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Briefing

Meeting colleagues
vocabulary for family members. The final part of this section deals with regulations for visitors in a hospital situation. Students will be asked to read a visitors code, which is followed by a chance to discuss regulations in their place of work or country.

This unit deals with meeting people nursing colleagues, patients and their visitors for the first time. It introduces the idea of creating rapport and reducing patient anxiety, especially prior to a hospital test.

Escorting a patient for tests


In this section, students familiarise themselves with the English terms for medical equipment used for testing: X-ray machine, CT scanner, MRI scanner and ECG machine. Previously known as a CAT (computerised axial tomography) scanner, the CT scanner takes computer images of the bodys organs. The patient lies on a narrow table that slides into the centre of the scanner, which can image the entire body in less than 30 seconds. Similar in appearance, the MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scanner uses a magnetic field and radio waves to produce detailed pictures of the bodys organs and structures, resulting in clear, cross-sectional, black and white images of the body. It differs from the CT scanner in that it does not use radiation. The MRI is used to detect a variety of conditions, including those of the brain, spinal cord, skeleton, chest, lungs, abdomen, pelvis, wrists, hands, ankles and feet. In some cases, it provides clearer images than those produced by X-ray, CT scan, or ultrasound. The ECG (electrocardiogram) is the most common cardiac test. It is simple to perform, risk-free and inexpensive. Ten electrodes (or leads) are attached to the patients limbs and chest in order to detect electrical impulses generated by the heart, which are then transmitted to the ECG machine. The ECG machine produces a graph (the ECG tracing) from which the following information can be determined: heart rate, heart rhythm, abnormalities, a prior or possible future heart attack. Students also practise taking appointments for the Radiology Department and learn expressions to use when escorting patients for tests. Nurses are required to go through a process of identifying the patient via their identity bracelet, to ensure they have the correct patient, and then explaining what is about to happen, therefore keeping the patient informed at all times.

Introducing yourself to the team


Arriving in a hospital for the first time, whether it be as a student nurse, an agency nurse (a temporary nurse hired through an employment agency for medical staff) or a new employee, can be daunting. This section of the unit helps students carry out and understand simple introductions. It also presents some of the key personnel in a (UK) hospital: ward sister (or ward manager) or charge nurse (male equivalent), who run the ward/department; staff nurse, a registered nurse; healthcare assistant (HCA), whose role is to assist the patient with their daily routine (eating, personal hygiene, dressing, toileting, etc). Use of the present simple provides the language tool to accomplish this.

Reading a nursing schedule


This section focuses on telling the time and the use of prepositions of time to enable students to read and ask about their nursing schedules. Use of the 24-hour clock is important for reading employee time sheets and nursing schedules, and reporting on medical documents and charts. Explanation of visiting hours and patient mealtimes, as well as hospital facilities (coffee shop, newsstand and gift shop) are more likely to be communicated through the 12-hour clock. This section also provides the opportunity to review days of the week.

Meeting patients and their visitors


In this section students will learn expressions they can use to introduce themselves to the patient on their first meeting. Some patients feel more comfortable if medical staff use their first name, preferring the more informal contact, while others like to maintain a more formal relationship and might ask staff to use their title and surname. Visiting hours are possibly the most important time of the day for patients, as family and friends play an essential role in the recovery process. By completing a (medical) family tree, students will review/learn

Preparing for this unit


Do the Entry test. For the Listening part of the test, use track 02.
Meeting colleagues
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Teachers notes
Warm-up
With books closed, write on the board: Hi/Hello, Im .../my names ... . Im from ... and then introduce yourself to the class. Ask: Whats your name? Point to the expressions on the board and encourage students to use these to introduce themselves. Then write: Im a(n) ... and the words teacher, student and nurse, and ask students: What do you do? Point to the relevant word/expression on the board to help students answer the question if necessary. Then elicit the expression nice to meet you and write it on the board. Depending on your class, you may wish to ask students to stand up and mingle, introducing themselves to each other using the expressions on the board. 2

he/she isnt. Ask the same question about the people in 1. Finally, do the same with the third person plural. Ask students to read through the Language box individually. Ask students to complete conversations 13 individually, then check answers as a class. Then ask them, in pairs, to practise reading the conversations aloud. They can then swap roles and repeat the activity. 1 am 2 Are 3 am 4 are 5 am 6 Is 7 isnt 8 is 9 am 10 am

Speaking
3 You may wish to go through the model conversation with a confident student first. Then ask students to use the model to introduce themselves to a partner.

Introducing yourself to the team Listening


1 02 Ask students to open their books and to look at the notice board. Ask: How many new staff members are there in Ward C? (five). Students can work individually or in pairs to look at job titles ae and tick the ones they already know. Tell students that they are going to hear three conversations between hospital staff. Ask them to listen and match the conversations to the job titles. Play the recording. If necessary, play it a second time, pausing after each conversation to allow students time to write their answers. Check answers as a class. a 2, 3 b 2 c 1 d 1 e 3

Extra activity
Hand out character cards prepared in advance with fictitious names, job titles from 1 and countries of origin. Ask students to stand up, mingle and introduce themselves to five different people in the class using the identities on their cards.

Language
On the board, write the days of the week, putting a tick next to each one, and draw a stick figure walking towards a hospital. Refer students to the Language box and the sentence He walks to the hospital every day. Ask: Where does he work? (He works in the hospital.). Explain that the present simple is used for things that happen regularly and things that are usually true. Point out the third person singular form and encourage students to always pronounce the final -s. Also draw their attention to the third person does/doesnt. Ask them to read the Language box individually. Before attempting 4, you could drill these forms using verbs students have already come across (e.g. live, work, walk). 4 Depending on your class, you may wish to elicit some (relevant) countries and their nationalities before asking students to complete this activity. Brainstorm countries and nationalities and write them up on the board. Check students pronunciation of these, first chorally, then individually. Ask students to complete the text individually or in pairs and then check answers as a class. Check that students understand agency nurse, shift and night shift.
Meeting colleagues
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Language
Depending on your class, you may wish to ask questions about the nurses in 1 to check students understanding of the target language. On the board, write: Whats your name? Whats his name? Whats her name? Point to a student and ask: Whats your name? Are you [name]? Then point to another student and ask: Whats his/her name? Repeat with a few students. Check that they are able to use the contracted forms of be. Refer students to the Language box. On the board, write teacher and a question mark (?). Elicit from a stronger student: Is he/she a teacher? Then elicit a short answer: Yes, he/she is./No,

1 doesnt live 2 lives 3 works 4 has 5 doesnt work 6 have 7 work

On the board, write: in, at. Then ask students to underline examples of in and at in the expressions in 2. On the board, write clock times + in/at and part of the day + in/at. Ask a stronger student to come to the board and circle the correct preposition in each case. Point out that we say at night, not in night. Refer students to the Prepositions of time section of the Language box. 1 9.20 a.m. 2 20.00 3 12.00 4 14.45 5 23.30 6 3 p.m. 7 8.15 a.m. 8 24.00

Extra activity
Tell students that they are starting a new job in a hospital. Ask them to write a short introduction, including the following details: name, country of origin, job title, where you work, one thing you like about your job. Encourage them to use expressions from the unit. Then ask them, in small groups, to take turns introducing themselves. Encourage other students in the class to ask questions.

Extra activity
For further practice, ask students to cover the expressions in 2 and to practise saying aloud the times in the box in 1.

Reading a nursing schedule Language


It is best to deal with the two sections of the Language box separately, in order to allow students to better assimilate the information. On the board, draw clocks showing the following times: 01.00, 04.30, 10.15 and 12.45, and elicit the question What time is it? Ask students around the class to ask and answer the question. Depending on your class, you may need to spend more time ensuring students know how to say these basic times. With a stronger class, you may prefer to ask students to complete 1 before referring to the Telling the time section of the Language box. This will allow you to gauge students prior knowledge of the target items. Then ask students to read this part of the Language box individually. 3

Speaking
In pairs, students take turns asking and answering questions 14.

Listening
4 03 Depending on your class, you may need to review the days of the week before asking students to complete this activity. First ask them to simply listen and note down the times they hear. Play the recording. Then write on the board: arrive/depart. Refer students to the employee time sheet and ask them to find verbs with a similar meaning (clock in, clock out). Play the recording again and ask students to complete Tylers time sheet. You may need to play the recording a third time before checking answers as a class. For weaker students, it may be beneficial to play the recording again while they read the audio script on page 72. Ask experienced nurses: Do you have time sheets where you work? What information do they give? Tuesday: 16.45, 23.00 Wednesday: 15.30, 22.15 Thursday: 15.30, 22.15 Saturday: 6.00/6 a.m., 14.00/2 p.m.

Vocabulary
1 Ask students to label the watches and clocks individually using the words in the box. Check answers as a class. Then refer students to the words in the box again and ask: Which ones are examples of the 24-hour clock? (20.00, 12.00 (both), 14.45, 23.30 and 24.00). A 14.45 B 9.20 a.m. C 23.30 D 12.00 E 24.00 F 3 p.m. G 8.15 a.m. H 20.00 2 Tell students that they are now going to learn expressions to tell the time. Ask them to work individually to match expressions 18 to the correct times in the box in 1. Ask them to compare answers with a partner, then check as a class.

Extra activity
For weaker students, bring in pictures of the following: car, bank, restaurant, cup of coffee, teddy bear, newspaper, plate of food. Ask students, in pairs or small groups, to match the pictures to the list of hospital facilities in 5. Check answers as a class.

Meeting colleagues

Speaking
5 Put students in pairs. Ask B Students to turn to page 68 and refer the class to the example questions. You could do the first question as an example with a more confident student. Monitor and assist students where necessary. Student A Car park: 7.30 a.m. 9.00 p.m.; Bank: 10.00 a.m. 12 noon and 1.00 p.m. 3.00 p.m.; Restaurant: 7.30 a.m. 5.30 p.m.; Coffee shop: 8.30 a.m. 6.30 p.m.; Gift shop: 10.00 a.m. 2.00 p.m. and 5.00 a.m. 8.00 p.m.; Newsstand: 12.00 noon 8.00 p.m.; Patient mealtimes: Breakfast: 7.30 a.m., Tea: 5.00 p.m. Student B Visiting hours: 2.00 p.m. 4.00 p.m. daily and 6.30 p.m. 8.00 p.m. daily; Restaurant: 10.00 a.m. 5.00 p.m.; Coffee shop: 12.00 noon 6.30 p.m.; Gift shop: 10.00 a.m. 8.00 p.m.; Newsstand: 10.00 a.m. 8.00 p.m.; Patient mealtimes: Dinner: 12.30 p.m., Beverages: 10.00 a.m. and 7.15 p.m.

7, 8

Extra activities
1 Ask confident students to model each of the expressions in 2. Give guidance as necessary. On the board, write: Can I come in? and Im taking care of you. Above each expression, draw an arrow to show the correct intonation patterns for a question and a statement. Then get students to practise reading the expressions aloud, first as a class and then in pairs, until you are happy they sound natural. 2 With stronger classes, have a class discussion about the use of first names and surnames in the students own countries. How well do they have to know someone before they use their first name? Are there any other factors (e.g. status, age) that play a role in the choice of names? What about in a hospital? Why do some patients prefer nurses to use their first name/surname?

Meeting patients and their visitors Listening


1 04 Tell students that they are going to hear four nurses meeting their patients for the first time and that they should tick the correct patient name for each nurse. Play the recording, then check answers as a class. Ask: Which nurse is talking to a child? (Denny) Whats the childs name? (Kendra) Anja: Ms Coxen Katya: Mr Williams Max: Susie Arnold Denny: Kendra 2 Refer students to expressions 18, then replay the recording section by section, allowing students time to write their answers. Play the recording again if necessary. Ask students to compare answers with a partner, then check as a class. Ask: Which expression does a patient use? (5) When can a nurse use this expression? (when speaking to new colleagues) 1 Can, in 2 course 3 isnt 4 care 5 call 6 Sorry 7 after 8 are 3 05 Play the recording and ask students to tick the expressions in 2 that Denny uses. Afterwards, ask: Who is Mr Willis? (Kendras toy/teddy bear)

Vocabulary
4 Refer students to the family tree and ask: What does it show? (family members). Go over the examples, then ask them, in pairs or small groups, to complete the family tree using the underlined words in the box. Then ask them to complete sentences ae using the rest of the words in the box. Check answers as a class. 1 grandfather 2 grandmother 3 father 4 mother 5 aunt 6 husband 7 brother 8 sister 9 cousin 10 cousin 11 son a grandson b wife c granddaughter d mother-in-law e father-in-law

Speaking
5 Ask students to draw a picture of their family they can invent the people if they wish and label it with words from 4. Students can draw stick figures if necessary. Alternatively, ask them to bring in photos of their family, or bring in pictures of family groups for the students to use. Then, ask students, in pairs, to turn to page 68 and roleplay meeting a patient for the first time. Student A takes the role of nurse and asks Student B questions about the family in his/her picture. Go through the example with a stronger student. When they have finished, ask them to swap roles and repeat the activity.

Meeting colleagues

Reading
6 Refer students to the illustration and ask: Where is this? (a hospital ward). Point to visitor E and ask: E is visiting a friend. Is it a good thing? Why not? (No, she has a cold.). Ask students, in small groups, to put a tick next to the visitors who are doing the right thing and a cross next to the visitors who are doing the wrong thing. Avoid confirming answers at this stage. A B C Dx Ex Fx Gx Hx Ix 7 Now ask students to read the hospital visitors code, checking their answers in 6 as they read. Reassure them that they do not need to understand every word at first. Help them develop their vocabulary by asking them to match words from the visitors code to items in the illustration in 6. Check that they understand touch, wound, vomiting, turn off and extinguish.

Escorting a patient for tests Vocabulary


1 Ask students, individually or in pairs, to label the medical equipment with the letters in the box. Pre-experience nurses may only be able to label some of these. Ask them to make a guess. A X B CT C MRI D ECG

Pronunciation
2 06 Elicit pronunciation of the letters of the alphabet by asking around the class. Then refer students to the medical equipment in 1 and ask them, in pairs, to guess the pronunciation of each one. Avoid correction at this point. Ask students to listen and repeat the names as they hear them. Pause after each word and check pronunciation, first chorally, then individually.

Speaking
8 Elicit/Pre-teach parent, guardian and overnight. Then ask students, in small groups, to discuss questions 14. Monitor and assist them where necessary. Depending on your class, you may wish to ask each group to give an informal presentation of their answers to the rest of the class. On the board, write: Excuse me, please dont ... ./ Im sorry, you cant ... . Refer students back to the illustration in 6, point to visitor G and elicit Excuse me, please dont sit on the patients bed./ Im sorry, you cant sit on the patients bed. With weaker classes, you may wish to elicit one or two more examples, or elicit the correct verb for each example. Suggested answers D ... give flowers to the patient/bring flowers on the ward. E ... visit the patient/hospital when you have a cold/the flu. F ... use a mobile phone on the ward. G ... sit on the patients bed. H ... touch the medical equipment. I ... bring children under 12 to visit the patient/visit more than two at a time.

Language
Before you go through the Language box, write the ordinal numbers for 1 to 20 on the board (1st, 2nd , 3rd, etc.). Review the numbers in order, chorally and individually if necessary. Then point randomly to the numbers and ask students to say them aloud, paying attention to their pronunciation. Add 21st and 22nd and do the same up to 31st. Ask: When do we use ordinal numbers? (for dates). Ask a student to write their date of birth on the board (e.g. 19th January 1988) and elicit the spoken form (the nineteenth of January, nineteen eighty-eight). Remind students that we do not usually write dates in words in English. Then ask them to read the Language box individually.

Listening
3 07 Refer students to the appointments sheet and ask: Why do patients go to the Radiology Department? (for tests, X-rays, etc.). What does DOB mean? (date of birth). Tell students that they are going to hear a nurse taking three patients to the Radiology Department. Give them time to look at the information on the appointments sheet first, then ask them to listen and write the correct test for each patient. Play the recording, then check answers as a class. a ECG b CT scan c X-ray

Meeting colleagues

Ask students to listen again and complete each patients name and date of birth in 16. If necessary, pause the recording after each patient to give students time to write their answers. Ask them to compare answers with a partner, then check as a class. 1 Khan 2 01.02.1956 3 Simpson 4 22.06.1932 5 Kadinska 6 16.04.1998

09 Give students time to read through statements 15. Then ask them to listen to the second part of the conversation between Kelly and Jake and to choose the correct words in italics. Play the recording, then check answers as a class. Depending on your class, you may wish to play the recording a second time. 1 wheelchair 2 cold, weak 3 blanket 4 Claire 5 10.30

Refer students to the audio script on pages 7273 and ask them to practise reading the dates of birth in pairs. Then put them in new pairs and ask them to dictate three dates of birth for their new partner to write down.

Extra activity
Ask students to draw their own family tree, as on page 8, labelling it with names and dates of birth. Put them in pairs and ask them to explain their family tree to their partner. Depending on your class, you may wish to ask students to prepare a PowerPoint slide and present their family tree to the rest of the group.

10 Ask students, individually or in pairs, to complete the expressions using the words in the box. Then play track 09 again for students to check their answers. They may have difficulty understanding item 2 (Are you warm enough?); encourage them to learn it as an expression and not to break it down into individual words. 1 help 2 arm 3 Let 4 better

Speaking
11 Refer students to the audio script for tracks 08 and 09 on page 73 and ask them, in pairs, to practise the conversation between Kelly and Jake. When they have finished, ask them to swap roles and repeat the activity. 12 Put students in new pairs. Tell them that they are going to practise escorting a patient to the Radiology Department. Depending on your class, you may wish to ask students to write their conversation out before carrying out the roleplay. When they have finished, ask each pair to join another pair. They then take turns listening to each others conversations and checking that they have followed all the steps. Now do Unit test 1.

Vocabulary
6 Ask students, individually or in pairs, to label the illustration with the words in the box. 1 trolley 2 walking stick 3 blanket 4 wheelchair 7 Tell students that they are going to hear a conversation between staff nurse Kelly and Jake, her patient. Explain that before they listen, they have to put the sentences and questions from their conversation in the correct order. You may wish to do the first item as an example with the class. Avoid correction at this stage.

Listening
8 08 Before students listen, check their understanding of identity bracelet, swipe and code (barcode). Ask them to listen to the first part of the conversation between Kelly and Jake to check their answers in 7. Play the recording, then check answers as a class. 1 Its time for your X-ray now. 2 Are you ready? 3 Can I just see your identity bracelet first, please? 4 Whats your full name? 5 Can I swipe the code on your bracelet, please?

Preparing for the next unit


In preparation for Unit 2, suggest the following to your students: Think about common symptoms and make a list. Do some (online) research into how to take a blood sample.

Meeting colleagues