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Dormitory Research 2013

What is Dormitory A dormitory (often shortened to dorm) in the United States is a residence hall consisting of sleeping quarters or entire buildings primarily providing sleeping and residential quarters for large numbers of people, often boarding school, college or university students. A room providing sleeping quarters for a number of persons. A building for housing a number of persons, as at a school or resort. A community whose inhabitants commute to a nearby city for employment and recreation. for hardware preferences, such as automatic openers. Equipment Typically Provided at Main Entrances: Card readers to control building access. Card access systems are recommended to prevent unauthorized access to the residence hall. Electric strikes controlled by card readers. Blue Light emergency phone device to call for help in an emergency. Fire alarm manual pull stations must be provided within 5 ft. of entrance (and all exterior) doors.

Main Lobby Recommended finishes in lobbies are as follows:


Flooring: Floor finishes should be durable, slip resistant, easily cleaned materials that can withstand water and salt tracked into the building by occupants and visitors. Recommended materials include stone tile, ceramic tile, paver tile, quarry tile, terrazzo, and rubber flooring. Walls: Wall construction and finishes should be of durable materials capable of resisting impact and gouging. Recommended materials include architectural concrete or brick masonry, glazed or painted concrete masonry units and heavy gauge metal stud systems with impact-resistant gypsum board materials. For gypsum board walls, recommended finishes include

Design Standards/ Guidelines for Dormitory Entrance Doors


Balanced doors or swinging doors with continuous hinges are recommended at main entrances. When aluminum main entrance doors are planned, medium or wide-stile door systems should be used, depending on the volume of traffic anticipated. Narrow stile aluminum door systems should be avoided. At a minimum, one pair of double doors, each leaf a minimum of thirty-six inches wide, is recommended at main entrances to facilitate student moving. Main entrance doors will typically be required to be accessible to disabled persons. Check with the campus 1

Dormitory Research 2013


hard wainscot systems, heavy-duty wall coverings, graffiti resistant coatings, and semi-gloss or gloss paint systems. Ceilings: Recommended materials include commercial grade suspended acoustical ceiling systems, lay-in cementitious wood fiber acoustical panels, and painted gypsum board. The Resident Directors office should be located so that it is visible and/or easily accessible from the lobby. A reception/security desk is often required at the main lobby adjacent the main entrance. Provide elevator sump pit drainage. Discharge from the sump pit shall be piped to indirect waste. Drainage pit should be sized accordingly.

Stairs and Ramps


Flooring: Floor finishes should be durable, slip-resistant, easily cleaned materials. Recommended materials include linoleum, vinyl composition tile, rubber flooring and epoxy paint. Floor finishes may be omitted entirely if bare concrete or painted steel is acceptable to the campus. Walls: Wall construction and finishes should be of durable construction capable of resisting impact and gouging. Recommended materials include heavy gauge metal stud systems with impact resistant gypsum board or concrete masonry units, painted with semi-gloss or gloss paint systems. Stairs at grade levels will be subject to corrosion from water and salt tracked into the building by occupants and visitors, and should be constructed of easily maintained or replaced materials. Recommended stair components include rubber treads and painted steel components. Ramps are preferable to stairs for small changes in elevation. Railing systems at stairs and ramps will experience heavy use and should be constructed of heavy-duty materials and systems.

Elevators
a minimum of two elevators should be provided. This allows for continued elevator service to students when an elevator must be taken out of service for maintenance or repair. Consider locating elevators near stairs to encourage stair use. In addition to health benefits for occupants, this will minimize elevator energy use. Where elevators are provided, locate and size them to facilitate moving in and out of the residence hall by students Smoke detection must be provided in all elevator lobbies. Elevator cab finishes should be of durable, vandal resistant materials.

Dormitory Research 2013


Raised or sunken floor areas should be avoided as they make providing accessibility to the disabled more difficult. Provide emergency lighting. Vandal proof light fixtures are preferred by some campuses. 120-volt receptacles are typically provided at each stair landing for cleaning equipment. Fire alarm system notification appliances (audio/visual alarms) should be provided within stairs. Manual pull stations must be provided within 5 ft. of all stair doors. Smoke detection must be provided. Movable and folding partitions are recommended to provide flexibility and maximize use of lounge and recreation room spaces. If a shared building kitchen is provided, it should be located adjacent to a lounge or recreation room. Electrical Devices Typically Provided: Convenience Outlets Ceiling Lights Telephone Outlets Cable TV Outlets Power and Cable TV outlets for wall hung televisions. Data Outlets Wireless Technology: Consider provisions for wireless communication. Consult with the facility and service providers to determine requirements.

Directors Office
The Resident Directors Office should be located in close proximity to the main building entrance and entrance lobby. Electrical Devices Typically Provided: Convenience Outlets Telephone Outlet Cable TV Outlet Data Outlet Ceiling lights Wireless Technology: Consider provisions for wireless communication. Consult with the facility and service providers to determine requirements.

Corridors
Recommended finishes in corridors are as follows Flooring: Floor finishes should be durable, slip resistant, easily cleaned materials. Consideration should also be given to the selected floorings sound absorbing characteristics. Recommended materials include linoleum, vinyl composition tile and rubber flooring. Carpeting has been used successfully, but requires more maintenance.

Lounges and Recreation Room

Dormitory Research 2013


Walls: Wall construction and finishes should be of durable construction capable of resisting impact and gouging. Recommended materials include heavy gauge metal stud systems (minimum thickness 22 gauge (.0283 inches, .72 mm) at maximum 16 inches on center, with double studs at door jambs) with impact resistant gypsum board or concrete masonry units, painted with semi-gloss or gloss paint systems. Hard wainscot systems, heavy-duty wall coverings and graffiti resistant coatings are recommended for areas that may be subject to impact or other types of abuse and vandalism. Ceilings: Recommended materials include commercial grade suspended acoustical ceiling systems, lay-in cementitious wood fiber acoustical panels, and painted gypsum board. The need for hold-down clips at specific locations and specific rooms should be evaluated where suspended acoustical systems are used. Access panels for maintenance of mechanical and electrical systems may be required where gypsum board or other hard ceiling types are used Exit signs should be visible from all locations, including exit signs indicating exit directional change. Exit signs should not be located at ceilings with a ceiling height less than nine feet high as they are subject to vandalism. Where ceiling heights 4 must be less than nine feet, wall mounted exit signs are recommended. Drinking Fountains: Drinking fountains are required in all residence halls Stainless steel (no. 4 brushed finish) is recommended for all surface finishes. If water coolers are provided, electric power is required in addition to water and waste piping. Placement of drinking fountains in an alcove is recommended.

Student Room (Dorm Units)


Recommended finishes in student living rooms and bedrooms are as follows: Flooring: Recommended materials include linoleum, vinyl composition tile and carpeting. Carpeting will require more maintenance. Walls: Wall construction should be durable. Recommended materials include painted gypsum board or concrete masonry units. Ceilings: Recommended materials include suspended painted gypsum board systems. Suspended acoustical ceiling systems (commercial grade) may be used, but these present a more institutional appearance and also provide potential space for hiding contraband materials.

Dormitory Research 2013


Consideration of suspended acoustical ceiling systems in student bedrooms should be reviewed with campus. Consideration should be given to providing systems for hanging items on walls of student living rooms and bedrooms. Ceilings: Recommended materials include suspended fiberglass reinforced plastic grid ceiling systems, with fiberglass faced gypsum board lay-in panels. Suspended painted gypsum board systems may be used successfully, but will require access panels. Check with the campus for preferences and other materials and systems that may have a record of successful performance at that campus.

Toilet Rooms and Bathrooms


Recommended finishes in student toilet rooms and bathrooms are as follows: Flooring: Floor finishes should be durable, slip resistant, easily cleaned materials that are resistant to water leakage. Recommended materials include ceramic tile, with waterproof sheet membrane underlayment at shower areas, pitched to floor drains, and a minimum static coefficient of friction of 0.6 at level surfaces and 0.8 at sloped surfaces. Sheet membrane underlayments are recommended over liquid-applied membrane underlayments as they are easier to flash into drain structures and provide a reliably consistent membrane thickness that is not dependent on installer skill. Walls: Recommended materials include glazed concrete masonry units, structural glazed facing tile and ceramic tile wainscot, with full height tile or solid surface material at shower areas. 5

Storage Rooms
Wall construction should be of durable construction capable of resisting impact and gouging. Recommended materials include heavy gauge metal stud systems with impact resistant gypsum board or concrete masonry units. Finishes: Finishes are optional in most storage rooms. Where finishes are provided, the selection should be based on the materials stored. Where large or bulky materials (such as furniture) are stored, durable finish materials resistant to impact should be provided. Where liquids are stored, finishes should be waterresistant. Heating: Storage rooms should have enough heating to prevent freezing of stored materials as well as any piping that passes through the room.

Dormitory Research 2013


Ventilation: Materials being stored in the storage spaces dictate ventilation requirements. serve two main functions: 1) to handle the occasional overflow of a fixture; and 2) to facilitate floor washing. The floor should always be sloped toward the drains.

Janitors Closet
Floor finishes should be durable, slip-resistant, easily cleaned materials that are resistant to water leakage. Recommended materials include ceramic tile, quarry tile and bare or epoxy coated concrete, pitched to floor drains. Tile should have a minimum static coefficient of friction of 0.6 at level surfaces and 0.8 at sloped surfaces. Utility sink: Janitors closets should have a utility sink installed. The utility sink can be either a floor sink or a wall mounted sink, depending on campus requirements, but should be low to accommodate buckets. They should be of substantial construction, either terrazzo or cast iron. Provide commercial grade utility faucet. Faucet should have a bucket hook, hose threads and a vacuum breaker. If the faucet is wall mounted, substantial wall blocking is required for support of the faucet and the piping should be well braced to support a full bucket. Wall finishes adjacent the utility sink should be of durable, water-resistant materials, such as ceramic tile or solid plastic panels. Floor drain: Floor drains are recommended in janitors closets, depending on the size of the space. The floor drains 6

Mechanical Room
Wall construction and finishes should be of durable construction capable of resisting impact and gouging. Recommended materials include heavy gauge metal stud systems with impact resistant gypsum board or concrete masonry units, painted with semi-gloss or gloss paint systems. Soundproof construction or other soundproofing methods are recommended for mechanical equipment rooms that are adjacent, above or below student living spaces. Consideration should be given to providing thermal insulation at mechanical equipment rooms containing heat generating equipment that are adjacent, above or below student living spaces. Ventilation: Mechanical equipment rooms should have ventilation provided in accordance with the Mechanical Code, Fuel Gas Code if there are gas combustion appliances, equipment manufacturers installation requirements, and good engineering practice.

Electrical Room

Dormitory Research 2013


Ventilation: Ventilation to transformer and electrical service rooms is required. Transformer Location: Some facilities prefer indoor transformers over outdoor transformers. Check with the facility to determine the preferred transformer location Smoke detection must be provided within all electric rooms. Fire alarm system notification appliances should also be provided.

Dormitory Research 2013