invites you to explore the way that members of your academic discipline or profession communicate through writing in online environments. That is, AWD Online is not just a course that you take online, but one that makes the online world the object of your study. Because 3301 sections of AWD are geared towards students with interdisciplinary interests, we will be studying principles of professional and disciplinary written communication more broadly than sections of this course designed for specific disciplines. The writing you do in this course provides you with a way to participate in your discipline's discourse community and to begin to construct a professional web presence as a member of that community. The work we do this semester will have you writing across multiple online platforms, culminating in the creation of an online professional eportfolio to house that work. You should expect to write every day and to share your writing with your peers. This course takes seriously the values of collaboration, revision, and reflection. A successful student will participate in all aspects of the writing process: planning, discussing, researching, drafting, reviewing, revising, and reflecting.

R EQUIRED M ATERIALS

Husky Mail and Blackboard -All students in Writing Program classes must use their NEU e-mail addresses in order to receive e-mail from their instructors and to access Blackboard sites for their writing courses. Blackboard will be used in a limited capacity, mostly for the reporting of grades and the posting of copyrighted material. Google + and Google Drive Account - We will be using a Google + Community as our primary "classroom" space. You will be provided information on how to set-up an account and join the community. We will also use Google Drive as our work space, where we will draft and review documents before they are finalized. Lino Notes-We will use this notetaking app to help plan and complete one of your major assignments. Twitter - One of your major projects for the semester will be to keep a Twitter feed about the work you are doing in your discipline. You will be provided information on how to set-up an account. Digication Eportfolios - Your final project of the semester will be to create a professional eportfolio of the work you have done in this class. The eportfolio will also serve as the "hub" of your web presence. You will be provided more information on how to set-up and create an eportfolio.

C OURSE B REAKDOWN
Writing to Learn: How Disciplines Create and Communicate Knowledge | 20% of final grade Working Draft Due 7/11 | Peer Review Due 7/14 | Final Draft Due 7/18 Our first project will help prepare you for the work that you will do throughout the semester. For this project, you will be asked to define how your discipline creates and communicates knowledge in a multi-part essay. Writing for a Research Audience: Reviewing the Literature | 30% of final grade Working Draft Due 7/28 | Peer Review Due 8/1 | Final Draft Due 8/4 For this project, you will complete an in-depth review of published research on a topic in your discipline. This project will take you through various stages including a proposal and annotated bibliography. Those stages will help you work towards a review of the literature crafted for an audience of fellow scholars in the field. Writing for a Public Audience: Tweeting Knowledge | 25% of final grade Working Draft Due 7/21, 7/28, & 8/1 | Peer Review Due 7/25, 8/1, & 8/4 | Final Draft Due 7/28, 8/4, & 8/8 Twitter is becoming an increasingly important venue not only for networking with other members of your discipline, but for communicating the knowledge of your discipline to a wider, more public audience. You will be asked to keep a Twitter feed in which you post updates about the research you are doing for your report and the knowledge that you are gaining on your issue. Your tweets should focus on condensing the most important information from your research and framing it for a non-specialized, public audience. Writing for a Professional Audience: Professional E-Portfolio | 25% of final grade Working Draft Due 8/11 | Peer Review Due 8/15 | Final Draft Due 8/18 For this final project you will create a professional eportfolio in which you can showcase your experiences and achievements as a professional. You can think of the eportfolio as the "hub" of your professional web presence. The eportfolio is primarily a professional networking tool that you can share with potential employers and colleagues in your field. Exercises, Discussions, Peer Reviews, & Reflections | Included in final grade for the project Exercises, peer reviews, and reflections will each comprise a portion of your final grade for each project. Details on the exact breakdown will be provided on each assignment sheet.

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L EARNING G OALS

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The Writing Program comprises First-Year Writing courses, Advanced Writing in the Disciplines courses, and the Writing Center. The goals below apply to all three sites, but our expectations for how well and to what extent students will accomplish the goals vary in each. 1. Students write both to learn and to communicate what they learn. 2. Students negotiate their own writing goals and audience expectations regarding conventions of genre, medium, and situation. 3. Students formulate and articulate a stance through and in their writing. 4. Students revise their writing using responses from others, including peers, consultants, and teachers. 5. Students generate and pursue lines of inquiry and search, collect, and select sources appropriate to their writing projects. 6. Students effectively use and appropriately cite sources in their writing. 7. Students explore and represent their experiences, perspectives, and ideas in conversation with others. 8. Students use multiple forms of evidence to support their claims, ideas, and arguments. 9. Students practice critical reading strategies. 10. Students provide revision-based response to their peers. 11. Students reflect on their writing processes and self-assess as writers.

W RITING P ROGRAM M INIMUM G RADE R EQUIREMENT A student must receive a grade of C or better in order to pass all required writing courses in the Department of English (C is required for Graduation). Any student earning a C- or lower will need to repeat the course in order to fulfill the writing requirement. The instructor makes the final decision with respect to any grade between A-C. Any portfolio receiving lower than a C must be reviewed and signed off on by a committee of 3-6 Writing Program instructors.

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This course is broken down into bi-weekly units of work called Modules. The first module of the week will run from Monday Thursday and the second module will run from Friday Sunday. You should expect to do the following for each module: 1. On each Monday and Friday, a new series of posts will go on the course blog. This blog post will detail the work that you need to complete for the week. The blog posts will be cross-posted to the Google+ page too. 2. All work for the first module of the week must be completed by Thursday at 11:59 PM and for the second module of the week by 11:59 PM on Sunday. Keep in mind that it will be impossible to complete all the work for the module in one day if you want to complete it at the level expected for an advanced writing class. 3. Use the Google+ page as your classroom space. Classrooms are dynamic environments. Feel free to "raise your hand and ask a question" by posting an update to the page. You are welcome to share ideas or opinions. Classrooms are also social spaces. Get to know each other. Feel free to start a conversation about the Red Sox game, the latest episode of Game of Thrones, or the music you are currently listening to.

W ORKLOAD
You should expect to log in to this course several times a week, and should allot several hours a week to reading, writing, and other online exercises. This course is as rigorous and demanding as an in-person advanced writing course. In fact, it may be more so since online learning presents its own set of challenges. Expect to spend as much time on this course as you would for a face-to-face course for which you earn the same amount of credit. There is also more to an online writing course than just turning in papers. You should expect to complete online equivalents of all the activities that you would expect in a writing course: discussions, readings, peer reviews, etc. There will, in fact, still be deadlines. ***A note on 7-week summer sessions. This summer course is based on a course that meets 4 days a week for an hour and forty minutes and that has homework every night. Lets use the standard 2 hours of homework for every hour of class time formula to figure out how much time you will need to spend online to complete this course: (1 hour and 40 minutes of class X 4 class meetings a week) + (2 hours of homework per every 1 hour of class time) 20 hours of online work per week!!!! Please be aware of this time commitment, especially those of you on co-op.

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Writing Program policy requires regular attendance at class meetings. Students are allowed three unexcused absences in classes that meet for three days a week; they are allowed two unexcused absences in classes that meet for two days. During the summer sessions, students are allowed two unexcused absences. Significant and/or frequent tardiness may be counted as unexcused absences at the instructor's discretion. In an online class, we will interpret this to mean that consistent, engaged participation is required. "Attendance" as such will be counted by your participation in all class exercises and assignments. That is, a missed assignment will not only affect your grade, but will be counted as an "absence." In keeping with the summer semester policy above, after 2 of these "absences," your final grade in the course will be affected. Each unexcused "absence" after the 2 will lower your final grade by 1/3 of a letter (eg. a B in the class becomes a B). Students also have the right to a limited number of excused absences due to a religious observance, illness, death in the family, required participation in athletic events, or other serious and unavoidable life circumstances. Students are responsible for notifying instructors when they must miss class for any reason. Instructors are responsible for determining whether a student will be excused from the class. Instructors are reminded that University Health and Counseling Services will not issue documentation of students illnesses or injuries. Don't just assume an absence is excused. Please inform me via email if you know you are going to be "absent" so we can work out a plan for you to make-up any late work. I will let you know via email if the absence will be counted as excused or unexcused. If I do not hear from you, then the absence will be marked as unexcused. Because writing classes are conducted workshop-style and focus on revision, a student who misses too many class meetings or falls too far behind in making up work, even with a legitimate excuse, is not earning credit for the same course as the rest of the class. In that case, the instructor may suggest, but not require, that the student to withdraw from rather than fail the course.

S UBMISSION G UIDELINES
All writing projects must be submitted according to the following guidelines: On Time-Late work will be penalized as follows: o Late homework, peer reviews, exercises, etc. will not be accepted unless approved by the instructor in writing (via email) o If you are late turning in a working draft, you will not be included in the peer review assignment, which means that you will not only miss out on the chance for feedback (from your peers and instructor), but you will receive no credit for that round of peer review o For every class period that a final draft is late, the grade will be reduced by 1/3rd of a letter In the Correct Format-if I ask for a paper copy, a paper copy must be provided. If I ask for an electronic copy, an electronic copy must be provided. Formatting guidelines appropriate to the genre and context are required and will be specified on the assignment sheet With an Appropriate File Type and Name-electronic files should be submitted as a pdf, no other file types will be accepted. Please name your files with your last name and project number. For example, if I submitted Writing Project 1 electronically, I would name the file: BrownWP1. Please, no spaces. Meet the Basic Requirements-a 500 word submission for a 1000 word assignment is unacceptable Substantially Revised-revision is a requirement for the class. Final drafts that have not undergone a significant revision process in response to feedback cannot earn above a C. Use Appropriate and Professional Citations-in both working and final drafts. If a working draft does not include citations, the final draft grade will be reduced by one letter. Final drafts without citations will be given a failing grade.

A CADEMIC I NTEGRITY Northeastern University is committed to the principles of intellectual honesty and integrity: the NU Academic Honesty and Integrity Policy is found at http://www.northeastern.edu/osccr/academicintegrity/index.html#Guidelines.The Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution web site (http://www.osccr.neu.edu/) provides extensive information on student conduct, the disciplinary process, and the range of available sanctions. All members of the Northeastern community are expected to maintain complete honesty in all academic work, presenting only that which is their own work in tests and assignments. In English classes, this definition of plagiarism applies not only to borrowing whole documents, but also to borrowing parts of anothers work without proper acknowledgment and proper paraphrasing or quotation. We will discuss effective and responsible use of sources throughout the semester.

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W RITING C ENTER

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The Northeastern University Writing Center is located in 412 Holmes (x4549; for current hours see http://www.northeastern.edu/english/writing-center/) in the English Department and offers free and friendly help for any level writer, including help with reading complex texts, conceptualizing a writing project, refining your writing process (i.e., planning, researching, organization, drafting, revising, and editing), and using sources effectively. You can receive feedback face-to-face during regular hours or via email/online response. Questions about the Writing Center can be directed to Professor Neal Lerner <n.lerner@neu.edu>, Writing Center Director. P EER T UTORING The Peer Tutoring Program offers a wide range of tutoring services to meet the academic needs of the undergraduate students in many of the introductory level courses, as well as some of the upperlevel courses in the NU Core. The goal is to create synergy among students, faculty, and tutors in a collaborative academic environment where the student's personal and academic growth and development is a priority. If you are in need of academic assistance, contact the Peer Tutoring Program Monday thru Friday from 9:00AM to 6:00PM. Peer Tutoring services are FREE and open to all NU undergraduate students. Peer tutoring begins the second week of classes and ends the last day of classes. The Peer Tutoring Program is located in Lake Hall. Call 617-373-8931 or email NUpeertutoring@gmail.com for more information. D ISABILITY R ESOURCE C ENTER The universitys Disability Resource Center works with students and faculty to provide students who qualify under the Americans With Disabilities Act with accommodations that allow them to participate fully in the activities at the university. Ordinarily, students receiving such accommodations will deliver teacher notification letters at the beginning of the semester. Students have the right to disclose or not disclose their disabilities to their instructors. For more information about the DRC, go to http://www.drc.neu.edu. W E C ARE WeCare is a program operated through the Office for Student Affairs. The mission is to assist students experiencing unexpected challenges to maintaining their academic progress. WeCare works with the student to coordinate among university offices and to offer appropriate on and off campus referrals to support successfully resolving the issue. WeCare also provide information to faculty and staff to identify Northeastern resources and policies to help students succeed.

The WeCare program is located in the Student Affairs Office in 104 Ell Hall. The hours are 8:30am 7pm Monday through Thursday and 8:30am - 5pm on Fridays (summer hours subject to change). Call 617.373.4384 or email wecare@neu.edu. S NELL L IBRARY In addition to providing research resources typical of a major university library, the Snell Library (http://www.lib.neu.edu/) collaborates with both the First-Year Writing and Advanced Writing in the Disciplines programs to support students information literacy. The English Department will coordinate workshops for all sections of our required courses. The library also houses the Digital Media Design Studio, which offers a variety of resources for instructors and students regarding multimedia projects: http://www.lib.neu.edu/about_us/digital_media/ NU W RITING NU Writing is an online journal that publishes compositions made in First-Year Writing and Advanced Writing in the Disciplines, courses that are part of Northeastern Universitys Writing Program. NU Writing helps students to find a wider audience for their compositions and to experience publishing, both by learning about the submission and review process and by participating on the journals board. Compositions published in NU Writing are alphabetic and multimodalwritten in verse or prose, or composed in multiple modalities, such as image and sound. NU Writing welcomes traditional essays as well as texts from alternate genres: for example, poems, photo-essays, digital narratives, and films. All currently matriculated students who have taken, or are taking, courses in the Writing Program are encouraged to participate, by submitting a composition or serving on the journals board or both. Any undergraduate may submit a composition made in FYW or AWD if she or he is enrolled at Northeastern University at the time of submission. For more information visit http://www.northeastern.edu/nuwriting/. Any questions may be emailed to Laura Hartmann at hartmann.la@husky.neu.edu.

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( W E E K LY M O D U LE 1: M O N D A Y THURSDAY A LL W O R K LIS T E D ON THURSDAY
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WEEK 1

Monday, July 1 Thursday, July 4 1. Read Writing to Learn Assignment 2. Social Reading of Philip Sargeant, Disciplinarity 3. Writing to Learn Exercise 1

Friday, July 5 Sunday, July 7 1. Social Reading of Grant-Davie, Rhetorical Situations 2. Video Lecture: Doing Online Research 3. Writing to Learn Exercise 2

WEEK 2

Monday, July 8 Thursday, July 11 1. Social Reading of Ellen L. Barton, Evidentials 2. Read Documentation from the AWD Toolkit & Review Citation and Formatting Guide for the Documentation System appropriate to your discipline 3. Writing to Learn Working Draft

Friday, July 12 Sunday, July 14 1. Video Lecture: Peer Review 2. Writing to Learn Peer Review

WEEK 3

Monday, July 15 Thursday, July 18 1. Video Lecture: Revision 2. Writing to Learn Final Draft and Reflection 3. Read Writing for a Professional Audience Assignment 4. Read Eilene Zimmerman, Showcasing your Work in an Online Portfolio 5. Read John Trimbur, Visual Design and Web Design 6. Writing for a Professional Audience Exercise 1 7. Video Lecture: Getting Started with Digication

Friday, July 19 Sunday, July 21 1. Read Writing for a Research Audience Assignment 2. Read UNC Writing Center, Literature Reviews 3. Writing for a Research Audience Exercise 1 4. Writing for a Research Audience Proposal

Continued on next page

WEEK 4

Monday, July 22 Thursday, July 25 1. Writing for a Research Audience Exercise 2 2. Read Writing for a Public Audience Assignment 3. Read Ryan Cordell, How to Start Tweeting 4. Read Shea Bennett, How to Write the Perfect Tweet 5. Writing for a Public Audience Exercise 1 6. Writing for a Public Audience Working Draft 1

Friday, July 26 Sunday, July 28 1. Writing for a Research Audience Working Draft 2. Writing for a Public Audience Exercise 2 3. Writing for a Public Audience Peer Review 1 4. Writing for a Public Audience Working Draft 2

WEEK 5

Monday, July 29 Thursday, August 1 1. Writing for a Research Audience Peer Review 2. Writing for a Public Audience Final Draft 1 3. Writing for a Public Audience Peer Review 2

Friday, August 2 Sunday, August 4 1. Writing for a Research Audience Final Draft and Reflection 2. Writing for a Public Audience Final Draft 2 3. Writing for a Public Audience Working Draft 3

WEEK 6

Monday, August 5 Thursday, August 8 1. Writing for a Public Audience Peer Review 3 2. Writing for a Professional Audience Exercise 2

Friday, August 9 Sunday, August 11 1. Writing for a Public Audience Final Draft 3 and Reflection 2. Writing for a Professional Audience Working Draft

WEEK 7

Monday, August 12 Thursday, August 15

Friday, August 16 Sunday, August 18 1. Writing for a Professional Audience Final Draft

1. Writing for a Professional Audience Peer Review