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Dear Colleague: As Tyco Electronics emerges as a stand-alone independent company, it is more important than ever that we understand that

ethics and integrity are a fundamental part of our strategy to become a truly great company. As a manager, you play a critical role in championing our four core values both in the example you set and the guidance you give to others. Our 99,000 employees look to you for leadership every day. You are the connection between them and their performance; and in turn our companys performance for customers and shareholders. The Performance Management program and our Values and Ethics initiatives are designed to help enhance your skills by providing the resources you need to continue to foster a global culture at Tyco Electronics that fully supports the integrity and development and job satisfaction of our employees. As managers, you know what it takes to build and maintain a culture of integrity and world-class performance. With your expertise, commitment and enthusiasm, all of us working together will demonstrate that at Tyco Electronics, both performance and integrity matter. Regards

Performance Matters
Managers Guide

This work and the information contained herein is proprietary to the company and is intended for internal use only. The information contained herein is confidential and any unauthorized copying or use is strictly prohibited. Copyright 2004, an unpublished work of our company. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi Understand our Performance Management Process The Performance Management Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Create Aligned Goals Set Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Goal Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Goal Setting Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Writing Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Performance and Development Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Performance Goal Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Development Goal Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Goal-Setting Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Provide Useful, Frequent, Candid Feedback Provide Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Hints for Providing Great Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Four Step Feedback Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Four Step Feedback Model: Conversation Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Really Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

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Write and Conduct a Fair, Collaborative Assessment Conduct Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 The Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 The Assessment Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 The Profile Form Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Completing the Profile Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 The Assessment Form Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Completing the Assessment Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Performance Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Nine Key Behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Strengths and Development Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Key Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Best Next Moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Development Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Summary Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Conducting the Assessment Discussion Introduction . . . .49 Plan for the Collaborative Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Conduct the Collaborative Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Appendix Nine Key Behavior DefinitionsPositive and Negative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Nine Key Behavior Definitions by Position Individual Contributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Executive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Lominger Competencies and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Standard Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
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Performance Matters

Introduction
Welcome to our performance management process. This standard, company-wide approach reinforces our goals of achieving operational excellence. Through this global process, we are uniting our teams into a single operating company; one that has a healthy culture characterized by alignment and growth opportunities. Together we are creating a company that inspires and supports our current employees, while attracting and retaining new ones. This reference guide will steer you through the process, while focusing on your role as a manager. Your commitment is critical to creating a global culture that achieves results by living our values. And because you are the connection between our employees and their performance, you have an incredible opportunity to make a difference in their lives and our organization. Whether assessing performance or promoting workplace integrity, your behavior has a significant impact on the behavior of others. This guide will provide a process and philosophy that will help you leverage your talents and those of your team. Its an exciting time to be a part of our companya time to realize our full potential. This is an opportunity to create a global workforce of energized, aligned employees who get as much out of their jobs as they give.

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The Performance Management Process

Introduction

Our performance management system is a simple, yet powerful, three-step process. It starts with setting goals, before or at the start of the fiscal year. Although goals may change and be adjusted during the course of the year, its important to begin by coming to an agreement and writing them down. The next step is providing feedback, throughout the year. We encourage you to sit down with your employees quarterly to talk formally, and to provide informal feedback often. To keep everyone aligned and productive, feedback should be useful, frequent and candid. Once the fiscal year is complete you begin the third step; conducting the assessment. Conducting the assessment is a threepart process. It begins with an employee completing/updating his/her profile. The next part involves gathering performance data and writing the assessment. Finally, you will conduct a collaborative assessment discussion.

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Roles and Responsibilities

Everyone has an important role in the performance management process. Employees: Work hard to achieve their goals Take responsibility for their own professional development Solicit, listen to, and act on feedback Assess their performance objectively Managers: Set and clarify employees goals Support employee development and possible career progression Provide useful, frequent and candid feedback Assess employee performance fairly The Company: Make performance management and employee development a business priority Ensure fairness, consistency and process integrity across all businesses Provide tools and processes to develop skills and behaviors that enhance performance We care as much about what gets done as how it gets done. Our new performance management process highlights both. Results focus on goals. Behaviors focus on how those results are accomplished. Everyone will be assessed on their demonstration of both results and behaviors.

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Create Aligned Goals

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Set Goals

Introduction

Goal-setting and feedback are a very powerful combination as each works better when supported by the other. Goal-setting is the first step; it is the map that identifies the destination with checkpoints along the way.
Goal Alignment

Goals should align from the top of the organization down through segments, business units, departments and finally to individual goals. This performance management process will help make that happen.

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Using the goal alignment diagram as a guide, we suggest you begin by scheduling a meeting with your employees to discuss business unit and department goals. This will enable individual goals to align with, and support, overall company goals. The diagram shows how goals flow down through the organization, beginning with the companys initiatives and ending with individual goals. If you cannot state how the employees performance goal supports the accomplishment of higher level goals, then the employees goal should be carefully re-examined.
Goal-Setting Sequence

The goal-setting sequence begins before, or at the start of, the new fiscal year. The purpose of this step is to establish goals for the fiscal year that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, timespecific and aligned with the companys goals for that year. The sequence begins with either a group or one-on-one meeting between you and your employees. At this meeting, you should discuss your department goals and provide a written copy for everyone. Using these goals as a guide, have your employees draft their individual goals for your review and approval. While its

Create Aligned Goals

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important to reach agreement on goals and write them down, its also important to remain flexible throughout the year because goals may change as business needs shift. As a best practice, teams and/or departments are encouraged to meet after employees complete their first drafts. In this meeting, employees can share their goals with each other to ensure there are no duplications, overlaps, conflicts or gaps that might cause inefficiencies. These meetings can also be used to set team (joint) goals.
Need More?

If you are interested in learning more about team goals and goal alignment contact your Human Resources representative or Organization Development/Training department.
Writing Goals

A useful acronym to remember when writing goals is S.M.A.R.T. or: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-specific. These are the characteristics of well-written goals. A brief definition of each is listed below: Specific: Goals should be distinct, clearlystated and focused on a single result. Vague generalities are not goals. Measurable: State how youre going to know the goal is completedconsider quantity and quality. Attainable: Goals should be challenging, but feasible. Consider the following: Can the goal be accomplished with the resources the employee controls? Think of their strengths and development needs. Relevant: Goals should be relevant to the employees position and the organization. Consider the following: Does the goal support the companys goals?

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Time-specific: When will the goal be completed? Deadlines focus an employees time and attention while encouraging the completion of commitments.

Performance and Development Goals

Performance and development goals require the same criteriato be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-specific. Performance goals are driven by, and aligned with, company, segment, business unit and department goals. Individual goals are most powerful when they are linked to the larger organization. Typically they focus on factors such as EBIT (earnings before interest and taxes), revenue, operational excellence, cash, growth and safety. An employee will typically have two to four performance goals.
Performance Goal Examples:

Reduce credit collection time to less than 35 days by January 31. Manage the relocation of a local office in accordance with agreed upon standards and action plans. Office must be operational by July 1. Improve extruder line efficiency by 15% by the end of the fiscal year. Increase overall monthly sales by 15% by introducing connector products into three new markets (Mexico, Poland and Japan) by the end of the third quarter. By the end of the fiscal year, develop an online system to track customer complaints and reduce them by 50%.

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Development goals are individually-driven and focus on the skills, knowledge and behavioral changes needed to accomplish performance goals or prepare for future assignments. Typically every employee will have one or two development goals which may focus on leveraging strengths or improving development needs.
Development Goal Examples:

Complete Leadership Machine Development course by June 30. Meet with manager to demonstrate use of skills/knowledge acquired by July 9. Monitor progress monthly. Prepare for Japan assignment within two years by attending/participating in 3-4 senior leadership meetings/year outside of the US. Meet with Dr. Watanabe monthly to receive mentoring on culture and business practices. Earn Certified Associate in Project Management through the Project Management Institute and pass the certification exam by Dec. 31. Improve communication skills by learning how to run project meetings that are time efficient, have the appropriate people in attendance, follow and accomplish the published agenda and follow-up on action items. Use a survey tool to measure improvement. Survey scores should show a 33% improvement by the end of the second quarter. Increase business acumen by working one day per quarter with regional sales manager; meet wide range of customers and prospects. Successfully present analysis and action plan to the regional sales team by the end of the first quarter.

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Goal-Setting Form

This form will be used throughout the company to record, update and track goals. When filling out the Performance Factor column (for performance goals), identify the factor, such as sales, EBIT, operational excellence, revenue, cash, growth, safety, etc. When filling out the Target Competency (for development goals) identify the competency or behavior, such as business acumen, drive for results, builds effective teams, etc.

In the Expected Results column, write specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, time-specific goals to ensure you will be able to assess the quantity and quality of the result. You may also include intermediate checkpoints in this column. The End of the Year Results/Accomplishments column is used to document results upon completion of the fiscal year and at checkpoints along the way.

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Need More?

For more information or assistance with goal-setting, contact your Human Resources representative.

Create Aligned Goals

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Provide Useful, Frequent, Candid Feedback

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Provide Feedback

Introduction

Feedback is an integral part of any formal performance discussion, however frequent, informal feedback is often cited as having the most impact on improving performance and satisfaction for both managers and employees. As a manager, providing feedback is a core responsibility of your job. Employees look to you to proactively provide direction, guidance, encouragement and advice. As a manager you should encourage your staff to ask for feedback as well. Let them know you are open and eager to provide information. Conversely, managers also must ask for feedbackon both your role as a manager and your role as an employee. Employees should actively ask for feedback in formal performance discussions and perhaps more importantly, in informal day to day conversations.

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Its not unusual for people to feel uncomfortable about asking for feedback. Yet, when most individuals are asked, they find it a fairly pleasant experience. At the very least, they welcome the chance to provide their comments to a willing receiver. In addition, research has shown that those who seek feedback are considered better performers than those who dont. Contrary to popular belief, asking for feedback creates a positive impression! Also, when you are clear and specific about what youre asking for, you are more likely to get it. And dont forget to use good listening skills as detailed later in this guide.
Hints for Providing Great Feedback

Feedback will provide greater benefits if you are willing to make small efforts. Consider the following: Provide both positive and constructive feedback. Keep in mind, that providing positive feedback ensures your employees keep doing what they do best. However, constructive feedback, if given well, is more likely to lead to improvement or change. Use both for maximum results. Think about how you would like to hear the message. Focus on behavior not personality. People rarely change their personality but they can, and do, change their behaviors. Personality-Focused Comment: Youre sloppy and just dont care. Behavior-Focused Comment: There are four errors in this report.

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Make it timely. Give feedback as soon as possible after the behavior in question. Timely feedback can be acted upon, often immediately. This also prevents unwanted or dangerous behavior from becoming a habit. Give a little at a time. Provide feedback in small amounts. Offer feedback like Ground Control provides guidance to a space craft. Ground Control offers many mid-course corrections to ensure a perfect landing, rather than simply pointing the rocket toward its destination and hoping for the best. Be creative, but sensitive. Not everyone likes to receive feedback in the same manner. Constructive feedback should always be done in private, but positive feedback can take place in either a public or private setting. While some people prefer that all feedback be handled privately, others respond well to public group acknowledgement or awards. To maximize the impact of your feedback, consider the preferences of the person involved. Document and maintain notable performance examples and feedback. Document both positive and constructive feedback. Collect e-mails, customer letters and summaries of events. While you should keep this information, its even better to encourage employees to track this information and use it when drafting their self-assessments.

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Four Step Feedback Model

The four step model for providing feedback works well for both positive and constructive feedback. All four steps work best in the order described below, but providing great feedback takes practice. Even if you only do the first step and/or change the order of the other steps, you will still experience better results.
The Four Step Model

1. 2. 3. 4.

Describe what happened Describe the impact Check for understanding and get the persons views Describe what you want to happen

Describe what happened. Keep it clear and concise. Again, talk about behaviors, and not personality characteristics. Describe the impact. Explain why it matters. What were the effects, consequences or results? Check for understanding and get the persons views. Does the receiver understand what youre talking about? Does the person agree or disagree? Does the receiver have additional information? How does the person feel about your feedback? Describe what you want to happen. Explain what you want to stop, start or continue. Sometimes people resist using a model to guide conversation because it seems stilted or contrived. However consistent practice makes it easier and soon it will feel more natural.
Need More?

For more information or assistance with providing feedback, contact your Human Resources representative.

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Four Step Feedback Model: Conversation Examples

Tyrone and Ken Tyrone: Ken, you did a good job with that employee survey. It was thorough, completed on time and you had a great response rate. Howd you do that? Ken: Well, thanks. I used that new online survey tool I told you about. Its really easy to work with. Tyrone: You showed a lot of personal commitment to get the survey launched and communicated. Ken: Im thinking about getting the whole department trained and then using it as our standard survey approach. Tyrone: That would be great. Keep me posted as you move forward with those ideas. In fact, could I get a status update in 30 days? Ken: No problem. Ill have it for you. Juanita and Eric Juanita: Eric, we agreed youd be available to the group. However twice this week it took more than an hour to find you. When you werent available it caused the whole production line to stop. The technicians couldnt start building prototypes without your instructions. This downtime affects the project schedule and the technicians resent it. It also hurts your credibility as a professional. Im very concerned about this, but Id like to hear your side of the story. Eric: There really isnt much to my side of the story. I hate the idea of wearing a pager, but I understand that my reluctance to do so is causing real problems.

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Juanita: Im happy to hear you recognize the problem. Im going to monitor this carefully because it is important for you, your team and the company. I agree with your idea of getting a pager and think it will probably solve the problem. You decide who gets the number and that may help keep it from going off incessantly. Lets meet next week after the staff meeting to see how its working out. Cecilia and Joan Cecilia: Joan, you did an outstanding job of pulling this meeting together on such short notice and preparing the presenters. I noticed that everyone was really engaged, paying attention and asking lots of questions. I think the preparation you put into it really showed and it made a significant impact on the management team. What did you think? Joan: I think it went pretty well. I was trying to showcase the talents of our new hires by having them present and demonstrate the value of our university recruiting program to gain continuing support from upper management. I think I could have spent more time with the presenters since some of them appeared rather nervous. Cecilia: Youre right about that, but the nervousness will diminish with experience and practice. Overall you did a great job and I want you to continue organizing and running these types of sessions.

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Really Listening

A feedback conversation is a two-way dialogue. That means not only are you talking, but you are also listening. Theres a difference between hearing and listening. Hearing is a physiological process involving the ability to hear sounds and noises. Listening is a psychological process involving understanding and interpreting those sounds and noises. Listening is a complex topic, however the following skills will help you have a productive feedback conversation. Attending is giving your physical attention to another person. Eye contact and being in a non-distracting environment are two powerful demonstrations of this skill. Following allows the listener to stay out of the speakers way so that the listener can discover how the speaker views the situation. Use minimal encouragers, such as really?, tell me more and oh? to let the other person know that you are paying attention. Infrequent questions keep the conversation going in a directed fashion without creating the feeling of an inquisition. The key is to ask questions that are non-judgmental and truly allow a dialogue to flow. Reflecting requires the listener to restate the feelings and/or content of the speaker in a way that demonstrates understanding and acceptance. Listeners frequently miss many of the emotional dimensions of a conversation. There is a tendency to concentrate on content, yet the key elements are often based on buried feelings. By simply empathizing with feelingsnot necessarily agreeing with them you can make remarkable progress in a conversation. Finally, paraphrasing, means providing a concise response to the speaker that states the essence of the others content in the listeners own words.

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You might find it useful to make a reminder list of these skills and keep it in sight when you find yourself giving formal or even informal feedback.
Source: Much of the content of Really Listening is from the work of Robert Bolton in his book, People Skills.

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Write and Conduct a Fair, Collaborative Assessment

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Conduct Assessment

Introduction

This part of the performance management process has three steps: 1. Completing/updating the profile form 2. Writing the assessment and 3. Conducting a collaborative discussion.
The Tools

Goal Setting Employee & Manager Complete Purpose: Goal agreement Goal alignment Results tracking Profile Employee Completes Purpose: Career highlights Internal resume Learn about your employee Identify candidates for open positions Assessment Employee & Manager Complete Purpose: Summarize results & behaviors Employee development Career planning

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The Assessment Sequence

The assessment sequence details the roles and responsibilities in this phase of the performance management process. Detail on completing and using the profile and assessment will be explained on the following pages.

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The Profile Form Introduction

The profile form serves as an internal resume. It creates a common and comprehensive information form for internal promotions and job transfers that can be used within and across functions, segments and business units. This form is updated annually by the employee. Employees are responsible for the accuracy of all information on the form. As in any hiring situation, verifying references and other information should be completed prior to extending an offer to an internal candidate.
Completing the Profile Form

This form may be completed on paper or electronically. It is deliberately limited to just one page.

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Highlights of the information requested include: Name: Enter your last name, first name. Title: Enter your current title. Reports To: Enter your managers last name, first name. Function: See the Appendix for a list of Standard Functions. Unique ID: Enter your employee ID or other number determined by Human Resources. Business Segment: Enter the name of your business segment. Business Unit: Enter the name of your business unit. Job Date: Enter the date you started in your current position (Day/Month/Year). Gender: For U.S. employees only. This information is voluntary and self-disclosed by employee. Select one of the following: Male Female Location: Enter your work location or office of record. Band: Contact your local Human Resources representative for career banding information. Diversity: For U.S. employees only. This information is voluntary and self-disclosed by employee. Select one of the following: Yes No Citizenship: Enter your country/countries of citizenship.

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Service Date: Enter your date of hire (Day/Month/Year). Company Work Experience: List your work experience at our company. Detail assignments starting with the most recent (not including current since this information is captured at the top of the form). Other Work Experience: List your work experience outside of our company, starting with the most recent. Education: List each degree youve earned after secondary (high) school levelstarting with the most advanced degree. Training/Development: List your top three most significant training experiences in the last five years. Awards/Patents/Recognition: List the top three. Licenses and Certifications: List current ones related to your position. Languages: Languages you speak, read or write. NT: Native tongue. F: Strong spoken fluency, and at least some reading/writing ability. M: Moderate spoken fluency, and at least some reading/writing ability. Career Interests: Indicate your next desired career move and long range career interests. Indicate any preferences for relocation.

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The Assessment Form Introduction

The intent of the assessment form is to summarize an employees performance and development, succinctly and accurately. Like the profile form, it is deliberately limited to one page. Documentation and feedback are collected throughout the year by both you and your employee and reviewed prior to drafting the assessment. Input may be obtained from peers, first and second level managers, internal and external customers, subordinates, and of course the employees own perspective. As you can see in the assessment sequence graphic, using information from the End of the Year/Results Accomplishments section of the goal-setting form, employees start the process by drafting their own self-assessment, completing/updating the profile form, and then give them to you. In turn, you complete the End of the Year/Results Accomplishments section of the goal-setting

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form and write the final assessment. You may use the employees drafts as a starting point, if you wish. In some cases, your manager may want to review the assessment before you and your employee meet to discuss the results. Typically the assessment and goal-setting sequences happen separately. Goal-setting is generally done before or at the start of the new fiscal year. This is important so that the employee knows what is expected at the start of the new assessment cycle. The assessment process begins once the current fiscal year is complete. This is done to ensure results for the entire twelve month period are considered. At a minimum, once signed, the goal-setting form (for the fiscal year in review), final assessment, and profile should be placed in the employees personnel file. Each segment or business unit may have additional local administrative requirements once the assessment is signed. Check with your Human Resources representative for this information.

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Completing the Assessment Form


Performance Summary

This section of the assessment form describes performance for the entire year, including successes and targets missed. Consider performance against specified goals. What goes in the box? Outline of performance for the year in bullet point format. The performance summary is much easier to complete if you and your employee have been discussing performance throughout the year, collecting documentation and updating the End of Year Results/Accomplishments section of the goal-setting form. When writing the bullet point summaries, consider the answers to these questions: What results did I expect from the employee based on his/her goals? Did the employee deliver consistently on the expected results? More? Less? How close was the employee to meeting each goal? How challenging was each goal? What external factors impacted the results? How much assistance did the employee need?

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Performance Summary Examples Executive Level Performance Summary Examples Developed organizational structure and recruited five new executives Established segment objectives to focus on growth and globalization Established a new culture based on processes, performance and metrics Removed $10 million in costs in last fiscal year Failed to meet business growth target by 4% (target 10%) Moved team from an atmosphere of skepticism to one of motivation and commitment as measured by 25% improvement in employee survey scores Manager Level Performance Summary Examples Reorganized department with customer focus orientation by providing 24x7 coverage by the end of the second quarter Led cross-training of entire staff to maximize efficiencies Turned cost center into a profit center in less than six months Formally aligned all team member goals with department, business unit and segment goals. Tracked results for entire year and met or exceeded all goals. Instituted Six Sigma practices during last five months. Results not yet clearly evident but metrics are established and being tracked and monitored. Significantly improved knowledge of the business, especially financial measures and globalization considerations

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Individual Contributor Level Performance Summary Examples Repaired and built a well-functioning relationship with major project partners Organized and led innovative project to outsource records retention. Project completed two months ahead of schedule, but exceeded budget by 15% Worked with managers of three departments to streamline information technology demands. Model may have broad applications. Generated first year cost savings of $75,000. Completed all requirements to earn a Six Sigma Green Belt

Key Behaviors

Our company is driven by four values: Integrity, Excellence, Teamwork and Accountability. Our values in turn are supported by nine behaviors: Champions Integrity and Trust, Managerial Courage, Customer Focus, Learning/Change Agility, Builds Effective Teams, Manages Vision and Purpose, Manages Diversity, Drive for Results and Business Acumen. Behaviors define performance expectations by reinforcing the importance of how we get results. They help us differentiate performancepeople who use these behaviors tend to produce better results.

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In the Appendix there are two sets of information that may help you complete the Key Behaviors section of the assessment form. 1. Nine Key Behavior Definitions-Positive and Negative: These definitions help you describe how each behavior was/was not demonstrated. 2. Nine Key Behavior Definitions by Position: These define how each behavior might be demonstrated by individual contributors, managers or executives. Reference these definitions as you complete the Key Behaviors section of the Assessment form. What goes in the box? Very short examples of how the employee demonstrated (or failed to demonstrate) each behavior. See examples on the following pages. Key Behavior Examples Champions Integrity and Trust Examples Often sought out by peers in confidential matters; seen as mentor Demands transparency in all business dealings and processes Demonstrates high standards in business and personal actions Truthful even when it hurts; can be abrasive Managerial Courage Examples Speaks his/her mind; challenges but knows when to stop Clear in convictions; deals with difficult issues and people decisively Candid, often blunt; realistic, but can be heavy-handed

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Customer Focus Examples Dedicated, accessible to both employees and customers seemingly 24x7 Organized newly formed department around customer priorities Hired staff with strong customer orientation Drives Six Sigma efforts with voice of the customer as top priority Learning/Change Agility Examples Actively seeks out best practices from within, and outside of, the company Seeks out feedback on technical topics; adjusted quickly to international assignment Has embraced new Six Sigma approaches and methods Builds Effective Teams Examples Established expectation that all on team would give and get feedback frequently Has cleaned up poorly functioning team; hired for all open positions; more work to be done Champions cross-functional teams and promotes accomplishments Manages Vision and Purpose Examples Can be cynical about philosophy/soft side of business Has widely inculcated a positive vision and purpose Conveys strategic direction and purpose well internally and externally

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Manages Diversity Examples Promotes different styles/approaches but doesnt encourage the same in others Excellent reputation internally and externally for being fair and equitable Teams are too homogenous; this limits creativity, ultimately results Drive for Results Examples Methodical; sets out goals, tasks, holds team accountable Relentlessly manages people, processes and metrics; may be too numbers focused Established formal reporting system to track progress against objectives Instituted contingency planning before its needed Business Acumen Examples Great balance of strategy, tactics, learning new markets in short timeframe Anticipates issues and prioritizes work based on business impact Excellent at containing costs while promoting revenue growth

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Strengths and Development Needs

Clearly communicating strengths and development needs increases the likelihood that employees will do more of what they do well, and will make efforts to improve in areas where they need to develop greater skill. What goes in the box? One or two word descriptions typically drawn from the Lominger Competency Set. The Nine Key Behaviors are also frequently referenced in this section. See the Appendix for a complete list of all the competencies and their respective definitions. During the assessment discussion, be prepared to support your entries with examples drawn from your observations and feedback from others. Remember development needs can refer to both the current role and/or preparation for the employees best next move.
Key Questions

The questions in this section should be very specific and can usually be answered within six to twelve months after being discussed. The answers to these questions often focus on future contributions and the role the employee will play. What goes in the box? One or two succinct questions with answers that typically come from development needs, anticipated challenges and career scenarios.

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Key Questions Examples Vision and Purpose Oriented Examples Can the employee continue to provide strong leadership when the situation becomes much more ambiguous? shift from an operational, short-term mindset to identify and plan for strategic issues? significantly increase the groups sense of urgency regarding market share issues? play a stronger role in shaping and selling a projects value in the corporation? establish stronger relationships with other managers and exert greater influence on key decisions? People Oriented Examples Can the employee delegate responsibility to others to free his/her time? motivate the unit to substantially increase its profitability and contribution? learn to provide candid, direct feedback? learn to demand higher performance standards for him/herself and the team? confront performance issues directly and improve performance? improve listening skills to obtain better input for decision-making? learn to negotiate and compromise with others versus always trying to win? more forcefully assert a point of view in groups, especially of higher-level executives?

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Process Oriented Examples Can the employee pull off a major restructuring and refocus the unit on key strategic objectives? more effectively use staff groups to help the unit improve results? leverage relationships to create the kind of organizational impact needed from the position? analyze issues more thoroughly, yet make and implement decisions more quickly? Self Oriented Examples Can the employee expand his/her technical knowledge to become qualified for a cross-functional position? improve his/her presentation skills to positively impact an audience? substantially raise his/her profile in the community and develop business? become more organizationally mature, more predictable under stress?

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Best Next Moves

This section reflects your assessment of the employees potential for transfer, lateral move or promotion within the next two years. In determining best next moves, both you and your employee should consider the employees: Current role and performance Behaviors, especially Learning/Change Agility Strengths and development needs. Can strengths be leveraged while also further developing the employee? Is there a good fit in terms of interests and aspirations? Additionally, you should consider: What will provide appropriate growth opportunities in the next one to two years? What is realistic? Be careful not to mislead or promise. Actual progression depends in part on what openings are available and the number of other qualified candidates. Can a growth opportunity be provided either laterally, vertically or cross-functionally? Be specific about the roles you believe the employee can take on in the indicated time frame. This is a great opportunity to discuss your assessment of the employees potential and what that means for his/her short- and long-term career growth. Focus on the fact that Best Next Moves are not just about promotions, they are about development. These can be lateral moves that provide new challenges or cross-functional exposure.

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What goes in the box? Brief descriptions of possible titles, band level, timing and standard function. Use your best judgment in describing titles If employee is not ready for a move within the next two years, enter develop in place (there is no timing code for this designation) If Band is unknown, leave blank Timing codes: N = ready now; 1 = ready within one year; 2 = ready within two years See the Appendix for a list of Standard Functions Most powerful developmental assignments
(adapted from The Leadership Machine, by Michael Lombardo and Robert Eichinger)

Cross MovesChanging to a very different set of activities. Examples: changing business units, functions (departments), field/headquarter shifts, country change. Fix-its/TurnaroundsRepairing serious people and morale problems. Examples: failed business/unit, fraud, obsolete staff, restructuring, product liability events, and system/process breakdowns. Heavy Strategic DemandsRequires new or significant strategic redirection; visible and watched by senior people. Typically part of a major job switch. Influencing Without AuthoritySignificant challenge with responsibility but not formal authority. Examples: project management, troubleshooting systems problems, negotiating with outside parties, working in a staff group. Line To Staff SwitchVisible role in a staff function, often at headquarters. Examples: business/strategic planning role, heading a staff department, assistant to senior executive, head of a task force, human resources role.

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Projects/Task ForcesOne-time, short-term events usually lasting from a few weeks to a year. Examples: implementing new ideas, product launches, systems development, acquisitions, joint ventures, one-time events like business crises, reorganizations. ScaleIncrease job responsibilities in the same area. Typically involves much more budget, volume of business, people, and layers of organization. Scope ChangeManaging substantially more breadth. Typically involves new areas of business, increase in visibility, complexity. Typical scope jobs are: moving to a new organization, adding new products or functions or services, moving from staff to line, and numerous first-time jobs such as first-time manager, managing managers, executive, or team leader. Significant People DemandsInvolves a sizable increase in either the number of people managed or the complexity of the people-challenges. Examples: going to a team-based management structure, changing to a quality format for work, and working with groups not worked with previously. Start-upsStarting something new for the organization. Examples: building a team, creating new systems or facilities or products, leading something new, establishing a branch operation, and moving a successful program from one unit to another.

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Development Plans

After the Performance Summary, Key Behaviors, Key Questions, and Strengths and Development Needs sections have been completed, you have established the foundation for creating a set of development actions that the employee will focus on throughout the year. These actions might include: In-Job assignments: special projects such as task forces, peer-to-peer coaching, cross-training or Green Belt projects Coaching/Mentoring either by someone or for someone Training including instructor-led classes, e-learning, or self-study by reading journals or books Most (70%) learning and development comes through challenging in-job assignments. As a manager, you should think about the time and money needed to complete these actions. This section represents an agreement that the employee will execute the plan and that you will support that effort. What goes in the box? A brief description of the target skills/knowledge and suggestions for how to achieve them. Some people find it useful to create a matrix that lists the target skills/knowledge and possible in-job assignments, coaching/mentoring and training options.
Target Skill/Knowledge Business Acumen In-Job Assignments Gain permission to attend next level business planning meetings once/month. Discuss learnings with manager. Offer to teach a company class on this subject. Offer to coach others preparing for important presentations. Coach/Mentor Training/Self-Study Subscribe to Wall Street Journal and read daily.

Leverage Presentation Skills ability

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Summary Categories

We value both the results achieved and the behaviors demonstrated in achieving those results. You must select and enter a category for both of these areas. While each area requires an evaluation, there is no overall category. What goes in the boxes? For Results choose: Below Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations N/A: Too New to Evaluate*
* This category may be selected if the employee has not been in their position long enough to make an accurate summary category selection. In general, 36 months should be used as a guide.

For Behaviors choose: Below Standard At Standard Above Standard N/A: Too New to Evaluate*
* This category may be selected if the employee has not been in their position long enough to make an accurate summary category selection. In general, 36 months should be used as a guide.

Use the following chart to select the appropriate summary

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category.
Below Expectations Meets Expectations All or most individual performance and development goals are met; some are exceeded. Exceeds Expectations All individual performance and development goals are met and many are exceeded.

Results

Some or many individual performance and development goals are not met.

Below Standard Some or many of the nine key behaviors are not demonstrated in the execution of goals.

At Standard All or most of the nine key behaviors are demonstrated in the execution of goals.

Above Standard All of the nine key behaviors are demonstrated in the execution of goals. A role model and leader who influences others to demonstrate the behaviors.

Category Selection Pitfalls While most managers try very hard to assess their employees in a fair and impartial manner, sometimes the following negative tendencies get in the way of writing an accurate assessment. You should avoid these when making your final summary category decisions. Halo/Horns Effect: Tendency to evaluate all aspects of performance based on one favorable or unfavorable factor. Central Tendency: Tendency to cluster most people near the middle (e.g., all At Standard). Recency Error: Tendency to focus on recent events rather than the entire assessment period. This is also known as the what-haveyou-done-for-me-lately syndrome. Leniency/Severity Error: Tendency to give high marks to everyone (lenient) or overly low marks to everyone (severe).

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First Impressions: Tendency to be overly-influenced by initial performance. This is especially common when a manager is heavily invested in a newly hired employee. Just Like Me: Tendency to assign better categories to people you perceive to be like you. (The opposite also occurs: assigning lower categories to people you perceive as different.) Self-Serving Bias: This occurs when managers inflate assessments to make themselves look good. Using the 9-Block Tool to Differentiate

The 9-Block creates an easy to understand visual representation of the performance of your group. To help you achieve differentiation, plot the results and behavior categories of each of your employees on the chart. It doesnt matter where you place an employees name, just that he/she is in the correct block. Once you have positioned all of your employees in the appropriate blocks, think about the following: Did I really differentiate high performers from low performers on both results and behaviors? Do the placements make sense based on my overall organization and how my organization has performed?

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We do not use forced rankings. This means you are not required to distribute your ratings in any prescribed manner. This 9-block grid is a working tool. If you have only a few employees to plot you will likely see less differentiation than if you have many employees.
Need More?

For more information, or assistance with completing the assessment or interpreting the 9-Block, contact your Human Resources representative.

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Conduct Assessment
Conducting the Assessment Discussion Introduction

As mentioned earlier, the assessment portion of the performance management process has three steps: completing/updating the profile form, writing the assessment and; conducting a collaborative discussion. In this section well focus on the latter.

Plan for the Collaborative Discussion

A little planning goes a long way. Before you hold the assessment discussion with your employee take some time to prepare. 1. Logistics Schedule the meeting; allow for a minimum of one hour Meet face-to-face unless there are absolutely no alternatives Minimize interruptions. Turn off all phones and close the meeting room door. 2. Things to Bring Copies of both the employees selfassessment and your assessment of the employee, including the completed goalsetting form (from the fiscal year in review) Documentation of performance examples and feedback Recommendations and resources for development 3. Skills to Use Be ready to use feedback to encourage discussion Be sensitive to potential areas of disagreement Be open to hearing your employees point of view

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Copies of your assessment and the employees self-assessment make it easier to discuss details. Allow a few minutes for the employee to review your assessment before you begin the discussion. Be sure to have supporting documentation (both positive and constructive) with you at the meeting and ask your employee to bring his/hers as well. Have development resources available to use for the basis of your development discussion. The For Your Improvement Coaching Guide by Lominger is a great tool. You may choose to have the employee use this resource to develop their own plan prior to or after the meeting. As you compare your assessment to the employees selfassessment, there may be areas where you disagree. Much of this can be mitigated by practicing and using the process and skills that have already been outlined, but there still may be differences of opinion. Use feedback, listening skills and documentation to work your way through any difficult areas. One tool you can use to help you determine how much negotiation and compromise is appropriate is the Rule of Three. If you can recall three specific examples of an employees behavior that support your position, you may have a solid case for standing firm on your assessment. Similarly if your employee can supply three examples, be open to reconsidering your opinion. In the end, you are the final decision maker, but you will gain tremendous commitment and buy-in if you can reach consensus.

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Conduct the Collaborative Discussion

Once the assessment is written and your preparation is complete, conducting the discussion is the final step. Most people find it helpful to conduct the discussion in the following order: Performance Summary: Discuss the highlights and targets missed relative to the goals that had been established for the employee. Values/Behaviors: Review the definitions of each behavior, if needed. Discuss specific behavioral examples. Strengths and Development Needs: Discuss strengths first. Give your own specific examples as well as feedback from others. Explain that development needs can refer to both the current role and/or preparation for the next move. Key Questions: These should be succinct and able to be answered within a few months of the discussion. Best Next Moves: Discuss both short- and long-term career potential. Give your honest feedback about the employees best next moves relative to their aspirations. Be careful not to promise any specific move. Development Plan: Review the recommended actions. Discuss appropriate timing of each. Ensure the employee understands how to execute on each recommendation by being specific about next steps and how you can assist. Summary Categories: When discussing both result and behavior categories, employees may inquire about the connection to compensation. Emphasize that performance is one factor in determining compensation. Other factors include internal equity and external competitiveness. While performance is one factor in compensation decisions, it should not be mathematically linked or formula-based.

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Signatures

At the conclusion of your discussion both you and your employee must sign the assessment form. Signatures demonstrate that both parties have reviewed the assessment. It does not mean the employee agrees with the final product. The employee may write and attach other commentary to the final assessment. If the employee refuses to sign the assessment, you should note that on the assessment form.

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Appendix

Performance Matters

Nine Key Behavior DefinitionsPositive and Negative


Integrity

Champions Integrity and Trust + Is widely trusted; is seen as a direct, truthful individual; can present the unvarnished truth in an appropriate and helpful manner; keeps confidences; admits mistakes; doesnt misrepresent him/herself for personal gain. Is not widely trusted; may hedge or not take a stand; may treat others differently or indifferently at times; may not walk his/her talk and be seen as inconsistent; may have trouble keeping confidences and talks out of school; makes promises he/she doesnt or cant keep; may lack followthrough and causes problems for others; blames others for own mistakes; seen as just out for him/herself. Managerial Courage + Doesnt hold back anything that needs to be said; provides current, direct, complete, and actionable positive and corrective feedback to others; lets people know where they stand; faces up to people problems on any person or situation (not including direct reports) quickly and directly; is not afraid to take negative action when necessary. Doesnt take tough stands with others; holds back in tough situations; doesnt know how to present a tough position; knows but doesnt disclose; doesnt step up to issues; intimidated by others in power; hangs back and lets others take the lead; is a conflict avoider unwilling to take the heat of controversy; afraid to be wrong, get in a win/lose situation, or make a tough personnel call.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Excellence

Customer Focus + Is dedicated to meeting the expectations and requirements of internal and external customers; gets first-hand customer information and uses it for improvements in products and services; acts with customers in mind; establishes and maintains effective relationships with customers and gains their trust and respect. Doesnt think of the customer first; may think s/he already knows what they need; may focus on internal operations and get blindsided by customer problems; may not make the first move wont meet and get to know customer; uncomfortable with new people contacts; may be unwilling to handle criticisms, complaints, and special requests; may not listen well to customers, may be defensive; may not make the time for customer contact. Learning/Change Agility + A relentless learner; learns quickly when facing new problems; entertains ideas, can project how ideas would play out; seeks out feedback; understands, articulates and uses the learnings. + A change leader; creates effective plans to promote change; knows how to manage in changing circumstances; strongly advocates an independent point of view, but can be counted on to execute management decisions and strategies; understands the need for change before being told; seizes opportunities; promotes and utilizes the operational excellence tools and mindset to drive change.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Very seldom asks about lessons learned; not good at evaluating experience, exposures, feedback and/or successes and mistakes. Habit bound, defensive regarding what is formula; actively fights change despite clear consequences; may be a perfectionist, over-controlling. May short-circuit ambiguity, conflict or complexity with pat answers, quick decisions; may go to other extreme and study problems into the ground; doesnt seek best practices or use operational excellence tools to improve.
Teamwork

Builds Effective Teams + Blends people into teams when needed; creates strong morale and spirit in his/her team; shares wins and successes; fosters open dialogue; lets people finish and be responsible for their work; defines success in terms of the whole team; creates a feeling of belonging in the team. Doesnt assemble, build or manage in a team fashion; manages people on a one-to-one basis; doesnt create a common mindset or common challenge; rewards and compliments individuals, not the team; may not hold many team meetings; doesnt create any synergies in the team; everyone works on his/her own projects; doesnt manage in a way that builds team morale or energy; doesnt have the skills or interest to build a team; may be very action and control oriented and wont trust a team to perform.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Manages Vision and Purpose + Communicates a compelling and inspired vision or sense of core purpose; talks beyond today; talks about possibilities; is optimistic; creates mileposts and symbols to rally support behind the vision; makes the vision sharable by everyone; can inspire and motivate entire units or organizations. Cant communicate or sell a vision; not a good presenter; uncomfortable speculating on the unknown future; isnt charismatic or passionate enough to excite and energize others; cant simplify enough to help people understand complex strategy; may not understand how change happens; doesnt act like s/he really believes in the vision; more comfortable in the here and now. Manages Diversity + Manages all kinds and classes of people equitably; deals effectively with all races, nationalities, cultures, disabilities, ages and both sexes; hires variety and diversity without regard to class; supports equal and fair treatment and opportunity for all. Not effective with groups much different from him/her; may be uncomfortable with those not like him/her; may act inappropriately with those different from him/her; defends turf from outsiders; avoids conflict and the noise of differing views and agendas; doesnt see the business value of diversity; treats everybody the same without regard to their differences; very narrow and ethnocentric; believes his/her group to be superior; may carry around negative and demeaning stereotypes s/he has trouble getting rid of.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Accountability

Drive for Results + Can be counted on to exceed goals successfully; is constantly and consistently one of the top performers; very bottom-line oriented; steadfastly pushes self and others for results. Champions and uses operational excellence tools to get results. Doesnt deliver results consistently; doesnt get things done on time; wastes time and resources pursuing non-essentials; something always gets in the waypersonal disorganization, failure to set priorities, underestimating time frames, overcoming resistance; not bold or committed enough to push it through; procrastinates around whatever gets in his/her way; doesnt go all out to complete tasks; does the least to get by; doesnt use operational excellence to address gaps. Business Acumen + Knows how businesses work; knowledgeable in current and possible future policies, practices, trends, and information affecting his/her business and organization; knows the competition; is aware of how strategies and tactics work in the marketplace Doesnt understand how businesses work; not knowledgeable and up-to-date about current and future policies, trends, developments in e-commerce and information affecting his/her business and organization; doesnt know the competition; is unaware of how strategies and tactics work in the marketplace.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Nine Key Behavior Definitions by Position


Individual Contributor

Champions Integrity and TrustIs seen as a direct, truthful individual;; keeps confidences; admits mistakes; doesnt misrepresent him/herself for personal gain Managerial CourageFaces up to people problems on any person or situation quickly and directly; doesnt hold back anything that needs to be said Customer FocusIs dedicated to meeting the expectations and requirements of internal and external customers; establishes and maintains effective relationships with customers and gains their trust and respect Learning/Change AgilityA relentless learner; learns quickly when facing new problems; entertains ideas, can project how ideas would play out; seeks out feedback; understands, articulates and uses the learnings; Embraces best practices, such as operational excellence tools Builds Effective TeamsParticipates with others to accomplish team goals; shares information and resources freely; avoids destructive competition; puts team goals ahead of individual goals; shares credit for successes Manages Vision and PurposeEmbraces and supports the vision by customizing and personalizing it to the specific job situation; asks challenging, sincere questions, but avoids cynicism and covert undermining; able to relate job tasks to the larger vision Manages DiversityDeals effectively with all races, nationalities, cultures, disabilities, ages and genders; avoids prejudicial attitudes or stereotyping; deals with others as individuals
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Drive for ResultsCan be counted on to exceed goals successfully; is constantly and consistently one of the top performers; uses operational excellence tools to get better results Business AcumenKnows how businesses work; takes time to learn the fundamentals of how the organization competes and is successful; understands the importance of efficiency, cost control, and revenue growth

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Nine Key Tyco Behavior Definitions by Position


Manager

Champions Integrity and TrustModels those behaviors which are expected of others; can present the unvarnished truth in an appropriate and helpful manner; keeps commitments Managerial CourageProvides current, direct, complete, and actionable positive and corrective feedback to others; lets people know where they stand; is not afraid to take negative action when necessary Customer FocusGets first-hand customer information and uses it for improvements in products and services Learning/Change AgilityKnows how to manage in changing circumstances; can be counted on to execute management decisions and strategies; strongly advocates an independent point of view, but understands the need for change before being told; adopts and introduces best practices, such as operational excellence Builds Effective TeamsCreates strong morale and spirit in his/her team; shares wins and successes; fosters open dialogue; lets people finish and be responsible for their work; creates a feeling of belonging in the team Manages Vision and PurposeCreates mileposts and symbols to rally support behind the vision; makes the vision sharable by everyone; spends time explaining, translating the vision to individuals and the team Manages DiversityManages all kinds and classes of people equitably; hires variety and diversity without regard to class; promotes an environment in which diverse individuals feel comfortable and valued
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Drive for ResultsVery bottom-line oriented steadfastly pushes self and others for results; adopts and introduces operational excellence tools Business AcumenKnowledgeable in current and possible future policies, practices, trends, and information affecting his/her business and organization; knows the competition Knowledgeable in current and possible future policies, practices, trends, and information affecting his/her business and organization; knows the competition

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Nine Key Behavior Definitions by Position


Executive

Champions Integrity and TrustIs widely trusted in the organization; demands integrity in others; takes decisive action when integrity is compromised Managerial CourageRewards and promotes managerial courage throughout the organization; builds processes to foster and protect openness and candor Customer FocusActs with customers in mind; promotes customer-focused business practices; takes time to establish personal contact with some customers, and ensures that the organization meets their needs Learning/Change AgilityA change leader; creates effective plans to promote change; seizes opportunities; drives operational excellence and other best practices for organizational improvement Builds Effective TeamsBelieves in and supports the value of teams as a business tool; creates the conditions necessary for teams to succeed; blends people into teams when needed; defines success in terms of the whole team Manages Vision and PurposeCommunicates a compelling and inspired vision or sense of core purpose; talks beyond today; talks about possibilities; is optimistic; can inspire and motivate entire units or organizations

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Manages DiversitySupports equal and fair treatment and opportunity for all; creates a diverse organization Drive for ResultsSets aggressive goals for the organization, and pushes through obstacles to achieve them; models the effort and focus needed; champions and drives operational excellence Business AcumenIs aware of how strategies and tactics work in the marketplace, the financial community, and the political community; knowledgeable of the global marketplace

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Lominger Competencies and Definitions


1 Action Oriented Enjoys working hard; is action oriented and full of energy for the things that he/she sees as challenging; not fearful of acting with a minimum of planning; seizes more opportunities than others. 2 Dealing with Ambiguity

Can effectively cope with change; can shift gears comfortably; can decide and act without having the total picture; isnt upset when things are up in the air; doesnt have to finish things before moving on; can comfortably handle risk and uncertainty. 3 Approachability

Is easy to approach and talk to; spends the extra effort to put others at ease; can be warm, pleasant, and gracious; is sensitive to and patient with the interpersonal anxieties of others; builds rapport well; is a good listener; is an early knower, getting informal and incomplete information in time to do something about it. 4 Boss Relationships

Responds and relates well to bosses; would work harder for a good boss; is open to learning from bosses who are good coaches and who provide latitude; likes to learn from those who have been there before; easy to challenge and develop; is comfortably coachable. 5 Business Acumen

Knows how businesses work; knowledgeable in current and possible future policies, practices, trends, and information affecting his/her business and organization; knows the competition; is aware of how strategies and tactics work in the marketplace.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Career Ambition

Knows what he/she wants from a career and actively works on it; is career knowledgeable; makes things happen for self; markets self for opportunities; doesnt wait for others to open doors. 7 Caring About Direct Reports

Is interested in the work and non-work lives of direct reports; asks about their plans, problems, and desires; knows about their concerns and questions; is available for listening to personal problems; monitors workloads and appreciates extra effort. 8 Comfort Around Higher Management

Can deal comfortably with more senior managers; can present to more senior managers without undue tension and nervousness; understands how senior managers think and work; can determine the best way to get things done with them by talking their language and responding to their needs; can craft approaches likely to be seen as appropriate and positive. 9 Command Skills

Relishes leading; takes unpopular stands if necessary; encourages direct and tough debate but isnt afraid to end it and move on; is looked to for direction in a crisis; faces adversity head on; energized by tough challenges. 10 Compassion Genuinely cares about people; is concerned about their work and nonwork problems; is available and ready to help; is sympathetic to the plight of others not as fortunate; demonstrates real empathy with the joys and pains of others.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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11

Composure

Is cool under pressure; does not become defensive or irritated when times are tough; is considered mature; can be counted on to hold things together during tough times; can handle stress; is not knocked off balance by the unexpected; doesnt show frustration when resisted or blocked; is a settling influence in a crisis. 12 Conflict Management Steps up to conflicts, seeing them as opportunities; reads situations quickly; good at focused listening; can hammer out tough agreements and settle disputes equitably; can find common ground and get cooperation with minimum noise. 13 Confronting Direct Reports Deals with problem direct reports firmly and in a timely manner; doesnt allow problems to fester; regularly reviews performance and holds timely discussions; can make negative decisions when all other efforts fail; deals effectively with troublemakers. 14 Creativity Comes up with a lot of new and unique ideas; easily makes connections among previously unrelated notions; tends to be seen as original and value-added in brainstorming settings. 15 Customer Focus Is dedicated to meeting the expectations and requirements of internal and external customers; gets first-hand customer information and uses it for improvements in products and services; acts with customers in mind; establishes and maintains effective relationships with customers and gains their trust and respect.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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16 Timely Decision Making Makes decisions in a timely manner, sometimes with incomplete information and under tight deadlines and pressure; able to make a quick decision. 17 Decision Quality Makes good decisions (without considering how much time it takes) based upon a mixture of analysis, wisdom, experience, and judgment; most of his/her solutions and suggestions turn out to be correct and accurate when judged over time; sought out by others for advice and solutions. 18 Delegation Clearly and comfortably delegates both routine and important tasks and decisions; broadly shares both responsibility and accountability; tends to trust people to perform; lets direct reports finish their own work. 19 Developing Direct Reports Provides challenging and stretching tasks and assignments; holds frequent development discussions; is aware of each direct reports career goals; constructs compelling development plans and executes them; pushes direct reports to accept developmental moves; will take direct reports who need work; is a people builder. 20 Directing Others Is good at establishing clear directions; sets stretching objectives; distributes the workload appropriately; lays out work in a wellplanned and organized manner; maintains two-way dialogue with others on work and results; brings out the best in people; is a clear communicator.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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21 Managing Diversity Manages all kinds and classes of people equitably; deals effectively with all races, nationalities, cultures, disabilities, ages and both sexes; hires variety and diversity without regard to class; supports equal and fair treatment and opportunity for all. 22 Ethics and Values Adheres to an appropriate (for the setting) and effective set of core values and beliefs during both good and bad times; acts in line with those values; rewards the right values and disapproves of others; practices what he/she preaches. 23 Fairness to Direct Reports Treats direct reports equitably; acts fairly; has candid discussions; doesnt have hidden agenda; doesnt give preferential treatment. 24 Functional / Technical Skills Has the functional and technical knowledge and skills to do the job at a high level of accomplishment. 25 Hiring and Staffing Has a nose for talent; hires the best people available from inside or outside; is not afraid of selecting strong people; assembles talented staffs. 26 Humor Has a positive and constructive sense of humor; can laugh at him/herself and with others; is appropriately funny and can use humor to ease tension.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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27 Informing Provides the information people need to know to do their jobs and to feel good about being a member of the team, unit, and/or the organization; provides individuals information so that they can make accurate decisions; is timely with information. 28 Innovation Management Is good at bringing the creative ideas of others to market; has good judgment about which creative ideas and suggestions will work; has a sense about managing the creative process of others; can facilitate effective brainstorming; can project how potential ideas may play out in the marketplace. 29 Integrity and Trust Is widely trusted; is seen as a direct, truthful individual; can present the unvarnished truth in an appropriate and helpful manner; keeps confidences; admits mistakes; doesnt misrepresent him/herself for personal gain. 30 Intellectual Horsepower Is bright and intelligent; deals with concepts and complexity comfortably; described as intellectually sharp, capable, and agile. 31 Interpersonal Savvy Relates well to all kinds of people, up, down, and sideways, inside and outside the organization; builds appropriate rapport; builds constructive and effective relationships; uses diplomacy and tact; can diffuse even high-tension situations comfortably.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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32 Learning on the Fly Learns quickly when facing new problems; a relentless and versatile learner; open to change; analyzes both successes and failures for clues to improvement; experiments and will try anything to find solutions; enjoys the challenge of unfamiliar tasks; quickly grasps the essence and the underlying structure of anything. 33 Listening Practices attentive and active listening; has the patience to hear people out; can accurately restate the opinions of others even when he/she disagrees. 34 Managerial Courage Doesnt hold back anything that needs to be said; provides current, direct, complete, and actionable positive and corrective feedback to others; lets people know where they stand; faces up to people problems on any person or situation (not including direct reports) quickly and directly; is not afraid to take negative action when necessary. 35 Managing and Measuring Work Clearly assigns responsibility for tasks and decisions; sets clear objectives and measures; monitors process, progress, and results; designs feedback loops into work. 36 Motivating Others Creates a climate in which people want to do their best; can motivate many kinds of direct reports and team or project members; can assess each persons hot button and use it to get the best out of him/her; pushes tasks and decisions down; empowers others; invites input from each person and shares ownership and visibility; makes each individual feel his/her work is important; is someone people like working for and with.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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37 Negotiating Can negotiate skillfully in tough situations with both internal and external groups; can settle differences with minimum noise; can win concessions without damaging relationships; can be both direct and forceful as well as diplomatic; gains trust quickly of other parties to the negotiations; has a good sense of timing. 38 Organizational Agility Knowledgeable about how organizations work; knows how to get things done both through formal channels and the informal network; understands the origin and reasoning behind key policies, practices, and procedures; understands the cultures of organizations. 39 Organizing Can marshal resources (people, funding, material, support) to get things done; can orchestrate multiple activities at once to accomplish a goal; uses resources effectively and efficiently; arranges information and files in a useful manner. 40 Dealing with Paradox Can act in ways that seem contradictory; is very flexible and adaptable when facing tough calls; can combine seeming opposites like being compassionately tough, stand up for self without trampling others, set strong but flexible standards; can act differently depending upon the situation; is seen as balanced despite the conflicting demands of the situation.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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41 Patience Is tolerant with people and processes; listens and checks before acting; tries to understand the people and the data before making judgments and acting; waits for others to catch up before acting; sensitive to due process and proper pacing; follows established process. 42 Peer Relationships Can quickly find common ground and solve problems for the good of all; can represent his/her own interests and yet be fair to other groups; can solve problems with peers with a minimum of noise; is seen as a team player and is cooperative; easily gains trust and support of peers; encourages collaboration; can be candid with peers. 43 Perseverance Pursues everything with energy, drive, and a need to finish; seldom gives up before finishing, especially in the face of resistance or setbacks. 44 Personal Disclosure Shares his/her thoughts about personal strengths, weaknesses, and limitations; admits mistakes and shortcomings; is open about personal beliefs and feelings; is easy to get to know to those who interact with him/her regularly. 45 Personal Learning Picks up on the need to change personal, interpersonal, and managerial behavior quickly; watches others for their reactions to his/her attempts to influence and perform, and adjusts; seeks feedback; is sensitive to changing personal demands and requirements and changes accordingly.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Performance Matters

46 Perspective Looks toward the broadest possible view of an issue/challenge; has broad-ranging personal and business interests and pursuits; can easily pose future scenarios; can think globally; can discuss multiple aspects and impacts of issues and project them into the future. 47 Planning Accurately scopes out length and difficulty of tasks and projects; sets objectives and goals; breaks down work into the process steps; develops schedules and task/people assignments; anticipates and adjusts for problems and roadblocks; measures performance against goals; evaluates results. 48 Political Savvy Can maneuver through complex political situations effectively and quietly; is sensitive to how people and organizations function; anticipates where the land mines are and plans his/her approach accordingly; views corporate politics as a necessary part of organizational life and works to adjust to that reality; is a maze-bright person. 49 Presentation Skills Is effective in a variety of formal presentation settings: one-onone, small and large groups, with peers, direct reports, and bosses; is effective both inside and outside the organization, on both cool data and hot and controversial topics; commands attention and can manage group process during the presentation; can change tactics midstream when something isnt working.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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50 Priority Setting Spends his/her time and the time of others on whats important; quickly zeros in on the critical few and puts the trivial many aside; can quickly sense what will help or hinder accomplishing a goal; eliminates roadblocks; creates focus. 51 Problem Solving Uses rigorous logic and methods to solve difficult problems with effective solutions; probes all fruitful sources for answers; can see hidden problems; is excellent at honest analysis; looks beyond the obvious and doesnt stop at the first answers. 52 Process Management Good at figuring out the processes necessary to get things done; knows how to organize people and activities; understands how to separate and combine tasks into efficient work flow; knows what to measure and how to measure it; can see opportunities for synergy and integration where others cant; can simplify complex processes; gets more out of fewer resources. 53 Drive for Results Can be counted on to exceed goals successfully; is constantly and consistently one of the top performers; very bottom-line oriented; steadfastly pushes self and others for results. Champions and uses operational excellence tools to get results. 54 Self Development Is personally committed to and actively works to continuously improve him/herself; understands that different situations and levels may call for different skills and approaches; works to deploy strengths; works on compensating for weakness and limits.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Performance Matters

55 Self Knowledge Knows personal strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and limits; seeks feedback; gains insights from mistakes; is open to criticism; isnt defensive; is receptive to talking about shortcomings; looks forward to balanced (pluses and minuses) performance reviews and career decisions. 56 Sizing Up People Is a good judge of talent; after reasonable exposure, can articulate the strengths and limitations of people inside or outside the organization; can accurately project what people are likely to do across a variety of situations. 57 Standing Alone Will stand up and be counted; doesnt shirk from personal responsibility; can be counted on when times are tough; willing to be the only champion for an idea or position; is comfortable working alone on a tough assignment. 58 Strategic Agility Sees ahead clearly; can anticipate future consequences and trends accurately; has broad knowledge and perspective; is future oriented; can articulately paint credible pictures and visions of possibilities and likelihood; can create competitive and breakthrough strategies and plans. 59 Managing Through Systems Can design practices, processes, and procedures which allow managing from a distance; is comfortable letting things manage themselves without intervening; can make things work through others without being there; can impact people and results remotely.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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60 Building Effective Team Blends people into teams when needed; creates strong morale and spirit in his/her team; shares wins and successes; fosters open dialogue; lets people finish and be responsible for their work; defines success in terms of the whole team; creates a feeling of belonging in the team. 61 Technical Learning Picks up on technical things quickly; can learn new skills and knowledge; is good at learning new industry, company, product, or technical knowledge; does well in technical courses and seminars. 62 Time Management Uses his/her time effectively and efficiently; values time; concentrates his/her efforts on the more important priorities; gets more done in less time than others; can attend to a broader range of activities. 63 TQM/Re-engineering Is dedicated to providing the highest quality products and services which meet the needs and requirements of internal and external customers; is committed to continuous improvement through empowerment and management by data; is willing to re-engineer processes from scratch; is open to suggestions and experimentation; creates a learning environment leading to the most efficient and effective work processes. 64 Understanding Others Understands why groups do what they do; picks up the sense of the group in terms of positions, intentions, and needs; what they value and how to motivate them; can predict what groups will do across different situations.
1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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65 Managing Vision and Purpose Communicates a compelling and inspired vision or sense of core purpose; talks beyond today; talks about possibilities; is optimistic; creates mileposts and symbols to rally support behind the vision; makes the vision sharable by everyone; can inspire and motivate entire units or organizations. 66 Work / Life Balance Maintains a conscious balance between work and personal life so that one doesnt dominate the other; is not one-dimensional; knows how to attend to both; gets what he/she wants from both. 67 Written Communications Is able to write clearly and succinctly in a variety of communication settings and styles; can get messages across that have the desired effect.

1992, 1996, 20012003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. All rights reserved. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT Competency Sort Cards developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc. Without the prior written permission of Lominger Limited, Inc., no part of this work may be used, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, by or to any party outside of our company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

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Standard Functions
CommunicationsProvide communications to external and internal audiences, using a variety of methods (print, electronic, live presentation, etc.). Customer ServiceRespond to customer requests and complaints, explain the use of products/services, and arrange for appropriate action to be taken by others in the organization as required. May be involved in customer claims and disputes. Customer Monitoring CentersTake appropriate actions in response to alarm signals and customer calls received at central monitoring stations. Distribution/LogisticsMove merchandise from the producing agent to the consumer or retail/wholesale point of sale. EngineeringDesign and support the manufacture of products. Finance/AccountingPlan, manage, and report on the acquisition and dispensing of funds. Accounting is responsible for accumulation and preparation of financial data. General ManagementManagement of multiple functions in five crucial areas: (1) planning, (2) organization, (3) staffing, (4) leading and motivating, and (5) exercising control. Full responsibility for P&L (profit and loss) within a designated part of the Company. Human ResourcesRecruit and place people in the right positions; resolution of employment problems; training, coaching, and developing managers and employees; design and delivery of compensation, benefits; HR information systems; labor relations; consulting on issues of organizational process and design. Information Technology and SystemsManage the storage and dissemination of records, data and information. InstallationInstallation of equipment for customers.

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LegalProvide structure and direction in those areas that are governed by laws and regulations. Manage certain transactions with employees, former employees, and other firms re: management/personnel relationships, environmental health, responsibilities to consumers and obligations to society. ProductionProcess raw materials or components that are fabricated and assembled into finished products. MarketingDevelop strategies, systems and materials by which goods and services are sold and purchased. Mergers/AcquisitionsIdentify, qualify, and support the acquisition of other organizations. OperationsManage the procedures, processes, and functions necessary to the day-to-day operation of the organization. Plant ManagementManage one or more plants or sites. Project ManagementPlan, estimate, and oversee complex projects. Quality AssuranceSystematically monitor and evaluate various aspects of a project, service or facility. Research and DevelopmentInvestigate/experiment on current and proposed products and ideas, create prototypes, and recommend viability of use or production. SafetyProvide direction and tools to ensure a secure and safe work conditions. May also provide support re: management of financial loss to company. SalesGenerate new revenue by identifying, contacting, and registering new customers or order. Develop merchandising functions and campaigns designed to increase consumption and demand for a companys products or services. ServiceService and maintain products/equipment for customers.

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Six SigmaLead the introduction, implementation, and evaluation of Six Sigma processes. Train others in the acquisition of Six Sigma knowledge and skills. Sourcing/PurchasingManage the process of acquiring goods and services for the Company, on the most favorable terms and in accordance with requirements. TelecommunicationsDevelop infrastructure that supports telephonic communications between divisions, departments, etc.

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