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Coach Carl Johnson THE BUZZ Spring Concert May 21st, 2009 7:00pm BOE Workshop May 11th,

Coach Carl Johnson

THE BUZZ Spring Concert May 21st, 2009 7:00pm BOE Workshop May 11th, 2009 7:00pm BOE

THE BUZZ

Spring Concert

May 21st, 2009

7:00pm

BOE Workshop

May 11th, 2009

7:00pm

BOE Meeting

June 8th, 2009

7:00pm

PTO Events Year End BBQ

June 11th, 2009 5:00 pm

Regents Week

June 16-19, 2009 June 22-26, 2009

High School

Graduation

June 28th, 2009

4:00pm

Quote Of The Month

“We need to promote greater toler- ance and understanding among the people of the world. Nothing can be more dangerous to our efforts to build peace and development than a world divided along religious, ethnic or cultural lines. In each nation, and among all nations, we must work to promote unity based on our shared humanity.” - Kofi Annan, Former Secretary General of the United Nations

The Hive Staff

Columnists Cesar Banados Nathan Hochstedler Photographers Greg Rojano Olivia Garrett Graphics Shawntise Stephens Darian Hemby Evan Marzan Sergio Palacios Technology Darian Hemby Nina Hemby Matt Marzan Shawntise Stephens Ana Rosa Vallejo Editorial Robin Gianis Biana Stepanian

Restaurant One Ocean Road Bridgehampton, NY tel. 631-537-5665 Open everyday at 5 pm except on

Restaurant One Ocean Road Bridgehampton, NY tel. 631-537-5665

Open everyday at 5 pm except on Tuesday Brunch Served Friday- Sunday at noon

Please also visit MJ Dowlings 3360 Noyac Road,Sag Harbor

THE HIVE

News from the Bridgehampton School Community

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2009 VOLUME 1 NO. 1

Sagharboronline.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2009 VOLUME 1 NO. 1 Sagharboronline.com L etters to the e ditor Dear

Letters to the editor

Dear Mr. Boyhan, The Staff at the Hive would like to give thanks to you, Graphic Artist Judy Clempner and Reporter Melissa Lynch, for giving us their time and expertise in order to launch our first page in the Sag Harbor Express. We are grateful for this unique opportunity for an authentic learning experience and the chance to share our school comunity with the readership of your newspaper. We are looking foward to working with all of you in the future. A sincere thank you for all that you have done for us. With much appreciation, The Staff at The Hive

for us. With much appreciation, The Staff at The Hive For more information on artist Joe
for us. With much appreciation, The Staff at The Hive For more information on artist Joe

For more information on artist Joe Zucker please visit:

info@nyehaus.com

on artist Joe Zucker please visit: info@nyehaus.com www.bridgehampton.k12.ny.us The Art of Basketball By The

www.bridgehampton.k12.ny.us

The Art of Basketball

By The Hive Staff

Since 1978, the Bridgehampton killer bees have walked away with 17class D championships. Every player on the team upholds the tradition and legacy of the killer bees. Since the team has always been formed from a small local popula- tion, the players have to work that much harder in order to succeed. Because of the unique character and diversity of the Killer Bees, many members of the local community have shown great interest in following the team. One member of the community turned out to be Joe Zucker who not only has been assistant coach since 1999, but also graciously opened up his world to the team. Joe Zucker continues to be an outstanding artist who invited students to the Nyehaus gallery in the National Arts gallery of Gramercy Park. The relationship between Joe Zucker and Coach Johnson enabled the “portrait project” class at Bridgehampton to evolve into a class project with the Sag Harbor Express newspaper. At that point, it became an exciting adventure where the students became engaged in an au- thentic expirence with a home town pa- per. Bryan Boyhan and his staff offered their assistance and invited the class to the offices of the Sag Harbor Express. Students got a firsthand introduction to the workings of the paper. Now it was time to have students pick jobs related to publishing a page in the Sag Harbor Express which would become a reflec- tion of the Bridgehampton School and community. Students decided to focus on the relationship between Joe Zucker

decided to focus on the relationship between Joe Zucker Arthur Gatling, Coach Johnson, and Joe Zucker

Arthur Gatling, Coach Johnson, and Joe Zucker en route to Zucker Studio

Biana Stepanian Photo

and coach Johnson for the Bridgehamp- ton page. As a result of the decision, Joe Zucker invited the class to his art studio. Stu-

dents recorded Joe Zucker on video as he explained his artistic process. When

students began editing the video tapes, a quote emerged which defined the art of basketball. Joe Zucker said, “In a con- ceptual world, you take things that are out there, with no boundaries, then you create your world…and basketball is like

very organized yet it allows for

invention.” “For me, this experience has led to a greater appreciation of the peo- ple around me that support the students on the basketball team, but also in the school,” said Nate Hochstedler. When students are exposed to different people who share a common goal, learning be- comes more relevant to their academic life.

that

it’s

“In a conceptual world, you take things that are out there, with no boundaries, then you create your world…and basketball

is

very organized yet it allows

like that

it’s

for invention.”

JOE ZUCKER

yet it allows like that it’s for invention.” JOE ZUCKER Seated for left to right: Coaches
yet it allows like that it’s for invention.” JOE ZUCKER Seated for left to right: Coaches

Seated for left to right: Coaches Joe Zucker, Carl Johnson and Ronnie White. For more info on Suffolk County Coaches vist http://www.suffolksportshof.com/

Karen Hochstedler photo

Insight into Coaching:

Coach Carl Johnson

By Cesar Banados

As a basketball player in Bridgehampton, I often wondered how our coach got to be such a great influence on the team. For a class project, I chose to interview Coach Johnson because I was inspired by him. When Coach Johnson was young, he was very active. He commented that he was always playing sports outside like a typical young boy. He played games like baseball and football but he didn’t start playing basket- ball until he came to New York from North Carolina. When Coach was nine years old, his fam- ily moved from North Carolina to New York for better economic opportunities. Growing up in North Carolina was a memorable expe- rience. Coach felt more comfortable in North Carolina than in New York. He felt that North Carolina offered more in the way of friend- ships. Coach grew up with two siblings, a sister Brenda, and a brother Bobby. Today Brenda works as a paralegal and Bobby followed Coach in the profession of coaching. It was not until the age of 10 that Coach picked up a basketball for the first time at the Bridge- hampton Child Care Center. From elementary school throughout his high school experience, he was in the Bridge-

hampton School. At this young age, his first dream was to grow up to be a professional baseball player. Although the baseball dream was not realized, in Bridgehampton he found a love for basketball that was irreplaceable.

This love for basketball developed into a life- long career. Growing up he also thought of things that would make him money, like going to school for business. He even at- tended Southampton Col- lege where he took courses in business.

Southampton Col- lege where he took courses in business. Eventually Coach’s pas- sion for basketball devel-

Eventually Coach’s pas- sion for basketball devel-

oped into his life’s work as the coach for the Bridgehampton Killer Bees. After college he was approached by his former high school coach, Roger Golden, who asked him to help coach junior high and varsity basketball. In 1991, as a result of this experience, Coach Johnson became the head coach of Bridge-

Cesar Banados in the studio.

hampton Varsity Basketball, and his legacy continues to affect my life, and the lives of others, long after they graduate from the team.

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” - Jackie Robinson

Joe Zucker: A Portrait of the Artist As A Basketball Fan

Joe Zucker: A Portrait of the Artist As A Basketball Fan By Nathan Hochstedler Before I

By Nathan Hochstedler

Before I visited the Nyehaus Gallery in Gramercy Park, NYC, I never really knew how intriguing and fascinating Joe Zucker was. At first, I only knew Mr. Zucker as my assistant basketball coach. After some research and a few interviews, I discovered how accom- plished Mr. Zucker is as an artist in the world of contemporary art. Mr. Zucker’s mother was a nurse, who also earned a degree in art history. At the age of six, his mother sent him to an art school in chicago. He grew up on the South Side of Chicago, in an emerging blue collar environment. A lot of racial tension existed between African Ameri- cans and whites in this lower middle class neighborhood. “There was a lot of fooling around in high school in the 1950’s,” Mr. Zucker said. The gang violence was extremely bad and there was police protection in the school on a daily basis. Mr. Zucker played baseball, basket- ball, and participated in several sports activities. He went to a good public grade school and graduated from Hur- ish High School in the Chicago area. He received a Master’s Degree in painting and drawing from the Art Institute of Chicago. He went on to teach art class at the Minneapolis School of Art in 1966 and 1967. A major inspiration for Mr. Zucker was the art scene in Chicago. Classes were held in the Museum of Chicago. He had many controversial influences. Art- ists such as Barry Lave, Chuck Close, Jenifer Bartlet, Vincent van Gogh, Jack- son Pollock, and Ad Reinhardt all had an impact on him. He was influenced by these artists’ unique styles and ways of projecting a picture on canvas. “There is

much more to art than people think” ac- cording to Mr. Zucker. The use of pro- cess and the way in which art is made is as important as how it looks in the end. When I asked Mr. Zucker about how he feels when people recognize him as a fa- mous artist, he explained he is very proud, although he wishes his mother could have

seen his success. The degree of self sac- rifice and pressure artists endure is widely not understood. Seven days a week, eigh- teen hours most days, is an overwhelming work schedule. Mr. Zucker said that fame can fade, or increase as time goes by. Ac- cording to him, it has been a very long road to recognition.

to him, it has been a very long road to recognition. Nathan Hochstedler stands in front

Nathan Hochstedler stands in front of a work in progress at Joe Zucker’s studio