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2012 WNA GENERAL EXCELLENCE WINNER
141st year, No. 29
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Keeping you current since 1872
$1.25
INDEX
Commentary ..............1D
Court ..........................4B
TV listings ...............5-6C
Community .............3-6D
Letters ........................2D
Classieds ...............8-9B
Alyce L. Britton, 77, Lake Geneva
Richard H. Burton, 84, Walworth
Joseph A. Caldrone, 90, Lake Geneva
Walter E. Grady, 89, Lake Geneva
Kathleen Kirkpatrick, Walworth
Adina M. Mancini, 96, Lake Geneva
Diane F. Purcell, 78, Lake Geneva
OBITUARIES 3D
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Williams Bay chicken roast
On Saturday, July 20, the Williams Bay
Volunteer Fire Department will host
its annual chicken roast fundraiser in
Edgewater Park, from noon until 7 p.m.
Lake Geneva Concerts in the Park
On Thursday, July 18, the featured per-
former will be Groundspeed Bluegrass
Band and on Thursday, July 25, Mark
and Gretch will perform. Shows are
from 7 to 8 p.m. at Flatiron Park, Wrig-
ley Drive, Lake Geneva.
NBC visits LG
The mailboat jump-
ers were set to be on
NBCs Nightly News.
Page 3A
The look of a slugger
Genoa City routed
Racine last week.
Page 1C
Ex-PTO treasurer
guilty of theft
Page 6A
Board approves direct legislation for projects costing more than $2 million
New ordinance makes petition useless
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY Hours after a resident
petition was delivered to the village clerk
that demanded direct legislation for capital
projects that cost more than $500,000, the
village board took action to make the peti-
tion useless.
Direct legislation allows voters to
decide by referendum on whether the vil-
lage can spend money on building projects,
such as a village hall.
Village Attorney Linda Gray said a peti-
tion requiring direct legislation for capital
improvement projects isnt legal if it con-
icts with an existing ordinance.
The petition didnt conict with an
existing ordinance until, on July 12, the
board approved direct legislation for proj-
ects that cost more than $2 million. The
petition was turned into the village earlier
that afternoon.
During the meeting, Village President
Bill Antti said the petition began circulat-
ing because of concerns about exorbitant
spending by the village board.
Trustee Alan Cornue said he opposed
direct legislation for two reasons.
We are generally running under a rep-
resentative democracy where people are
elected to the ofce to make judgments
to the best of their abilities, Cornue said.
The problem with using a referendum for
any issue of concern is it is very difcult for
everyone who will vote to get all the infor-
mation.
The board didnt allow any public com-
ments during the discussion of the ordi-
nance.
Despite being told there would be no
public comments during the meeting,
former Village President Chuck Schuren,
who helped collect signatures for the direct
legislation petition, asked if there was any
public discussion on creating the direct
legislation for $2 million.
Antti responded by telling Schuren he
was out of order, to which Schuren replied,
I know.
Antti said the citizen petition required
the board to get referendum approval
before any money was spent. He said this
wouldnt allow the board to hire architects
or engineers to develop the plans to pres-
ent to citizens.
The ordinance that was approved
doesnt include legal mandates. For exam-
ple, if the DNR tells the village it needs to
build a new well, the board doesnt need
voter approval to do so.
A direct legislation petition needs 15
percent of the number of people who voted
in the last gubernatorial election to sign it.
Once the signatures are certied, the
board can approve it, deny it or take no
action.
GENOA CITY
PLEASE SEE ORDINANCE PAGE 4A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
What is now a concrete slab near
the lagoon at Flat Iron Park would be
transformed into an open pavilion
suitable for musical performances and
special events under a plan presented
by former alderman Todd Krause.
Krause, representing the Lake
Geneva Beautication Committee, a
private nonprot group that works
with the city on improving public
spaces, made a presentation on the
proposed pavilion during the July 10
meeting of the Lake Geneva Board of
Park Commissioners.
Krause said that the committee is
proposing that the performance pavil-
ion be built on the site of the slab on
the north end of the park, near the
lagoon. Although the proposal is new,
and there are no drawings, Krause
said preliminary suggestions are that
the structure be eight-sided, that it be
46-feet wide and 35-feet deep and that
it top out at 18 feet.
The new pavilions foundation
would elevate the stage 18 inches over
ground level.
The architecture would be compat-
ible with the Riviera and the nearby
Flat Iron Park gazebo.
Were trying to jazz it up and make
it something special, Krause said.
Krause estimated that the pavilion
would be large enough to accommo-
date a 50-piece orchestra.
Cost of the project is estimated at
$300,000.
Krause said the beautication
committee will do fundraising to help
pay for the structure.
Group proposes building
pavilion in Flat Iron Park
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
A BOY OVERLOOKS the Lake Geneva beach through a fence at Library Park Friday, July 12. With the nice weather,
the beach has been lled with locals and visitors.
Eyes on the water
PLEASE SEE PAVILION PAGE 8A
PLEASE SEE BRADEN PAGE 9A
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
IN HIS OFFICE for just awhile longer, Lake Geneva Police
Ofcer Ralph Braden takes a brief break while doing security
at the recent Mission of Mercy free dental clinic at Badger High
School during the June 27 setup in the school gym.
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Almost as much teacher as he was cop, Ofcer Ralph
Braden was the face of the school liaison program in Lake
Geneva for 19 years.
Braden ofcially retired as a Lake Geneva police ofcer
on July 2, after 39 years and one day wearing a badge.
His last few days at the school were to work security
for the Mission of Mercy free dental clinic that was in the
Badger gym June 28 and 29.
He was getting ready to post the No Smoking signs
the day before the free clinic, when he took some time to
talk with a Regional News reporter in his ofce at the high
school.
Often wearing a broad grin under his trademark mus-
tache, Braden took a police presence into Badger High
School and he made it work.
At the police station, he said, he was referred to as
teacher Braden.
Im going to miss Ralph, said Lake Geneva Police
Chief Michael Rasmussen. No one is ever going to truly
replace him.
Rasmussen said that Braden dened the police-school
liaison position.
Bradens devotion to the program and the work he put
into reaching out to students and teachers was amazing,
Rasmussen said. Braden said hes had no trouble connect-
ing with the students.
Badgers Braden
retires from beat
19 years helping at high school
2A The Regional News July 18, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Lake Geneva and some residents are keeping a close
eye on the newcomer to Geneva Lake.
Flyboard Milwaukee LLC wants to set up a business
here, but its gotten off on the wrong foot.
First, it set up operations on the Bella Vista Suites -
Meridien Hotel pier, a location off-limits for commercial
businesses by city resolution.
According to a 1986 agreement between the city and the
Meridien Hotel, the pier can only be used by hotel guests
for recreational purposes.
And the Flyboarding operation also failed to get a city
business permit.
Lake Geneva Police Chief Michael Rasmussen said
hes been working with the owners of Flyboard Milwaukee
about the lack of a business permit.
In order to get the permit, however, the operation will
have to get a permanent address in the city, Rasmussen
said.
And that will not be at the hotel pier.
City Administrator Dennis Jordan has since sent a
letter to the company dated July 9 informing it that the
pier on which they had located was off-limits to commer-
cial businesses.
The letter stipulates that the business cannot dock its
boat at the pier to load people who are renting time for Fly-
boarding or who are purchasing Flyboards, nor can they
fuel the boat at the pier for commercial purposes.
In an interview, Jordan said he told the operators they
may moor their boat at one of the Bella Vistas piers, but it
may not have any advertising signs on it. Customers, equip-
ment and fuel will have to be loaded onto the boat outside
the city limits.
In his letter, Jordan advises the operators that the city
limits extend from South and Forest streets to where they
meet in the water.
Flyboard Milwaukee was also giving demonstrations
at Big Foot Beach. Rasmussen said the city attorney was
reviewing the location to make sure the demonstrations
were outside the city limits.
Flyboards use a converted jet ski to pump water into a
hose that feeds into a board that straps to the riders feet
and two hand-held jets. The force of the water can lift a
person up to 40 feet into the air, depending on the length
of the hose carrying the water from the jet ski to the Fly-
board.
The boards give the rider the ability to y, not so much
like Superman, but more like Ironman. The rider literally
stands on a jet of water generated by a Jet Ski and trans-
mitted to the yboard through a hose with at least a 4-inch
diameter and about 40 feet long.
The Flyboard becomes the Jet Skis jet and will pull it
along. Usually a second person sits on the jet ski to steer
it.
The Meridien pier, where Flyboard Milwaukee rst set
up business, is on Baker Park.
Baker Park is a small piece of land just south of the city
pier and was dedicated to the city in 1898 by a group who
owned the property at the time.
Location so near the city boat launch was also a factor
in stopping the Flyboard operation at the Meridien pier,
Jordan said.
Dont do it next to the busiest place on the lake, he
said.
Court cases and city resolutions govern the use of the
Meridien Hotel pier.
The owners of the Meridien property may use the pier
and buoys (a total of four slips) for the pleasure of their
guests.
However, absent express approval by the city council,
the Meridien pier cannot be used for the operation of per-
sonal watercraft, parasailing or rental of other watercraft.
Flyboard Milwaukee was renting time on the Flyboards
and offering them for sale. According to Flyboard websites,
the device retails for about $6,200, not counting the price
of the Jet Ski.
Not everyone is happy with the Flyboards.
Bill Tauber, who owns a unit at Bella Vista Suites, has
been sending letters complaining about the Flyboard oper-
ation to the city council and has contacted the Lake Geneva
Regional News.
In an issue unrelated to Flyboarding, Tauber and others
have also led a lawsuit against the Bella Vista board of
directors and others for nancial mismanagement and
misallocation of funds. The state DNR is currently deciding
on how to classify the Flyboards, since they are not water-
going vessels in the usual sense of the word.
DNR spokesman Marcus L. Smith did not get back to
the Regional News before deadline this week.
Flyboards wont soar on Geneva Lake
FILE PHOTO/REGIONAL NEWS
FLYBOARDS HAVE BEEN GROUNDED in the city of Lake
Geneva. The city wont allow the business to operate within
the city because it doesnt have a license, and it was operat-
ing off of a pier that prohibited commercial operations.
District waits until fall for nal state aid information
Property taxes may drop
for Badger High School
By John Halverson
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Taxpayers in the Lake Geneva-Genoa City School
district may pay less for Badger High School when they
get their property tax bill next year.
Warren Flitcroft, director of business services for
the district, presented a budget of $18.32 million for the
2013-2014 school year to the board at its annual meet-
ing last week.
As it stands now, thats an 8.78 percent increase over
2012-2013 projections.
However, Flitcroft said in an email after the meeting,
that amount represents more of a worst case scenario
for the school board on what the tax levy would be.
The hoped-for reduction, Flitcroft said, is based on
the likelihood that state aids will increase.
If the district does in fact receive an additional
$1.5 million in state aid rather than losing $500,000
and equalized valuations go up rather than remaining
unchanged, then the average property tax bill for schools
should actually go down for next year and this would be
very good for the community, he said.
The budget he presented was based on a $100 per
pupil revenue limit increase, a 15 percent drop in state
aid and no increase in the local equalized valuation,
Flitcroft said.
However, official numbers arent calculated until
late October.
Thats when the district gets most of the official
numbers, such as the equalized valuation of the district,
the more accurate pupil counts and official state aid
amounts.
Flitcroft said its been a particularly difficult year
to forecast because of the late budget approval in Madi-
son and all of the changes that they have recently final-
ized.
As usual, the districts payroll represents the larg-
est chunk of the budget presented to the board showing
a slight increase from an estimated $10.58 million for
2012-2013 to $10.88 million.
Fringe benefits showed the largest percentage
increase primarily because of health insurance costs
going up 16 percent.
If the district does in fact receive an addi-
tional $1.5 million in state aid rather than losing
$500,000 and equalized valuations go up rather
than remaining unchanged, then the average
property tax bill for schools should actually go
down for next year and this would be very good
for the community, Warren Flitcroft, director
of business services said.
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 3A
CORRECTIONS
We make every effort to be accurate. If you feel weve made an error, please contact us
at jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net. Include your name and phone number in case we
need to get back to you.
Correct information for man
killed in crash
An article that appeared in the July 4
edition of the Regional News had incorrect
information about the man who was killed
in a June 15 crash.
Kevin D. Green, 22, Fontana, died after
sustaining injuries when a car he was a
passenger in crashed into a tree.
The driver of the vehicle, Daniel P. Con-
solo, 24, Woodstock, has been charged with
homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle.
Correct date for when
Lake Geneva man went missing
In the July 11 edition story : Missing
LG man found on page 1A, a date was
wrong.
Eliga Roach, 86, was reported missing
at 3 p.m. July 5.
Have the city website come to your
mobile device at least twice a month, free.
At least two times every month, Lake
Geneva will email subscribers a link to
notices, agendas and information packets
for the upcoming city council meeting.
The link will also include tidbits of
information about city services and upcom-
ing events, including public works remind-
ers, elections, changes in parking rules and
changes in city services.
The emails are sent out the Friday
before the meeting, said City Clerk Michael
Hawes. Emails are also sent out in case of
emergencies or special events, he said.
Subscriptions are free.
Sign up by going to www.cityoakeg-
eneva.com/alerts.
Or sign up in person at the city hall coun-
ter. All thats needed is an email address.
The service is provided through a com-
pany called Constant Contact.
It costs the city $18
a month, and the cost is
shared through emer-
gency government,
Hawes said.
The city email ser-
vice has been offered
since March 8, he said.
As of this month, the
city had 130 business
contacts and another
130 or so private citizen
contacts, he said.
Wed love to get that into the thou-
sands, Hawes said. The idea is we want to
build this up as big as possible.
Lake Geneva also has accounts on
Facebook and Twitter, and the city admin-
istration is now working to link them all
together into one package, Hawes said. And
city council meeting videos are also now
online at www.vimeo.com/lakegeneva.
City can reach out,
touch your cell phone
Hawes
RELAY FOR LIFE EVENT
Event set for Friday at Fairgrounds
The Walworth County Relay For Life
event will be held Friday, July 19, at the
Walworth County Fairgrounds in Elkhorn,
with an opening ceremony at 6 p.m. This
years theme is Dance Away Cancer. Hon-
orary Survivors, sisters Darcie Henriott and
Debbie Kenyon, will lead off the opening lap
as part of a celebration of the 100th anni-
versary of the American Cancer Society.
The silent auction will open at 5 p.m.,
with the rst half of the auction closing at
8 p.m., with those items being available for
pickup at 9:30 p.m. The second portion of
the silent auction will close promptly at 10
p.m. and those items will be available for
pickup after midnight. Successful bidders
are asked to be present to pick up silent auc-
tion items during the relay event.
Team campsites will surround the track
with many items for sale including food,
clothing and merchandise, with a giant
inatable slide and bounce house and bingo
as some of the interactive campsite activi-
ties. The Walworth County Cloggers camp-
site will present high energy entertainment
and Clogging For Cash dancing from 8:30
to 9 p.m. The Luminaria Ceremony will
begin at 10 p.m., a time of remembrance
and hope, by honoring survivors and those
who have lost the battle to cancer. Lumi-
narias will circle the entire track and be lit
up during the ceremony. They may be pur-
chased at the event from 5 to 9 p.m. at the
luminaria tent for $5 each. Relay For Life
concludes at 8 a.m. Saturday with the Fight
Back closing ceremony where team totals
are announced. For more information, con-
tact Valerie Tribble, American Cancer Soci-
ety Staff Partner, at (262) 523-5509 or Val-
erie.Tribble@cancer.org.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
THE NBC NIGHTLY NEWS crew boarded the Walworth II along with Lake Geneva tourists to
see the famed mailboat jumpers deliver mail. The Geneva Cruise Line delivers mail to houses
on the lake, with jumpers depositing mail and returning to the still-cruising boat. The show
was scheduled to air July 16.
NBC news lms
mailboat jumpers
LAKE GENEVA Last week, a lm
crew from the NBC Nightly News program
toured the lake with the mailboat jump-
ers.
Harold Friestad, vice president and
general manager of the Lake Geneva Cruise
Line, said the segment on the news pro-
gram will help spur more interest for the
cruise line and the Geneva Lake area.
Its just part of the publicity we try to
get for the mailboat, he said. The mail-
boat is so unique. When people hear about
it, they realize its something they want to
see.
Every summer, the Walworth, a member
of the cruise line, delivers mail to residents
living on the lake. Mailboat jumpers jump
from the boat to the dock, deposit the mail
and jump back to the boat.
It doesnt sound too risky, except the
boat doesnt stop moving.
Many of the jumpers are college stu-
dents home for the summer.
The Lake Geneva Cruise Line posted on
its Facebook page that the tour was sched-
uled to air Tuesday, July 16.
Another cruise line boat will be fea-
tured on Discover Wisconsin next year. See
a story in a future edition of the Regional
News.
Fundraiser in Linn
Hoedown raises money for Haiti
LINN A Western hoedown, featuring
live music, square dancing and a dinner, is
set for Saturday, July 20, at Chapel On The
Hill, N2440 Ara Glen Drive.
The Limber Timbers Square Dance Club
and J.P. Olson are scheduled to perform at
the event.
The club has members from several area
counties who meet on a regular basis to
square dance. According to a press release
from Haitis Children, Inc., the club will dem-
onstrate several dances, incorporating line
dancing and the Virginia Reel.
Olson has performed on stage with
Amy Grant, Billie Ray Cyrus, Anne Murray,
Michael Bolton and others. Recently, he
released two solo albums Favorite Hymns
of Faith and A Guy Like That.
There will be a Western dinner featur-
ing barbecued pork chops, country pork and
beans, coleslaw, potato salad and dessert.
Also, there will be a silent auction, rafes
and people can attend dressed in western
attire and have their pictures taken with
Olson and the club. The dinner will be served
from 4 to 7 p.m. in the parish hall. Olson will
perform during the dinner. The club will
begin its performance at 7 p.m.
The event is a fundraiser for Haitis Chil-
dren. Gladys Mungo, a local woman and
Haitis Children founder, has been a full-time
missionary in Haiti for ve years.
For more information, call Mungo at
(262) 492-3069.
4A The Regional News July 18, 2013
GENOA CITY - BLOOMFIELD
The petition needed 110 signatures and organizers said
they collected 234.
If the board denies the petition or it or takes no action,
the direct legislation proposal goes to referendum.
After the petition is submitted, the village board has 15
days to certify the signatures, which means the village clerk
must ensure that the signatures are from eligible voters.
The board moved to make the motion before the signa-
tures were certied, which may make the petition invalid.
What pushed citizens to action?
The catalyst for the direct legislation petition was talks
of building a new village hall. However, the village board
hasnt taken any action, or made any decision toward build-
ing a new village hall.
The board created a subcommittee
to examine the current village hall and
make a recommendation on whether to
make repairs to it, build a new one or
renovate an existing building.
Schuren and Dawn Lentz said build-
ing a new village hall isnt needed and
taxpayers in Genoa City are already
stretched too far.
This new village hall should have
been addressed when we were growing.
We are stagnant now, Schuren said.
This (village board) doesnt want to
save money at all.
Lentz, a resident who spoke against a new village hall
during the meeting, said residents are tired of paying high
water bills and taxes.
There is no reason to justify it, she said.
Schuren said Genoa City isnt competitive with other
communities in terms of taxes and water rates. This means,
he said, that homeowners and businesses dont look to the
village to buy homes or open shop.
Schuren said the problem with the current village
hall is that the board hasnt maintained it and it has been
neglected.
Anttis view
Antti disagrees with Schuren that the board has
neglected the village hall and has failed to maintain it.
He said the village board has made improvements to
the buildings washrooms. The building was also recently
painted and the carpet is new, he said.
After the meeting, Antti said he objects to the petition
for the same reasons Cornue gave.
We are a representative government elected by the
people to make decisions for them, Antti said. I dont
think we do anything by handcufng us from making those
decisions.
Antti emphasized that the board hasnt made a decision
about the village hall and there arent any rm plans.
We are trying to gather information and be open and
honest, he said.
Antti added that the board isnt out to upset people in
the village.
We dont want to tick off the people in the village,
Antti said. We are representing them. Some have jumped
to the conclusion that we are going to spend money regard-
less. We want to be responsible with what we do.
Board approves project for South Road
Gas station, restaurant coming to GC
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanew.net
GENOA CITY It has been a long
time since new development has come to
Genoa City, but last week the village board
approved a new project at the intersection
of South Road and Highway 12.
The property has been owned by David
Laurine for about 30 years. Laurine plans
on building the Genoa City Travel Center,
which will be a gas station, restaurant and
a drive-thru. Laurines property is located
on 229-231 South Road, and is directly
across the street from the park-and-ride.
Laurine will construct his building in a
way that will allow for more development
at that location.
Laurine said he started planning the
development with former Village President
John Wrzeszcz. He said Wrzeszcz con-
tacted him about developing the site, which
Wrzeszcz hoped would spur new economic
growth.
One of the roadblocks to bringing other
developments to the area is a lack of a traf-
c signal at the intersection of Highway 12
and South Road.
Walgreens had expressed an interest-
ing in building at that location, but needed
a trafc signal to proceed.
The Wisconsin Department of Trans-
portation informed the village there isnt
enough trafc at the intersection to war-
rant a trafc signal. Laurine said that by
building the travel center the trafc will
increase, and this may prompt the DOT to
install a trafc signal.
Laurine said the travel center will be
open seven days a week from 6 a.m. to 11
p.m. He said to staff the 12,000-square foot
building he will need to hire more than 70
people.
We are not leasing it. It is a family
project, and we are going to be around for
awhile, Laurine said.
During Thursday nights village board
meeting, the board discussed numerous
changes to the developers agreement.
The board eventually approved an
amended agreement with Laurine. How-
ever, the agreement wont take affect until
Laurine creates a limited liability company
for his business.
Architect talks about
Village Hall project
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY The architect in charge of devel-
oping a plan for the village hall emphasized that no
decisions have been made, and promised residents he
would treat their money as if it was his.
Jon P. Wallenkamp of Kueny Architects LLC, spoke
at Thursday nights village board meeting after several
residents expressed concerns about taxes and the pos-
sibility of a new village hall.
We are telling you exactly where we are today,
Wallenkamp said as he spoke directly to the audience.
We have toured the entire facility and we are 90 per-
cent done collecting data.
He said every facility as old as the current village
hall has its issues.
There are conditions that have to be cleaned up
here, Wallenkamp said.
Wallenkamp said the board has reviewed the pros
and cons of repairing the building and building proj-
ects.
I look at every solution like it is my home, like it is
my money, Wallenkamp said.
The architect has also reviewed four locations for
the village hall, the current location, two locations on
Elizabeth Lane and one off of Walworth Street.
Wallenkamp said the architects have ruled out the
two locations on Elizabeth Lane.
He said that he hopes to have some recommenda-
tion to the board by the end of the month.
It would be a piece of paper, it doesnt mean theres
a wrecking ball coming, he added.
Ordinance/This (village board) doesnt want to save money at all
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Schuren
We are a representative govern-
ment elected by the people to
make decisions for them, Village
President Bill Antti said. I dont
think we do anything by handcuff-
ing us from making those deci-
sions.
BLOOMFIELD POLICE REPORTS
Bloomeld police recently reported the following inci-
dents.
n A female was arrested for second-offense operating
while intoxicated June 14 at 12:33 a.m. on Douglas Avenue
near Charles Young Drive. The driver also had a warrant
and was cited for open intoxicants in a vehicle.
n Arrested a male motorist for operating while intoxi-
cated July 7 at 2:38 a.m. on Highway U near Eastside Road.
The driver also was cited for vehicle nonregistration.
n A male motorist was arrested for operating while
intoxicated June 19 at 11:57 p.m. on Highways 120 at H. He
also was cited for speeding.
n Arrested a female driver for operating while intoxi-
cated July 6 at 2:19 a.m. on Highway U near Pell Lake
Drive.
n Someone damaged a door and ATM prior to June 12 at
5:01 a.m. at the Pell Lake Inn, W1282 N. Lake Shore Drive.
n The rear door was damaged at the Big House, N1320
S. Lake Shore Drive, prior to June 27 at 4:44 a.m. Police
noticed the door and door jamb were damaged, and believe
it appeared that someone attempted to gain entry to the
business.
n A house was egged prior to June 13 at 9:59 p.m. on
Catalpa Road.
n A brass, twin-sized headboard was reported stolen
July 7 at 4:25 p.m. from a Phlox Road residence.
The body of a 27-year-old Barron County man was
found July 9 in a van at the Pell Lake Beach.
Seth Lindner was been identied as the deceased.
Deputy Corner Ron Wilson said Lindners family has been
notied.
Lindner had lived in the Pell Lake area before moving
to Barron County.
Wilson said an autopsy was performed July 10 and a
cause of death hasnt been determined. Wilson said he is
waiting for toxicology reports, which he may not receive
for a month.
Wilson said there is no indication of foul play at this
time. The investigation is being handled by the Walworth
County Sheriffs Ofce Detective Bureau.
Capt. Dana Nigbor, who is in charge of the bureau,
didnt return a call seeking comment.
Body found near Pell Lake
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Pastor discusses Trinitys beginnings, future, why he wont leave
Metke: 30 years, still growing
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
BLOOMFIELD Bloom where youre planted, said Pastor Brian
Metke.
Thirty years ago, fresh out of seminary, Metke was planted at Trinity
Church, his rst and only congregation.
On July 10, shortly before lugging dufe bags bloated with supplies
for a mission trip to Kenya into the open trunks of vehicles belonging to
volunteers not long before their ight, he said he has no
plans on leaving.
With testimonials like the one provided by fellow
pastor Joyce Rossen, why would he?
He has so many gifts, so many talents, its really
almost impossible to think of all of them in one person,
Rossen said.
Its also uncommon for a Lutheran pastor any
pastor, these days to remain with one church for 30
years.
I was expecting to be here three years or so,
because thats what pastors did, but we stayed here,
Metke said.
He could boast that what he accomplished with
Trinity is the kind of thing politicians and even other church leaders often
dream of, but never see fully materialize.
When he arrived at Trinity, in 1982, the church was on the verge of
collapse, he said. Nobody could nd it, rst of all, and it was surrounded
by a junkyard.
It was also in a community people often write off.
This is the kind of place where one person said to me theyve never
seen anything good come out of Pell Lake, he said. Its with that kind
of attitude, where people grow up (in) a blue collar community. We real-
ized Jesus is a blue-collar individual, and weve seen a revitalization here.
People are proud of the community because they saw a church that was
about to die rejuvenated.
Not just rejuvenated, but growing.
Trinitys congregation grew from 65 members in 1982 to currently 450,
Metke said, drawing followers who live as far as 25 miles away. We are
unique, Metke said. We have a unique style.
Gone are the junkyard surroundings of the former church on Clover
Road.
For several years now, the church has deepened its roofs in 12 acres
at W775 Geranium Drive, housed in a structure thats visible to motorists
traveling north and south on Highway 12. This congregation didnt have a
future on Clover Road, Metke said. It was a unanimous decision to leave,
which that in itself tells you something.
The location changed, but the man at the front of the church has
remained the same. When asked why he has stayed and why he said
without hesitation that he wont leave could be to set an example.
Ive taken a vow of stability, Metke said. People move around so
much in our world and to take a vow of stability, like monks do, this is a
spiritual effort. To have a person stay in one place is a great thing.
Metke is celebrating his 30th anniversary at the church he saved in a
way thats just as unique as the church itself.
He said the congregation is providing him with the opportunity to
pursue a doctorate in discipleship.
Metke will use Trinity as his thesis on healthy discipleships and reju-
venating congregations.
Thats really my gift for my 30th (anniversary), and what a legacy for
the congregation, to take a green pastor and put up with all this stuff, all
these changes I did. Thats the real celebration.
Or, he joked, maybe the congregation is sending him back to school
because he needs extra help.
Being unique
A sense of humor is one cornerstone of Metkes vibrant personality.
But maybe he doesnt t the usual stereotypes associated with the term
pastor. Metke has lots of stories, much to say as any pastor would
but his stories dont stretch on innitely, nor is he a repetitive speaker.
He still looks young and full of energy, lifting duffel bags half his size and
joking with missionaries at the same time. A 1974 graduate of Union Grove
High School, Metke discovered his calling at Marquette University, after
learning to play guitar with a campus ministry. A priest said to me, You
should be a priest, and I said, Hey, Im Lutheran and I want to get mar-
ried, Metke said. Then he said, You should be a pastor.
Why? He said he is a learner who has genuine faith.
I have a gift set, Metke said. Im a good speaker, Im a good teacher,
I have a passion to achieve. My gift set, as a leader, was there, but I was
open to developing my spiritual character. Im still growing. Ill never
be nished.
Neither is Metkes work in rejuvenating congregations. Recently,
Metke, Rossen and Pastor Tom De Groot began working to revitalize St.
Johns Lutheran Church in Elkhorn. Metke said they continue to look at
struggling congregations. I believe thats our calling, he said.
What is the secret to restoring a congregation?
Metke said he believes God is using them. One key to success in this
arena is for one to allow him or herself to be an instrument of God, he
said.
Another key: Loving people. Its not a job, Metke said. We really care
about people.
But a main focus at Trinity, the purpose of its activities, he said, is to
make disciples. Most churches dont make disciples, Metke said.
This, he said, is also how he wants to celebrate his 30th anniversary
with Trinity. When we see churches thriving because of our efforts and
people developing a positive, life-changing connection with Jesus Christ,
I want to celebrate with the congregation by saying, yes, with the help of
God, many good things continue to come out of Pell Lake.
Which perhaps also means Metke has bloomed nicely.
Metke on ...
Family: Pastor Brian Metke said family has always been
strong for me. He met his wife, Cindy, at a church camp.
They are both spiritual directors and raised three children
Elissa, Lainie and Peter in Pell Lake.
Community: Metke called Trinity a spiritual hospital for
Pell Lake. He said the church has implemented several
programs to help Pell Lake become a stronger community,
such as ReachOut, in which church volunteers repair homes
for people who cant do the work themselves; and provide a
community garden, so people who need extra food can grow
their own even if they dont have the resources. There are
also some plans to build a community playground on Trini-
tys 12 acres near Highway 12 and a youth basketball court.
Helping other congregations: We realized that we had
learned how to renew dying churches and we felt called to
reach out and help rejuvenate congregations who yearned to
grow and become healthy again, Metke said. We invited
a Hispanic Assembly of God congregation to use Trinitys
building and then developed a partnership with St. Johns
Lutheran Church in Elkhorn.
BLOOMFIELD
Metke
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN Taxpayers will save
nearly a million dollars when the county
changes how it provides its employees
health insurance.
However, the 790 county employees
enrolled in the insurance and their fami-
lies will now face higher deductibles, larger
out-of-pocket maximums and are respon-
sible for more expenses.
During the boards July meeting it
approved its 2014 plan for employee health
insurance on a 8-3 vote with supervisors
Jerry Grant, Rick Stacey and Carl Rede-
nius opposing the change.
Those supervisors supported switching
to the state health insurance plan, which
Grant said would have saved the county
$3 million in 2014. However, the state plan
didnt include Aurora directly in its cover-
age.
Aurora is responsible for 52 percent
of the countys health insurance claims,
said Dale Wilson, the county payroll and
benet manager. Wilson said that Mercy
accounted for about 20 to 25 percent of the
employees claims
Since fall 2012 the county has been
examining how it provides its employees
health insurance and searching for ways to
reduce costs.
Wilson said the county asked for bids
from health insurance providers. How-
ever, it only received one bid, which Wilson
described as not competitive.
The county also compared its health
insurance policy to the coverage provided
in similar counties. Wilson said Walworth
County was providing better insurance
than those counties.
This will put us more in the middle,
to maybe even below middle, Wilson said.
There are denitely counties that have
better insurance, and by better I mean
lower deductibles, lower out of pockets.
The county offers two tiers for its
health insurance. The rst tier cost more,
but has a lower deductible. The second-tier
is considered a high deductible insurance
plan. That insurance plan includes a $750
county contribution to individuals and a
$1,500 contribution to families for their
health savings accounts.
Walworth County Supervisors can pur-
chase their own health insurance directly
from the board under the countys health
insurance plan.
The county doesnt contribute anything
to the supervisors insurance if they choose
to purchase it. County employees pay
between 7 and 12 percent of their insur-
ance costs.
Wilson said there are 790 employees
covered by the countys health insurance,
which includes 528 employees who receive
family coverage.
There are an additional 103 retirees,
who receive health insurance benets.
There are nearly 900 full-time employees
in Walworth County, but some dont receive
health insurance.
State plan
The state health plan is available to local
municipalities. Grant said at the meeting
that if the county board would adopt that
plan, it would save about $3 million.
It is a different type of plan, it is an
HMO instead of a PPO, Wilson said.It
would be a big shift from what are employ-
ees are used to.
He said the state plan does offer some
PPOs, but those are more expensive, for
both the county and its employees. He also
said the employees could have received cov-
erage from Aurora, but it would have been
signicantly more expensive for them.
Wilson said the plan would have saved
the county money. However, he disagreed
with Grant on the amount.
The state could add a surcharge when
a new municipality joins the plan, Wilson
said. Wilson said it was likely that the county
would have been charged a surcharge.
We have, in our population, with 790
lives on the population, with some of those
being retirees there are some signicant
issues in a limited part of our population,
Wilson said. On average I would say we are
a healthy population, but we do have some
larger claimaints that would raise some
concerns.
6A The Regional News July 18, 2013
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
2013 2014
Single Family
2013 2014
Walworth County Health Insurance Plan
Current 2013 Plan & Accepted 2014 Plan
*Co-Insurance and Out-of-Pocket Maximum gures show In Network provider cost only.
1
2
Deductible
Co-Insurance*
Out-of-Pocket Max.*
$100
90/10
$350
$900 $2,225
$300
90/10
$1,050
$1,250
80/20
$2,250
$743
$500
80/20
$1,200
$828
$1,500
90/10
$2,000
$705 $1,793
$2,500
80/20
$4,500
$2,048
$1,500
80/20
$3,500
$1,701
$3,000
90/10
$4,000
Total Premium
TIER
TIER
Deductible
Co-Insurance*
Out-of-Pocket Max.*
Total Premium
2013 2014
Single Family
2013 2014
Employees have higher deductibles
County saves nearly $1 million on insurance
COUNTY REPORT
Former Star Center PTO
treasurer guilty of theft
The former treasurer of the Star Center School PTO
pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $10,000 from the
group.
Katherine A. Tworek, 46, N1695 Mallow
Place,Bloomeld, pleaded guilty to a felony charge of theft
from a business setting.
She was sentenced to three years of probation. A condi-
tion of her probation is that she must serve 30 days in jail
with work-release privileges.
She also must obtain counseling as recommended by
her probation agent, provide a DNA sample, pay court cost
and restitution in the amount of $11,114.26.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Oct. 30, 2012, a Bloomeld police ofcer went to
Star Center School to take a theft complaint.
The ofcer met with principal Lidalyn Tennessen and
PTO president Kathleen Seeberg.
Tennessen said that while going through the schools
budget she noticed a missing payment from the PTO.
Tennessen contacted Tworek about the missing pay-
ment but wasnt given a satisfactory reason why the pay-
ment wasnt made.
Tworek had been the PTO treasurer since October
2011.
After learning of the missing payment, Seeberg
retrieved the PTOs bank statements. Seeberg identied
several debit transactions and withdrawals that were not
authorized including:
n A Nov. 23, 2011, ATM withdrawal for $350.
n A Nov. 25, 2011, check to the defen-
dant for $482.50.
n A Dec. 2, 2011, withdrawal for
$900.
n A May 31, 2012, withdrawal for
$825 for a money order to Kalex Realty
Group.
n A June 29, 2012, withdrawal for
$1,000, which included making a money
order out to a realty group.
Seeberg also stated that there were
transactions made to Walmart, Dunn
Lumber, Goodwill and Target during the
summer months when the PTO isnt spending much money.
During a meeting with Seeberg and Tennessen, Tworek
admitted to using the PTOs debit card to pay for an electric
bill because her wallet had been stolen.
Tworek said she also took some money to reimburse her-
self for cookbooks that she had purchased for the PTO.
The school purchases cookbooks from a company named
Morris.
Morris reports that neither the PTO nor Tworek pur-
chased cookbooks from them.
On Jan. 7, Tworek met with a Bloomeld police ofcer.
During that meeting, Tworek admitted to using the PTOs
debit card to pay her rent, her electric bill and her gas bill.
Tworek told police said she had received permission to do
this, but Seeberg told the ofcer Tworek was never given per-
mission to use the PTOs funds to pay personal bills.
Tworek
GRAPHIC BY SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS
There are denitely counties
that have better insurance, and by
better I mean lower deductibles,
lower out of pockets, said Dale
Wilson, the county payroll and
benet manager.
GENOA CITY DAYS
Hosted by the Genoa City Lions Club
AUGUST 2nd, 3rd, 4th
KIDS GAMES INFLATABLES BINGO MERCHANTS LIVE MUSIC
BLOOD DRIVE MUD BOGS FOOD & DRINK ECUMENICAL
CHURCHSERVICE 20THANNUALHARLEY-DAVIDSON RAFFLE
31st Annual
For More Information Go To: www.genoacitylions.org
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2
ND
5:00 p.m. Genoa City Days Begins
Pig Roast Hosted by First Congregational Church
Ruthie the Singing DJ Local Gal Plays Hits of Yesteryear
6:00 p.m. Bingo with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
8:00 p.m. The Fairlanes Band with Walworth County Idol winner,
Alyssa Montes de Oca
SATURDAY, AUGUST 3
RD
8:00 a.m. Lions Club Blood Drive Call Lee Swenson at
(262) 279-3316 for an appointment
12:00 p.m. Genoa City Days Parade
1:00 p.m. Ruthie the Singing DJ Local Gal Plays Hits of Yesteryear
Lakeland Animal Shelter Barnyard Babies & Storytime
(On the 1/2 hour)
Kiddie Tractor Pull (Kids under 100 lbs.) Hosted by the
S. E. Wisconsin Antique Power & Collectibles Society
2:00 p.m. Frankie Miglio Vegas Stylist
5:00 p.m. Bingo with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
8:00 p.m. The Chasing Amy Band with Rock Central
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4
TH
9:00 a.m. Ecumenical Service First Congregational Church
9:30 a.m. 3rd Annual Pauline Parker Memorial Mud Bogs
Registration at the Park
11:00 a.m. Peter Guerin One Entertainer, Many Shows
1:00 p.m. 3rd Annual Pauline Parker Memorial Mud Bogs Event Begins
Bingo with $$ Prizes at the North Shelter
2:00 p.m. The Fairlanes Band
Nippersink Resort Alumni Reunion
7:00 p.m. 20th Annual Harley-Davidson Raffle
*SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE*
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in Genoa City, Wisconsin
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 7A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Those who really need to know this will
probably never read it in this newspaper.
But to the lines of folks who come to
the Lake Geneva Police Department to
complain about the parking kiosks, Police
Chief Mike Rasmussen has a simple mes-
sage: Please stop.
People make their meter complaints at
the police department, Rasmussen told the
Lake Geneva Police and Fire Commission
during its July 11 meeting. We dont have
authority over the parking meters.
For that, the city has a Parking Enforce-
ment Department.
However, the park-
ing enforcement depart-
ment, which has a
summer staff of nine
part-time supervisors
and enforcers, is not
open 24 hours a day,
seven days a week.
The police depart-
ment is.
This July 4 weekend,
dozens of unhappy park-
ers lined up in front of
the police departments reception window
at the city hall with complaints about park-
ing tickets, or about the parking kiosks in
general.
While the department tries to make
an ofcer available to assist persons with
questions or complaints, it cant always do
that, Rasmussen said in an interview on
Monday.
The rush of disatised customers comes
in all during the weekends and after 5 p.m.
and distracts the dispatchers from their
primary duty of taking 911 calls and dis-
patching ofcers, Rasmussen said.
When youre trying to do your job and
people are screaming at you, it makes it dif-
cult, Rasmussen said. They just want to
yell at someone because theyre upset.
Rasmussen asked the commissioners
to request from city administration that a
parking enforcement person be made avail-
able to handle those complaints on summer
weekend evenings.
He said the situation was bad enough
this past July 4 that he called a meter
enforcement person in to help.
That raised some concerns from the city
comptrollers ofcer later, he added.
Rasmussen suggested that a parking
enforcement ofcer be on duty throughout
the evenings on every summer weekend
starting the week of July 4 through Labor
Day to help deal with the parking com-
plaints.
In the meantime, persons with com-
plaints can download complaint forms
from the city website, www.cityoakeg-
eneva.com.
The catch is, complaints cant be led
online. They must be submitted with the
paid parking tickets.
Police unhappy elding ticket complaints
Chief Rasmussen asks for weekend parking staff at city hall
Heroin dealers sentencing delayed
The sentencing hearing for a con-
victed heroin dealer was postponed
Monday morning after his attorney,
Elliott Price, was unable to attend the
hearing.
Malik D. Iseini, 35, N1985 Hafs
Road, Bloomeld, has pleaded guilty
to three felony charges of delivering
heroin and possession of a narcotic
drug.
Iseini also pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor charge of resisting or
obstructing an ofcer and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Iseinis hearing was rescheduled
for July 24 at 10:30 a.m. in front of
Judge David Reddy. Iseini faces more
than 70 years imprisonment.
Iseinis local attorney, Stephen
Kramer, said Price was unable to
attend the hearing because of medi-
cal reasons.
Kramer said the sentencing could
move forward if the state would
accept the presentence investigation
(PSI) recommendation. A PSI is done
by the Department of Corrections
and makes a sentencing recommen-
dation. After the
hearing, Assistant
District Attorney
Zeke Wiedenfeld
said he would ask
for a longer term of
connement than
the one recom-
mended by the PSI.
Wiedenfeld said he
couldnt disclose
the PSIs sentenc-
ing recommenda-
tion because it is contained in a docu-
ment that is sealed to the public.
According to the criminal com-
plaint on the drug and weapon case:
Deputies with the Walworth
County Sheriffs Department Drug
Unit worked with a condential infor-
mant to purchase heroin from Iseini.
On March 19, two Walworth
County Sheriffs Department detec-
tives went to Iseinis trailer to speak
with him. At the end of the conversa-
tion, one of the detectives told Iseini
he was under arrest for delivering
heroin.
Iseini resisted and the detectives
struggled. During the struggle a detec-
tive attempted to handcuff Iseini, and
he was pushed into the screen door
of the trailer. After subduing Iseini,
both detectives searched Iseinis
trailer and, inside of an exhaust fan,
they found 23 foil bindles containing
heroin.
An ofcer also found a white PVC
pipe, which appeared to have a fuse.
The squad identied the pipe as an
explosive device and disposed of it.
A .22 caliber rie was also found
in the trailer. In 2010, Iseini pleaded
guilty to a felony marijuana charge, so
he cannot legally possess a rearm.
According to the criminal com-
plaint for possession of a narcotic
drug:
On April 6, a correctional ofcer
found a piece of paper containing a
white powdery substance oating in
the toilet.
When questioned about the sub-
stance, Iseini admitted that it was a
Percocet. Iseini refused to say how he
got the pill.
Rasmussen
Iseini
ALPINE VALLEY ARRESTS
Eighty people were arrested for possession of mari-
juana during the Dave Matthews Band concerts July 5 and
6 at Alpine Valley.
On Friday about 19,000 people attended the show and
28,000 people attended Saturdays concert.
On Wednesday morning the Walworth County Sheriffs
Department released arrest statistics from the event.
The Walworth County Drug unit issued 72 citations
for possession of marijuana, 14 citations for possession of
drug paraphernalia and one ticket for resisting arrest.
Walworth County Sheriffs deputies issued 113 cita-
tions and arrested four people and brought them to the
Walworth County jail. Two other people were taken into
custody for alcohol consumption.
The citations were as follows:
n 44 for underage possession or consumption of alco-
hol.
n Three for reworks.
n Two for possession of drug paraphernalia.
n Eight for possession of marijuana.
n Four for nonregistration of vehicle.
n Five for disorderly conduct.
n Two resisting arrest or obstructing an ofcer.
n 33 for speeding.
n Nine for operating without car insurance.
n One operating after suspension.
n One for criminal damage to property.
The nal concert this season is Jimmy Buffett on Aug.
24.
Babies and their families enjoy a great start at our beautiful new birthing
center within Mercy Walworth Hospital and Medical Center. Our doctors, nurse
midwife and obstetrical registered nurses offer exceptional family-centered care
in safe, supportive and comfortable surroundings.
When youre expecting, expect the best at the New Generations Birthing Center
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8A The Regional News July 18, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
The citys Tax Increment Finance dis-
trict budget also contains about $140,000
for improvements to Flat Iron Park, said City
Administrator Dennis Jordan.
The existing concrete slab would have to be
removed, he said.
This could be a revenue source for the city,
Krause told the commissioners.
The pavilion stage would not be tiered, but
have a flat floor, so it could be rented out for
weddings and parties when not used for musi-
cal performances, said Krause, a musician and
self-described recovering alderman.
Originally conceived as a bandshell, Krause
said that creating a classic curved wall band-
shell would limit the use of the structure to
most musical performances.
Most serious bands and entertainers now
have their own acoustic shells which they mount
behind the stage, and most also have their own
sound and light systems, as well.
However, Krause suggested that the perfor-
mance pavilion would also have a modest sound
system of its own and some conventional lights
and spotlights, as well.
Krause said hes been in contact with the Jaycees,
who operate Venetian Fest in Flat Iron Park in August.
He said many of the proposed design features of the
performance pavilion are intended to meet the Jaycees
Venetian Fest needs, as well as provide a year-
around venue for the city.
Krause said the new structure will fit into
the required 100-foot setback from navigable
water.
Krause said the building would be con-
structed with the goal of long-term life and little
maintenance.
The floor will be decorative concrete and the
pillars will be made of plastic composite.
The park commissioners passed along the
proposal with their recommendation that it be
approved.
Commission president Doug Skates said a
bandshell, or bandshell-like structure was pro-
posed for Flat Iron in the citys parks master
plan.
Plans for the performance pavilion will
be reviewed by the city councils public works
committee and will require approval by the city
council.
Krause said the beautification committee is
moving ahead with planning and funding for
the project so construction can start in early
spring.
The beautification committee is an independent,
nonprofit organization.
Public Works Director Dan Winkler and Mayor Jim
Connors sit on the committee as city representatives.
Brugger received the appreciation of
the Lake Geneva City Council, a may-
oral resolution and a plaque just prior
to the council meeting July 8 for his 27
years as the city building inspector and
zoning administrator
Its been a pleasure to serve the city
for 27 years, Brugger said in a few brief
comments after receiving his plaque.
Brugger said that as a Lake Geneva
native, he did his job with the intention
of making Lake Geneva better place.
I treated everyone who walked
through the door as my boss, said Brugger, who worked
with developers, builders and private citizens to get proj-
ects properly permitted and inspected.
And then he was gone. Bruggers last ofcial day was
Tuesday, July 9.
The city has advertised for applicants for the building
inspector/zoning administrator position, but construction
and zoning issues will not take a respite.
So, the city council took action to ll in the gap.
The council members voted unanimously to hire Munic-
ipal Services LLC, Lyons, to do city inspections.
The inspection rm will charge the city $57 for each
trip to the city and $57 an hour for inspections, ofce hours
in the city and attending meetings if requested.
City Administrator Dennis Jordan recommended hiring
Municipal Services. Jordan had also been in contact with
Professional Building Inspections, Delavan, as well. PBI
was asking $65 per inspection for permitted projects, and
80-20 percent split in fees for new construction and new
projects, with PBI getting 80 percent, a $65 fee for nonper-
mit related services and $85 an hour to attend meetings at
the citys request.
Meanwhile Mike Slavney of Vandewalle & Associates,
the city planner, will do the zoning administration for the
city. The council voted to hire Municipal Services from July
9 until a full-time building inspector/zoning administrator
is hired.
The councils personnel committee is scheduled to
begin reviewing resumes July 17.
Brugger leaves, search for replacement begins
Brugger
Pavilion/Park Commissioners give their approval
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
The Cornerstone Shop & Gallery 214 Broad St., will
host a public exhibit of works by local artists and a recep-
tion from 4 to 7 p.m. July 26.
The Cornerstone Shop & Gallery is a retail shop and
gallery specializing in home dcor and artisan products
including unique jewelry, hand-blown glass, fine ceram-
ics and exotic woods.
Painters Anthony Soskich, Jeanne Dyer, Angela
Gelasi, Heather Gentile Collins, Patricia Heintzelman
and Donna Sands will be painting, displaying and auto-
graphing their work.
Two Cents Flat, a group of students in Badger High
Schools jazz program, will perform.
Light refreshments will be served.
n Soskich was born in Austria, immigrated to the
U.S. as a child, and now spends time at his Williams Bay
cottage painting Geneva Lake in acrylics and oils.
n Dyer of Lake Geneva is president of the Geneva
Lake Art Association Inc., has studied oil painting,
lithography and photography. She is now focusing on
botanical watercolor under award-winning local artist
Lynne Railsback of Williams Bay.
n Gelasi won the prestigious Ohio Governors Award
for art as a high school senior.
Since, she has won awards in art shows from Con-
necticut to New Mexico.
In addition to her oil and pastel painting, Gelasi is
also an interior designer at the Cornerstone Shop & Gal-
lery.
n Gentile Collins studied at the School of the Art
Institute of Chicago.
Her work has been featured in the media, and she
received grants to paint public murals for the City of Chi-
cago, Chicago area schools and at other locations.
n Heintzelman of Lake Geneva earned her fine arts
degree from North Park University, Chicago. Her award
winning watercolors grace the walls of many homes, busi-
nesses and institutions throughout the United States.
n Sands specializes in landscapes. Most recently,
she has been working in encaustics, a process of mixing
paint with wax and fusing it with heat.
Following a career in commercial art and operating
her own business as an art director, she has painted pro-
fessionally for 17 years. Sands also serves on the cultural
committee at the College of Lake County, Grayslake, Ill.
Two Cents Flat is an award-winning eight-piece
combo. Members include: Laura Kidder and Sarah Clau-
sen on saxophone; Brady Schmidt and Erik Martinez on
trumpet; David Ayala on trombone; Max Engelman on
bass; Zach Ott on guitar; and Cooper Bohn on drums.
They play everything from blues to swing and funk.
Cornerstone Shop & Gallery hosts local art exhibit
Krause
Connors
Stressing the importance of offering nutritious meals to
children during the summer months, the Lake Geneva Joint
One School District announces the sponsorship of the Summer
Food Service Program.
The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), which is funded
by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and is admin-
istered by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction,
provides nutritious meals to children during the summer, when
free and reduced-price school meals are typically unavailable.
Free meals will be made available to children 18 years of age
and under. Persons over 18 years of age who are determined
by a state or local public educational agency to be mentally
or physically disabled and who also participate in a public or
private non-prot school program during the regular school
year may receive free meals as well.
The following locations will be serving the free meals from
August 5 through August 23:
Star Center Elementary School
W1380 Lake Geneva Hwy, Lake Geneva, WI
Eastview Elementary School
535 Sage Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Central-Denison Elementary School
900 Wisconsin Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Breakfast will be served from 9:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Meals are provided to eligible children regardless of race,
color, national origin, age, gender or disability, and there will
be no discrimination in the course of meal service.
This program lls a void created when school lunches are
not available, said Ms. Donna Ecklund, School Food Service
Coordinator. Helping parents meet the nutritional needs of
their children is the strength of the program.
To le a complaint of discrimination, write the USDA, Director, Ofce of Civil Rights
(Ofce of Adjudication), 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington , D.C.
20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). TDD users can contact USDA
through local relay or the Federal Relay at (800) 877-8339 (TDD) or (866) 377-
8642 (relay voice users). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
For More Information, Please Call (262) 348-1000 ext.1015

LAKE GENEVA SCHOOLS


SUMMER BREAKFAST FEEDING PROGRAM
COMUNICADO DE PRENSA - EL PROGRAMA
DE SERVICIO DE COMIDA PARA EL VERANO.
(Para patrocinadores que no son campos y que establecieron el programa de
elegibilidad por rea geogrca.)
Insistimos la importancia de ofrecer comidas nutritivas a
nios durante los meses de verano, Donna Ecklund, anuncia
la patrocino del Programa de Servicio de Comida de Verano.
El Programa de Servicio de Verano (SFSP), que fue fondeado por
el Departamento de Agrucultura de los EEUU (USDA) y es admin-
istrado por el Departamento de Instruccin Pblico de Wisconsin,
provee comidas nutritivas a los nios durante el verano, cuando
tpicamente las comidas gratis o reducidas no estn disponsibles.
Comida gratis va estar disponsible para todos los nios de 18 aos
o menos. Personas mas de 18 aos que estn determinados por el
estado o agencia pblica de educacin en ser incapacitado mental
o sicamente y que tambin participa en un programa escolar
privado o pblico sin nimo de lucro durante y ao escolar regular-
mente puede recibir comida gratis tambin.
Las localizaciones siguientes van a servir comidas gratis
este verano. Desde el 5 de agosto hasta el 23 de agosto,
2013, de las 9:00 de la maana hasta las 9:30 de la
maana en las escuelas de:
Star Center Elementary School
W1380 Lake Geneva Hwy, Lake Geneva, WI
Eastview Elementary School
535 Sage Street, Lake Geneva, WI
Central-Denison Elementary School
900 Wisconsin Street, Lake Geneva, WI
La comida se provee a nios elegible a pese a raza, color, origen
nacional, edad, sexo o incapacidad, y no va ver discriminacin
en el curso del servicio de comida.
Este programa llena el vacio creado cuando almuerzos esco-
lares no estn disponsibles, dice Donna Ecklund. Ayudando
a padres lograr las necesidades nutritivas para sus nios es una
fuerza de esta programa.
Para presentar una denuncia de discriminacin, escriba USDA Director, Ofce of
Civil Rights (Ofce of Adjudication), 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington
, D.C. 20250-9410 or llame gratis a (866) 632-9992 (Voz). Los que usan TDD
pueden contactar USDA con un rel o el Rel Federal a (800) 877-8339 (TDD) o
(866) 377-8642 (voz de rel). El USDA es un empleador que cree en la igualdad de
oportunidades y sus empleados.
Para Ms Informacin, Llame Al (262) 348-1000 ext.1015

OPEN Monday-Saturday
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*Closed Sundays in June, July & August
N1445 S. Hwy. 120 Lake Geneva, WI
(262) 248-9876
See our website for specials
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 9A
Ive adopted 35 daughters and a hundred sons, he
said. Ive been invited to their weddings, and unfortu-
nately, I attended some of their funerals.
Ralph was the perfect individual for the job, said
Mark Pienkos, former Badger principal and now president
of the Lake Geneva Police and Fire Commission. He had
a passion for the school.
Born and raised in Lake Geneva, the Braden family
ran the Riviera until the city took it over in 1979.
As a 1976 Badger graduate, Braden knew the school
and knew many of the teachers who were still there.
Knowing the teachers and principals, it was a good
t, Braden said.
Braden said he worked with the police departments
gang unit starting in the 1980s.
In the early 1990s, Braden was the departments gang
ofcer. He was a member of the Midwest Gang Investiga-
tors Association.
Lake Geneva didnt have any established gangs, but
there were a lot of gangbanger wannabes in the city who
were causing trouble, he said.
We didnt have any problems in the school, yet,
Braden said.
The key to heading off gangs was getting into schools,
where the kids were, Braden said.
Braden said he and former Police Chief Richard New-
berry decided the best way to cut off trouble was to go
where the young people were, in the school.
Braden moved into Badger High School as liaison in
1995.
Pienkos said the goal of the liaison program was to
integrate the police ofcer into the life of the school.
It wasnt just a police ofcer with an ofce in the
school, Pienkos said.
And Braden knew just what to do.
Here was Ralph, in plainclothes, in the hallway and
talking with the kids, Pienkos said. He was proactive, he
wasnt just waiting for things to happen.
Pienkos said the Badger School District, then under
Superintendent Harry Van Dyke, were thinking along the
lines of a school liaison program in 1994, the same year
Pienkos came on as Badger principal.
Pienkos said that in the mid-1990s, Badger was
entirely different. It was about half its current size and it
was crowded.
And there were discipline issues. Pienkos said that
in his rst year as Badger principal we probably had the
highest expulsion rate in the state of Wisconsin.
The school district applied for and received a federal
grant that covered half of the cost of the program for a few
years, and the school-police liaison program was born.
When the program rst started, Braden said, he came
to the school in uniform. More than once, a student on a
dare or just trying to be funny, tried to steal his badge, he
said.
Then he went to a sport coat and tie, and found that
worked much better.
Kids will talk to you with a suit coat, he said.
Recently, the uniform was changed to a polo shirt and
khakis. And yes, Braden did carry his service sidearm
into the school, right up until his last day.
He said he was approached just once by a teacher, who
wanted to know when Braden started carrying his pistol
into the school.
I told him I always carried it, Braden said. Students
were more accepting. He said that to them, the holster
and sidearm was just a part of the uniform.
Braden didnt develop his relationships with students
by taking a strict ofcer on patrol, attitude.
Hes coached Badger football and coached Badger girls
softball.
You need to be in the hallways. You need to talk to
kids, he said.
Teachers, particularly social studies and civics teach-
ers, would ask Braden to talk to their classes about the
laws and law enforcement in general.
Braden said he, in cooperation with the schools staff
and the police and sheriffs departments, developed safety
plans for the Lake Geneva schools.
He said the Lake Geneva elementary, middle and high
schools have all been conducting lockdown drills, in which
students, staff and law enforcement ofcers practice pro-
cedures to be used in the case of an active shooter. Braden
said Lake Geneva has been conducting those drills since
the 1999 Columbine school shootings.
Wisconsin didnt make those drills mandatory until
the next school year, Braden said.
Braden also keeps his eyes open for funding to improve
school security.
He said that the police department applied for a
$57,000 federal Save Our Schools matching grant for
school security. The Lake Geneva school districts matched
the grant, he said.
Awarded in 2010, the grants allowed the districts to
add between 12 and 16 security cameras in the schools.
Those cameras can be monitored from the school ofces
and by police computers as well, Braden said.
The grant and matching funds also paid for several
new security doors at Eastview Elementary School, he
said.
Braden said he never planned on being a police of-
cer.
I just fell into it, he said.
Braden said he married out of high school and was
working as a milk delivery man for a local dairy. Then, he
broke his foot playing basketball.
A young part-timer was assigned to help Braden make
milk deliveries while his foot mended.
Braden said the young assistant was Jeff Nelson,
son of then Lake Geneva police Lt. Tom Nelson. He said
Nelson told him he should apply to the Lake Geneva police
department.
After his foot healed, Braden did just that.
In June 1980, Braden was hired as a reserve (part-
time) ofcer.
Braden earned his certication as a police ofcer in
1981 at Blackhawk Technical College, Beloit. On July 1,
1981, he was hired as a full-time Lake Geneva police of-
cer.
Braden said his retirement doesnt mean hes going to
stop working altogether.
He said he still plans to work part-time as director of
maintenance for the Alpine Valley Music Theater.
That will keep me busy, he said.
Braden said he and his wife, Ginny, live in Burlington.
They have three daughters, one who lives in Kenosha one
who lives in Muskego and one at home who is majoring in
pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin.
The Bradens have two grandchildren.
Braden/Working on gang unit lead to the school liason position
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Here was Ralph, in plainclothes, in the hall-
way and talking with the kids, former Badger
Principal Mark Pienkos said. He was proactive,
he wasnt just waiting for things to happen.
Ive adopted 35 daughters and a hundred sons,
Ralph Braden said. Ive been invited to their
weddings, and unfortunately, I attended some of
their funerals.
Road maintenance
set for this week
The Walworth County
Public Works department
has announced that main-
tenance will be performed
on the following roads,
beginning the week of July
15, weather permitting.
n County Highway K
(5.7 miles) from Highway
14 to the state line.
n County Highway X
(1.5 miles) from Darien to
County Highway K.
n County Highway B
(2.7 miles) from County
Highway C to Rock County
line.
n County Highway
C (3.6 miles) from High-
ways14 and 11 to Highway
14.
n County Highway C
(2.2 miles) from Martin
Street to the county line.
n County Highway ES
(1.7 miles) from Highway 12
to County Highway A.
n County Highway C
(5.7 miles) from County
Highway X to Sharon city
limits.
The chip-seal process
consists of distributing a
liquid asphalt emulsion
on the roadway and cover-
ing the liquid asphalt with
crushed stone to provide a
new wear surface.
Chip-sealing extends
the life of a roadway by pro-
tecting it from moisture,
provides a new wear surface
and helps keep the original
payment from becoming
brittle. Chip-sealing is one
of the most cost effective
pavement preservation
procedures available.
After this process is
completed, a 35 mph speed
limit will be posted for one
week to allow adequate
time for the surface to fully
set up. Obeying the 35 mph
speed limit and allowing
additional space between
vehicles will limit potential
damage to vehicles by loose
stone.
COUNTY NOTE
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
PARKING LOT RESURFACING
PROJECT NO. TST-13-03
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City Clerk's office at
626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, until Thursday, August 1, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. for milling
and resurfacing, including restriping, three (3) downtown parking lots in the Lake Geneva,
WI.
GENERAL:
Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clear-
ly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be
considered.
Bid documents are available by calling the office of the Director of Public Works &
Utilities, 262-248-2311, for pick-up at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main
Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies of bidding documents are available for viewing at the
Commission's main offices or at the City Clerk's office, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI.
Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements
are; Contractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and proper-
ty damage insurance. Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of
$1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000 property damage including both injury and proper-
ty damage caused by vehicles and machinery.
Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages
occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers.
A current Certificate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions
of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable
local, state and federal requirements pertaining to public works projects.
PREVAILING WAGE RATES: The project is subject to the Wisconsin State Statutes
which requires all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates,
hours of labor and hourly basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the
Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development for a single trade project with a total of
$48,000 or more or a multiple-trade project total cost of $100,000 or more.
If the bid exceeds these amounts, the Contractor would then be required to compensate his
workers per the order.
If a Special Order of the Department of Workforce Development is required, it shall be
obtained by the City and included in the final contract documents. The Contractor would then
be obligated to compensate his workers per the order.
BID SECURITY: No Bid shall be received unless accompanied by a Certified Check, Bid
Bond, Cashier's Check or Money Order equal to at least 5% of the total Bid, payable to the
City of Lake Geneva as a guarantee that if his Bid is accepted, the Contractor will execute and
file the Contract and the Insurance Certificates that are required by the Contract Documents
within the time limit set by the City.
CONTRACT SECURITY: This is expected to be a multiple trade project. If the award
is greater than $100,000, the successful Bidder will be required to furnish a satisfactory
Performance Bond & Payment Bond each in an amount equal to the Contract Price within ten
(10) days after the award of the contract. If the successful Bidder fails, for any reason, to exe-
cute and file such contract and performance/payment bond, the amount of the Check or Bid
Bond shall be forfeited to the City of Lake Geneva as liquidated damages. However, if the
successful bidder's contract amount is less than $100,000, the requirements for per-
formance and payment bonds shall be waived.
BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: The City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to
accept the lowest responsible bid. The acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is final
and binding on all bidders without recourse by rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall
be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening of the Bids without the consent
of the City.
Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva.
BY ORDER OF :JAMES CONNORS, MAYOR
MICHAEL HAWES, CITY CLERK
PREPARED BY: DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E.
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA &
LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION
361 W. MAIN STREET
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311
10A The Regional News July 18, 2013
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
FROM 6 A.M. UNTIL 10 P.M.
1414
E. GENEVA
STREET
DELAVAN
(262) 728-2638
LIQUOR STORE:
(262) 740-0541
www.shopthepig.com
Pig points available at
all stores
Prices in this ad are good
Thursday, July 10tth, 2013
through
Wednesday, July 24th, 2013
Located in the ShopKo
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7600
PERSHING
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KENOSHA
(262) 764-1954
Located in the Pershing
Plaza
Thank You
for Shopping
at Stinebrinks
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100
E. GENEVA
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LAKE GENEVA
(262) 248-8798
Located in the Geneva
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B
Serving Walworth, Fontana, Williams Bay and Walworth County
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Former coach gets 4 years for child enticement
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN The prosecutor painted
former wrestling coach Steven Springsteen-
Hensel as a man who groomed children so
he can develop a sexual relationship with
them.
Springsteen-Hensels defense attorney
argued his client was a good person and
coach who used terrible judgment when he
sent sexually explicit text messages to a 17-
year-old boy on the cusp of his 18th birth-
day.
Walworth County Judge John Race sen-
tenced Springsteen-Hensel, 32, Elkhorn, to
four years in prison and
six years of extended
supervision after he
pleaded guilty to a felony
charge of child entice-
ment.
Springsteen-Hensel
was arrested May 15,
2012, after he sent text
messages to a Delavan
detective who was pre-
tending to be a 17-year-
old boy that Springs-
teen-Hensel knew from the Southern Lakes
Wrestling Center.
Springsteen-Hensel was an unpaid vol-
unteer at the wrestling club for more than
a decade.
He spent a signicant amount of time
there and was instrumental in its growth,
according to courtroom testimony.
On May 7, 2012, the boy asked Springs-
teen-Hensel for a job at the Southern Lakes
Wrestling Center, and Springsteen-Hensel
told the boy to get the job he would need to
allow Springsteen-Hensel to perform oral
sex on him, according to the criminal com-
plaint.
Delavan Police Det. Joaquin Alonzo
used the boys phone to send text messages
to Springsteen-Hensel.
Posing as the 17-year-old, Alonzo set up
a meeting with Springsteen-Hensel at Phoe-
nix Middle School in Delavan.
According to the plan that was devel-
oped during the texting, Springsteen-Hensel
and the boy would go on a bike ride on the
White River Trail and on the trail Springs-
teen-Hensel would perform oral sex on the
17-year-old.
When police arrested Springsteen-
Hensel in the parking lot of Phoenix Middle
School, he had two mens bicycles mounted
on the back of his Ford Escape.
The victim in the case turned 18 the
next day.
COURT REPORT
PLEASE SEE ENTICEMENT PAGE 3B
Springsteen-Hensel
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
HANK PAULSON, the former United States Secretary of the Treasury, speaks with John
Notz, and William Pollard, Jr., on the porch of John and Linda Andersons Lake Geneva
home last Thursday at a fundraising dinner for the Geneva Lake Conservancy.
From Washington to LG
WILLIAMS BAY Wayne R. Anderson
was named the interim superintendent of
the Williams Bay School District, following
a special Williams Bay School Board meet-
ing on July 11, said Dianna Woss, school
board president.
Anderson, who recently retired as
superintendent of the Mount Horeb School
District, signed a one-year contract in Wil-
liams Bay, she said.
She said Anderson is now looking to
relocate to Williams Bay.
The pre-K-12 Mount Horeb district is in
Dane and Iowa counties.
It has ve buildings and an enrollment
of about 750 students.
Anderson was selected from 26 candi-
dates, Woss said.
He will now assist the district in nding
a new principal for the junior/senior high
school.
Woss said the district received about
100 applications for that position.
Williams Bay found itself without a
superintendent or junior/senior high school
principal as of June 30, following the res-
ignations of Superintendent Vance Dalzin
and Principal Barry Butters.
Dalzin was hired as superintendent of
the K-8 Fox Point-Bayside School District
in Milwaukee County.
Butters took a position with Precision
Plus Inc., Elkhorn, where he will do staff
education and marketing.
Bay hires interim
administrator
Walworth man
killed in shooting
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH A 23-year-old village
of Walworth man was killed in Milwaukee
July 11.
An ofcial in the Milwaukee County
Medical Examiners ofce, Karen Doma-
galski, said the police were still investigat-
ing.
Domagalski said the Walworth victim
was Gabriel Contreras.
According to a report from CBS 58
News in Milwaukee, two other men were
also shot. Their injuries were non-life-
threatening.
The shooting occurred in the 1400
block of W. Concordia Avenue at 3:40 a.m.
Contreras body was found near the
intersection of 15th Street and W. Keefe
Avenue, one block to the northwest.
Milwaukee police told CBS 58 News
they had four people in custody. The shoot-
ing may be drug-related.
Domagalski said no further informa-
tion was available for release at this time.
Fontana swim benets warriors foundation
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA Five years ago, the Swim
4 Freedom raised $3,000 from its six par-
ticipants.
Last year, 60 participants raised more
than $45,000.
I dont know if well be able to top that
again this year, Steele Whowell, organizer
of the event, said.
The swim, held on Sunday, Aug. 4,
raises money for the Special Operations
Warrior Foundation. The foundation
helps fund college education for children
of Special Operation service members.
The foundation is rated a four-star
charity for nancial efciency by Charity
Navigator.
Whowell said it was important for him
when selecting a charity that the funds
help people, not fund overhead.
I really looked into (the foundation)
when we started this, he said. I didnt
want people to raise money to go to public
relations or that kind of thing. I wanted
the money to help.
Whowell said the group has been sup-
portive of the swimming fundraiser since
the beginning.
They were easy to work with and
helpful in getting all the information we
needed, he said.
The swim
The event starts at 5 a.m. at Gordys
Boat House in Fontana.
We like to get the swim out of the way
early, Whowell said.
After a sign-up, swimmers get on
a boat and are dropped off at the Lake
Geneva Beach.
At 6 a.m., the water safety patrol
sounds their horn to start, he said. Some
people do it by themselves, others in relay
teams. They jump off the boat and a team
member continues the race.
The straight distance is eight miles,
but Whowell said it varies by person.
Last year, my wife and I swam about
nine miles because we were trying to avoid
the wind, he said. The top nishers come
in between three and four hours. There
are a lot that come in around the four- to
six-hour range. There are some that take
seven or eight hours to complete it.
Whowell said he has all skill levels sign
up for the swim, but dont think its easy.
A long-time swimmer, Dan Projansky
calls the Swim 4 Freedom his most dif-
cult swim.
Id say even though its not 27 miles
like I did just two days ago, the eight miles
that it is, I have to rank that as one of the
toughest swims I do, Projansky said.
Youve got white caps. Youve got squalls.
Youve got messy water blowing in your
face.
To sign up for the Swim 4 Freedom,
visit the fundraisers website, www.
swim4freedom.org. The site also
allows donations to the foundation.
More information about the Special
Operations Warrior Foundation can
be found at www.specialops.org.
PLEASE SEE FREEDOM PAGE 2B
2B The Regional News July 18, 2013
GENEVA LAKE WEST
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Projansky swims the entire route with
the buttery stroke. Thats how hes done it
the last three years. The rst year, he said
he swam it freestyle.
I have to put as much energy into that
swim as what I did in the 27 miles, he said.
Id rank the Swim 4 Freedom a top notch
event.
Swim among friends
Projansky has been swimming for his
whole life.
I started doing triathlons in 1989,
he said. I was always on the master swim
team. I stopped doing those in 2009. Now, I
just swim. Thats my better sport anyway.
He trains in Geneva Lake, too.
Lake Michigan is unpredictable, Pro-
jansky said. I like to go to Williams Bay
or Reid Park and swim. Im usually seen
in Lake Geneva a couple of times a week
throughout the summer.
Because he swims alone, he pulls a
boogie boat with a rudder to hold his sup-
plies and a ag to let boaters know hes
there.
His training plan? Just swimming.
I wear the harness and like to swim the
circumference of the bay, Projansky said.
I just get in the water and swim.
He likes fundraising for the Special
Operations Warrior Foundation, too.
I love that event. The charity that its
for is a wonderful charity, he said. To be
afliated with a charity for kids that need
an education is important to me. I look for-
ward to the collecting process to get money
for the event.
The swim may be a challenge, but its
worth it.
Steele does a great job, Projansky said
of Whowell. Hes a terric race director.
He works hard. The volunteers are terric.
Ive always had a great time.
Freedom/Volunteers help raise
money for the families of troops
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
From mailboat jumper to ship captain
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
Keith Vogt doesnt get interviewed
much anymore.
They like to come and talk to the rst-
time jumpers, not someone whos been
here for this long, he said. They want to
talk to new kids, see why theyre trying
out.
Vogt has been a mailboat jumper for
four years, since he was a senior in high
school.
Every summer, the Walworth II, a
member of the Geneva Lake Cruise Line,
delivers mail to residents living on the
lake. Mailboat jumpers jump from boat to
dock, deposit the mail, and jump back on
the still-moving boat.
Now, a student at the University of Wis-
consin - La Crosse, Vogt doesnt deliver the
mail as much as he used to.
I train others to jump now, Vogt said.
I still jump sometimes, but its mostly the
others.
Hes not just a trainer, though. Vogt
is also a captain on one of the cruise line
boats, the Geneva.
Its a smaller version of the Walworth,
he said. They (management at the cruise
line) came to me and asked if I wanted to
learn how to captain the boat.
Vogt said he didnt need to get his cap-
tains license because of the small size of
Geneva Lake.
I just needed to be trained and get
a safety certicate, he said. A lot of the
older captains, who have been doing it a
while, they just cruise right into the docks
and park. I just coasted in real slow the
rst time.
With a full boat, Vogt said parking a
boat is nerve wrecking.
The crowd makes you more nervous,
he said. Theyre all watching and waiting
for you to park the boat.
While he doesnt deliver mail that
often anymore, the mailboat tour on the
Walworth is still his favorite.
The people on that tour really pay
attention, Vogt said. They want to be
there and hear about the mail delivery and
everything. Theyre not just on a tour to get
out on the lake, like on some other tours.
His favorite house on the lake isnt
mentioned on any of the tours, and he
wouldnt share the homes name.
They wanted to stay anonymous, so
we dont mention the house, he said. I
also like Hillcroft, one of the former Wrig-
ley mansions.
Hillcroft was originally built in the late
1800s, and the home was P.K. Wrigleys
summer residence from 1927 to 1977. The
current Hillcroft is a reconstruction of the
original.
FILE PHOTO
EVERY YEAR SWIMMERS traverse Geneva Lake in an effort to raise money for the fami-
lies of troops who have been killed in combat. Past Swim 4 Freedom events have raised
more than $15,000 for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
KEITH VOGT, right, helps clean the Walworth before the rst tour of the day. He serves in
many different roles on the Lake Geneva Cruise Line, mailboat jumper, tour guide, jumper
trainer and captain to the Geneva.
The crowd makes you more ner-
vous, Keith Vogt said about park-
ing a cruise line boat. Theyre all
watching and waiting for you to
park the boat.
Facebook.com/LakeenevaReqionalhews Facebook.com/RegionalNewsSportsCheck
News You Can Share
Mabel Cratty Hall at George Williams
College of Aurora University, Williams
Bay, received a Merit Award for excellence
in architectural design by the 2013 Design
Awards program of AIA Wisconsin, the
state society of the American Institute of
Architects.
It was one of seven Wisconsin building
projects to receive recognition.
Mabel Cratty Hall was designed by HGA
Architects and Engineers and honored for
its innovative and environmentally sensi-
tive design solutions, as well as for its atten-
tion to detail and creative use of materials.
Aurora University ofcials asked the
architect to restore the social and educa-
tional functions of the building, originally
constructed in 1926, and the shared court-
yard.
After researching its historic qualities,
HGA recommended retaining the exte-
rior Arts and Crafts aesthetic shared by
other campus buildings through respectful
reconstruction and renovation.
A new entrance hall was created, and the
wings to the courtyard were rebuilt to pro-
vide support services. A wraparound porch
was reconstructed with period details and
lighting.
The energy efciency of the entire
building was improved by adding insula-
tion, replacing all the windows and install-
ing new heating and cooling units, which
enable the building to be used yearround.
The interior was reimagined for contem-
porary campus life while being consistent
with the original design intent.
The centerpiece of the project involved
the renovation of the great hall, which was
demolished to the structural framing before
gaining a new polished cement oor.
In addition, the project restored the
replaces and inserted new vertical glass
doors, restoring the concept of free owing
space from the courtyard through the hall
and out to the porch facing the lake.
The building brings the outdoors in,
transforming from a warm replace study
in the winter to an inviting and exciting
event space in the summer.
Mabel Cratty Hall
awarded for design
Building was one of seven to get recognition
Aurora University ofcials asked the
architect to restore the social and
educational functions of the build-
ing, originally constructed in 1926,
and the shared courtyard.
WALWORTH - FONTANA ROTARY CLUB
CORN & BRAT FESTIVAL
Saturday, August 3rd, 2013
11:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Walworths HEYER PARK
All funds raised by this event are donated
back to local community programs.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FEATURING
Black Rock Glen Davis & The Blues Deluxe
Coffee Table Ninjas
$8.00 includes 1 Bratwurst or
1 Hotdog and 2 Ears of Corn
GENEVA LAKE WEST
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 3B
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Mecum presents plans for expansion
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH The village plan commission has
nally seen some preliminary plans from Mecum Auctions
on its long-proposed expansion.
In June, the village board approved an extension on the
auto auction companys option to buy village-owned land.
During the July 15 commission meeting, Troy Giles,
general legal counsel for Mecum, presented proposed
plans for the storage building.
Were starting to get a little pressed for space in our
building, Giles said. Were proposing to build a structure
immediately to the north of our building.
Giles said the building would include some ofce space
but would mostly be overow storage for vehicles.
We would start in probably one phase and expand
as we need to in the future, he said. The purpose of the
building is going to be what the request for rezone is for,
for additional storage.
The companys property expansion will also cut down
on semi-trailer trafc along Fairview Drive because a
between-property access drive would be created.
If this were a residential property, we wouldnt allow
access between properties, Ron Nyman, building inspec-
tor, said. In this case, the code does allow for it. This
requires a rezone public hearing by the board (and) a con-
ditional use permit.
Giles said the paved area connecting the two proper-
ties wouldnt be for parking.
Our intent is to bring the vehicles through Mecums
existing property and use the area for a loading zone,
he said. Its not going to be for parking, just for access
between the two properties.
The loading and unloading of cars wont happen in that
open space, though.
We have the building designed so the trucks can drive
in and we unload inside, Giles said. The trucks will exit
and go back through (the property).
The indoor unloading will keep passers-by from seeing
it, and additional landscaping will blend in with an area
that was originally zoned residential.
If that area ever does open up again for homes, well
work with the village to make sure our lighting isnt harm-
ing anyone, Giles said. We have to nd that balance of
keeping our area safe but not creating light pollution for
our neighbors.
Future expansion could be approved at the same public
hearing as the rst expansion.
Giles said the company could break ground for the
building as soon as the spring.
We thought we would look at making the future
expansion part of the conditional use permit, Nyman
said. Then follow up when they actually (want to build)
with a site plan for plan commission.
Nyman said this removes the additional step of setting
another public hearing.
Tomorrow, we could literally be out of space, he said.
It all depends on what comes up to our facility.
Scheduling a public hearing takes time.
The commission has to approve a recommendation to
send the rezoning public hearing to the village board.
If the board approves of setting a hearing, they can
schedule it as early as two weeks later, depending on public
notice laws. Village President David Rasmussen said the
rezone may not be fully approved until September.
The purpose of the building is going to be
what the request for rezone is for, for additional
storage, Troy Giles, general legal counsel for
Mecum, said.
Bay school days will be 15 minutes longer
WILLIAMS BAY School days in Williams Bay Ele-
mentary School will be 15 minutes longer starting the 2014-
15 school year.
The Williams Bay School Board voted to extend the
school day at a special meeting July 11.
Dianna Woss, school board president, said the change
will bring the district more into line with state Department
of Instruction guidelines.
Class times for math and reading were already extended,
and teachers suggested that more time be devoted to lan-
guage arts as well, Woss said.
The school day last year went from 8:20 a.m. to 3:10
p.m. Next year, the day will start at 8:15 a.m. and run until
3:20 p.m. to give an extra 15 minutes to language arts, Woss
said.
Barb Isaacson, elementary school principal, did a survey
of area schools and discovered some districts have already
gone to seven and half hour school days.
Historical Society meeting set for July 25
Fine-art photography by Bruce Thompson and oil paint-
ing by his late father Richard will be featured at the Histori-
cal Society of Walworth and Big Foot Prairie summer get-
together Thursday, July 25.
The event starts at 6:30 p.m. at Thompson Art Gallery,
N1381 Highway 14, just northwest of Walworth. Every-
one, not just society members, is invited to attend. Bruce
Thompson will provide a tour of his studio as well as share
stories of his successful commercial photography career
and his passion for high-quality artistic photography. He
has won numerous awards with both color and black-and-
white photographs.
His awards are not surprising, since his grandfather,
Abijah Thompson, was a Chicago illustrator in the early
1900s and later became the art director for Montgomery
Ward. Richard Thompson gained international fame as an
American Impressionist and often was compared to the
French artist Monet. Bruce will tell about his fathers many
talents and eventual rise to fame.
Richard Thompson, who died in 1991, focused on ne
art beginning in 1959.
Before that he achieved success in commercial illustra-
tion by creating works for World War II bond posters and
the Saturday Evening Post.
He worked for Haddon Sundblom Studios in Chicago,
which produced many famous Coca-Cola ads of the era.
The majority of Thompsons work was sold through the
Richard Thompson Gallery located in San Francisco, Calif.
His paintings are exhibited in museums, galleries, numer-
ous private collections and such places as Sears Roebuck,
Brigham Young University, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mar-
quette University, Naval Art Collection at the Pentagon in
Washington, Robert Louis Stevenson Academy, University
of Washington, Wisconsin Memorial Park and Continental
Illinois Bank. On display will be various products the gal-
lery offers for sale such as ne art, color and black-and-white
photography, acrylic prints, canvas prints, metal prints and
posters of Geneva Lake.
Those attending the talk are requested to bring their
own lawn chairs.
For more information, call society president Nancy
Lehman at (262) 275-2426.
Blood drive at Big Foot High School
The need is constant. The gratication is instant. Give
blood.
With that in mind, the Big Foot High School FFA will
host a blood drive in the main gym of the high school at 401
Devils Lane, Walworth, on Friday, July 26, from 12:30 to
5:30 pm.
To make an appointment, call 1-800-RED CROSS (800)
733-2767 or visit redcrossblood.org. Appointments are pre-
ferred, but walk-ins are welcome.
Church hosting cream puff/bake sale
Walworth Immanuel United Church of Christ will have
a cream puff/bake sale Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. until
everything is sold out.
The church is adjacent to the square in Walworth.
Enjoy the Walworth/Fontana Rotary Club Corn/Brat
Day and at least one cream puff.
Prosecutors arguments
Deputy District Attorney Joshua Grube said this case
is more than a man propositioning sex to a boy on the eve
of his 18th birthday. Instead, Grube argued that Springs-
teen-Hensel used his position as a coach to gain trust and
inuence over a child.
The presentence investigation (PSI) recommended an
11-year sentence for Springsteen-Hensel, which included
seven years of initial connement and four years of
extended supervision. A PSI is a report by the Department
of Corrections.
The PSI writer reviews the relevant facts and speaks to
the victims and the defendant.
Grube said Springsteen-Hensel also sent inappropriate
text messages to the victims 15-year-old brother. Springs-
teen-Hensel admitted to the presentence investigator that
he may have said sexually inappropriate comments to other
children, but nobody younger than 15, Grube said during
the hearing.
This was horric for (the victim), Grube said. Hes
a smart kid, hes a tough kid, but this had a tremendous
impact on him.
Because Springsteen-Hensel was the boys coach, he
conned in him, Grube said.
He used this as a way to build his trust and to nd
common ground, Grube said. This is prime and glaring
evidence of his grooming behavior.
Grube said after the charges against Springsteen-
Hensel became public other boys came forward with
reports of odd behavior by the coach.
Children reported to their parents that Springsteen-
Hensel would hug them, tell them he loved them and would
make sexual comments to them.
Grube said this case isnt a single act, but instead was
months in the making.
Defense arguments
Public Defender Travis Schwantes said it would be a
sad day if Springsteen-Hensel was sent to prison.
He pointed out to the judge that Springsteen-Hensel
never performed a sex act on a child, but instead was there
because he sent extremely inappropriate text messages.
Schwantes said parents coming forward with reports
of unusual behavior is the result of the charges becoming
public. Schwantes said that actions that werent questioned
before hugs and comments were now viewed as devi-
ous.
It suffers from the hindsight bias, Schwantes said.
Schwantes said that if Springsteen-Hensel was truly
using the wrestling club to groom children, the courthouse
would have been lled with children that Springsteen-
Hensel harmed. The actual incident, Schwantes argued,
involved Springsteen-Hensel sending inappropriate text
message to a child 10 hours before the boys 18th birthday.
Schwantes read some of the text messages between his
client and Alonzo to Race.
In at least three of the text messages Springsteen-
Hensel asked Alonzo, who he thought was the victim, if he
wanted to back out, Schwantes said.
Schwantes said Springsteen-Hensel also built up the
club. When Springsteen-Hensel arrived it was a bad-news-
bears organization and is now a national powerhouse,
Schwantes said.
Schwantes said in the past two years he found six cases
in Walworth County where men actually had sexual con-
tact with children and didnt receive a prison sentence or a
shorter sentence than the one the PSI recommended.
Schwantes asked Race to stay a 10-year sentence, with
ve years of initial connement and ve years of extended
supervision. Defendants only serve stayed sentences if
they violate the terms of their probation.
If he violates the terms of his probation he would go
to prison for longer than adults who actually had sex with
children, Schwantes said.
Springsteen-Hensels statement
When given a chance to speak, Springsteen-Hensel
apologized to the victim and his family.
For everything I created, the pain, anger and public-
ity on the victim I am sincerely sorry, Springsteen-Hensel
said. I pray they can heal and move forward.
He said when he spent 29 days in jail after his arrest, he
prayed they would heal from the wounds that I created.
GENEVA LAKE TIDBITS
Enticement/Prosecutor said it wasnt a single act, but months in the making
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
Williams Bay Volunteer Fire Dept.
48th ANNUAL
CHICKEN ROAST
SATURDAY, JULY 20TH
12:00 noon to 7:00 p.m.
or until the chicken is gone.
Edgewater Park,
Williams Bay.
Includes: 1/2 Chicken, Baked
Potato, Coleslaw, Rolls & Butter,
Dessert and a Drink.
Tickets are $10.00 and Available
From Williams Bay Firemen,
at the Village Hall,
Daddy Maxwells or at the Park.
Funds Raised Support the Building
Maintenance & Fire Department.
4B The Regional News July 18, 2013
WALWORTH COUNTY COURT REPORTS
315 Broad St. Lake Geneva, WI
262.248.4444
pbonyata@lakegenevanews.net
Your business
is already listed!
On one of ReelLifeTV.nets
Channel Guides
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great places to dine, shop, stay and play.
Tourists and locals alike are already viewing your free listing
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PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR116
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
EUNICE O. BRINCHMAN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
June 2, 1919 and date of death May 29,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 133 N. Potawatomi Rd., (Box 603)
Williams Bay, WI 53191
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 4,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 28, 2013
Bonnie Gene Olberg
2525 Countryside Dr.
Delavan, WI 53115
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE W. SALUS
Apetition for formal administration was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
August 17, 1930 and date of death July 4,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of N3130 Tamarack Road, Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 18,
2013.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Dela Race
July 12, 2013
Nicholas A. Egert
835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-6600
Bar Number; 1056736
July 18, 25, August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR119
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ENID J. WESTFALL
A/K/A ENID JANETTE WESTFALL
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
April 6, 1918 and date of death June 18,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 703 S. Lakeshore Dr., Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents state is October 10,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
July 3, 2013
Attorney Richard W. Torhorst
500 Commercial Court, PO Box 1300
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-3333
Bar Number: 1015127
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
WALWORTH COUNTY
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR121
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JOHN F. DREWS
A petition for formal administration
was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
January 7, 1947 and date of death May 25,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 506 Main Street, P.O. Box 304, Genoa
City, WI 53128.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 11,
2013.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Dela Race
Circuit Court Commissioner
July 5, 2013
Nicholas A. Egert
McCormack & Egert, S.C.
835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-6600
Bar No. 1056736
July 11, 18 & 25, 2013
WNAXLP
Please turn to page 5
LEGAL NOTICE
12 P.M. MONDAY
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
DEADLINE
Child porn, pot land man in prison
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN Walworth
County Judge John Race sent a
former Whitewater man to prison
July 10 for three years after police
found more than 200 grams of pot,
a loaded pistol and child pornogra-
phy in his apartment.
David J. Patwell, 25, now of
Cross Plains, pleaded guilty Oct. 19
to felony charges of possession of
child pornography and possession
of marijuana with intent to deliver.
After Patwell serves his prison
sentence, he will spend three years
on extended supervision.
Deputy District Attorney
Joshua Grube asked Race to send
Patwell to prison, but Grube wasnt
specic about the length of sen-
tence.
The presen-
tence investiga-
tion report (PSI)
and Patwells
attorney, John
Birdsall, recom-
mended a pro-
bation sentence.
A PSI is a report
by the Wiscon-
sin Department
of Corrections
that recom-
mends a sentence.
After the hearing, Grube
explained why he believes that
prison was appropriate.
There were certainly a lot of
concerning images, and there are
real people behind these images
who are profoundly affected by
people viewing and sharing these
images, Grube said. He was also
an admitted drug dealer that had
a loaded pistol in his desk drawer
when they found him.
The Walworth County Drug
unit raided Patwells apartment on
June 10, 2010, after a condential
informant purchased $1,000 worth
of pot from him.
The amount of marijuana
and the admission to dealing for
at least a year, and the presence
of at least one loaded rearm may
have resulted in a prison term on
its own, Grube said. Really by far
the more serious charges were the
child pornography.
During the raid, police also
conscated Patwells computers
and hard drives and found child
pornography, child erotica and
hundreds of images of bestiality.
Patwell rst appeared in front
of Race for a sentencing hearing in
January, but Race ended the hear-
ing after 45 minutes and continued
it. This was done because it was
almost 5 p.m. During the July 10
hearing, Birdsall made an argu-
ment for probation before Race
sent his client to prison.
During the rst court appear-
ance, Grube said that Patwell
wasnt just simply viewing the child
pornography, but he was saving the
images into folders and archiving
it.
Law enforcement also exam-
ined the search terms Patwell used
on search engines. The search
terms sought information on per-
forming bestiality.
The loaded pistol in Patwells
desk drawer wasnt the only rearm
police located in the apartment.
Assault ries and a pistol-grip
shotgun were also conscated.
Patwell
Processing server gets probation
ELKHORN A 40-year-old
process server was sentenced June
12 to two years of probation after
he lied about serving court papers
to two people.
Randy L. Ruegg of Kenosha
pleaded guilty May 24 to two felony
counts of forgery of an ofcial cer-
tication.
The probation term wont begin
until he has completed his proba-
tion term in Kenosha County on
unrelated charges.
According to the criminal com-
plaint:
On Nov. 29, 2011, Walworth
County Court Commissioner Kris-
tine Drettwan made a complaint
against Ruegg, a private pro-
cess server, to
the Walworth
County Sheriffs
Department.
Dr e t t wa n
reported that
two parties,
who were sup-
posedly served
by Ruegg, ada-
mantly claimed
that they hadnt
been served.
One person was reportedly
served on Dec. 19, 2010, at a private
residence in Lake Geneva. Rueggs
notarized signature appears on the
afdavit, indicating that he person-
ally served the individual.
On March 6, police spoke to the
man who said he owns two rental
properties in a private subdivision
in Lake Geneva but doesnt live
there.
Police spoke to both tenants on
the property, who conrmed no
one attempted to serve papers to
anyone at their residences.
When police spoke to Ruegg, he
admitted that the personal service
on the afdavit was incorrect.
He said the residence was in a
private gated community, and he
was denied access.
Police spoke to Keith Tillman
of GAS Security, who oversees the
subdivisions security.
Tillman reviewed the denied
access log and reports no one was
denied access into the community
from Nov. 28, 2010, to Jan. 22,
2011.
In the other case, Ruegg
claimed he served a woman at a
private residence in Aniwa. At the
time of the service, the woman was
in Chicago.
When police spoke to Ruegg,
he said he served papers to the
woman.
When police asked Ruegg where
Aniwa was, he responded up in
Wisconsin and in the Madison
area.
Aniwa is more than 150 miles
from the Madison area, about 25
miles east of Wausau.
Ruegg
Como man faces charges for chats with child
An 18-year-old Lake Como
man is accused of asking a 12-year-
old boy, whom he met on Facebook,
for naked pictures and sending the
child a link to a pornographic web-
site.
Matthew S. Rollie, N3326 Hick-
ory Road, faces a felony charge of
exposing a child to harmful mate-
rial. He also faces misdemeanor
charges of impersonating a peace
ofcer and disorderly conduct.
The felony charge carries a
maximum penalty of 3 1/2 years
imprisonment.
According to the crim-
inal complaint:
On June 3, police
interviewed the boy
about his relationship
with Rollie. The child told
police that he and Rollie
regularly chat on Face-
book and Rollie asks the
child to send him pictures
of his penis.
The boy said Rollie has
sent him pictures of marijuana and
offered to get the child the
drug. The child told police
that Rollie offered to vid-
eotape himself having sex
with his girlfriend and to
send the child the video.
Police reviewed the
chat log between the
victim and Rollie. During
the chat, Rollie told the
boy that he was a Delavan
police ofcer and was off
of work because he was
hurt during an on-duty accident.
On June 23, the boy told police
that he met Rollie on Facebook in
January or February. The two met
at the McDonalds in Lake Geneva
in April or May.
After hanging out at the McDon-
alds, the boy and Rollie walked to
the bathroom at Library Park. At
the park, Rollie unsuccessfully
attempted to call someone to buy
marijuana.
Rollie also asked the child
to expose himself, but the boy
refused.
Rollie
COURT REPORT
Woman gets probation for
New Years Day crash
A 20-year-old Kansaville
woman who was driving drunk on
New Years Day, crashed her vehicle
and injured her passenger was sen-
tenced July 5 to four years of pro-
bation.
As a condition of her probation,
Danielle J. Curley must spend six
months in jail without work-release
privileges.
Her drivers license has been
revoked for two years and an igni-
tion interlock must be installed in
her vehicle during that time.
According to the criminal com-
plaint:
On New Years Day, police
responded to a one-vehicle crash
at about 7:48 a.m. on Sheridan
Springs Road, in the town of Lyons.
The vehicle had driven off the road
and into a ditch.
Once police arrived, Curley had
already been removed from the
vehicle and was receiving treat-
ment in an ambulance. A passen-
ger was still pinned in the vehicle
and rescue workers were trying to
remove her.
The passenger was taken to
Froedtert Hospital, Wauwatosa, by
Flight For Life.
Inside the ambulance where
Curley was receiving treatment, a
Walworth County Sheriffs Deputy
could smell the odor of intoxi-
cants.
Medical personnel told the
ofcer that they could smell alco-
hol on Curley. A blood sample was
collected from Curley at Froedtert
Hospital.
The results came back at 0.121.
The legal limit is 0.08.
On Jan. 9, a Walworth County
Sheriffs sergeant met with the pas-
senger and her mother at Froedtert
Hospital.
The woman suffered a skull
fracture, concussion, a broken
clavicle, a broken arm, broken ver-
tebrae, a broken leg and other inju-
ries.
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 5B
PUBLIC NOTICES
CITY COUNCIL
PROCEEDINGS
by David Maccoux, CPA of Schenck SC
David Maccoux and Lisa Salo of
Schenck SC presented the 2012 Financial
Audit final report for the year ending
December 31, 2012. Mr. Maccoux explained
the format of the budget and the new report-
ing standards required by GASB 63 and 65.
He provided an overview of the basic finan-
cial statements. Ms. Salo presented the
management communications report. She
commented on two areas that were identi-
fied as significant deficiencies segregation
of duties and preparation of the annual
financial report. She explained there are not
enough employees to segregate accounting
procedures as much as they would like to
see. She stated the City has not fully imple-
mented recommendations from the prior
year report. Ms. Salo said she is not overly
concerned about these deficiencies. In clos-
ing, Mr. Maccoux stated the City is in excel-
lent financial position. He said the City has
strong reserves in the general fund, positive
operating balances and a TID with a strong
balance.
Acceptance of 2012 Financial Audit,
as presented by Schenck SC
Kupsik/Taggart motion to accept.
Unanimously carried.
Consent Agenda
Original Class B Fermented Malt
Beverage License Application for Hawks
View Golf Club LLC d/b/a Hawks View
Boutique, 728 Main St., Lake Geneva,
Daniel R. Daniels, Agent
Original Massage Establishment
License Application filed by CJR Partners
LLC d/b/a Spinal Rehabilitation Center of
Lake Geneva, 800 Geneva Parkway N.,
Suite 102, Lake Geneva
Renewal Alcohol Beverage License
applications filed by the following, contin-
gent upon payment of all outstanding liabili-
ties and delinquencies with the City of Lake
Geneva and wholesaler invoices, and clear-
ance of any Department of Revenue holds:
Class B/Class B Intoxicating
Liquor & Fermented Malt Beverage License
Application for Popeyes Galley & Grog, 811
Wrigley Dr., Lake Geneva, Michael
Anagnos, Agent
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage
& Class C Wine License application filed
by Mama Ciminos LLC, 131 Wells Street,
Lake Geneva, Nick Cimino, Agent
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage
License application filed by Lake Geneva
Hospitality Group LLC d/b/a Comfort Suites,
300 E. Main Street, Lake Geneva, Sam
Russo, Agent
Class A/Class A Intoxicating
Liquor & Fermented Malt Beverage License
application filed by Kenru LLC d/b/a Village
Gourmet & World Wine Shop, 725 West
Main Street, Lake Geneva, Kenneth H.
Conell, Agent
Class A/Class A Intoxicating
Liquor & Fermented Malt Beverage License
application filed by Queso Corp. LLC d/b/a
The Cheese Box, 801 S. Wells Street, Lake
Geneva, Leslie Schwinn, Agent
Class A/Class A Intoxicating
Liquor & Fermented Malt Beverage License
application filed by Midwest Fuel LLC d/b/a
Northside Mobil, 501 Interchange N., Lake
Geneva, John Consolino, Agent
Renewal Taxi Company License
application filed by Lakefront Shuttle &
Services, W3746 Lake View Drive, Geneva,
WI.
Renewal 2013-2014 Operator
(Bartender) License applications
Original 2013-2014 Operator
(Bartender) License applications filed by
Krystal N. Blum, Tara M. Costa, Amber D.
Agen, Marina E. Rebellato, Justin R.
Bender, Kelsey B. Coltrane-Reeb, Margaret
M. Roesser, Ian W. Ottoway, Kimberly D.
Zimmerman, Savannah R. Dettman, Ryan
E. Sylvester, Charlotte J. Wrzesinski, Gina
Nocek, Eric M. Burt, Jay M. McNulty,
Lonette M. Parkey, Luke J. Cucchi,
Alexandria E. Witt and Shannon M. Tenney.
Hill/Kupsik motion to approve.
Unanimously carried.
Items Removed from the Consent
Agenda
The Council considered Items 11-A
and 11-B as one item.
Park Permit Application filed by
Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce
for Post Winterfest Activities Week using
Riviera Park on February 6, 2014 from 3
p.m. to 8 p.m. (continued 6/10/13).
Street Use Permit Application filed by
Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce
for Post Winterfest Activities Week using
Wrigley Drive on February 8, 2014 from 7
a.m. to 10 a.m.
Hill/Kupsik motion to continue to the
July 8, 2013 meeting. Unanimously carried.
Request to amend Renewal Class
B/Class B Liquor & Fermented Malt
Beverage License filed by Sandal Inc. d/b/a
Lake Geneva Lanes, 192 E. Main Street,
Lake Geneva, Franklin D. Guske, Sr., Agent
to include front patio area in the premises
description, contingent upon conditional use
permit.
Kupsik/Wall motion to approve, con-
tingent upon installation of bollards connect-
ed in such a manner that the patio tables
appear as an enclosed area, the require-
ment of signage indicating that alcoholic
beverages may not be carried outside of the
enclosed patio (unless taking them inside)
and issuance of a conditional use permit for
outdoor entertainment. Unanimously car-
ried.
Discussion/Action on directing staff to
solicit bids for north Broad St. lighting
replacements funded by TID #4 (reconsid-
ered 6/10/13).
Kupsik/Hill motion to table until sam-
ple lighting fixtures are installed and can be
reviewed by the Council. Unanimously car-
ried.
Renewal Carriage Company License
application filed by Field Stone Farm
Carriage & Pony LLC, 6913 Womack Lane,
Burlington, WI (continued 6/10/13).
Taggart/Kupsik motion to approve.
Alderman Taggart apologized for remarks
he made to Alderman Mott at the last meet-
ing. Mr. Taggart expressed support for the
carriage business, but said he was still con-
cerned about traffic congestion.
Hill/Mott motion an amendment
requiring the carriages to have signage indi-
cating that vehicles may pass them. City
Attorney Draper expressed concern with the
amendment, stating that it may provoke
vehicles to pass when it isnt safe. He said
people have a right to pass slow-moving
vehicles and the current triangle sign they
use communicates that. Motion failed 1 to 7,
with Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik
and Lyon opposed.
Main motion carried unanimously.
Discussion/Action on one-year exten-
sion of conditional use permit requested by
John Tracy on behalf of Tom and Mary
Myers, 670 Vernon Place, Elm Grove, WI
52122 for the construction of a new single-
family residence in the ER-1 Zoning District
using the lot area and setback requirements
of the SR-4 Zoning District at 1600 Orchard
Lane, Tax Key Number ZLM 00003, includ-
ing all staff recommendations.
Taggart/Lyon motion to extend the
conditional use permit for a period of one
year. Unanimously carried.
Finance, License and Regulation
Committee Recommendations Alderman
Hill
Discussion/Action on award of bid for
Dunn Field Restroom reconstruction
Hill/Kupsik motion to approve the
award of contract with Gilbank Construction,
PUBLIC
NOTICES
40 day period with a written demand for a
copy of the Complaint by mailing or deliver-
ing said written demand to the court and to
the Plaintiffs attorneys at their respective
addresses listed above.
If you do not provide a proper answer to the
Complaint or provide a written demand for
said complaint within the 40 day period, the
court may grant judgment against you for
the award of money or other legal action
requested in the Complaint, and you may
lose your right to object to anything that is or
may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judg-
ment may be enforced as provided by law.
A judgment awarding money may become a
lien against any real estate you own now or
in the future, and may be enforced by gar-
nishment or seizure of property.
Dated at Milwaukee, Wisconsin June
13 2013.
KOHN LAW FIRM S.C.
/s/ Joseph R. Johnson
State Bar No. 1053052
Attorney for Plaintiff
Our File # 753377
July 11, 18, & 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
AMENDED SUMMONS
Money Judgment: 30301
Case No. 13CV519
Our File: 1697514
CITIBANK, N.A.
701 E 60TH ST NORTH
SIOUX FALLS, SD, 57117
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRAD A NICHOLS
W3823 PARKER DR
LAKE GENEVA WI 53147-4108
Defendant(s).
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each per-
son named above as Defendant:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit
or other legal action against you. The com-
plaint, which is also served upon you, states
the nature and basis of the legal action.
Within 40 days after 07/31/2013 you
must respond with a written answer, as that
term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin
Statutes, to the complaint. The court may
reject or disregard an answer that does not
follow the requirements of the statutes. The
answer must be sent or delivered to the
court whose address is 1800 COUNTY
HWY NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 and to
RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON &
HORNIK, LLC, Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is shown below. You may have an
attorney help or represent you.
If you do not provide a proper answer
to the complaint or provide a written
demand for said complaint within the 40 day
period, the court may grant judgment
against you for the award of money or other
legal action requested in the complaint, and
you may lose your right to object to anything
that is or may be incorrect in the complaint.
A judgment may be enforced as provided by
law. A judgment awarding money may
become a lien against any real estate you
own now or in the future and may also be
enforced by garnishment or seizure of prop-
erty.
Dated: July 2, 2013.
/s/ Ryan M. Peterson
RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL,
ENERSON & HORNIK LLC
ATTORNEYS IN THE PRACTICE
OF DEBT COLLECTION
250 N. Sunny Slope Rd., Suite 300
Brookfield WI 53005
Toll Free: (877) 667-8010
Attorney for the Plaintiff
July 18, 25, & August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
TOWN OF
LINN
Town of Linn
Plan Commission Agenda Item
Monday, July 22, 2013
7:00 pm - Linn Town Hall
Variance
Margaret Lass-Gardiner, applicant
retaining wall, patio pavers and vegetated
pavers for vehicle parking within the 75
shoreland setback
IW 00019, N1923 Beach Road
Applications are on file with the Clerk
W3728 Franklin Walsh St., Zenda
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
CITY COUNCIL
PROCEEDINGS
CITY COUNCIL MEETING
MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2013 7:00 PM
COUNCIL CHAMBERS, CITY HALL
Mayor Connors called the meeting to
order at 7:20 p.m.
The Pledge of Allegiance was led by
Alderman Taggart.
Roll Call. Present: Mayor Connors,
Aldermen Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill, Kehoe,
Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon. Also present:
Administrator Jordan, City Attorney Draper,
DPW Winkler, and City Clerk Hawes.
Awards, Presentations, and
Proclamations. None.
Re-consider business from previous
meeting. None.
Comments from the public as allowed
by Wis. Stats. 19.84(2), limited to items on
this agenda, except for public hearing items.
Comments will be limited to 5 minutes.
Caroline Ausman, 6913 Womack
Lane, Burlington, asked the Council to
approve the renewal of her carriage compa-
ny license for Field Stone Farm Carriage &
Pony. Ms. Ausman said they have not had
one accident in the last ten years. She said
she is open to suggestions on signage.
Terry ONeill, 954 George St., Lake
Geneva, commented on the 2012 financial
audit report. He said the City should be
keeping state highway aids in a separate
account from the general fund. He stated
that the total unassigned balanced seems
misleading and he asked what the term dis-
cretely presented unit meant. Mr. ONeill
asked whether the City is properly funding
its other post-employment benefits. He
asked about the Citys implementing of
GASB 65.
Acknowledgement of
Correspondence. None.
Approval of Minutes
Wall/Taggart motion to approve the
regular meeting minutes of June 10, 2013,
as distributed. Unanimously carried.
Presentation of 2012 Financial Audit
PUBLIC
NOTICES
AND DESIGNATED AS LOTS 6705-6711,
INCLUSIVE, IN BLOCK 146 AS DESIG-
NATED AND DELINEATED ON THE MAP
ENTITLED MAP OF SECTION 4 OF PELL
LAKE FOR WALWORTH COUNTY, WIS-
CONSIN, AND RECORDED IN THE
OFFICE OF THE REGISTER OF DEEDS
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WAL-
WORTH AND STATE OF WISCONSIN ON
THE 16TH DAY OF JULY 2004; AND SAID
LAND BEING IN THE VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN.
Tax Key No.: &PL 01464
Property Address:
W1149 MIGNONETTE RD.,
GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN 53128
Lauren L. Tobiason
State Bar No. 1092310
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9710
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates,
LLC is the creditors attorney and is attempt-
ing to collect a debt on its behalf. Any infor-
mation obtained will be used for that pur-
pose.
July 4, 11, & 18, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 12CV00980
Code: 30404
WALWORTH STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
-vs-
GERALD S. GROBMAN,
SOUTH SHORE CLUB ON
LAKE GENEVA,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by
virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and
Sale entered into the above-entitled action
on December 27, 2012, in favor of the
Plaintiff, Walworth State Bank and against
the Defendants, Gerald S. Grobman and
South Shore Club on Lake Geneva, the
undersigned sheriff of Walworth County,
Wisconsin, will sell at public auction in the
lobby of the Walworth County Sheriffs
Department, 1770 County Trunk Highway
NN, Elkhorn, Walworth County, Wisconsin,
on the 25th day of July, 2013, at 10:00
oclock in the forenoon of that day, the real
estate and mortgaged premises directed by
said judgment to be sold, and therein
described as follows:
Unit 35, together with said units undi-
vided appurtenant interest in the common
elements (and the exclusive use of the limit-
ed common elements appurtenant to said
unit) all in South Shore Club on Lake
Geneva, a condominium declared and exist-
ing under and by virtue of the Condominium
Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and
recorded by a Declaration as such condo-
minium in the Office of the Register of
Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on
February 12, 2002, as Document No.
500526, as amended by First Amended and
Restated Declaration recorded on June 5,
2002, as Document No. 512553, Second
Amended and Restated Declaration record-
ed on August 20, 2002, as Document No.
520275, Third Amended and Restated
Declaration recorded on August 28, 2003,
as Document No. 572980, and Fourth
Amended and Restated Declaration of
Condominium recorded October 23, 2003,
as Document No. 581115, said condomini-
um being located in the Town of Linn,
County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on
the real estate described in said Declaration
and incorporated herein by this reference
thereto.
All of said land lying and being in the
Town of Linn, County of Walworth and State
of Wisconsin.
Tax Key No: ISSC 00035
Terms of Sale: Cash.
Down Payment: Ten Percent (10%) of Bid
by cash or cashiers check or certified
funds, made payable to the Walworth
County Clerk of Courts. At the sale, the suc-
cessful bidder must deposit with the Sheriff
a check payable to Walworth County
Register of Deeds in the amount of the
applicable real estate transfer tax. The bal-
ance of the successful bid must be paid to
the Clerk of Court in cash, cashiers check
or certified funds upon the courts confirma-
tion of the sale.
Upon confirmation of the sale, the
purchaser shall receive a sheriffs deed,
subject to the express conditions that the
property is sold subject to existing real
estate tax, accrued and accruing special
assessments, if any, and that there are no
warranties of title; the property is sold with-
out escrow and in AS IS condition.
Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording
fees and any cost of title evidence.
Dated at Elkhorn, Wisconsin, this
26th day of June, 2013.
David Graves, Sheriff
Walworth County
Richard W. Torhorst
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 1300
Lake Geneva WI 53147-1300
Telephone (262) 248-3333
July 4, 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
AMENDED SUMMONS
Case No. 13CV000401
CAPITAL ONE BANK USA NA
140 E SHORE DR 12017-0380
GLEN ALLEN VA 23059
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGELE PETROS
Defendant.
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
TO: ANGELE PETROS
1618 MILLER RD
PO BOX 505
LAKE GENEVA WI 53147-9998
You are hereby notified that the
Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or
other legal action against you. The
Complaint, which is also served on you,
states the nature and basis of the legal
action.
Within Forty (40) days after July 11,
2013, you must respond with a written
answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802
of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the Complaint.
The court may reject or disregard an answer
that does not follow the requirements of the
statutes. The answer must be sent or deliv-
ered to the court, whose address is: CLERK
OF CIRCUIT COURT, WALWORTH COUN-
TY, 1800 COUNTY RD NN, ELKHORN WI
53121 and the Kohn Law Firm, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 735 N. Water
St., Suite 1300, Milwaukee, WI 53202. You
may have an attorney help or represent you.
If no Complaint accompanies this
Summons you must respond within the said
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR114
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JOHN SCHLIMMER
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
September 7, 1931 and date of death June
6, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 5693 Alvin Howe Road, Lyons, WI 53148.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents state is October 2,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch,
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 25, 2013
Stephen M. Clubb
Rizzo 7 Diersen, SWC
3505 30th Ave.
Kenosha, WI 53144
262-652-5050
Bar Number: 1055103
July 11, 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 12CV00077
WALWORTH STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
BENCHMARK LAND & DEVELOPMENT,
LLC a/k/a BENCHMARK LAND AND
DEVELOPMENT LLC, a Wisconsin limited
liability company,
WILLIAM McCARRON a/k/a
WILLIAM E. McCARRON
a/k/a WILLIAM EDWARD McCARRON,
JEAN J. McCARRON, and
THE COTTAGES OF LAKE GENEVA HILLS
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on
December 20, 2012 in the amount of
$360,036.51, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: August 15, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 1: Units
5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 13, together with said
units undivided appurtenant interest in the
common elements (and the exclusive use of
the limited common elements appurtenant
to said unit) all in The Cottages of Lake
Geneva Hills Condominium, a condominium
declared and existing under and by virtue of
the Condominium Ownership Act of the
State of Wisconsin and recorded by a
Declaration as such condominium in the
Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth
County, Wisconsin, on June 6, 2006, as
Document No. 678653, and amended by
First Amendment to the Declaration of
Condominium The Cottages of Lake
Geneva Hills recorded June 1, 2007 as
Document No. 709825, said condominium
being located in the City of Lake Geneva,
County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on
the real estate described in said Declaration
and incorporated herein by this reference
thereto.
Tax Key Nos. ZCOT 00005, ZCOT
00006, ZCOT 00007, ZCOT 00009, ZCOT
00010 and ZCOT 00013
PROPERTY ADDRESS: Platt Avenue, Lake
Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: July 11, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
July 18, 25, Aug. 1, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 11 CV 001763
Case Code No. 30404
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff
Vs.
JOHN F. PAPENDIK, SR.;
Defendant
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue
of a judgment of foreclosure entered on
June 28, 2012, in the amount of
$114,727.35, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: August 8, 2013 at 10:00 am
TERMS:
1. 10% down in cash or money order
at the time of sale; balance due within 10
days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin
Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds
of the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY
SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW
ENFORCEMENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY
ROAD NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description:
ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF
LAND SITUATE IN THE TOWNSHIP OF
WALWORTH, COUNTY OF WALWORTH,
STATE OF WISCONSIN BEING KNOWN
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF ADJOURNED
SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 12 CV 00061
Case Code No. 30404
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE,
FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2006-2
Plaintiff
Vs.
STACY E. MCDERMOTT A/K/A STACEY E.
MCDERMOTT; JAMES D. MCDERMOTT;
STATE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT; VEN-
TURE INVESTMENT PARTNERS, LLP;
CAPITAL ONE BANK, N.A.; MIDLAND
FUNDING LLC; STATE OF WISCONSIN
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
Defendants
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue
of a judgment of foreclosure entered on
September 25, 2012, in the amount of
$465,732.02, the Sheriff will sell the
described premises at public auction as fol-
lows:
TIME: July 11 , 2013 at 10:00 am
ADJOURNED TIME: August 1, 2013 at
10:00 am
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to
pay balance due will result in forfeit of
deposit to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal liens
and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real
Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of
the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHER-
IFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCE-
MENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD
NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description:
BEGIN AT THE NORTH 1/4 CORNER OF
SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE 4TH P.M. CITY
OF LAKE GENEVA. WALWORTH COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN; RUN THENCE SOUTH
ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1/4 SEC-
TION LINE 1192.62 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89
DEG. 48 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
42.40 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH
0 DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
439.25 FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT.
SAID STONE MONUMENT MARKS THE
PLACE OF BEGINNING OF PARCEL OF
LAND HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED. RUN
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25
SECONDS WEST 200.00 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 14 MIN-
UTES 35 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET TO
A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 45
MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 199.78
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0
DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
70.00 FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT
AND THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. SAID
PARCEL OF LAND IN LOCATED IN THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 AND THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1. TOGETHER
WITH AN EASEMENT IN COMMON WITH
OTHER USERS FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW, TO-
WIT; BEGIN AT THE NORTH 1/4 CORNER
OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE 4TH P.M., CITY
OF LAKE GENEVA, WALWORTH COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN. RUN THENCE SOUTH
ON THE NORTH AND SOUTH 1/4 SEC-
TION 1196.62 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG.
48 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 42.40
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 0
DEG. 03 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST
349.25.FEET TO A POINT, SAID POINT
MARKS THE PLACE OF BEGINNING OF
EASEMENT HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED.
RUN THENCE NORTH 0 DEG. 03 MIN-
UTES 47 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET
TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 45
MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 531.68
FEET TO AN IRON STAKE; THENCE
SOUTH 88 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS WEST 138.60 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE ON AN ARC THE CHORD OF
WHICH IS NORTH 45 DEG. 37 MINUTES
18 SECONDS WEST 29.81 FEET (RADIUS
20.85 FEET) TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 69 DEG. 20 MINUTES 43 SEC-
ONDS WEST 64.11 FEET TO STONE
MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 11
MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.60
FEET TO A STONE MONUMENT, THENCE
NORTH 66 DEG. 25 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS WEST 235.25 FEET TO THE
SHORE LINE OF GENEVA LAKE; THENCE
SOUTH 31 DEG. 46 SECONDS WEST 8.24
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 66
DEG. 25 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST
233.90 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTH 0 DEG. 49 SECONDS EAST 15.37
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89
DEG. 11 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST
100.90 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST 222.28 FEET TO A POINT;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 45 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING. SAID EASEMENT IS LOCAT-
ED IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4 AND THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWN-
SHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 17 EAST, OF THE
4TH P.M. CITY OR LAKE GENEVA, WAL-
WORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN.
Tax Key No.: ZYUP 00106A
Property Address: 968 S. LAKESHORE
DR., LAKE GENEVA, WISCONSIN 53147
Adam C. Lueck
State Bar No. 1081386
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe St., Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9710
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is
the creditors attorney and is attempting to
collect a debt on its behalf. Any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Case No: 07 FA 226
Case Code: 40601
In re the Marriage of:
LOREN ALLEN SCOTT,
Petitioner,
and
CRYSTAL KAREN SCOTT,
n/k/a CRYSTAL KAREN ROLOFF,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF MOTION
AND MOTION BY PUBLICATION
TO: CRYSTAL KAREN SCOTT,
n/k/a CRYSTAL KAREN ROLOFF
1370 Elkhorn Rd., Apt. A
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Please take notice that the Petitioner, Loren
A. Scott, will bring a Motion for Modification
of Placement regarding the minor child,
H.S., DOB: May 6, 2001, before the
Honorable Kristine E. Drettwan on August
16, 2013 at 3:30 p.m. A complete copy of
the motion and supporting affidavit may be
obtained from the Law Office of Mark E.
Sostarich, 6 S. Church St., Elkhorn, WI
53121; 262-723-5041.
Dated this 25th day of June, 2013.
Law Office of Mark E. Sostarich
Attorney for Petitioner
By: Mark E. Sostarich
State Bar No: 1018382
Law Office of Mark E. Sostarich
6 South Church Street
Elkhorn, Wisconsin 53121
Phone: 262-723-5041
Fax: 262-723-5141
July 4, 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice and Order for
Name Change Hearing
Case No. 13CV00620
In the matter of the name change of: BRI-
ANNA MARIE COOK
NOTICE IS GIVEN:
A petition was filed asking to change
the name of the persons listed below from:
Brianna Marie Cook to
Breanna Marie Rullman.
Birth Certificate: Brianna Marie Cook
IT IS ORDERED:
This petition will be heard in the
Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin before the Hon. Judge Phillip A.
Koss, at the Walworth Co,. Judicial Center,
1800 County Road NN, Elkhorn, WI on
August 12, 2013 at 11:30 a.m.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED:
Notice of this hearing shall be given
by publication as a class 3 notice for three
(3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the
hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News,
a newspaper published in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7012
at least ten (10) working days prior to the
scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
BY THE COURT:
James L. Carlson
Circuit Court Judge
July 2, 2012
July 18, 25, August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice Setting Time to Hear
Application and Deadline
for Filing claims
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR113
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ALBERT HINZPETER
D.O.D. 4-25-2013
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
June 13, 1923 and date of death April 25,
2013 was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 898 Sauganash Drive, Fontana, WI
53125.
3. The application will be heard at the
Walworth County Probate.
You do not need to appear unless you
object. The application may be granted if
there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
6. This publication is notice to any
persons whose names or address are
unknown.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7014
at least 10 working days prior to the sched-
uled court date. Please note that the court
does not provide transportation.
Please check with person named
below for exact time and date.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
June 24, 2013
Attorney Lindsey M. White
1624 Hobbs Drive
Delavan, WI 53115
262-741-1971
Bar Number: 1088716
July 4, 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
Continued from page 4
Search For:
JOBS
RENTALS
HOMES
VEHICLES
& MORE!
In the Lake Geneva
Regional News & Resorter
Classifieds.
Call 262.248.4444
for more information
Please turn to page 6
6B The Regional News July 18, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICES
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
ORDINANCE NO. 792 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-324
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO THE FAMILY
COURT COMMISSIONER SALARY
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-324 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to remove the requirement
that the salary of the Family Court
Commissioner be established by County
Board resolution. Like the Circuit Court
Commissioner, the Family Court
Commissioner will be placed in the pay for
performance plan.
PART II: The ordinance shall be
effective upon passage and publication.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 787 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-17
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO THE ELIMINATION
OF CONTRACTS AND THE
CREATION OF POSITIONS IN HEALTH &
HUMAN SERVICES
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-17 in
Division 2 of Article I of Chapter 15 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to create four county posi-
tions to replace services that are currently
contracted out.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file in the
County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 788 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-359
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO SPECIAL PAY
PREMIUMS FOR CERTAIN
LHCC EMPLOYEES
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-359 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to revise the existing ordi-
nance to exclude the payment of weekend
premiums for newly-created maintenance
positions that will have weekends as part of
their normally assigned schedule.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 790 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-17
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO THE
RECLASSIFICATION OF
A PROPERTY TAX SPECIALIST
TO AN ACCOUNT CLERK IV
IN THE TREASURERS OFFICE
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-17 in
Division 2 of Article I of Chapter 15 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to reclassify the vacant
Property Tax Specialist position to an
Account Clerk IV.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC NOTICES
The refundable deposit will be returned to
the apparent low Bidder and all other plan
holders who return the Documents to
Crispell-Snyder, A GAI Company, in usable
condition within 10 business days after the
opening of Bids. These are the only condi-
tions under which the deposit will be
returned.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: The Contract letting
shall be subject to the provisions of
Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of
the Wisconsin Statutes.
WAGE RATES: Contractors shall be
required to pay not less than the prevailing
wage rates on the Project as established by
the State of Wisconsin, Department of
Workforce Development. Copies of these
wage rates are on file in the office of the City
Clerk and incorporated into the Contract
Documents.
BID SECURITY: Bid Security in the amount
of not less than 5% nor more than 10% of
the Bid shall accompany each Bid in accor-
dance with the Instructions to Bidders.
Acceptable Bid Security shall be Bid Bond,
Certified Check, Cashier s Check, or
Money Order.
CONTRACT SECURITY: The Bidder to
whom a Contract is awarded shall furnish a
Performance Bond and a Payment Bond
each in an amount equal to the Contract
Price.
BID REJECTION/ACCEPTANCE: Owner
reserves the right to reject any and all Bids,
waive informalities in bidding or to accept
the Bid or Bids, which best serve the inter-
ests of Owner.
Published by authority of the City of Lake
Geneva
By:
James Connors, Mayor
Michael Hawes, Clerk
CRISPELL-SNYDER, INC.
Professional Consultants |
A GAI Company
July 18, 25, 2013
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
ORDINANCE NO. 794 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 2-200
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO ESTABLISHING
TERMS FOR CERTAIN MEMBERS
OF THE LAND INFORMATION
ADVISORY COUNCIL
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 2-200 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance is to
establish term limits for certain members of
the Land Information Advisory Council.
PART II: This Ordinance shall
become upon passage and publication.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 795 07/13
AMENDING SECTIONS 2-32
AND 2-154 OF THE WALWORTH COUN-
TY CODE OF
ORDINANCES RELATING TO
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
OF THE COUNTY BOARD
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 2-32 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
PART II: That Section 2-154 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance is to
set a term limit for the chairperson and to
create jobs descriptions for the Board.
PART III: This Ordinance shall
become upon passage and publication.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 789 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-337
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO REINSTATEMENT
OF PAY AND BENEFITS FOR
EMPLOYEES REINSTATED
FROM LAYOFF
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-337 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to clarify the health insurance
eligibility for employees reinstated from lay-
off, based on their original hire date and
health enrollment status prior to layoff.
PART II: The ordinance shall be
effective upon passage and publication.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
GENOA CITY
PUBLIC NOTICES
part) project requiring a village capital
expenditure which aggregates $2.0 million
or more, the village board shall submit to the
electorate a binding referendum for
approval of the project. Failure of the bind-
ing referendum shall preclude the village
from proceeding with the project. The word-
ing of any referendum shall provide the spe-
cific purpose, location and cost of the proj-
ect. Nothing in this provision shall be con-
strued to preclude the village from exercis-
ing its role in the planning or design of such
publicly financed projects. The village shall
be precluded from intentionally dividing up a
project so that the total amount is less than
$2.0 million. Capital expenditures for main-
tenance, repair or replacement of existing
utilities or infrastructure, or pursuant to
existing contractual obligations or legal
mandates shall be exempt from this section.
A project is defined as work that can be bid
and contracted separately and requires no
other work to be operable or complete.
2. This ordinance shall become effec-
tive immediately upon passage and publica-
tion as required by law.
Dated this day of, 2013.
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY
By: WILLIAM ANTTI, President
ATTEST: CLAUDIA JUREWICZ,
Clerk/Treasurer
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
NOTICE TO DESIGN BUILD BIDDERS
PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING ADDITION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
The Town and Village of Bloomfield
are requesting design build proposals for a
40 x 60 public safety building add-on to the
existing Town Hall. Bidders must comply
with the Prevailing Wage Rate Schedule, all
State, County and local government regula-
tions and requirements.
Bid specs and draft design layout are
available in the Clerks office during normal
business hours, N1100 Town Hall Road,
Bloomfield (Pell Lake), Wisconsin. For
more information please call (262) 279-
6039.
Proposals are no later than 4:30 p.m.
on July 26, 2013. Bids should be delivered
to the Clerks Office or mailed to Bloomfield
Municipal Clerk, PO Box 609, Pell Lake, WI
53157. The envelope should be clearly
marked Public Safety Building Bid.
Bids will be opened at the Public
Works, Safety & Utility Committee Meeting
on July 29, 2013. Bid awards, if any, will be
on Monday, August 5, 2013, subject to proj-
ect financing.
The Town and Village of Bloomfield
reserve the right to accept or reject any pro-
posal or portion thereof.
July 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
LAKE GENEVA
PUBLIC NOTICES
OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS
2013 STREET IMPROVEMENT
PROGRAM
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN
OWNER: The City of Lake Geneva
hereby gives notice that sealed Bids will be
received for the construction of the 2013
Street Improvement Program.
The Project consists of one prime
Contract and is identified as follows:
Project No. W130141.04:
24,235 Sq. Yds. Asphaltic Pavement
Milling
935 Ton Remove and Replace Base
Aggregate
5,313 Ton Asphaltic Concrete Pave
ment, Type E-0.3
3 Each Adjust Manhole Covers
218 Lin. Ft. Remove and Replace
Curb and Gutter
1 Lump Sum Common Excavation
65 Cu. Yds. Excavation Below Sub
grade (EBS)
130 Ton Granular Backfill for Excava
tion Below Subgrade
Various Pavement Marking on STH 50
and Other Locations
Traffic Control
Lawn Restoration
Erosion Control
This project is partially funded with
Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Local Road Improvement (LRIP) funds.
All Bidders shall comply with the Contractor
Qualification Ordinance of the City of Lake
Geneva requiring pre qualification of
Bidders prior to submitting bids or to act as
a Contractor or Subcontractor who act as a
general contractor on any public improve-
ment project. Application for Qualification
forms may be obtained from the Lake
Geneva Utility Commission at the office of
the Director of Public Works, 361 Main
Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147, or
at Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company,
700 Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin 53147.
TIME AND PLACE OF BID OPENING:
Sealed Bids will be received until 10:00
a.m., Local Time, on the 1st day of August,
2013, in the office of the City Clerk, 626
Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
53147. After the official Bid closing time, the
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.
BIDDING DOCUMENTS: The Bidding
Documents are on file for inspection at the
office of the City Clerk, 626 Geneva Street,
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147, and the
offices of Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI
Company, 700 Geneva Parkway, Lake
Geneva, Wisconsin 53147. All submitted
Bidding Documents, including addendums,
shall be official copies obtained directly from
Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company. Bids
prepared on downloaded (internet) docu-
ments, which cannot be verified as being
obtained directly from Crispell-Snyder, Inc.,
A GAI Company, will not be accepted.
Copies may be obtained by applying to
Crispell-Snyder, Inc., A GAI Company, P.O.
Box 550, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 53147.
A $30.00 refundable payment for each set of
Bidding Documents is required. A separate
$10.00 non-refundable handling charge for
each Document set that is not picked up, is
also required.
Copies of the Bidding Documents may be
secured in person at the Crispell-Snyder, A
GAI Company, office in Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin, eliminating the handling charge.
WILLIAMS BAY
SCHOOL BOARD
District Administrator could add his/her
expertise on. It was recommended that the
new Interim District Administrator update
this page using the PI 34 guidelines.
P. 10 - A Board member suggested
we look at our extra-curricular compensa-
tion and adjust accordingly. I would recom-
mend adding:
Cross Country $1455
Assistant Cross Country $ 979
Track $1455
Assistant Track $ 979
M. Coolidge will review all of the ath-
letic extra-curricular position compensation
and submit a written report to the Board
members for approval.
P. 14 - Tuition Reimbursement
1. The District shall reimburse teach-
ers the full cost of tuition for course work at
the prevailing costs equal to that of the
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater system
charge for resident students. Annual cost
per teacher will not exceed the amount
equivalent to 12 graduate credits at UW-
Whitewater.
2. Prior approval of course selection
must be given by the administration.
3. Tuition payments must be returned
to the School District if:
(a) The course is not completed
(b) A below B grade is received
(c) The employee voluntarily resigns
from employment and courses were (1)
approved after July, 1, 2014 change to of
the current school year and (2) reimbursed
within the previous 24 months of the effec-
tive date of resignation. Exceptions shall be
for serious health conditions, retirement,
and other reasons at the discretion of the
District.
P.27 - Add statement: Employees in
the Williams Bay School District are not to
have current students as friends on their
personal social networking sites (e.g. face-
book, myspace). How will it be monitored?
Clarify coaches, volunteers, etc. The DA
will check with the Districts attorney for
advisement.
P. 45 - Last year DA Dalzin created
Meet and Confer language to ease the tran-
sition from a collective bargaining agree-
ment to an employee handbook. He recom-
mended that the Board allow the new
District Administrator to develop new lan-
guage that better fits his/her style and needs
for collaboration. MOVE THIS TO THE
BEGINNING OF THE EMPLOYEE HAND-
BOOK, if the new DA wants to continue with
this committee.
Overload Pay
The School Board needs to make a
decision on what they believe a secondary
teacher should be paid for an overload.
Secondary teachers are required to teach
six classes in an eight hour period day.
There is no language in the past collective
bargaining agreement but records indicate
they were paid 1/6th of their salary. So for
an example if a teacher was making
$60,000, they would be paid an extra
$10,000. Mr. Butters and DA Dalzin
researched what other districts pay and the
most we could find was $2,994 per semes-
ter which is roughly $6,000 per year. The
recommendation for the overpay was to
have a flat rate of $6,000 per overload. J.
Pfeil stated he supports a flat rate of $6000.
Any changes decided on at this meet-
ing should be brought back to the July 8th
board meeting for approval.
C. Update on Interim Superintendent
Selection Process
DA Dalzin talked about the process
and timeline for selection of the superinten-
dent and high school principal positions. L.
Landgraf and C. Beinetti will present some
final applicants to the Board at a June 15th
closed session meeting. C. Beinetti will
contact the applicants. Interviews will be
held on June 27 for the Interim District
Administrator and a decision will be made at
a July 1, 2013 meeting to be held at 5:00
pm.
D. Update on High School Principal
Selection Process
J. Pfeil and B. Boggs will present can-
didates for the high school principal on June
26 and June 28, when interviews will be
held. The final decision for the high school
principal position will be on July 2, 2013.
The Board desires to have a recommenda-
tion for both positions for the July 8, 2013
school board meeting.
V. REPORTS
A. SCA Absent.
B. Athletic Booster Club The Annual
Booster Club Golf Outing will be held on
Wednesday, June 12th.
C. Athletic Director Mike Coolidge
and D. Rowland informed the Board of the
new tackle football Programs upcoming
schedule. The Williams Bay School junior
high flag football program will be eliminated.
The Williams Bay Rec Department will offer
a youth flag football league. It was request-
ed by the Board members that M. Coolidge
present written information regarding costs,
officials, procedures and parent travel poli-
cies for the junior high tackle football pro-
gram at the July School Board meeting.
D. District Administrator DA Dalzins
report were agenda items.
E. High School Principal B. Butters
reported that four junior high students were
taking six courses online for summer school
to recoup credit.
F. Elementary Principal B. Isaacson
reported that interviews are being held for a
Reading Specialist.
G. School Board President Woss pre-
sented V. Dalzin and B. Butters with Bulldog
Pride Awards for their two years of dedicat-
ed service to the Williams Bay Schools. A
Commemorative Brick will also be pur-
chased by the Board for each administrator.
VI. ADJOURN
AT 10:03 pm, A C. BEINETTI/L.
LANDGRAF MOTION AND SECOND TO
ADJOURN THE MEETING, 5-0.
Rebecca Boggs
Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
GENOA CITY
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY
ORDINANCE NO.07-11-13
The Village Board of Genoa City,
Walworth and Kenosha Counties
Wisconsin, does hereby ordain as follows:
1. Section 41-9, Capital
Improvement Referendum of Chapter 41,
FINANCE, of the Municipal Code of the
Village of Genoa City is hereby created to
read as follows:
41-9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT
REFERENDUM.
Prior to the start of any physical construction
of any municipally financed (in whole or
WILLIAMS BAY
SCHOOL BOARD
WILLIAMS BAY SCHOOL
BOARD OF EDUCATION
REGULAR SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING
MONDAY, JUNE 10, 2013
Board Members Present:
C. Beinetti, R. Boggs, L. Landgraf, J.
Pfeil, D. Woss
Absent: None
Administration Present: District
Administrator V. Dalzin, High School
Principal B. Butters, Elementary School
Principal B. Isaacson, Assistant for
Business C. Reynolds
Absent: None
Guests: Twelve
I. CALL TO ORDER
President Woss called the meeting to
order at 7:00 PM.
A. Pledge of Allegiance
The meeting started with the Pledge
of Allegiance.
II. COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC
COMMENTS
A. Public Comments
C. Curry asked the Board to
answer the following questions: Is 1)
Scherrer under contract with the school dis-
trict at this time? 2) Do open enrollment stu-
dents pay to attend the Williams Bay
Schools? 3) Do we have a plan for what
type of building we would build? D. Woss
responded stating that Scherrer
Construction is not under contract at this
time; Open Enrollment students do not pay
to attend, but their school district pay an
approved amount; and there are no
specifics for a new building and that is why
the community has been asked for their
input. Discussion followed. The Board also
noted that studies have been done on the
ageing elementary school and the recom-
mendation from the Facilities Committee
was to go forward and pursue new con-
struction of an elementary school. It was
also stated that the Board will consider all
suggestions and input from the community.
Moved ahead on the agenda
IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS
A. School Perceptions Survey
Presentation by Bill Foster
School Perceptions is a credible com-
pany that specializes in surveys for the pub-
lic sector. Bill Foster, from School
Perceptions, and Kit Daly, from Eppstein
Uhen Architects, explained the survey
process. Discussion followed. It was noted
that this survey is being done by a neutral
independent company with ideas and con-
cepts with very predictable and accurate
results. Staff, parents, nonparents and stu-
dents will be included in the survey. There
is a confidential demographics code includ-
ed and it prevents the same person from
doing duplicate surveys. The cost of the
survey would be approximately $8200 with
an additional cost for printing and postage,
which could be an additional $1000-$1200.
A June 19 meeting at 4:00 pm, Core Team
and representatives from EAU Architects
and School Perceptions will be held regard-
ing survey development.
II. COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC
COMMENTS
B. Recognition of Achievements
B. Butters congratulated Sam
Storms, Taylor Scott, and Claudia Wautlet
for making the 1st Team All-Conference
Team in softball and to Emmalyn Meyers for
making the 2nd Team All-Conference Team
in the Trailways Conference. Jake Sutter
and Michael Guss were also congratulated
for making the 2nd Team All-Conference in
baseball. Congratulations to K. Rowbotham
and students for donating $300 to the Red
Cross Oklahoma Disaster fund from the
profits of their cupcake sales.
III. ACTION ITEMS
A. Approval of Consent Agenda
1. School Board Minutes
Approve the minutes of the Regular
School Board Meeting of May 6, 2013 and
Special School Board Meetings of May 20,
and May 23, 2013.
2. Bills Payable
Approve bills payable for May 2013,
Funds 10, 27, and 50, check numbers
58802-58979, Fund 60, check numbers
5030-5072 for a total of $691,608.31.
A J. PFEIL/C. BEINETTI MOTION
AND SECOND TO APPROVE THE CON-
SENT AGENDA AS PRESENTED, CAR-
RIED 5-0.
B. Dousman Bus Contract for 2013-
2014 and 2014-2015 School Years
Discussion followed. A J. PFEIL/L.
LANDGRAF MOTION AND SECOND TO
APPROVE THE CONTRACT WITH DOUS-
MAN TRANSPORT COMPANY, INC., FOR
THE 2013-2014 AND 2014-2015 SCHOOL
YEARS AS PRESENTED, CARRIED 5-0.
C. Lunch Contract with Fontana Joint
School District for the 2013-2014 School
Year
Discussion followed. A J. PFEIL/B.
BOGGS MOTION AND SECOND TO
MOVE APPROVAL OF A JOINT AGREE-
MENT WITH FONTANA SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT TO PROVIDE MEAL SERVICE FOR
FONTANAS LUNCH AND MILK PRO-
GRAMS FOR 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR,
CARRIED 5-0.
D. Request from District Speech
Therapist for Part-time Status
A request from Dana Syring, the
Speech and Language Therapist to go to
.60% for the 2013-2014 school year was
presented. Discussion followed. A B.
BOGGS/C. BEINETTI MOTION AND SEC-
OND TO APPROVE THE REQUEST OF
OUR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERA-
PIST TO GO TO .60% WITH BENEFITS
FOR THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
WITH THE STIPULATIONS THAT A 40%
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPIST
WOULD BE HIRED BY AUGUST 1ST AND
THAT THE AMOUNT OF PAY IS NOT TO
EXCEED 40% OF THE CURRENT WAGE
OF THE SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THER-
APIST, CARRIED 5-0. It was noted that if a
40% person was not found by August 1st,
the current Speech and Language Therapist
would stay in her 100% full-time position at
her request.
IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS
B. Employee Handbook Changes
DA Dalzin presented employee hand-
book changes.
P. 3 - A Board member has requested
that language that requires all employees
have a drug test be added. DA Dalzin sug-
gested he was in favor of this, but some
specific elements need to be worked out
such as who pays for it and what will the test
consist of? New employees will be added to
this statement and J. Pfeil will research the
cost and type of drug test required. ie:
blood, urine, etc.
P. 7 - Personal Appearance/Staff
Dress Discussion followed. No changes
were recommended.
P. 7 - A Board member has recom-
mended that the high school work hour for
teachers be stated as 7:15 am. to 3:15 pm
instead of 7:30 am 3:30 pm.
Recommendation is to change the posted
hours from 7:30 am 3:30 pm to 7:15 am to
3:15 pm for the jr/sr high school.
P.9 - A Board member has suggested
that we redo the mentoring page. DA Dalzin
suggested that it would be something a new
CITY COUNCIL
PROCEEDINGS
including alternate #1 for heating the build-
ing and alternate #3 for demolition of the
current building, for a total amount of
$298,600.00 funded by TID #4, contingent
upon approval of a budget amendment.
Alderman Hill said the metal seam
roof was preferred due to its longer lifespan
than the shingled roof. She said the alter-
nate for heating the building was recom-
mended so that the building could be used
throughout the year. Alderman Wall stated
he did not support spending almost
$300,000.00 for a restrooms and conces-
sions building. He commented that the City
only receives $1,500.00 per year from the
current concessionaire for Veterans Park
and Dun Field. Alderman Kupsik said that
the concessions lease is a biannual lease
and it will be revisited once the Dunn Field
building is rebuilt. Alderman Taggart said the
new skate park is highly popular and the
new restroom facilities are necessary.
Alderman Mott said the proposed building
would also have a small break area that
could be used for senior citizens who volun-
teer at the skate park. Alderman Hougen
said his only objection to the project is
spending the additional $18,000.00 for the
metal seam roof.
Roll Call: Hougen, Mott, Hill, Kehoe,
Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted yes. Wall
voted no. Motion carried. 7 to 1.
Discussion/Action on installation of
two stand-up paddle boarding racks at the
west-end of Library Park in the amount not
to exceed $500.00 funded by the lakefront
fund (recommended by Piers, Harbors and
Lakefront Committee 5/23/13).
Hill/Mott motion to approve. Alderman
Hill referenced a sketch by DPW Winkler of
the proposed racks. She said the racks
would be an excellent use of space for a
non-motorized water sport. Alderman Mott
noted that DPW Winkler volunteered to con-
struct the racks and he invited others to offer
their assistance.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried.
Discussion/Action on renewal of
Health Insurance Plan
Kupsik/Hougen motion to approve the
renewal of Health Insurance Plan with
Cypress for administrative services and
Berkeley for stop loss protection services.
Administrator Jordan said the City had a
high number of claims in the last year, but
he was comfortable with raising the stop
loss specific from $30,000 to $40,000
because the City doesnt have many claims
that fall between those figures. He noted the
City has begun implementing a wellness
program.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried.
Plan Commission Recommendations
Alderman Hougen
Resolution 13-R42, authorizing the
issuance of a Conditional Use Permit
requested by Franklin D Guske, W797
Myrtle Road, Pell Lake, WI 53157, for out-
door dining (Outdoor Commercial
Entertainment) at Lake Geneva Lanes, 192
Main Street, Tax Key Number ZYUP 00107.
Hougen/Wall motion to approve.
Alderman Hougen said the Plan
Commission recommended bollards around
the proposed patio area. Alderman Taggart
expressed support for Mr. Guske and the
application. Unanimously carried.
Resolution 13-R43, authorizing the
issuance of a Conditional Use Permit
requested by Sunrise Gardens LLC, 203 E.
Beloit St. Apt A, Darien, WI 53114 for Roger
and Wendy Fisher, 1234 National Ave.,
Rockford, IL 61103, to modify an existing
passive recreation area by repairing/rebuild-
ing existing wood stairs in the same location
and adding a deck with canvas awning to
the stairs located in the Lakeshore Overlay
District at 946 Ceylon Court, Tax Key
Number ZA1240 00002.
Hougen/Kupsik motion to approve.
Alderman Hougen said the proposed condi-
tional use is similar to other permitted uses
in the lakeshore overlay district.
Unanimously carried.
Presentation of Accounts Alderman
Hill
Hill/Kupsik motion to approve Prepaid
Bills in the amount of $6,844.61.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried.
Hill/Hougen motion to approve
Regular Bills in the amount of $164,438.21.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried.
Hill/Hougen motion to accept the
monthly Treasurers Report for March and
April 2013. Unanimously carried.
Mayor Appointments Mayor
Connors
Discussion/Action on appointment of
Ald. Hougen to the Geneva Lake
Environmental Agency Board (GLEA) to
replace Ald. Wall due to scheduling conflict.
Kupsik/Taggart motion to approve.
Unanimously carried.
Closed Session
Hougen/Kupsik motion to go into
Closed Session pursuant to Wis. Stat. 19.85
(1)(b) for considering licensing of Lori Anne
Hall by a board or commission or the inves-
tigation of charges against such person and
the taking of formal action on any such mat-
ter (City Attorney Draper), with Lori Anne
Hall present.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried.
The Council entered into Closed
Session at 9:03 p.m.
Kehoe/Hougen motion to return to
open session pursuant to Wisconsin
Statutes 19.85 (2) and take action on any
items discussed in Closed Session.
Roll Call: Hougen, Wall, Mott, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted
yes. Unanimously carried. The Council
reconvened in open session at 9:20 p.m.
Taggart/Kupsik motion to approve the
renewal Operator (Bartender) License appli-
cation filed by Lori Anne Hall with a six-
month review caveat.
Roll Call: Hougen, Mott, Hill, Kehoe,
Kupsik, Taggart and Lyon voted yes. Wall
voted no. Motion carried 7 to 1.
Adjournment
Mott/Taggart motion to adjourn at
9:22 .pm. Unanimously carried.
/s/ Michael D. Hawes, City Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
Continued from page 5
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
MUST BE PLACED
BY 11 A.M. FRIDAY
FOR THE FOLLOWING
WEEKS NEWSPAPER
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 7B
PUBLIC NOTICES
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
ORDINANCE NO. 797 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-17
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO STAFFING
CHANGES AT THE LAKELAND HEALTH
CARE CENTER
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-17 in
Division 2 of Article I of Chapter 15 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to eliminate two 0.50 FTE RN
positions and create one 1.0 RN, and to
eliminate one 1.0 FTE LPN and create one
1.0 RN. These changes will be accom-
plished through attrition and utilizing the RN
staffing pool.
Affordable Care Act addresses health
care providers. As a health care provider,
LHCC is required to employ more RNs than
currently authorized. In the past two quar-
ters, LHCC has received two stars for RN
staffing as part of the overall federal five-star
rating program. LHCC is at risk of losing
their five-star rating.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective September 4, 2013.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE AMENDING
WALWORTH COUNTY
ZONING ORDINANCE
WHEREAS, the Walworth County
Board of Supervisors has heretofore been
petitioned to amend the Walworth County
Zoning Ordinance; and
WHEREAS, the petitions have been
referred to the Walworth County Zoning
Agency for public hearing; and
WHEREAS, the Walworth County
Zoning Agency on due notice conducted
public hearings on the proposed amend-
ments and filed their recommendations with
the board; and
WHEREAS, the proposed amend-
ments have been given due consideration
by the Board in open session.
NOW, THEREFORE, the County
Board of Supervisors of the County of
Walworth do ordain as follows:
The Zoning Ordinance of Walworth
County and Shoreland Zoning Ordinance
(and accompanying Zoning Map) is amend-
ed in the following respects:
1. S. Terry Woods Ltd., Inc., Town
of Linn Filed a petition to amend said zon-
ing maps from A-2 Agricultural District to A-
4 Agricultural Related Manufacturing,
Warehousing and Marketing District the fol-
lowing described lands:
Part of Tax Parcel #I L 3100007, Linn
Township.
A part of the Southwest of the
Southwest of Section 31, Town 1 North,
Range 17 East, Town of Linn, Walworth
County, Wisconsin, currently zoned A-2 to
be rezoned as A-4, described as follows:
Beginning at the southeast corner of certi-
fied survey map no. 4230, recorded as doc-
ument no. 759710 on the south line of the
southwest of said section 31 (T1N,
R17E); Thence N 01Deg 02Min 46Sec W,
279.07 feet along said CSM; Thence N
88Deg 57Min 14Sec E, 151.80 Feet;
Thence S 00Deg 39Min 54Sec E, 279.77
feet to the South line of said section;
Thence S 89Deg 13Min 08Sec W, 149.84
feet to the point of beginning. Containing
42,155 square feet of land (0.97 acres) of
land more or less.
Total area for rezone approximately
.97 acres more or less.
ATTEST this 11th day of June 2013
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
ATTEST this 11th day of June 2013
Kimberly S. Bushey
County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
make a decision tonight but they need direc-
tion from the Board.
Supervisor Kilkenny stated this is
something that needs to be looked at if it is
going to save money. He also stated he is
concerned that if you are out-of-state or
have an emergency, if you are allowed to
see a different provider or if you would have
to pay more money. Vice-Chair Grant stat-
ed if a doctor refers you to a specialist, part
of the referral process is to get clearance
from the insurance company to pay that bill
for wherever you go. Supervisor
Schiefelbein asked how the State Health
Plan will affect retirees. He stated that it is
important to know that Supervisors are not
covered by the county health plan. Vice-
Chair Grant stated that if retirees are eligible
for the county health plan then they are eli-
gible for the State Health Plan. He also stat-
ed that any employee that has not retired
yet, they will be eligible for the State Health
Plan when they do retire. Supervisor
Kilkenny stated that he is covered under the
county health plan and he pays the full pre-
mium. He said he would like to know the
aggregate savings if the county moves to
the State Health Plan. Andersen stated if
the county moves to the State Health Plan
and an employee chooses a plan that cov-
ers Aurora, it would require employees to
pay $500-$1,000 per month for their plan.
Supervisor Kilkenny stated the county con-
tribution to the premium under the State
Health Plan is stable. Vice-Chair Grant sug-
gested distributing the information he has
compiled on the State Health Plan to all
employees. Supervisor Weber stated listen-
ing sessions would need to be conducted so
that everyone is on the same page. He said
he is concerned about taking Aurora out of
the picture because of the network they rep-
resent which has degrees of expertise that
are available to us and our employees. He
stated he is not sure the competitors have
the same level of expertise even with their
dynamic growth. He said we need more
comparable information. He also said that
the savings rarely are there and if there are
savings, they are momentarily.
Supervisor Brandl stated if the county
moves to the State Health Plan, they will not
see savings initially due to being subject to
a surcharge the first year and possibly the
second year. Vice-Chair Grant stated there
may or may not be a surcharge. He said the
process is that the county applies for the
State Health Plan which includes submitting
24 months of medical payouts. He stated
the State Health Plan reviews this informa-
tion and determines if a surcharge would be
assessed. He said the county would be
notified if they will be assessed a surcharge
and what the surcharge will be before the
county would agree to be a part of the pro-
gram. He also said that if we are assessed
a surcharge, it is for the first year then the
second year is half of the surcharge. He
stated the surcharge is based on the num-
ber of employees and it would be the coun-
tys costs not the employees. Andersen
asked if the surcharge is subject to the 88%,
and Vice-Chair Grant indicated he could
obtain this information. Supervisor
Schaefer asked what surrounding counties
are on the State Health Plan and what their
surcharge was. Vice-Chair Grant stated
that Jefferson and Dodge Counties are on
the State Health Plan and he is unsure of
their surcharge as they have been on the
plan for quite some time. Chair Russell stat-
ed that one of the advantages of being on
the State Health Plan is that you are a part
of a bigger pool. Bretl asked if it is a priori-
ty to reduce the countys health insurance
costs. Vice-Chair Grant stated that is a pri-
ority to reduce insurance costs and that is
why he supports the State Health Plan
because it reduces the countys costs and it
keeps employees out-of-pocket expenses
reasonable.
Supervisor Stacey offered a motion,
seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, to eliminate
the on-site clinic as an option. Supervisor
Brellenthin stated it was a bad idea to elim-
inate the on-site clinic if we dont know what
insurance we are going to have. Bretl stat-
ed the Board can refer this back to the
Human Resources Committee and the
motion to refer back to committee would
take precedence over Supervisor Staceys
motion to eliminate the clinic. Supervisor
Kilkenny offered a motion, seconded by
Supervisor Brellenthin, to refer the issue of
the clinic back to the Human Resources
Committee as well as fully examine the
State Health Plan in order to obtain the infor-
mation requested. Motion carried. Chair
Russell suggested that Supervisors be in
attendance at the Human Resources
Committee on June 19, 2013. Administrator
Bretl directed the Clerk to place Supervisor
Grants correspondence regarding the State
Health Plan information on the countys
website.
Report of Special Committees
There was none.
Comment Period by Members of the
Public Concerning Items Not on the Agenda
There was none.
Supervisor Stacey was excused at
8:05 p.m.
Closed Session
The Board will convene in closed ses-
sion pursuant to the exemption contained in
Section 19.85 (1)(e) of the Wisconsin
Statutes, Deliberating or negotiating the
purchasing of public properties, the invest-
ing of public funds, or conducting other
specified public business, whenever com-
petitive or bargaining reasons require a
closed session.
In closed session, the Board will
discuss the following item:
Establishing guidance/parame-
ters for negotiations with LEA, HHS
Professionals, and Deputy Sheriffs
Association for successor agreements
On motion by Supervisor Brandl, sec-
onded by Vice-Chair Grant, the board con-
vened into closed session at 8:05 p.m. A roll
call vote was taken. Total votes: 10. Ayes:
10 Brandl, Brellenthin, Grant, Kilkenny,
Monroe, Redenius, Schaefer, Schiefelbein,
Weber, and Russell; Noes: 0; Absent: 1
Stacey.
The Board will reconvene in open
session and may take action on the closed
session item.
On motion by Supervisor Kilkenny,
seconded by Supervisor Brandl, the board
convened into open session at 8:22 p.m.
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Schaefer, to proceed
as discussed in closed session. Motion car-
ried.
Chairpersons Report
Chair Russell did not have anything to
report.
Adjournment
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Brandl, the meeting
was adjourned at 8:25 p.m.
STATE OF WISCONSIN )
) SS
COUNTY OF WALWORTH )
I, Kimberly S. Bushey, County Clerk
in and for the County aforesaid, do hereby
certify that the foregoing is a true and cor-
rect copy of the proceedings of the County
Board of Supervisors for the June 11, 2013
meeting.
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
petitive or bargaining reasons require a
closed session.
In closed session, the Board will
discuss the following item:
Establishing negotiating
parameters for the potential acquisition or
lease of on-site clinic building
On motion by Supervisor Brandl, sec-
onded by Supervisor Weber, the board con-
vened into closed session at 6:35 p.m. A roll
call vote was taken. Total votes: 11. Ayes:
11 Brandl, Brellenthin, Grant, Kilkenny,
Monroe, Redenius, Schaefer, Schiefelbein,
Stacey, Weber, and Russell; Noes: 0;
Absent: 0.
The Board will reconvene in open
session and may take action on the closed
session item.
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Schiefelbein, the
board convened into open session at 6:55
p.m.
Human Resources Committee
1. Discussion and possible action
regarding the future of Walworth Countys
health plan and on-site clinic
Administrator Bretl stated there has
been much discussion over the past sever-
al months regarding health insurance. He
said the countys Tier 1 health plan is a good
plan with respect to employee choice; how-
ever, it is an expensive plan relative to our
peers. He stated that of seven comparable
counties, the Tier 1 plan is one of the high-
est of surrounding counties. He said the
Tier 2 plan was also higher than average but
in the ballpark of what our peer counties
were. He stated over the years the county
has heard from its consultants that moving
to an off the shelf health plan with a group
of our size is not a good idea. He said that
costs for an off the shelf health plan are
the same but the county would be subject to
any rate increases. He also said that an on-
site clinic with a fitness facility was made
part of the 2013 budget. He stated that
based on feedback Supervisors had
received from constituents, the fitness and
new construction portions of this on-site
clinic were removed.
Bretl stated the first option for
Supervisors is that they can decide to con-
tinue with the countys current health plan,
Tier 1 and Tier 2, and they do not have to
change anything. He said a second option
is the possibility of moving to the State
Health Plan, which is significantly cheaper
than our current plan and is more cost effec-
tive from a taxpayer perspective. He stated
the State Health Plan is more limiting in
terms of employee choice. He said there
are several options that are free under the
State Health Plan but if you do not use those
providers, it is more expensive from the
employees perspective. He stated a third
option is the on-site clinic, which would be
coupled with the countys partially self-fund-
ed health plan. He said the county would
not need an on-site clinic if it is decided to
move to the State Health Plan because they
do not give credit for an on-site clinic. He
stated that the Board had discussed in
closed session the potential availability of a
building. He said setting up the on-site clin-
ic does not only include the purchase price
but also the costs of equipping it and oper-
ating it. He also said that if the Board
chooses this route, they would be looking at
a minimum of a three-year commitment.
Supervisor Schiefelbein asked for
clarification that with the State Health Plan,
employees are tied to one health care sys-
tem, which is Mercy. Vice-Chair Grant stat-
ed that is incorrect as Walworth County has
eight different plans to choose from under
the State Health Plan. He said that if an
employee chooses MercyCare or Unity, the
employee does not have to pay a premium
contribution towards the plan as the entire
contribution would be paid by the employer.
He stated he has made arrangements with
his contact at the State Health Plan to con-
duct a conference call with him during the
Human Resources Committee meeting on
Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Supervisor
Schiefelbein asked if Aurora is available as
a provider under the State Health Plan.
Vice-Chair Grant stated that Aurora is not
accepted by the State Health Plan as they
refused to submit a quote to the State. He
said that if an employee uses a clinic out-
side of Walworth County, the employee
must pay the premiums that coincide with
that county. Supervisor Schiefelbein asked
what providers are available in Walworth
County besides Mercy and Dean. Vice-
Chair Grant stated there is a Dean Clinic in
Whitewater and Mercy is available through-
out the county with the exception of the
eastern portion of the county. He said that
Unity does not have a clinic in Walworth
County, but they are contracted with Mercy.
He also said that if an employee wants to
use other providers, the State Health Plan
has plans such as the Standard Plan,
Anthem, and Humana; however, the rates
and out-of-pocket expenses are higher.
Supervisor Schiefelbein asked about the
dental and vision components of the State
Health Plan. Vice-Chair Grant stated that
currently there is limited dental offered in the
State Health Plan; however, it is anticipated
that in 2014, dental plans will be available.
He also stated he is not aware of any vision
plans with the State Health Plan.
Supervisor Schaefer asked how
many employees utilize Aurora. Nicki
Andersen, Deputy County Administrator
Finance, stated that based on the total
claims in 2012, 56% of those claims came
from Aurora, which equated to 46% of total
costs. Supervisor Schaefer stated that if the
county moves to the State Health Plan, any
employees that use Aurora doctors will have
to switch providers. Vice-Chair Grant stated
that if the county moved forward with the on-
site clinic, there would be a switch of med-
ical providers. Bretl stated the estimated
savings they came up with was based on
the incentive of utilizing the on-site clinic.
Andersen stated the incentive was to waive
copays and deductible if employees use the
on-site clinic. She also said that the more
people you have use the clinic, the more
savings you will have. Vice-Chair Grant
stated they have no guarantee as to how
many employees will utilize the clinic.
Andersen stated they have not factored in
any change in plan design other than
adding the on-site clinic. She said that
unless the Board decides otherwise, they do
not expect an increase. Supervisor
Brellenthin stated he cannot support chang-
ing to an insurance company that does not
recognize Aurora as a provider. Chair
Russell stated there are plans under the
State Health Plan that accept Aurora; how-
ever, they are more expensive. Vice-Chair
Grant stated that with the Standard Plan, an
employee can use any medical provider;
however, it carries a higher premium. He
said the maximum the employer will con-
tribute towards the premium is $552.88 for a
single plan. He also said that under the
family plan of the Standard Plan, the
employee would pay $985.39 towards the
premium. Bretl stated the employees con-
tribution for a family plan under the countys
current Tier 1 plan is $155 per month. He
also stated that under the countys present
plan, an employee can see a variety of
providers. He said that if the county moves
to the State Health Plan, it is cheaper for the
county but it is more expensive for a more
inclusive plan from the employees perspec-
tive. He stated the Board does not need to
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by
the Executive Committee 5-0)
Vice-Chair Grant offered a motion,
seconded by Supervisor Weber, to approve
Ordinance No. 782-05/13. A Supervisor
excused himself from the meeting temporar-
ily. The Board moved on to the next item
until the Supervisor returned. A roll call vote
was taken. Total votes: 11. Ayes: 8
Brandl, Grant, Kilkenny, Schaefer,
Schiefelbein, Stacey, Weber, and Russell;
Noes: 3 Brellenthin, Monroe, and
Redenius; Absent: 0. Ordinance No. 782-
05/13 was approved by roll call vote.
New Business
Reports of Standing Committees
County Zoning Agency Report of
Proposed Zoning Amendments
1. S. Terry Woods, Ltd., Inc. (Terry
Woods, Owner/Applicant), Section 31, Linn
Township. Rezone approximately .85 acres
of A-2 to A-4 Approved: 4-0 (May 16, 2013
County Zoning Agency Public Hearing)
On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, sec-
onded by Supervisor Stacey, Item 1 under
Report of Proposed Zoning Amendments
was approved as recommended by the
County Zoning Agency.
Executive Committee
1. Ord. No. 783-06/13
Amending Section 2-151 of the Walworth
County Code of Ordinances Relating to
Rules and Duties of Members Vote
Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by
the Executive Committee 5-0)
2. Res. No. 29-06/13 Opposing
State Legislation Re-introducing the Use of
Bail Bondsmen in Wisconsin Vote
Required: Majority (Recommended by the
Executive Committee 5-0)
3. Res. No. 30-06/13
Recognizing Joshua P. Grube, Deputy
District Attorney, on Receiving the 2013
Voices of Courage Award Conveyed by the
Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault
Vote Required: Majority (Recommended
by the Executive Committee 5-0)
4. Res. No. 31-06/13 Opposing
State Legislation Setting Hours for
Obtaining Absentee Ballots Vote
Required: Majority (Recommended by the
Executive Committee 5-0)
5. Res. No. 32-06/13 Denying
the Claim of Thomas R. Austin Vote
Required: Majority (Recommended by the
Executive Committee 5-0)
Vice-Chair Grant offered a motion,
seconded by Supervisor Weber, to approve
Item 1, Ordinance No. 783-06/13. On
motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by
Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 783-
06/13 was approved by unanimous consent.
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Brandl, Item 2,
Resolution No. 29-06/13; Item 4, Resolution
No. 31-06/13; and Item 5, Resolution No.
32-06/13, were approved by voice vote.
Item 3, Resolution No. 30-06/13, was
acted upon earlier in the meeting.
Finance Committee
1. Discussion and possible action
regarding the communication from
Supervisor Rick Stacey regarding zoning
fees
2. Res. No. 27-06/13
Committing Children with Disabilities
Education Board 2013 Fund Balances
Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended
by the Children with Disabilities Education
Board 3-0 and the Finance Committee 5-0)
3. Res. No. 28-06/13
Recognizing Trina Adams for Receiving the
American Payroll Associations Citation of
Merit Vote Required: Majority
(Recommended by the Finance Committee
5-0)
Chair Russell stated that Item #1,
Discussion and possible action regarding
the communication from Supervisor Stacey
regarding zoning fees, was defeated at the
Finance Committee meeting by a vote of 2-
3. She stated it was recommended to
review the fee structure. On motion by
Supervisor Kilkenny, seconded by Vice-
Chair Grant, Supervisor Staceys communi-
cation was placed on file.
Supervisor Weber offered a motion,
seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, to approve
Item 2, Resolution No. 27-06/13. On motion
by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by
Supervisor Weber, Resolution No. 27-06/13
was approved by unanimous consent.
Item 3, Resolution No. 28-06/13, was
discussed earlier in the meeting.
Human Resources Committee
1. Discussion and possible action
regarding the future of Walworth Countys
health plan and on-site clinic
2. Ord. No. 784-06/13
Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth
County Code of Ordinances Relating to the
Creation of a Circuit Court Commissioner
Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended
by the Human Resources Committee 5-0)
3. Ord. No. 785-06/13
Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth
County Code of Ordinances Relating to the
Creation of Six Project Economic Support
Specialists and the Reclassification of an
HS Worker II to an Economic Support
Specialist Vote Required: Two-thirds
(Recommended by the Human Resources
Committee 5-0)
4. Ord. No. 786-06/13
Amending Section 15-359 of the Walworth
County Code of Ordinances Relating to
Special Pay Premiums for Health and
Human Services Employees Vote
Required: Majority (Recommended by the
Human Resources Committee 5-0)
5. Res. No. 33-06/13 Adopting
the Pay Range for the Circuit Court
Commissioner Position Vote Required:
Majority (Recommended by the Human
Resources Committee 5-0)
Item #1, Discussion and possible
action regarding the future of Walworth
Countys health plan and on-site clinic, was
discussed later in the meeting.
Supervisor Monroe offered a motion,
seconded by Supervisor Brandl, to approve
Item 2, Ordinance No. 784-06/13. On
motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by
Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 784-
06/13 was approved by unanimous consent.
Vice-Chair Grant offered a motion,
seconded by Supervisor Brandl, to approve
Item 3, Ordinance No. 785-06/13. On
motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by
Supervisor Brandl, Ordinance No. 785-
06/13 was approved by unanimous consent.
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Monroe, Item 4,
Ordinance No. 786-06/13, and Item 5,
Resolution No. 33-06/13, were approved by
voice vote.
Park Committee
1. Res. No. 34-06/13
Supporting a Land Acquisition in the Town of
Troy by the Nature Conservancy for
Conservation and Recreational Purposes
Vote Required: Majority (The Park
Committee considered this item at a special
meeting on June 10, 2013 and it was rec-
ommended 5-0)
On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, sec-
onded by Supervisor Weber, Resolution No.
34-06/13 was approved by voice vote.
Closed Session
The Board will convene in closed ses-
sion pursuant to the exemption contained in
Section 19.85 (1)(e) of the Wisconsin
Statutes, Deliberating or negotiating the
purchasing of public properties, the invest-
ing of public funds, or conducting other
specified public business, whenever com-
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
save money for employees and taxpayers.
Bob Schiltz, 2142 Sheridan Springs
Road, Lyons Township. He stated he repre-
sents the Deputy Sheriffs Association. He
spoke in favor of the county continuing with
its current partially self-funded plan. He
also spoke in favor of the board aggressive-
ly looking into making the current health
plan a Health Savings Account (HSA) type
plan and the on-site clinic to help reduce the
overall costs of that plan.
Executive Committee
3. Res. No. 30-06/13
Recognizing Joshua P. Grube, Deputy
District Attorney, on Receiving the 2013
Voices of Courage Award Conveyed by the
Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault
Vote Required: Majority (Recommended
by the Executive Committee 5-0)
On motion by Supervisor Weber, sec-
onded by Supervisor Brandl, Resolution No.
30-06/13 was approved by voice vote.
Chair Russell asked Deputy District
Attorney Joshua Grube and District Attorney
Daniel Necci to come forward. Chair
Russell read the resolution. District
Attorney Necci addressed the board.
Deputy District Attorney Grube thanked the
board for the recognition.
Finance Committee
3. Res. No. 28-06/13
Recognizing Trina Adams for Receiving the
American Payroll Associations Citation of
Merit Vote Required: Majority
(Recommended by the Finance Committee
5-0)
On motion by Supervisor Schaefer,
seconded by Supervisor Weber, Resolution
No. 28-06/13 was approved by voice vote.
Chair Russell asked Trina Adams and Nicki
Andersen, Deputy County Administrator
Finance to come forward. Chair Russell
read the resolution. Andersen addressed
the Board. Ms. Adams thanked the board
for the recognition.
Appointments/Elections
1. Aging and Disability Resource
Center Governing Board (ADRC) - Ryan
Keller Three-year term to begin upon con-
firmation and end on June 30, 2016
(Recommended by the Executive
Committee 5-0)
On motion by Supervisor Schaefer,
seconded by Supervisor Weber, the
appointment of Ryan Keller to the ADRC
was approved by voice vote.
Communications and Matters to Be
Referred
Chair Russell announced that unless
there was a request for an individual com-
munication to be discussed, the Clerk would
dispense with the reading of each title and
the Chair would direct that all communica-
tions be referred or placed on file as indicat-
ed on the agenda.
1. Claims Received After Agenda
Mailing
2. Claims: None.
3. Outagamie County Resolution
No. 142013-14 Opposing all legislative
efforts to remove local control of the 911
system (To be referred to the Executive
Committee)
4. Portage County Resolution No.
155-2012-2014 Resolution In Support of
Amending State Law to Permit a Multi-
Vendor Student Information System for
Wisconsin School Districts by 2013
Assembly Bill 60 and 2013 Senate Bill 54
(To be referred to the Executive Committee)
5. Manitowoc County Resolution
No. 2013/2014-11 Resolution Requesting
State Funding of Lake Michigan Beach
Testing Programs (To be referred to the
Executive Committee)
6. Correspondence received from
the State of Wisconsin Criminal Justice
Coordinating Council in regard to creating or
working to further advance the countys
Criminal Justice Coordinating Council (To
be referred to the Executive Committee)
7. Correspondence received from
Governor Scott Walker acknowledging
receipt of Walworth County resolution (To
be placed on file)
8. Correspondence received from
Senator Tim Cullen acknowledging receipt
of Walworth County resolutions (To be
placed on file)
9. Report of the County Clerk
Regarding Communications Received by
the Board and Recommended to be Placed
on File
Langlade County Resolution
#34-2013 Opposition to Increasing
Acreage of Alien Ownership (was previous-
ly referred to the Executive Committee)
Manitowoc County Resolution
No. 2013/2014-13 Resolution Opposing
AB 85 and SB 95 (was previously referred
to the Executive Committee)
10. Report of the County Clerk
Regarding Communications Received by
the Board After the Agenda Mailing
Resolution No. 33-06/13
Adopting the Pay Range for the Circuit
Court Commissioner Position Vote
Required: Majority (Recommended by the
Human Resources Committee 5-0)
Town of Richmond Ordinance
No. 5/21/13-2 An ordinance amending
Chapter 10 of the Town Code of the Town of
Richmond, relating to Buildings and Building
Regulations To be referred to the County
Zoning Agency
Town of Richmond Ordinance
No. 5/21/13 An ordinance amending and
replacing Chapter 39 of the Town Code of
the Town of Richmond, Wisconsin, to pro-
vide for the licensing of center pivot manure
distribution systems in the Town of
Richmond To be referred to the County
Zoning Agency
Correspondence received from
Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning
Commission (SEWRPC) in regard to the
SEWRPC Planning Report No. 54, A
Regional Housing Plan for Southeastern
Wisconsin: 2035 To be referred to the
Executive Committee (The full report can be
viewed in the County Clerks office)
Correspondence received from
State Representative Andy Jorgensen
acknowledging receipt of Walworth County
resolutions To be placed on file
Correspondence received via
e-mail from State Representative David
Craig acknowledging receipt of Walworth
County resolutions To be placed on file
Correspondence received from
Secretary Mark Gottlieb, Wisconsin
Department of Transportation, acknowledg-
ing receipt of Walworth County Resolution
No. 20-05/13 To be placed on file
Walworth County Aging &
Disability Resource Center News, June
2013 To be placed on file
11. Report of the County Clerk
Regarding Zoning Petitions (To be referred
to the County Zoning Agency)
David A. Hernandez and
Tereasa Surratt, Sugar Creek Township.
Rezone approximately 3.12 acres of R-1
Single Family Residential District to P-1
Recreational Park District
Adam Friemoth and Donald
Barker, Lafayette Township. Rezone
approximately 5.28 acres of A-2 Agricultural
District to A-1 Prime Agricultural District and
rezone 5.28 acres of A-1 to A-2
Unfinished Business
1. Ord. No. 782-05/13
Amending Section 2-45 of the Walworth
County Code of Ordinances Relating to
County Board Supervisor Compensation
For Supervisors Elected in 2014 Vote
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
ORDINANCE NO. 791 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-17
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO THE CREATION
OF A TREATMENT COURT
COORDINATOR POSITION IN THE
CLERK OF COURTS OFFICE
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-17 in
Division 2 of Article I of Chapter 15 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to create a 1.00 Treatment
Court Coordinator position to oversee the
management of the OWI Court and Pre-
Trial Diversion Programs in Walworth
County.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 793 07/13
AMENDING SECTIONS 15-6
AND 15-810 OF THE WALWORTH COUN-
TY CODE OF
ORDINANCES RELATING
TO POSITION TITLES IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-6 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
PART II: That Section 15-810 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to update the Code with
respect to the titles of several Information
Technology positions that were referenced
in the Code but no longer exist.
PART III: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 796 07/13
AMENDING SECTION 15-17
OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY
CODE OF ORDINANCES
RELATING TO THE 2013-14
LAKELAND SCHOOL
STAFFING PLAN
THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD
OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS
FOLLOWS:
PART I: That Section 15-17 in
Division 2 of Article I of Chapter 15 of the
Walworth County Code of Ordinances is
hereby amended.
The purpose of this ordinance
amendment is to eliminate two teacher posi-
tions (-2.0 FTE) transitioned to the school
district and increase six special education
aide positions (+1.50 FTE) to full-time due
to the Patient Protection & Affordable Care
Act. Staffing levels were reviewed for com-
pliance with requirements under this act.
PART II: This ordinance shall
become effective upon passage and publi-
cation.
The full text of this ordinance is on file
in the County Clerks office, Room 101,
Government Center, 100 West Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262-
741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us
PASSED and ADOPTED by the
Walworth County Board of Supervisors this
9th day of July 2013.
Nancy Russell
County Board Chair
Kimberly S. Bushey
Attest: County Clerk
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
JUNE 11, 2013
WALWORTH COUNTY
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
MEETING
The Walworth County Board of
Supervisors meeting was called to order by
Chair Russell at 6:00 p.m. in the County
Board Room at the Walworth County
Government Center, 100 W. Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
Roll call was conducted and the fol-
lowing Supervisors were present: Richard
Brandl, Tim Brellenthin, Vice-Chair Jerry A.
Grant, Daniel G. Kilkenny, Kenneth H.
Monroe, Carl Redenius, Joe Schaefer, Tim
Schiefelbein, Rick Stacey, David A. Weber,
and Chair Nancy Russell. A quorum was
established.
Kimberly S. Bushey, Walworth
County Clerk, delivered the invocation.
Amendments, Withdrawals, and
Approval of Agenda
On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, sec-
onded by Supervisor Weber, the agenda
was approved by voice vote with the follow-
ing amendments: 1) move Executive
Committee Item #3 and Finance Committee
Item #3 to immediately after Comment
Period by Members of the Public
Concerning Items on the Agenda; 2) move
the Closed Session regarding Establishing
negotiating parameters for the potential
acquisition or lease of on-site clinic building
to immediately after Park Committee; and 3)
move Human Resources Committee Item
#1 to immediately follow this Closed
Session.
Approval of the Minutes
On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, sec-
onded by Supervisor Brandl, the May 14,
2013 County Board meeting minutes were
approved by voice vote.
Comment Period by Members of the
Public Concerning Items on the Agenda
Linda Eastburg, 5751 State Road 50,
Lyons Township. Ms. Eastburg addressed
the board regarding the Walworth County
health insurance. She spoke in favor of the
on-site clinic because employees will
receive better care and the on-site clinic will
JUNE 11, 2013 SESSION
OF THE
WALWORTH COUNTY
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE
The Walworth County Board
Committee of the Whole meeting was called
to order by Chair Russell at 5:07 p.m. at the
Government Center, 100 W. Walworth
Street, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
Roll Call
Roll Call was conducted and the fol-
lowing Supervisors were present: Richard
Brandl, Tim Brellenthin, Vice-Chair Jerry A.
Grant, Daniel G. Kilkenny, Kenneth H.
Monroe, Carl Redenius, Joe Schaefer, Tim
Schiefelbein, Rick Stacey, David A. Weber,
and Chair Nancy Russell.
The purpose of the meeting is:
o Presentation by the
Wisconsin & Southern Railroad
(WSOR) regarding opportunities
provided by WSOR operations for
economic development
Ken Lucht, Director of Government
Relations of Wisconsin & Southern Railroad
LLC, delivered a presentation. Mr. Lucht
stated that Walworth County has been a
founding member of the Wisconsin River
Please turn to page 8
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
to place a listing or
for more information
8B The Regional News July 18, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICES
BIG FOOT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
staff in answering questions, sending out
updates, and works with office staff to make
sure BF is keeping compliant, etc. Dan indi-
cated he will personally work to make a
smooth transition if insurances companies
are changed.
Eugene Dunk gave a brief history of
WEA and its long relationship with Big Foot.
Because of Act 10, WEA has made changes
including their bylaws so they are able to
offer plans to the state and municipalities.
Big Foots loss ratio for 2012-13 was $1.23
to $1.00 and carried some large claims
which caused the proposed increase of
7.8%. Eugene indicated that over 10 years
the aggregate was less than 35%. He is
proud of their organization, people and his-
tory. Eugene also indicated that it has been
a pleasure to serve Big Foot and if BF
moves to a different carrier, that hopefully
some day WEA will be able to be Big Foots
provider once again.
On a Bill Grunow/Kim Arntz motion,
the Board accepted WCA to be the health
and dental provider for Big Foot High School
and EPIC to provide the life, long-term dis-
ability and short-term disability for 2013-
2014. Motion carried 5/0.
The meeting adjourned at 6:43 p.m.
on a McCarthy/Arntz motion. Motion carried
5/0.
Gretchen McCarthy, Clerk
Deborah Way, Recording Secretary
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
WILLIAMS BAY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILLIAMS BAY SCHOOL
NOTICE OF ANNUAL
DISTRICT MEETING
MISSION STATEMENT
Williams Bay School District promotes aca-
demic excellence through diverse opportu-
nities and student-centered education deliv-
ered by a team of dedicated professionals in
a nurturing environment. We are committed
to progress and will employ technology,
embrace community partnerships, and work
to maximize each students potential in
order to create confident, creative problem
solvers for our global society.
Notice is hereby given to qualified electors
of the Williams Bay School District, that the
annual meeting of said district for the trans-
action of business will be held in the lecture
center at the Williams Bay JR/SR High
School, 500 W Geneva Street, Williams
Bay, WI, on the 22nd day of July, 2013, at 8
oclock P.M..
Rebecca Boggs
Clerk
July 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
BIG FOOT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
BIG FOOT UNION HIGH SCHOOL
BOARD OF EDUCATION
Special Meeting
May 29, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: President
Edward Hayden called the meeting to order
at 6:04 p.m. on a roll call vote: Gretchen
McCarthy, yes; Kim Arntz, yes; Edward
Hayden, yes; Bill Grunow, yes. Susan
Pruessing (arrived at 6:15 p.m.)
ALSO PRESENT: Dorothy
Kaufmann, District Administrator; Deborah
Way, Administrative Assistant; Eugene Dunk
representing WEA and Dan Martin repre-
senting WCA; and current and retired staff
members: Chrys Hovestol, Jan Berlin, Jen
Taylor, Michael Manghera, Kim Pitassi,
Margarita Gomez, Mike Sroda, Beth Grever,
Gail August, Neal Raskin, Amanda Boland,
Mary Burke and Marsha Ries.
There were no agenda revisions.
Personnel: Action to Approve
Recommendation for Filling the Art Position:
On a Gretchen McCarthy/Bill Grunow
motion, the board approved the hiring of
Becky Kohler as the new art teacher.
Motion carried 4/0. She is replacing
Jennifer King. Becky is presently teaching
at Evansville High School on a 65% con-
tract, comes highly recommended and is
very skilled in every area of the art curricu-
lum.
Request for Summer Hours: On a Bill
Grunow/Gretchen McCarthy motion, the
board approved 200 technology hours for
Tom Schauf and 67 Athletic Director hours
for Tim Collins. Motion carried 4/0.
Discussion and Possible Action on
Employee Health Care Coverage for the
2013-2014 school year: Edward Hayden
agreed to give ten minutes to the support
staff members in attendance to speak
regarding the topic. Previously, employees
were given an opportunity to speak on this
subject at the May 20, 2013 BOE meeting.
Jan Berlin spoke in favor of the switch.
WCAs coverage is comparable to WEAs
and with staff paying 12.6% of the premium;
it would save approximately $720 per year
for those with a family plan when computed
against WEAs July 1st renewal rate. Kim
Pitassi indicated that she would like to stay
with WEA because she is familiar with the
plan and knows what to expect with WEA. It
would give her peace of mind. Chrys
Hovestol read a statement indicating she
supports the switch to WCA because of the
cost savings for comparable insurance.
Gail August also favored the switch to WEA
because of the money savings, not only to
the staff, but to the school district. The com-
munity may ask why a change wasnt made
when there was an opportunity to save
money especially in light of the referendum
not passing and the Boards plan to try
again.
Gretchen McCarthy spoke of her
meeting with Dan Martin which included Kim
Arntz. Mr. Martin was able to answer all her
questions and put her mind at ease that if
the switch was made, the benefit package is
comparable to what Big Foot presently
offers. Premiums can be reduced because
discounts are based on United Health
Cares network. Gretchen also spoke about
the Affordable Care Act and how that will
affect Big Foot and the plans we offer.
Also discussed was the issue of net-
work and non-network providers. As long
as members have a referral from a Dr. in
network, then members can still go to
providers out of network with the same ben-
efit level and payment as those in network.
Members are still able to go out of network
if they choose but they would pay the 20%
co-insurance. The Wellness piece of WCA
was also reviewed as well as deductibles
that members have met with WEA will be
credited. It was also noted that if Big Foot
continues with WCA in 2014-2015, the max-
imum premium increase would be capped at
12%.
Mike Sroda asked why we went with
a third party broker who receives 1.5% com-
mission and not go to WCA directly. Dan
Martin explained that Big Foot would pay
the same rate whether we contract with
WCA directly or work through a third party.
The broker works on gathering data and
shopping around for the most competitive
rates. Their customer service works with
BIG FOOT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
h. Status of Union Dues
Collection for 2013-2014: Union dues will
continue to be collected until the end of the
2012-2013 school years. BFHS will not col-
lect union dues for the upcoming 2013-2014
school year. Approval was made on a
Hayden/Pruessing motion, carried 5/0.
i. Consideration & Approval
CESA 2 Contract: Dorothy Kaufmann
reported that the only service we will be
requesting from CESA #2 is the
Administration (state required) service at a
fee of $586.00 per school year. Approval
was made on a Pruessing/McCarthy
motion, carried 5/0.
j. Update of Food Service
Contract with Fontana: Dorothy Kaufmann
reported that the Fontana School District will
not be utilizing our food services. Due to
cost, they have decided to go back to Taher
through Williams Bay.
k. Private School Transportation
Contracts: Approval of the contracts for pri-
vate school transportation was made on a
Hayden/McCarthy motion, carried 5/0.
l. Requests for Summer Hours
Guidance Counselors 50 hours each to be
completed by June 30, 2013: Mike Hinske
asked the BOE for an additional 50 hours of
work time for each Guidance Counselor to
be completed by June 30, 2013. Approval
was made on a Grunow/McCarthy motion,
carried 5/0.
m. Proposal to Extend Guidance
Counselors Contracts from 191 days to 201
days effective July 1, 2013: Mike Hinske
requested that the BOE extend the
Guidance Counselors contracts from 191 to
201 days. He is asking for 5 additional days
at the end of the school year and 5 addition-
al days prior to the beginning of the new
year. He said that there is an approximate
cost of $6,900 associated with it, but feels it
is definitely worth it and will make a big
impact on the students and getting their
schedules set up correctly. Approval to
accept the extension of contracts for
Guidance Counselors was made on an
Arntz/Grunow motion, carried 5/0.
n. Recognition of Art Students @
Geneva Lake Art Association Exhibit:
Dorothy Kaufmann reported that three
BFHS students were awarded for outstand-
ing art work. Zoe Klesmith received $500 for
her drawing, Sophia; Kyle Rambatt received
$250 for his self-portrait; and Eli Thompson
received $100 for his ceramic piece, Circle
Teapot. Ed Hayden said this reflects well on
our students and congratulations to all.
o. Legislative Update: Mike
Hinske asked BOE members to pay real
close attention for the next four weeks to
what is happening in the state legislature.
The Legislature is looking at capping Fund
80 and increasing the per pupil rate to $200.
Mike said he will send letters to Loudenbeck
and Kedzie. There was also some discus-
sion of the voucher system.
MEETINGS / ACTIVITIES:
a. BFHS Top Ten Dinner will be
held on May 22, 2013 @ Lake Lawn @ 6:00
PM
b. Honors Day will be May 31,
2013 @ 12:15 pm
c. Senior Dinner will be at 5:00
PM & Honor Night at 7:00 PM on June 1,
2013
d. Graduation will take place on
June 2,2013 @ 1:00 PM
e. Retirement party will take place
on June 6, 2013 @ 11:45 AM
f. AHS Graduation Breakfast will
be on June 7, 2013 @ 9:00 AM @ the
Monte Carlo Room. Kim Arntz will not be
able to attend. Ed Hayden will take his
place.
SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR THE
NEXT MEETING AGENDA: Dorothy
Kaufmann suggested that health insurance
be discussed at another meeting. Jan Berlin
passed out additional information for the
board members to go through which com-
pares WEA to WCA.
ADJOURN MEETING: The meeting
was adjourned at 8:44 p.m. Members took a
Roll Call Vote, (McCarthy, yes; Arntz, yes;
Hayden, yes; Pruessing, yes; and Grunow,
yes) and moved to the Office Conference
Room for a closed session meeting.
Gretchen McCarthy, Clerk
Melinda Nelson, Recording Secretary
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
BIG FOOT UNION HIGH SCHOOL
BOARD OF EDUCATION
SPECIAL MEETING: Open
June 5, 2013
RETURN TO OPEN SESSION: Roll
Call Vote, Bill Grunow, yes; Kim Arntz, yes;
and Edward Hayden, yes.
UPDATE ON INSURANCE PLAN
COVERAGE: Mrs. Kaufmann provided the
board members with information on both the
WEA and EPIC plans related to Life, LTD
and STD coverage and that Dan Martin had
informed us that there was a difference with
the life insurance conversion policy cover-
age. He said they were not the same and
that he recommended that we remain with
WEA Insurance for coverage of Life, LTD,
and STD.
RECOMMENDATION TO REMAIN
WITH COVERAGE FOR LIFE, LTD AND
STD: A motion was made by Bill Grunow
and seconded by Kim Arntz to change cov-
erage from EPIC back to WEA for Life, LTD
and STD, carried 3-0.
ADJOURN REGULAR MEETING: A
motion to adjourn the regular meeting at
8:07 PM was made by Kim Arntz with a sec-
ond from Bill Grunow, carried 3-0. Edward
Hayden, BOE President
Dorothy Kaufmann, Recording Secretary
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
BIG FOOT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
reminded the other members that Steven
attended every meeting. The board present-
ed Steven with a UW-Madison sweatshirt,
where hell be attending in the fall.
REPORTS:
a. Recreation Directors Report:
Chuck Thiesenhusen reported that the sum-
mer guide has been out for about a month.
Registration has been slow up until the last
couple of days. At a later date, he will give
the findings of the survey. He suggested
that a separate agenda item be put on next
months itinerary.
b. Student Council Report: Steven Schauf
reported that half of the Student Council
members participated in the Day of Service.
At this time the underclassmen are working
on the senior display for the graduates.
c. Principals Report: *Mike Hinske
informed BOE members that last
Wednesday was the second time Day of
Service was hosted by BFHS. Seventy stu-
dents participated and seemed to really
enjoy it. They got a lot of work done!
*Master Schedule was turned over to
Guidance Dept. The impact of the cuts was
reflected by the constraints on the schedule,
it was very challenging.
*Title 1 Focus Report has been sub-
mitted to the state. Mike felt they made good
progress and the Math Team worked very
well. This Friday the training team will meet
for the 6th and final session at UW-
Parkside.
*This Sunday is the graduation cere-
mony. Participants need to be here at 12:30
PM.
*Wednesday night the RVC Top Ten
dinner will be held at Lake Lawn Lodge @
6:00PM. There will be a short program. At
this time eight out of the ten students have
responded.
* Seventeen students have met the
standards and finished a portfolio for
Diploma Endorsements. They were honored
at Abbey Springs on Thursday.
*WSMA State Band and Choir partici-
pated at UW-Whitewater. The Jazz Band
received a number 1 rating and a standing
ovation. Congratulations to Neil Raskin and
Marie Severing for a job well done!
District Administrators Report:
Dorothy stated that this weekend is a spe-
cial time for the seniors and everyone is
working hard to make it a memorable event.
Flowers will be planted in the front circle at
9:15 AM tomorrow.
OLD BUSINESS:
a. Approval of Open Enrollment
Contracts-In and Open Enrollment
Contracts Out: Dorothy reported at this time
we have 27 Open Enrollment Students in
and 23 Open Enrollment Students out. This
speaks well of the teachers and administra-
tion. Students still have until the third week
of September to make their decisions.
Approval was made on a McCarthy/Grunow
motion, carried 5/0.
NEW BUSINESS:
a. Discussion of Health Insurance
Options for 2013-2014: Mike Manghera,
BFE President, addressed the BOE and
passed out an outline with information on
how the possible insurance change to WCA
could adversely affect the faculty at BFHS.
He also handed out materials from the State
of Wisconsin/Office of the Commissioner of
Insurance and written testimonials from
Jennifer Taylor, Nicole Raskin and Mary
Burke. The board also listened to endorse-
ments from Neal Raskin, Kim Pitassi, Marie
Severing and Stephanie Call regarding their
positive experiences with WEA Trust. Mike
Manghera asked that the board look at the
information and if they should have any
questions, to please contact him. He asked
that they carefully consider the decision that
is before them. Kim Arntz thanked the
teachers and other interested parties that
attended. Gretchen McCarthy stated that
the BOE needs to educate themselves
about WEA and WCA. They need to be fis-
cally responsible and need to get all the
facts, costs, etc.
b. Consideration of Koerner
Transportation Contract: Dorothy Kaufmann
reported that they are asking for a 4%
increase over last year. Koerner transports
our students to Lakeland School. Approval
was made on a Grunow/McCarthy motion,
carried 4/0. Kim Arntz abstained.
c. Retirement Letter Tricia
Reece: Dorothy Kaufmann read Tricias res-
ignation letter. Liz Lochner said that she
worked with Tricia for ten years and she is a
rare soul that was appreciated so much.
She went on to say she had an innate sense
with students and will be greatly missed.
With deep regrets, approval to accept the
resignation was made on an
Arntz/Pruessing motion carried 5/0.
d. Resignation Letter Jennifer
King: The approval to accept the resigna-
tion was made on a Pruessing/Grunow
motion carried 5/0.
e. Resignation Letter Stephanie
Fuerst: The approval to accept the resigna-
tion was made on an Arntz/Grunow motion
carried 5/0.
f. Recommendation for JV Boys
Basketball: Dorothy Kaufmann reported that
Tim Collins recommended Jeff Fenrick for
the position of JV Boys Basketball Coach.
Approval was made on an Arntz/Grunow
motion, carried 5/0.
g. Selection of Food Service Bids:
Dorothy Kaufmann reported on the food
service bids. Alpha Baking Co. and Fox
River Foods are roll-over bids and Novaks
was the only party to bid on the sub sand-
wiches. We received two bids for pizza, but
Mama Ciminos was not made to the specifi-
cations of the bid, therefore, the recommen-
dation was made to continue with Novaks.
Two bids were made for milk by Dean
Foods and ECO. Dean Foods was the lower
bidder. Approval to accept the recommend-
ed bids was made on a Grunow/Pruessing
motion, carried 5/0.
BIG FOOT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
BIG FOOT HIGH SCHOOL
BOARD OF EDUCATION
REGULAR MONTHLY MEETING
May 20, 2013
CALL TO ORDER: The regular meet-
ing of the Big Foot High School Board of
Education held in the lecture hall of Big Foot
High School was called to order at 7:03 p.m.
by Ed Hayden.
BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT:
Gretchen McCarthy, Kim Arntz, Bill Grunow,
Ed Hayden and Sue Pruessing (Pruessing
arrived at 7:35 PM).
BOARD MEMBERS NOT PRESENT:
None
ALSO PRESENT: Mike Hinske,
Principal, Steven Schauf, BFHS Student
Council Representative, Dorothy Kaufmann,
District Administrator and Melinda Nelson,
Recording Secretary.
VISITORS PRESENT: Kristi
Reierson, Jade Bolack, (Lake Geneva
Regional News), Lisa Konkel, Rick
Henningfeld, Deb Way, Elizabeth Abel,
Michael Manghera, Mary Burke, Marsha
Ries, Marie Severing, Jan Berlin, Neal
Raskin, Margarita Gomez, Kim Pitassi and
Stephanie Call.
RECOGNITION OF ANN ZUBOW:
Ed Hayden represented the BOE by recog-
nizing past president, Ann Zubow for her
many years of appreciated service. She was
presented with a plaque and flowers.
REORGANIZATION OF THE BIG
FOOT UNION HIGH SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION:
SELECTION OF OFFICERS:
*Kim Arntz moved to nominate Ed
Hayden as President, seconded by
Gretchen McCarthy. Motion to close nomi-
nations was made on an Arntz/McCarthy
motion, carried 4/0.
*Kim Arntz moved to nominate Bill
Grunow as Vice President, seconded by
Gretchen McCarthy. Motion to close nomi-
nations was made on a McCarthy/Arntz
motion, carried 4/0.
*Ed Hayden moved to nominate
Gretchen McCarthy as Clerk, seconded by
Kim Arntz. Motion to close nominations was
made on a Hayden/Arntz motion, carried
4/0.
*Gretchen McCarthy moved to nomi-
nate Kim Arntz as Treasurer, seconded by
Bill Grunow. Motion to close nominations
was made on a Hayden/McCarthy motion,
carried 4/0.
*Sue Pruessing will remain as the
Member of the BFHS School Board.
OTHER APPOINTED POSTS:
*Gretchen McCarthy moved to nomi-
nate Kim Arntz as BFASA Representative,
seconded by Bill Grunow. Motion to close
nominations was made on a
Hayden/McCarthy motion, carried 4/0.
*Gretchen McCarthy moved to nomi-
nate Walworth State Bank, Sharon
Community Bank and LGIP as Designated
Bank Depositories, seconded by Kim Arntz.
Motion to close nominations was made on a
Hayden/McCarthy motion, carried 4/0.
*Bill Grunow moved to nominate Lake
Geneva Regional News as Designated
Official Newspaper, seconded by Gretchen
McCarthy. Motion to close nominations was
made on a Hayden/Arntz motion, carried
4/0.
*Kim Arntz moved to nominate Deb
Way as Designated Board Secretary, sec-
onded by Ed Hayden. Motion to close nom-
inations was made on a McCarthy/Arntz
motion, carried 4/0.
*Bill Grunow moved to nominate
Gretchen McCarthy as WASB Delegate
Representative, seconded by Ed Hayden.
Motion to close nominations was made on
Arntz/Hayden motion, carried 4/0.
* Ed Hayden moved to nominate Sue
Pruessing as BFHS Educational Foundation
Representative, seconded by Kim Arntz.
Motion to close nominations was made on a
McCarthy/Grunow motion, carried 4/0.
*Gretchen McCarthy moved to nomi-
nate Sue Pruessing as Board
Representative to CESA 2, seconded by Bill
Grunow. Motion to close nominations was
made on a McCarthy/Arntz motion, carried
4/0.
COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVES:
* Gretchen McCarthy moved to nomi-
nate Kim Arntz and Ed Hayden as Policy
Committee Members, seconded by Bill
Grunow. Motion to close nominations was
made on a Hayden/McCarthy motion, car-
ried 4/0.
* Ed Hayden moved to nominate Sue
Pruessing and Gretchen McCarthy as
Building and Grounds Members, seconded
by Kim Arntz. Motion to close nominations
was made on a Hayden/Arntz motion, car-
ried 4/0.
* Ed Hayden moved to nominate Bill
Grunow and Kim Arntz as Negotiations
Team Members, seconded by Gretchen
McCarthy. Motion to close nominations was
made on a Hayden/Grunow motion, carried
4/0.
MEETING TIME/NIGHT: It was decid-
ed that the BOE meetings will remain on the
3rd Monday of each month @ 7:00 PM.
OTHER PROCEDURAL CHANGES: None
AGENDA REVISIONS/ADOPTIONS:
Ed Hayden asked that the AHS breakfast
info be added under Meetings and Activities.
Dorothy Kaufmann asked to move the
health insurance options to the top of new
business.
APPROVE MINUTES OF APRIL 15,
2013 REGULAR MEETING: Ed Hayden
asked that a correction be made to the pre-
vious minutes regarding the vote to move
the AG teacher over to the science depart-
ment for 50% of the time. Minutes reflected
carried 3/0 whereas it should read 3/1, due
to Sue Pruessing voting no. Approval was
made on an Arntz/McCarthy motion, carried
5/0.
REVIEW BANK RECONCILIATION
FOR APRIL, 2013 AND APPROVE PAY-
MENT OF BILLS FOR APRIL, 2013 AND
May, 2013: Review of the bank reconcilia-
tion for district funds for April, 2013 and
approval of payment of bills for April, 2013
and May, 2013was made on an
Arntz/Grunow motion, carried 5/0.
Walworth State Bank General Fund Check
Numbers 45291-45541 & voids 44539,
45124 & 45328
$ 326,450.35
Walworth State Bank Payrolls 4/25/13 &
5/9/13 $ 308,297.58
Common Remitter for 403(b) Wire
Transfers 4/25 & 5/9/13 $ 17,876.68
Rec. District Bank Fees $ 212.33
WRS April report (ACH) 5/31/13
$ 29,539.76
CITIZENS PARTICIPATION FOR
ITEMS ON OR NOT ON THE WRITTEN
AGENDA: None
PRESENTATION TO STUDENT
COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE: Dorothy
Kaufmann honored Steven Schauf for his
dedication as Student Council President
and as the BFHS Student Board
Representative. Dorothy commented on
what a great job he did and Kim Arntz
WALWORTH
COUNTY LEGALS
Rail Transit Commission. WSOR contracts
with the Wisconsin River Rail Transit
Commission and the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation (DOT). DOT is the man-
ager of the rail road system that WSOR
operates. As a freight rail operator, they
work closely with local units of government.
They operate in 21 counties in Southern
Wisconsin with 44 locomotives that service
over 180 customers throughout their entire
system, which is approximately 600 miles.
Mr. Lucht stated they have 250 dedicated
team members that provide service to all of
their customers on their system.
Mr. Lucht stated that the State of
Wisconsin and Walworth County are
involved in freight rail system preservation
because of the economics. He said one rail
car equates to four trucks. He stated last
year, they surpassed 60,000 car loads. He
also stated that trains and railroads are
environmentally friendly forms of transporta-
tion. He said todays trains can haul one ton
of freight over 480 miles on one gallon of
diesel fuel and they are continuing to
improve this so the costs savings to users is
substantial.
He stated their primary commodity is
grain and 50% of their traffic is related to
agricultural and energy products. He stated
it has been a successful partnership work-
ing the counties and the State of Wisconsin
as it has resulted in 40 new businesses in
the past five years and led to the creation of
1,300 new jobs. He added they have 12
new businesses in the planning stages.
He stated the company was estab-
lished in 1988 and at that time, they had
approximately 7,500 car loads. In 2012,
they surpassed 60,000 car loads. He also
stated they were affected by the recession
but they are climbing out of it. In 2016, they
estimate they will be close to 75,000 car
loads. He said the consequences of having
a successful partnership are the challenges
that you face. One of the biggest chal-
lenges is investments in track and infra-
structure. Over the last 30 years, they have
had an aggressive capital upgrade plan to
invest in these corridors to bring them up to
modern standards. A program that they
support and share with the Wisconsin River
Rail Transit Commission and DOT is an
aggressive tie replacement program. He
said one tie, if properly maintained, can last
over 40 years. They have an annual contin-
uous welded rail program as the majority of
the track operated on is a jointed track
which is nearly over 100 years old and was
designed for much lighter loads. Another
priority for their capital upgrade plan is to
invest in bridges. They have over 360
bridges that are not up to modern stan-
dards, which have resulted in numerous
slow orders where trains can only go 5 miles
per hour due to the age and condition of the
bridges. He stated the priority is to replace
these structures that are deteriorating. Mr.
Lucht gave an overview of a 2013 Capital
Rehab Project in Walworth County, which is
the Janesville to Zenda CWR (Continuous
Welded Rail) Project. He stated this is an
$11 million project with 80% coming from
DOT and 20% coming from WSOR. He
stated all projects use domestic products
with most materials coming from the
Midwest.
Mr. Lucht gave an overview of the
socio-economic benefits of freight rail,
which include 200 businesses employing
34,500 people; businesses pay $34 million
in property taxes per year; railroads pay $27
million in ad valorem taxes per year, which
is a tax on equipment, locomotives, and ter-
minals and buildings; rail saves agriculture
producers approximately $6 million per
year; the system saves Wisconsin taxpay-
ers over $12 million in highway mainte-
nance costs by having freight continued to
be used; 1,100 new jobs created in the past
five years; and 300 new jobs projected in
the next two years. These numbers were
generated by a recent economic impact
study that was conducted by UW-Extension
Services. Mr. Lucht also gave an overview
about the businesses in Walworth County
that use WSOR. He stated that grain is the
largest commodity in Walworth County.
There are approximately 500,000 tons of
products that go in and out of Walworth
County on an annual basis, with 83% of this
being grain or approximately 16.3 million
bushels of corn transported by rail. Another
large commodity in Walworth County is
refrigerated/cold storage foods.
Mr. Lucht opened up the presentation
for any questions and thanked the Board for
their support.
Adjournment
On motion by Supervisor Brandl, sec-
onded by Supervisor Weber, the meeting
was adjourned at 5:37 p.m.
STATE OF WISCONSIN )
) SS
COUNTY OF WALWORTH )
I, Kimberly S. Bushey, County Clerk
in and for the County aforesaid, do hereby
certify that the foregoing is a true and cor-
rect copy of the proceedings of the County
Board of Supervisors for the June 11, 2013
Committee of the Whole Meeting.
July 18, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
ON GENEVA LAKE
Walworth County, WI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
for
PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ZONING
ORDINANCE PIP
AMENDMENT APPLICATION
before
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
PLAN COMMISSION
Monday, July 29, 2013 @ 5:30 PM
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public
Hearing will be held before the Fontana
Plan Commission on Monday, July 29, 2013
beginning at 5:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter
as the matter may be heard, at the Fontana
Village Hall, 175 Valley View Drive, concern-
ing an application to amend the Precise
Implementation Plan for the Abbey Springs
Planned Development Zoning Ordinance
filed by Abbey Springs, Inc., 1 Country Club
Drive, Fontana, WI, for the proposed
exchange of approved mooring spaces on
the Abbey Springs lakefront. Copies of the
application are on file at the Fontana Village
Hall and available for public inspection dur-
ing regular office hours: Monday Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Submitted by:
Dennis L. Martin, Village Clerk
villageclerk@villageoffontana.com
July 11, 18, 2013
WNAXLP
Continued from page 7
11 A.M. FRIDAY
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
CLASSIFIED
AD DEADLINE
EXPERIENCED
LICENSED JOURNEYMAN PLUMBER
401K Plan
Health Insurance
Dental Insurance

Holiday Pay
Vacation Pay
125 Plan
Life Insurance

MUST HAVE EXCELLENT DRIVING RECORD


We are looking for motivated individuals looking
for career opportunities with a progressive, growing
company. Call for an interview or apply in person.
PECK & WEIS HEATING & COOLING INC.
2506 CREST DRIVE
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147
(262) 248-6836
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right
candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business oppor-
tunity today.
SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training
class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call
(262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.
PART-TIME POSITION
OPPORTUNITIES ARE
AVAILABLE FOR:
Accounts
Bookkeeper
Representatives
Payable
Receivable
REQUIREMENTS:
Ability to function
independently in a fast-
paced environment.
If you are interested in
this job please apply
online at
ptommy61@gmail.com
EXPERIENCED
HVAC INSTALLATION & SERVICE TECH
401K Plan
Health Insurance
Dental Insurance

Holiday Pay
Vacation Pay
125 Plan
Life Insurance

MUST HAVE EXCELLENT DRIVING RECORD


We are looking for motivated individuals looking
for career opportunities with a progressive, growing
company. Call for an interview or apply in person.
PECK & WEIS HEATING & COOLING INC.
2506 CREST DRIVE
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147
(262) 248-6836
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 9B
Residential
Rentals
84
Residential
Rentals
84
G& S PROPERTIES Office 694-3077
Call Today to Schedule an Appointment!
7919 60th Ave. #103
1004202
24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping
RENTALS STARTING AT
$
640 per month
2 Bedroom/2 bath
all appliances, full size washer/
dryer, private patio, balcony,
private entry, attached garage
2 Bedroom/1 bath
all appliances, on site laundry,
private patio, balcony,
secured entry, garages available
Quiet
Residential Living
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Mon.-lr|. -5 Sat. 10-+ Sun. by /ppt.
1
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4
2
2
2
Wood Creek
Kenoshas best in apartment living!
1 Beds from $560
2 Beds from $670
552-8365
Residential
For Sale
98
FOR SALE: GARAGE AND LOT in Lake Geneva
on West Barry Street. 262-248-4771
Burial, Cemetery
Lots, Monuments
110
CEMETERY LOTS For sale. #8, one grave
site, #9, one grave site and #10, two grave
sites. Block #15, West Lawn A at Green
Ridge Cemeter y, Kenosha,WI. Asking
$1000.00 per site or best offer. Call Richard
Brown 972-342-4706.
Manufactured
Home Sale/Rent
112
BEACH PARK-For sale, 3BR, 2 bath, sunken
living room, large shed. Ph. 224-730-1623
PARK CITY, IL Senior Community. Marlette.
1344 sq. ft. Excellent condition. 2 BR & 2 full
baths. Large covered deck & carport. New
Central Air. $45,000. 847-204-0117.
Motorcycles 114
08 HARLEY DAVIDSON Street Glide, 22,000
mi, pearl white, new tires. All fluids changed,
many extras. $15,900. 262-279-2100
CUSTOM MOTORCYCLE 2005, 6 speed, 96 Cu
in. S & S engine, 240 rear tire, black with nat-
ural flame. $11,000 Ph. 262-909-8694
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 SOFTTAIL. $9900
OBO. 5,000 miles; Custom paint. Lots of
chrome. Ph. 262-620-1393.
HONDA SHADOW 1100 CC 1997 $2,800 -
Low miles, excellent condition, 3 bags, new
tires, custom exhaust. Ph. 847-271-0798
Trucks & Heavy
Equipment
118
FORD F150 1997 $4250 108,600 miles,
4WD, great runner, well maintained. Ph 262-
818-1698
Automobiles 120
04 MERCURY MARQUIS 62k, new tires, bat-
tery, leather. Remote start. Grandma kept.
$6500. 262-215-6634
1970 CHEVY CHEVELLE 454 Super Sport, Cold
A/C, automatic, asking $8999, text or call
414-367-9829!
CHEVROLET IMPALA 2002 $2,700 OBO - Good
runner, strictly highway miles, high mileage,
good runner. Ph. 847-525-7204.
FORD 2001 TAURUS $3800 Flex fuel, 2nd
owner. 120k miles. New transmission.
Clean carfax. Great shape. 262-657-0507.
FORD CROWN VICTORIA 1999 $3950. Runs
great, very good condition, Call 262-909-3067
PONTIAC 2000 BONNEVILLE SLE $2000 For
Sale: 108K miles. Ph. 262-551-0490.
Vans & SUVs 121
CHEVROLET Venture LT 2000 Van. Loaded,
silver/gray, good condition. $2,500. 262-949-
2584
DODGE 2007 Grand Caravan SXT, V6, full
power, dual air, 7 passenger, very clean. Low
miles. 69K. $9,475. Ph. 262-694-7108.
DODGE DURANGO 1999 $4,000 - 5.2, V-8,
156,500 mi. Runs great, original owner. Towing
package. 262-694-9733/262-945-7790
FORD EXPLORER 1997 $1995 - New rotors,
brakes and radiator, tune up, 126,000 mi.,
Ph. 262-705-5163
Residential
Rentals
84
10 NAZ MOTEL
Effeciency apartment, Free HBO & WI-FI,
Kitchenettes, Low Weekly & Daily Rates
847-746-1400
1004 HARBOR MOTEL
Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet,
phone, refrigerator & microwave,
Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly
rates.
847-872-5400
1128 ABODE MOTEL
Sleeping rooms, Kitchenettes,
Free wi-fi, Cable TV. Low Daily/Weekly Rates
847-872-3476
31ST AVE., 6009 Upper 1 bedroom. $650.
All utilities included + security. 262-620-
9343.
58TH AVE., 5414 1 BR $575. 2 BR, $675,
heat included. 4 BR home, $1100. 262-344-
0187 or 847-226-0297.
60TH ST., 1615
FREE MICROWAVE
FREE HEAT & HOT WATER!
COMPLETELY REMODELED.
T1 BR, $629
2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground
parking, locked lobby, close to shopping
& bus line. No smoking building.
Ask for Everett, 262-617-1104
88TH AVE., 222 Country Home in quiet
Somers 2br W/ Basement, Garage, 1 Acre
$1050 262-652-1195
BRISTOL 19737 - 84th Place. 2 BR, 2 BA
UPPER condo style unit, Attached 1 car
garage. private laundry Pets OK. $930+sec.
Char @ 209-481-0000.
BRISTOL19727 84TH PL. 2 BR, 1 BA LOWER.
Garage. Laundry. Basement storage. Private
entrance Pets o.k. $780+sec. 209-481-0000.
LAKE GENEVAKitchenettes and sleeping
rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988.
SHARON, WI Modern 1 and 2 BD apts.
Country living in Historic Sharon. 20 minutes
from Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan. 10 from
Walworth. Located on Hwy 67. 262-736-
2300
SHERIDAN RD., 1455-65 Kenosha, WI
BAYSIDE APARTMENTS
Phone: 262-551-8362 Large 2 BR,
$675.00 Monthly. Includes: Heat &
appliances. No pets. Escrow.
SILVER LAKE 641 N. COGSWELL DRIVE. 2
BR upper, 1 bath, laundry, storage, pets ok.
$780/mo. + security. 262-818-3682
WALWORTH, 115 Maple, 3 BD, 1 bath house,
no pets, no smoking, $850 per month, securi-
ty deposit required, call (262) 275-2127
between 8 am and 5 pm.
ZION EAST SIDE VALUES1BR units on 2nd
floor, staring at $575 per month plus gas,
electric, & security deposit. No pets. Ph. 847-
903-7563
ZION TOWNHOUSE Nicely updated 3BR,
end unit, 1.5BA, full heated basement w/
washer/dryer hookups. Living room has nice
view of huge front yard, private driveway,
Tenant pays all utilities. Close to shopping
restaurants, transportation.224-419-5552
Residential
For Sale
98
ALLENDALE 120 68th Pl. By owner. 4 BR,
2.5 bath, complete rehab. Views of Lake
Michigan. $350,000 obo. 262-653-9758.
Miscellaneous 50
FURNITURE
Loveseat $100, Chair $75, Dresser $50,
Kitchen table with chairs $50.
Call 262-857-7460.
LOSE WEIGHT-
ALL NATURAL
Enjoy summer..feel
good...look good!
Call-262-786-6603
MATTRESSES Full $65. Queen $75. King
$95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave.
Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750.
OLD POST OFFICE LOCK BOX DOORS
Various sizes. Ideal for making banks.
Ph. 847-623-8746.
PRINT Thomas Kinkade.
Framed print titled Hometown Chapel.
The edition has been limited to 4950 artist
proofs on canvas, hand signed and
numbered. The print has been appraised
at $2100 by local art shop.
Asking price of $1500.
Call 262-658-3857 for more information.
TRUCK (REMOTE) Traxas Stampede RC
truck with 2 batteries and 2 chargers. 1
charger is a Dynamite Vision Peak 2. $250.
OBO. Ph. 262-694-4398.
WANTED TO BUY BUYING Gold & Silver -
coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches
- knifes - swords & military items & more!
262-497-6688 Joe
Recreation,
Exercise & Sports
52
CUSTOM BOAT COVERS/seat upholstering,
motor & drive repair/replacements. Stereo
installations, buffing, waxing, indoor boat stor-
age w/free winterizing & wash. Since 1963
AmericanMarineDelavan.Com
262-728-3453
$100 and Under 59
GRASS TRIMMER TORO, electric . $10. Ph.
262-694-2688
Pets, Supplies
& Services
62
PET CREMATION SERVICES
Pets are family too! Cremation
services for your pets. Kenosha
Funeral Services & Crematory.
Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.
Residential
Rentals
84
1 & 2 BRs STARTING AT $675
www.professionalrealty.biz
262-942-8399 Pet Friendly
8TH AVE., 3908 2 BR; 2nd floor; A/C.
Offstreet parking, Laundry, $670.
Ph. 847-624-9286
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
2524 - 18TH STREET
$670 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED!
262-551-7255
CALL FOR SUMMER SPECIAL
Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail
1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT
1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140
www.petrettiapartments.com
1 BEDROOM from $560
2 BEDROOM from $670
GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING
AND HOT WATER INCLUDED
262-552-8365
WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS
Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt.
http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek
Help Wanted 20
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
Seeking a part-time 30 hour week
maintenance tech at a Kenosha apartment
community. Strong maintenance and
good customer service skills required
with custodial duties.
E.O.E.
Fax 414-390-1146
Metropolitan Associates
c/o CScherer
1123 N. Astor Street
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Job Site ID#1007501
RECEPTIONIST
Receive and direct all incoming phone calls.
Greet visitors and accept payments. Perform
incoming and outgoing mail functions and
other clerical duties. Customer Service skills
are a must. Previous experience working with
the general public, switchboard and MS Office
(Word and Excel) is required.
North Shore Sanitary District
Wm. Koepsel Drive
P.O. Box 750
Gurnee, IL 60031-0750
Fax: 847-623-6101
hrmail@northshoresanitary.org
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1007585
SHELTER WORKER Cleaning and working
with cats and dogs at animal shelter. Apply at
12300 116th St., Kenosha.
Job Site ID#1007559
Training/Education
22
TUTORMathematics or Science, 6th,7th &
8th grade, hold current Illinois teaching certifi-
cate, hours & service fee negotiable. Call
Randy 920-723-6557
Information
Services
23
CHILDCARE
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! 2-parent fami-
lies over age 25, able to work with youth age
10-17 & Empty Nesters/Retired Parents
encouraged to Call 866-776-3760 or
CommunityCareResources.com/now-recruit-
ing.
IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SUR-
GERY between 2004 and present time and
required a second surgery you may be entitled
to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-
800-535-5727
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you under-
go transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic
organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence
between 2005 and the present? If the mesh
caused complications, you may be entitled to
compensation. Call Charles H.Johnson Law
and speak with female staff members 1-800-
535-5727
Service
Directory
26
FENCING Alex Fence. We beat any price.
Top quality work. 25% off any written estimate.
We do repairs. Free estimates. Call Alex, 262-
344-6736
FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring
installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-245-
6168
PAINTING AND DRYWALL
Fully insured. 10% off after $1,000 bid.
262-705-4594.
ROOFING GET ROOFED! All types of roofing
& repairs. Free estimates.
References 28 yrs exp. 262-764-0041
Business
Opportunities
28
SMALL PLASTICS COMPANY FOR SALE.
Operate full or part time. Move to your area.
563-213-2458
Rummage,
Estate, Moving
49
GURNEEGarage Sale, July 20 & 21, 9am-
3pm, 3722 Florida Ave., Electronics, furniture.
stove, vintage Honda 3-wheeler, power tools,
lawn mowers, & much more.
Help Wanted 20
DELIVERY
ROUTES
KENOSHA NEWS
is looking for route delivery
INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS
Extra income comes easy with an early
morning delivery route.
Our delivery crews are out early in the
morning so they have the rest of the
day open for other activities.
Are you looking for an early morning job
in your neighborhood? A Kenosha
News delivery route could be perfect
for you.
Stop in to pick up
a form at the
FRONT LOBBY
5800 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI
53140-0190
Job Site ID#1006326
DRIVERS (SCHOOL BUS)
Olson Transportation is hiring drivers for
routes in Deerfield, Lake Bluff and Lake
Forest. $13.85 to start. Prior driving
experience may qualify for higher pay. Must
be 21 years of age or older. All candidates
must pass a drug test and background
check. Must pass a pre-employment
physical. Health benefits available.
Paid training. Apply in person:
1134 N. Route 41, Gurnee, IL 60031
Ph. 847-336-0720.
Job Site ID#1006412
DRIVERS NEEDED/GURNEE IL Dedicated
Account Local / Regional Mix Home 2-3 Nights
+ Weekends 43CPM + $14.67 / Stop $2000
Sign On Bonus. Medical / Dental / RX /
401K & More!!! Apply Online @
www.thekag.com. Call 800 871-4581 Option
#2 Dawn
#1006347
DRIVERS NEEDED/GURNEE IL Dedicated
Account Local/Regional Mix Home 2-3 Nights
+ Wkends 43CPM + $14.67/Stop $2000
Sign On Bonus.
Medical/ Dental/RX/ 401K & More!!!
Apply Online @ www.thekag.com
Call 800 871-4581 Option #2 Dawn
DRIVERS Needed for upcoming school year
to transport special needs children. Sign on
bonus. Call (847) 244-8700 M-F 9am-2pm.
Drivers: Class A CDL. Join the Family!!
Experienced Drivers start @ .45 loaded.
Extra pay for the work you do & Benefits too!
Awesome home time!! 877-261-2101
ENGINEERING SERVICES
ASSISTANT
Organize, maintain, research and distribute
equipment literature and engineering files.
Input data into various applications. Review
and issue permits. Perform clerical, adminis-
trative and building tasks, duties and projects.
North Shore Sanitary District
Wm. Koepsel Drive
P.O. Box 750
Gurnee, IL 60031-0750
Fax: 847-623-6101
hrmail@northshoresanitary.org
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1007583
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Nosco continues to grow, and you can be a
part of it! Were a key provider of printed
packaging for the pharmaceutical and relat-
ed industries. Our opportunity is for a tal-
ented Graphic Designer, who can translate
our needs into compelling print and digital
visuals. Additional tasks include Marketing
and Business Development activities. In
addition to your creative abilities, excellent
organizational and team skills and a familiar-
ity with B2B marketing are required.
Requires B.A. in Graphic Design, Marketing,
or related field, and 2+ years of creative art
and branding experience. Includes develop-
ment of marketing collateral using strong
Adobe Creative Suite capabilities, and expe-
rience with print and online media. High
energy and initiative complete the picture!
This position may be full time or contract.
Please send resume (portfolio access, if
available) with salary requirements to:
Nosco, Inc.
2199 Delany Road
Gurnee, IL 60031
hr@nosco.com
Attn: Jeremy Bloom
Job Site ID#1006882
JOURNALIST
(Part-Time)
We are seeking a part-time journalist
able to produce news and feature
stories and shoot pictures. The ideal
candidate will aggressively pursue
breaking and spot news, while juggling
other assignments.
If interested in this position, please
stop in to fill out an application
(include your resume) at:
Human Resources
5800 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53140
Equal Opportunity Employer
Job Site ID#1007649
Classified
SPECIALS
2
AS A KENOSHA NEWS
SUBSCRIBER YOU HAVE ACCESS
TO ALL ONLINE CONTENT AT
KENOSHANEWS.COM FOR FREE!
Call the Kenosha News Today!
Customer Care Center
262-657-1500 and well be glad
to help you get registered.
Ask about our Members Program
for a few cents more
you can receive your paper
plus local retail offers and more!!
Community
Announcements
4
SPORTS CARD SHOW & LIVE AUCTION
Moose Lodge #286, 3003 30th Ave. Kenosha,
Sat. July 20th, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Tables Available
262-344-1743 or 262-344-5131
Advertised in Beckett
Help Wanted 20
100 WORKERS NEEDED - Assemble crafts,
wood items. Materials provided, To $480+ wk.
Free Information pkg. 24 hr.
801-264-4992
AUTO DETAILER / PREPPER Experienced.
Apply at Valeri Auto Body, 544 Sheridan Rd.,
Winthrop Harbor, IL. Ph. 847-746-8330.
Job Site#1007563
AUTO SALES
Full time sales position available at
Kenoshas premier pre-owned
dealership. Mature sales person with
some auto sales experience. 3 1/2
week days and every Saturday. Send
your resume to:
larry_goodman@anastosmotors.com
Job Site ID#1007544
CHILD CARE PROFESSIONAL
TEACHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE (Full Time)
Full time TEACHER positions available. Many
great reasons to work at Extended Love CDC:
Flexible Schedule, 4-day Work Week, Well
organized, stable, successful Center.
Credentials a plus. High expectations of all
staff. Come in for an application and take a
look around. See what makes us the best!
Apply in person at: 9191 80th St, Pleasant
Prairie, WI EOE Must be 18 or older.
Job Site ID#1005935
CLAY SITE INSPECTOR /
GENERAL LABORER
(Seasonal)
Working outside checking tickets and use of
monitoring equipment to insure compliance
with regulations. Will train on monitoring
equipment. $10 per hour to start. Must have
valid drivers license and clean driving record.
A copy of your drivers license must be pre-
sented at the time of application.
Apply in person at:
Thelen Sand and Gravel, Inc.,
28955 West Illinois Route 173
Antioch, IL 60002
EOE D/V/M/F
Job Site ID#1007297
Cleaning
MAID
POSITION
THE ALMOST
PERFECT JOB
* No Nights or Weekends
* Transportation Provided
* Excellent Pay
* Drivers License Req
* Must be 21
El Trabajo Casi Perfecto
* No Noches o Fin de Semanas
* Transportacion Includio * Paga
Exceiente * Se Necesita Licensia de
Manajar * Debe de Tener 21 anos
1421 Old Deerfield Rd.
Highland Park, IL 60035
847-681-1800
10B The Regional News July 18, 2013
BENOY MOTORS IN WOODSTOCK
**Pri ces excl ude tax, ti tl e, l i c. & doc fee. Incl udes al l manufacturer rebates & i ncenti ves. Photos are for i l l ustrati on purposes onl y and may not represent actual vehi cl es. Jeep & Chrysl er are regi stered trademarks of Chrysl er LLC.
No pri or sal es. Expi res 3 days after publ i cati on. See deal er for more detai l s. ^On sel ect model s, see deal er for compl ete detai l s.
E-ma||:|nfo@benoymotors.comorwww.benoymotor.com
1790S.EastwoodDr.(CornerofRt.14&47|
(815)
338-5100
Hours:
Mon:7:30am-8pm
Tues:7:30am-8pm
Wed:7:30am-6pm
Thurs:7:30am-8pm
Fr| : 7: 30am-6pm
Sat:8:00am-4pm
Hours:
Mon:7:30am-8pmTues:7:30am-8pm
Wed:7:30am-6pmThurs:7:30am-8pm
Fr| : 7: 30am-6pmSat:8:00am-4pm
(815)
338-5100
OrE-ma||:|nfo@benoymotors.com
1790S.EastwoodDr.(CornerofRt.14&47|
WWW.BENOYMOTOR.COM
*Pri ces excl ude tax, ti tl e, l i c. & doc fee. No pri or sal es. Expi res 3 days after publ i cati on. See deal er for more detai l s.
FAMILY OWNED AND
OPERATED FOR OVER
60 YEARS!
BENOY MOTORS IN WOODSTOCK
QUALITY PRE-OWNED VEHICLES TO FIT YOUR BUDGET
0
%
x 72
^
MONTHS
APR
NOW
ONLY: $
17,958
**
A|r Cond|t|on|ng
PowerW|ndow&Locks
17" A|um|num Whee|
2.0L I4 DOHC
Eng|ne
6 Speed Auto Trans
Key|ess Entry
NEW 2013
DODGE DART
SXT
Stk.#D13-14
SALE
PRICE:
$
21,148
**
MSRP-$24,490
Rebate-$2,000
Trade Ass|s Reb-$750
Benoy D|s.-$592
4 Whee| ABS
Sunscreen G|ass
17" A|um|num Whee|s
Rear A/C & Heat
Power W|ndows/
Locks
Stow-N-go
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Sports
C
Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Winning big
More Genoa City photos.
2C
Youth: YMCA baseball,
softball scores.
2C
Scores are back
Team is 13-6, gearing up for regionals this week in Burlington
Genoa City splits with East Troy
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
EAST TROY Bouncing back from a 7-0 hole is never
easy.
But with plenty of offensive repower, the Genoa City
Junior Legion almost pulled off the impossible Sunday at
East Troy.
In game two of a doubleheader, Genoa City got to
within two runs after falling into an early hole but eventu-
ally lost, 11-9.
Despite the loss, Genoa City is 13-6 and begins the
playoffs Wednesday in Burlington.
Genoa Citys Colton Tisch was hot from the plate. He
went 4-for-5, drove in one and scored two runs. Tisch sin-
gled in the rst, second, fourth, and seventh innings.
The game was never in doubt after the rst, as East
Troy scored seven runs on an error, a elders choice, a
passed ball, three singles, and a wild pitch.
Genoa City got three-run rallies in the rst and fourth
innings. In the rst, Genoa City scored on a elders choice,
plating Tisch.
After pushing across two runs in the bottom of the
second, Genoa City cut the lead to 8-5. An RBI single by
Tisch and an error fueled Genoa Citys comeback. East
Troy stopped the rally after Nick Bertschinger got Alex
Morland to y out.
After three runs in the bottom of the fourth, Genoa
City faced just a 11-8 decit. An RBI single by Tisch, an
error and a groundout by Morland sparked Genoa Citys
rally.
One run in the bottom of the sixth helped Genoa City
cut the lead to 11-9. A sacrice y by Isaac Ziervogel gave
Genoa City life, but Nick Bertschinger retired Grayson
Grimsley to end the inning.
Genoa City battles Waterford in the rst game of
regionals Wednesday at Beaumont Field in Burlington.
In the rst game of the doubleheader, Genoa City
needed extra innings but came through with three in the
eighth to pull out a 5-2 victory.
Tischs RBI single proved to be the game-winner in the
eighth. Taylor Zick added a sacrice y in the frame.
Joe Ippolito got on base three times for Genoa City. He
singled in the seventh and eighth innings.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
GENOA CITY CATCHER CLINT UGOLINI shows the umpire the ball after tagging out a Racine Mudcats player at home plate
July 11. The Red Legs won, 12-0.
Hinske shines
in rst action
since surgery
Hawks View offers beautiful challenge
By Sue Hinske
shinske@lakegenevanews.net
My name is Sue Hinske, and I am
the office manager at the Lake Geneva
Regional News. I started working
at the paper in 1964. I took two and
a half years off when I had my first
child, came back and here I am still.
Something about making deadlines
and different duties each day make
my job enjoyable.
Our sports editor, Mike Ramczyk,
asked me if I would like to join him
for nine holes of golf at the beautiful
Hawks View Golf Club. He wanted
an opponent so he could do a story
about the experience and also the golf
course.
Mike apparently figured if he
played against a female senior citizen
(still mending from extensive upper
spine and neck surgery in March), it
would give him a chance to win the
match and have bragging rights. So
we played but he didnt win. Sorry
Mike, maybe next time.
Mike arrived and we went to the
first tee. The starter asked for the
receipt, which somehow I managed to
lose between the club house and the
first hole.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
REGIONAL NEWS OFFICE MANAGER SUE HINSKE tees off on No. 6 on the front nine at
Hawks View. Although a par-3, players must send the ball at least 150 yards over the pond.
SUE HINSKE/
REGIONAL NEWS
REGIONAL
NEWS
SPORTS
EDITOR
MIKE
RAMCZYK
cant help
but chuckle
at how bad
his slice was
on his tee
shot on No.
7.
Ramczyk better
overall, putting game
borderline pathetic
For the last few years, I have been going to
area golf courses and testing my luck with my
sub-par golf game.
Whether it was Grand Geneva, Geneva
National, Nippersink or even Prairie Woods,
former editor Lisa Seiser, current Editor John
Halverson and several area golf pros have joined
me and beaten me most of the time.
While I have
plenty of experi-
ence in football,
baseball and bas-
ketball, golf is
a game I played
a couple times
for fun over the
years. I never
had the passion
or the money,
quite frankly, to
get serious about
it. But as I grow
older, Im now 31,
I continue to learn more about the game.
Our golf series returned July 12 at one of
my all-time favorite courses, Hawks View Golf
Club. I am a bit biased because I got married
there in 2011.
With lush greens and picturesque views of
water and even bunkers, Hawks View is one of
the nicest and most challenging courses in the
area.
With no Seiser around, I tried to teach the
game to Halverson last summer. That was on the
Hawks View par-3. This time around, I reached
out to another co-worker, Sue Hinske, our ofce
manager.
I knew the 67-year-old was coming off spinal
surgery, but I also knew she loves the game and
has a lot of experience. Hinske actually received
doctors clearance to play golf last week.
Since I only tied Seiser once and never actu-
ally beat her, I thought taking on a hobbled
Hinske would be my ticket to victory. I even
played from the ladies tees to make it as fair as
possible.
PLEASE SEE GENOA CITY PAGE 3C
PLEASE SEE RAMCZYK PAGE 3C PLEASE SEE HINSKE PAGE 3C
Sky high for the pick
2C The Regional News July 18, 2013
SPORTS
RICK BENAVIDES/SPECIAL TO THE REGIONAL NEWS
WILLIAMS BAY RESIDENT RYAN YUNKER, right, soars for an interception during the Lake Geneva Generals
season opener Saturday in Rockford, Ill. The Roscoe Rush crushed the Generals, 48-15. Generals quarterbacks
threw four picks, but Williams Bay native Kaahlin OLaughlin completed 5 of 6 passes for 85 yards and a touch-
down. The Generals home opener is Saturday night at 7 p.m. at Williams Bay High School against Racine. Tickets
for adults are $7, and seniors and military get in for $5. Kids are $3, and Williams Bay students get in for free.
More scenes from Genoa Citys big win
MIKE
RAMCZYK/
REGIONAL
NEWS
COLTON
TISCH
had two
hits and
four RBIs
in Genoa
Citys 12-0
win over
Racine
July 11.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
PELL LAKES ZACH DITZENBERGER struck out ve and allowed only two hits.
YMCA/LAKE GENEVA FRIDAY NIGHT MENS SOFTBALL
Stahulak Concrete 9, Nameless 4
Peck & Weis 13, Stinebrinks 11
Advocare 14, Team Nurnburg 9
Advocare 18, Mama Ciminos 7
Mt. Zion 16, Fat Cats 15
Rumours 15, Mecum Auction 2
Mama Ciminos 8, Vaughn Hammers 7
Rumours 15, Stinebrinks 3
Standings
Stahulak Concrete 7 0
Mama Ciminos 7 1
Vaughn Hammers 7 2
Advocare 7 2
Rumours 6 3
Team Nurnburg 5 4
Fat Cats 3 4
Mt. Zion 3 5
Stinebrinks 2 6
Peck & Weis 2 6
Nameless 1 8
Mecum Auction 0 8
YMCA/LAKE GENEVA ADULT KICKBALL
Lakeland Community Church def. Kickin Old School
99 Problems def. One Kick Wonders
Standings
Lakeland Community Church 2 1
One Kick Wonders 2 1 1
99 Problems 1 1
Kickin Old School 0 2 1
YMCA/LAKE GENEVA COLT LEAGUE BASEBALL
Edward Jones def. Dairy Queen
Culvers def. Baker House
Edward Jones def. Baker House
Culvers def. Dairy Queen
Standings
Edward Jones 8 0 1
Dairy Queen 5 3
Culvers 4 5 1
Baker House 1 8
YMCA/LAKE GENEVA MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Casting Solutions def. Autoworks Plus
LG Chiropractic def. Kokodynski Ortho
Peck & Weis def. Next Door Pub
Autoworks Plus def. Kokodynski Ortho
LG Chiropractic def. Next Door Pub
Casting Solutions def. Peck & Weis
Standings
Casting Solutions 11 0
LG Chiropractic 7 3
Peck & Weis 6 4
Kokodynski Ortho 3 8
Autoworks Plus 3 8
Next Door Pub 0 10
YMCA/LAKE GENEVA SENIOR LEAGUE SOFTBALL
Stinebrinks and Kokodynski Ortho tied
PFI Screenprint def. Central Vending
PFI Screenprint def. Stinebrinks
Kokodynski Ortho def. Central Vending
Standings
Kokodynski Ortho 7 2 1
PFI Screenprint 5 4 1
Central Vending 4 6 1
Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly 3 7 1
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 3C
#23
RICKIE WEEKS
2nd Baseman
2011 National League All-Star
#49
YOVANI GALLARDO
MVP Pitcher
2010 National League All-Star
#99
JEREL WORTHY
Starting Defensive End
Star-Michigan State
KUNES COUNTRY FORD-LINCOLN PRESENTS...
ALL STAR
SPORTS SPECTACULAR
SATURDAY, JULY 20TH
FROM 11:30AM UNTIL 1:30PM
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(262) 728-5544
ALL HAPPENING AT
*Strictly ONE autograph per person and no personalizations due to time limitations
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FREE COLOR 11X14 PLAYER PHOTOS WILL BE ON HAND TO AUTOGRAPH,
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Call for more information
Ask for Bob ONeill
F
R
E
E
John Laskowski got the
win for the Red Legs. He
allowed two runs over four
innings.
Laskowski struck out
ve, walked one and sur-
rendered six hits.
Ziervogel started on the
mound and allowed only
three hits in four innings.
Genoa City 12, Racine
Mudcats 0
On July 11 at Horlick
Field in Racine, Genoa City
avenged a 4-0 loss to the
Racine 17U with a beating
of the citys 16U club.
Zack Ditzenburger was
dynamite on the mound for
Genoa City, scattering just
two hits and allowing no
earned runs in four innings
while striking out ve.
Zick allowed one hit in
the nal two innings.
Genoa City scored ve
runs in the fth on a two-
run error, a passed ball, an
RBI single by Riley Gentile
and an RBI single by Clint
Ugolini.
Tisch racked up four
RBIs on two hits for Genoa
City. He tripled in the fourth
and singled in the sixth.
Genoa City didnt relin-
quish the lead after scoring
one run in the rst inning
when it scored on an error.
The Red Legs also added
three-run frames in the
fourth and sixth.
Siegler was 3-for-4 for
the game, and Levi Bur-
nette, Gentile, Morland,
Ugolini, Grimsley and Zier-
vogel each added hits.
While Hinske took that as weak, I know
how bad I am and how much advantage I
needed simply to compete.
It was my rst time playing all summer,
and Hawks View is no cake walk. While
most holes are straight and a decent tee
shot puts you in good position, the greens
are brutal. Talk about undulation. Hit it too
strong and youre in the opposite rough.
Tap it too soft and there is no friendly roll.
No. 2 was where I made my rst splash.
On my second shot, I used a 4-wood from
150 yards out and got on the green. I n-
ished with a ve for bogey and had a brief
two-stroke advantage.
But on No. 3, a par-3 where you tee off
roughly 50 feet above the ground and shoot
downhill, Hinske started her comeback.
She sunk a 10-foot putt for par. I earned
my second straight bogey. The wheels will
come off, Hinske joked. But her hot streak
had just begun.
After another par and two double
bogeys, Hinske took a three-stroke lead
through six holes. She drained a 10-foot
putt with the ag in the hole on No. 4. Then,
after a six on No. 5, Hinske recovered for a
bogey on a beautiful par-3 where you had to
hit it over a pond off the tee. Hinske admit-
ted she was on some heavy pain-killers, and
I demanded she be tested for her perfor-
mance-enhancing drugs.
All jokes aside, Hinske was crushing me
and I needed to pick it up.
Hinske lost a ball in the water on No. 7
and claimed she hated the entire hole, but
she still managed an eight to my seven. It
was bunker city, as bunkers not only hinder
your tee shot but also completely surround
the green. It was the most challenging hole
on the front nine.
I told Hinske I was closing the gap, but
she kept her focus. On No. 8, I was on in
three but once again three-putted for a six.
Hinske also managed a six, and she said the
only thing she liked was the scenery.
So it all came down to the last hole. I
was down two strokes, and I thought the
par-5 would work to my advantage.
But lets be honest, I knew I needed
a miracle with my inconsistent shots. I
cranked the ball about 215 yards on my tee
shot, but it was in the wrong direction. I
landed on the tee box of the adjacent hole,
and as I hesitantly walked over to my ball,
I politely asked the two gentlemen who had
just teed off if I almost hit them. Luckily,
they saw nothing.
My second shot had to leap over a line
of trees. Unfortunately, my solid line drive
cracked a tree and died. I talked Hinske into
letting me avoid a penalty stroke. The only
way we wouldve counted the extra shot was
if I beat her. The rest of the hole assured us
that wouldnt be an issue.
Staring into a bright sun, my third shot
was a pop y that landed on the absolute
last strand of grass before a bunker behind
the green.
I slammed the ball out of there, but it
rolled to the opposite rough. My horren-
dous putting left me with an eight. Hinske,
whose best shot is a long ground ball, used
two grounders to close the deal. Her tee shot
rolled and rolled, but it was straight. Then,
on her approach, she scooted a ground ball
a good 50 yards and wound up only 10 feet
from the cup. Hinske two-putted for a six
and nished with a 52 to my 56.
Sadly, it was one of my best scores. A
54 at Lake Lawn Resort is my best nine-
hole score of all time. Overall, my tee shots
were long and fairly straight, and my fair-
way woods were solid, but putting was my
downfall.
Hinske showed signs of why she has
shot in the low 80s on 18 holes. She has a
consistent, straight tee shot despite not
having much power.
Every shot is straight and puts her in
position to have a good hole. While her put-
ting isnt back up to speed yet, she sank sev-
eral putts from 10 or more feet out.
Whether youre a hack like me or an
experienced golfer like Hinske, Hawks
View has it all. The scenery is phenomenal,
and the course is challenging but fun and
manageable at the same time.
With a par-3 course for the kids, there is
something for all ages at Hawks View.
The starter finally told us to proceed
before a large outing started teeing off
before us.
Now Mike is a big man. Probably 6-
foot-3ish and twice my weight. I can
barely claim to be 5-foot-5 any longer
with age and three spine surgeries taking
their toll.
But when I said I was going to play off
the ladies tees, the big brute did the same
so any advantage on my part was lost.
But I will admit playing off the same tees
made the game more fun.
Neither one of us had touched a golf
club since last year. My concern was that I
wouldnt be able to swing the club without
hurting myself and it would have all been
for nothing. But, after a couple of swings
it seemed to be working and the fear sub-
sided. It would be only fair to mention that
my opponents knee started hurting after a
couple of holes, so neither of us were physi-
cally up for the challenge.
We tied the rst hole. Mike got me by
two strokes on No. 2, but then I rallied and
took back-to-back pars, putting me one up
and Mike never caught up. I took several
penalty strokes which didnt help my score.
I am not one for searching for lost balls that
have found water or trenches with weeds
and long grass clippings hiding the ball. My
motto is to take the penalty, drop another
ball and keep play moving. After all, this
was not league play where it really counted
for something.
Leading up to our game, Mike kept tell-
ing me what a bad golfer he was. After a
couple of holes, I referred to him as a sand-
bagger. He could hit the ball a ton and had
some excellent approach shots from about
150 yards. He didnt stray too far off the
course as I thought he might. The other
disadvantage for me was on a couple holes
it took me a tee shot and a fairway shot to
catch up to his drive. Let me again remind
you this big guy was playing off the ladies
tees.
Going into No. 9, our last hole, I was
winning by two strokes. He hit a long drive
that put him next to another tee box some-
where out there. He then proceeded to put
his second shot into the trunk of a tree and
when I told him he had to take a penalty
stroke for taking a drop, he started whin-
ing like a school girl on a bad hair day. So
I broke down and told him he only had to
count the penalty if we tied the match but
no worries. I took a six and he took an eight
without counting the extra stroke. I win, I
win.
We had a little waiting time after letting
a four-some through, so Mike was teaching
me how to use the camera so I could cap-
ture a photo of him taking a golf swing. The
camera weighed about as much as a bowling
ball, had a huge dial to focus and a shutter
button that was a little too sensitive for my
liking. I could barely hold the darn thing to
my face, let alone focus and click. I want a
tripod next time.
I thought Mike was listening to cell
phone messages a lot or maybe asking his
lovely wife what was for dinner, then I
found out he was tweeting or twittering or
whatever it is people do on cell phones and
computers. I am just learning how to sign
into Facebook.
I ran into another co-worker after the
game, and he already knew how the game
had gone. What, really?
Summing up our round at Hawks View,
I would say the weather was absolutely per-
fect. Sunny, low- to mid-80s, low humidity
and gentle breezes.
Thank you to our sports editor for invit-
ing me to play, and I am ready for another
match. If the time comes when Mike can
dedicate more time to the game of golf, it
is my opinion that he will become a good
competitive golfer. He is not nearly as bad a
player as he claims to be.
Love of the game
I golfed for the rst time in my late
twenties and loved it. I walked the full 18
holes and counted every stroke. It took me
a lot of golf before being brave enough to
join a league. I played at George Williams
Golf Course for a couple of years until get-
ting good enough for other larger courses. I
was a member at Hillmoor for many years
until the course closed. My goal was to
break into the 70s but that never happened.
To the best of my recollection, 81 was my
lowest all-time score at Hillmoor. However,
I do have my fair share of trophies, prizes,
memories and was lucky enough to have
two holes-in-one at Hillmoor, the 143-yard
No. 17 and the 96-yard No. 6.
I ran the Thursday Morning 18-Hole
Ladies League for a number of years. Also,
I ran the Monday Night 9-Hole League
until we merged with the Wednesday
Night League. I think I ran that for only
one season. I also helped run the Couples
Friday Night League and also the Junior
Golf League, which my youngest daughter
was a part of for several years.
I still golf and go on golf outings with
gal pals. Golf has been an important part
of my life. I made so many friends along the
way.
Genoa City
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Hinske/Golfing veteran flabbergasted Ramczyk played from ladies tees
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
SUE HINSKE/REGIONAL NEWS
RAMCZYK tees off on No. 7.
Ramczyk/Things started well but went bad when Ramczyk almost hit people
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
4C The Regional News July 18, 2013
The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its read-
ers to submit photos of charitable events, personal
milestones and school activities for publication. We
also accept unique photos of wildlife and nature.
Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution. The
photos must be in focus and have a natural color
distribution. The Regional News may alter the color
on photos and crop them. We use editorial discre-
tion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pic-
tures must be identied. Submitted pictures may
also appear online at www.facebook.com/LakeG-
enevaRegionalNews.
Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ire-
land at rireland@lakegenevanews.net. Readers can
also bring pictures to the Regional News Ofce, 315
Broad St. Lake Geneva, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
HENRY HANK PAULSON, former Secretary of the Treasury and former CEO of Goldman Sachs, and his wife Wendy spoke
at the home of John and Linda Anderson last Thursday at a dinner fundraiser benetting the Geneva Lake Conservancy. Both
Hank and Wendy are ardent conservationalists. The economic models that we have are based on the false assumption that
natural ecosystems are free, that they are inexhaustible, Hank Paulson said. Shown are William Pollard, Jr., Judy Pollard,
Wendy Paulson, Hank Paulson, Linda Anderson and John Anderson.
SUBMITTED
A RUMMAGE SALE was held by the Terraces and Highlands
of Geneva Crossing senior community to benet the
Alzheimers Association and Support Our Troops, a program
sponsored by the Walworth County Council of the American
Legion. The $3,000 raised was divided by the two groups.
Shown are (from left), Jan Peterson, resident manager of the
Highlands, sale organizer Marlene Bonjean, Bob Webster,
American Legion member, Betty Sanders, resident man-
ager of the Terraces, and Andy Kerwin, cochairman of the
Walworth County Walk to End Alzheimers, scheduled this
year on Sept. 21 in Lake Geneva.
SUBMITTED
ALL ABOUT
CHILDREN
DAYCARE
brought their
4th of July
parade to the
residents at
Arbor Village
of Geneva
Crossing. More
than 40 children
enjoyed show-
ing off their
decorated bikes
and scooters.
SUBMITTED
FIREWORKS COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN Dr. Jeremy Bria
(right) accepted a donation of $2500 from the Abbey Resort
General Manager David Lindelow (left). In partnership with
the village of Fontana, the Geneva Lake West Chamber of
Commerce sponsors the Fontana Lakefront Fireworks on the
Fourth of July year after year. It is only through generous
donations from local business and individuals that we are
able to put on one of the areas nest reworks displays,
GLWCC Executive Director Kristina Staude said.
SUBMITTED
THE BADGER HIGH SCHOOL FFA Veterinary Science Team
received a rst place award at the state FFA convention and
will proceed to nationals. Team members are (from left),
Miranda Hall, Rebecca Kamps, Taylor Kundert and Chandler
Carlson.
SUBMITTED
SHANNA MERCIER of the Lake Geneva Badger FFA Chapter
was named the 2013 State FFA Diversied Horticulture
Prociency Award recipient, recognizing the student who
best demonstrates an understanding of horticultural prac-
tices, business and marketing. She works at Pesches
Greenhouse. With 20 greenhouses, she has developed
skills that will serve her well as she continues to pursue a
future education and career in agribusiness. Mercier will
learn this summer if she is selected as one of four national
nalists who compete at the National FFA Convention in
Louisville, Ky., in October.
SUBMITTED
OPEN ARMS FREE CLINIC INC. hosted their inaugural golf
outing and dinner Wednesday, June 12, at Hawks View Golf
Club. Judy Johnson and Dr. Katherine Gaulke chaired the
event. With close to 100 golfers, 200 dinner guests and 40
volunteers, almost $15,000 was raised to help the clinic con-
tinue its mission of offering free nonemergency health care,
including labs and medications, to individuals who live or
work in Walworth County, have no health insurance, and are
at or below 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level. Shown
is the team with a score of 56 (from left), Craig Johnson,
Stefan Johnson, Bill Bell and Harry Mohr.
SUBMITTED
THE BIG FOOT RECREATION DISTRICT recently offered
a drawing class at the Fontana Library, taught by Frank
Breneisen, a retired art professor. The class worked with
a variety of media and studied drawing techniques. The
artwork is on display in the Fontana Library during the
remainder of July. Class participants were (from left), Allen
Anderson, Denise Woods, Jill Acker and Karen Krolow.
SUBMITTED
THE OLD SETTLERS LOG CABIN on the Walworth County
fairgrounds received a $1,000 donation from Home and
Community Education and will soon begin the restoration
process. The annual Pork Chop Dinner also raised $7,500
that will be put towards the budget. The cabin was built
on the fairgrounds in 1936. In the 1970s the Homemakers
Association, which later became Home and Community
Education, took over the cabin with displays every day of
the fair.
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 5C
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Currently playing on
Dear W.C.,
I am worried about my
children. I work full-time at a
low wage job.
My wage does not cover all
my rent, utilities, child care,
gas and food.
My ex-husband is three
months behind in his child
support. This has made it
impossible for me to provide
for my children with just my
paycheck.
I have fallen behind in both our rent and utilities.
Why do so many men start a family, bring children into the
world, and then feel they can just walk away with no obligation
to provide for them?
Could you please help my children and me?
Dear readers,
I went to visit this desperate mother and children.
Once the mother was certain of my identity, I was invited
into the small apartment.
The two children were shy about company but their curios-
ity soon took over. The mother introduced me to the children.
After a brief conversation with the whole family and lots of
questions, the mother set them up at the table to play with clay
while we talked in the living room. I noticed she kept a watch-
ful eye on them. Good parents are attentive to their childrens
needs.
We got right to work going over her budget and nancial
situation. The mother worked full time, yet was paid a very low
wage.
She denitely fell into the category of the working poor. Her
hard work was not compensated by a fair wage or benets.
By the time she paid for child care, food and gas for the car
she did not have enough for all her rent and utilities.
The mother had no problem keeping up with her expenses
when her ex-husband was paying child support.
Since he had stopped paying over the last
three months she had fallen farther and far-
ther in debt. I asked if she knew where he was
at this time and she said she did. I asked the
mother if her ex-husband was working.
She said, He has been at the same job for
years but he may be laid off or changed jobs
without notifying child support. His problem
is he likes to impress women. Whenever he
has a new one or two women in his life he will
buy them expensive gifts and take them out on the town.
I was surprised by the comment about two women but
not by his selshness causing his children to endure nancial
hardship. She looked very uncomfortable and had tears in her
eyes talking about her ex-husbands bad habits.
She told me her ex-sister-in-law was still close to her and
the children. The sister-in-law would tell her about her ex-hus-
bands affairs.
I asked the mother if she had gone to the child support
agency to enforce his child support.
She said she had not, due to the ex-husband having threat-
ened her in the past. She also spoke about an incident where
the ex-husband had even choked her to the point of nearly
fainting.
After getting the mother to share with me some additional
information on the ex-husband, I told her I would be back as
soon as I could. She told me her ex-sister-in-law said her ex-
husband was living dual lives with two different women. The
ex-sister-in-law even had the addresses.
I went to one of the two addresses where
the ex-husband lived with two different
women, according to the ex-sister-in-law.
At the rst address the door was answered
by a woman but the ex-husband was not there.
I informed the woman that the ex-husbands
children were having nancial hardship, and
it was imperative that he contact me.
I could smell alcohol on the womans
breath and could tell she was nearly drunk,
but sober enough to ask, What children? Are you telling me
he has kids? I said, Yes, and if hes not here he may be at his
other address.
Of course, this set her off, yelling, What other address?
I held the piece of paper up that was given to me and read off
the address.
On July 4, I crossed the
nish line of my rst 5K race
in two years.
It was an exhilarat-
ing rush. All adrenaline, all
smiles, all sweat.
On July 9, I celebrated a
one-year anniversary with the
Regional News.
Passing this milestone
with the Regional News was
an exhilarating rush, too.
Ive always been a sucker
for milestones, for keeping time, for celebrat-
ing segments of life.
I love birthdays, anniversaries, saint days
and holidays.
Its the same idea that made me sign up
for a 5K after not racing for so long. Passing
the nish line is another reason to celebrate.
The celebrating is part of the preparation
for the next race, a
four-mile run coming
up in a month.
I celebrate
because I know the
next four weeks will be tough,
adding an extra mile to my
training while speeding up
my pace.
Last Thursdays run was
about the challenge.
This past year was a chal-
lenge, too, the kind of chal-
lenge that makes a person
stronger, that turns a person
into who shes really sup-
posed to be.
This reporter wont be
sliding through life avoiding challenges.
No, this past year at the Regional News
has taught me a person cant survive without
testing the waters.
As the anniversary approached, I decided
to nd other challenges to overcome and cel-
ebrate.
I took a boat tour of the lake.
This is only daring
for someone who
cant swim, myself
included.
While I was on
the boat, looking at houses and kids on
inner tubes, I thought about not being able
to swim.
I dont even know why I cant swim, why
Im afraid to go in the water.
So, after working
up some courage, I
bought a swimsuit.
This was daring
in itself.
Then, I went to
the lake, Geneva
Lake, the lake that
draws you in like a
magnet.
I jumped right in before I could lose all
this anniversary courage.
Im reporting now that I did not die, but
the part of me that attested I couldnt swim
did.
I tried some of the moves I remembered
from watching Olympic swimming on TV.
They didnt work for me.
While I cant swim in the traditional
sense of the word, I do not drown immedi-
ately upon entering the water.
I just ail around.
It was way too early on a Saturday morn-
ing for anyone else to be on that stretch of
shoreline. No one was there to judge me but
myself.
While I did not
fall in love with swim-
ming, I did fall in love
with being in, on and
near the water. Its so
good, yet so simple.
Being in the lake
is a celebration itself.
In July 2012, I
wrote that I was content with my life after
starting at the Regional News.
That is still true, but after a year with
this paper, I need to make sure contentment
doesnt become complacency.
I may not be seen on a Jet Ski anytime
soon, but I do plan to try new, daring things
as often as I can.
Bolack is a reporter for the Regional
News.
Resorter Editor/
Special Projects Coordinator
Jessica Franzene
Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Community & Commentary
D Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
CONTACT
Newsroom
(262) 248-8096
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Advertising
(262) 248-4444
ads@lakegenevanews.net
Fax (262) 248-4476
General Manager/Editor
John Halverson
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Manager
Sue Hinske
Customer Service/Office
Glenda Hill
Jacki Larisch
EDITORIAL STAFF
Managing Editor/New Media
Rob Ireland
Sports Editor
Mike Ramczyk
Reporters
Jade Bolack
Chris Schultz
Steve Targo
ADVERTISING STAFF
Advertising Representatives
Duane Hove
Mike Coolidge
Phil Bonyata
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Joy Kowald
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Advertising Sales
Michael Reinsissel
Asst. Graphic Arts Director
Sarah Schauf
PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 4D
PRODUCTION STAFF
The Lake Geneva Regional News Serving the area for more than 140 years Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
Learning to face, overcome challenges
Time Is Now goes after ex-husband
PHOTOTORIAL
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
AMERICA WAS IN FULL-BLOOM July 4th. Not only did
we have the annual July 4th parade sponsored by the
American Legion Auxiliary but there were a variety of
other slices of Americana that showed we havent lost
that small town spirit. Do other countries have Kool-Aid
stands? I dont know. Im just happy we still do. At the
stand are Miuccia DeBello-Recigno and Chloe Haegele.
John Halverson, editor
This past year was a challenge,
too, the kind of challenge that
makes a person stronger, that
turns a person into who shes
really supposed to be.
Normally, I do not get
involved but when a
woman is choked and
the children are left to
suffer, I cannot stand by
and ignore the situation.
Ive always been a sucker for
milestones, for keeping time, for
celebrating segments of life.
See Readers recall July 4, 1967 riots page 2D
2D The Regional News July 18, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
We all feared
what might
happen next
To the Editor:
I graduated from Badger High School
in June of 1961. The summers of 1961 and
1962 I worked at Carol Martins restau-
rant, which is now Speedos (Harborside
Cafe), my rst job as a waitress. While
working there, the rst riot happened in
Lake Geneva. It was very scary to a young
graduate and I was unable to go home after
work, because of the massive crowds. They
were very out of control and intimidating
people. They were outside the restaurant,
standing next to the window, and we all
feared for what might happen next.
My parents eventually showed up at
the restaurant with the minister from
the Episcopal Church, and with his help,
escorted me to the other end of town
where my home was. It was the rst time
our beautiful city was overrun with such
a mob. I remember the National Guard
in later years closing the roads into Lake
Geneva and that caused more stress as to
what was going to happen in our commu-
nity.
The destruction of the Andy Gump
statue was deeply sorrowful for me, as he
had stood in Flat Iron Park my entire life
as I grew up in Lake Geneva. This destruc-
tion of our city and the surrounding cities
of Geneva Lake was appalling at the time
it happened.
Thank you for your article of these
riots on July 4 that was in the paper. It
was very interesting and there were many
things mentioned that I did not know
about until I read it.
Carolyn A. Wareld
Walworth Township
Everyone held their breath
when the next July 4 neared
Headed to the
hospital for C-
section
To the Editor:
The front page of the July 4 issue was a real
reminder for me. I called the police to make
sure my husband and I could get through
town on the 3rd since I was on my way to go
to the hospital in Rockford, Ill. I was to have
a C-section on the early morning of July 3 for
the birth or our child who happened to be a
boy. I will never forget that Dummers Hill
was blocked. There were National Guard on
top of the roofs downtown, and the streets
were quiet. We went by the lake and out 120
toward the Illinois border. Yes, we lived on
Linda Lane in Sturwood and things were
exciting. Thanks for writing the article.
Sincerely,
Doris Roan
Lake Geneva
Alley full
of National
Guard
To the Editor:
I was working at the Lake Geneva
Regional News at 315 Broad St. where I
am still employed. I drove from Pell Lake
to the Dairy Queen on Wells Street where
I parked my car and walked the rest of
the way to the Regional News. I dont
remember what day it was or if I did it
more than one day but it was leading up
to the 4th of July.
At noon I began walking to the post
office and Olympic Restaurant on Main
Street to get a sandwich. The streets, side-
walks, hoods, roofs and trunks of cars
loaded with mostly college age students.
As I was walking past the alley in the 200
block of Broad St. I caught something out
of the corner of my eye. Turned to look
into the alley and it was full of National
Guard. It took me by surprise and I think
I jumped out of fear or just the surprise
of it. After all they were there for our pro-
tection and they had their weapons for all
to see.
Rumor had it, that signs were every-
where in some of the popular spring
break vacation spots in Florida. Ft. Lau-
derdale Beach was one of those places.
Supposedly, signs were along roads
from Florida to Wisconsin telling people
to be in Lake Geneva for the 4th of July
holiday.
When I wanted to travel from Pell
Lake to Lake Como to visit my parents
in the evenings, I had to take routes that
avoided Lake Geneva because of closed
streets entering the city.
Sue Hinske
Office Manager
Lake Geneva Regional News
Readers recall July 4, 1967 riot
To the Editor:
I just got the Lake Geneva paper and read
your recounting of the riots that took place in
1967. Boy, that brought up some old memo-
ries.
Actually on July 4th Lake Geneva became
the go-to place for college-aged kids as early
as 1961. I was between my junior and senior
years at Badger that summer and working as
a telephone operator at the telephone com-
pany on Main Street. My parents picked me
up from work on the night of July 3rd and
told me I was coming home and not going
out again. I couldnt understand why I had
to dump my plans with my friends. They told
me a bunch of college kids had decided to
come to Lake Geneva for the holiday and had
taken over lower Broad Street.
As we drove through the Main and Broad
intersection, I saw road-closed barricades
lined up across Broad Street and a line of
cops standing there. Nothing much was going
on just a bunch of kids milling about. My
mom said something about it being terrible
the way they took over the town. I guess I got
her blood pressure up when I said, It looks
like theyre having fun. I think I said it just
to say it more than anything. I did get a rise
out of her.
Every Fourth of July after that, the
crowds grew, but there were no riots. The
rst summer after Id been away at college
for a year, I did head downtown and join the
crowd because so many kids I knew from
school were there. All we did was walk up one
side of Broad Street and down the other side
since none of my friends were old enough to
get into a bar. The drinking age at that time
was 21 within the city limits, but a lot of the
bars actually raised the age limit a couple
more degrees to hopefully keep those with
false IDs from getting in.
With each subsequent year, the crowds
grew even more, and I stayed away. And,
as you reported, in 1966 they started doing
property damage. Over the Fourth of 1967
my parents and I were in LaCrosse attending
my roommates wedding and heard nothing
about the riots until we came back to Lake
Geneva the following day. I remember hear-
ing about Andy Gump being torn down and all
the damage the rioters had caused. We all felt
violated for what they had done to our town. I
was so glad we werent home and grateful the
mob never made it into the neighborhoods to
do damage there too.
It was very strange the next year when the
Fourth rolled around. We all held our collec-
tive breaths and, like you wrote, nothing hap-
pened. And, thank the Lord, nothing like that
ever happened again. In all the years we were
invaded every Fourth of July, I never saw it
as related to protesting the war or anything
like that. Just a bunch of kids gone wild. Per-
haps I was a bit naive about that part of the
deal. I have a feeling that most of them today
probably do look back on that time and have
regrets. At least I hope so!
Pamela S. Meyers
While Meyers now lives in Arlington
Heights, Ill., she makes frequent trips back
home, which is Lake Geneva.
Editors note: Meyers is author of Love
Finds You in Lake Geneva, which is avail-
able at the Cornerstone Shop and Gallery
and at bookstores.
Thankful
for
locating
friend
To the Editor:
I would like to thank the
Lake Geneva Police Depart-
ment for nding my neigh-
bor and good friend Eliga
Roach.
He went missing
recently for several hours
and the Havenwood Apart-
ment community feared the
worst.
I am glad that Eliga is
now safe and healthy. He is
truly a wonderful person.
James Kaye
Lake Geneva
LETTER
THE RIOTS MADE NEWS AND HISTORY. This page was in Geneva Lake Reections, a
publication produced by the publishers of At the Lake.
SUBMITTED BY WALTER LEE FLEMING
WHO ARE THESE basketball players? Theyre members of the 1932 Lake
Geneva High School basketball team. We know Oliver Fleming is the
second player from the left in the back row, but who are the others? Walter
Lee Fleming submitted the photo and would be interested in nding out.
If you know, email jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net.
FROM THE FILES OF THE REGIONAL NEWS
July 22, 1993
The Marcus Corp., Milwaukee,
purchased the former Americana
Lake Geneva Resort. The facility
opened in 1968 as the Playboy Resort
and Country Club.
Charles Vaughan received a
Bachelor of Science degree from the
College of Arts and Sciences at Van-
derbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.
His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Vaughan Jr.
Badger High School teacher
Shirley Peabody and students Sarah
Priebe, Shannon Cain, Katie Recht,
Robin Hughes, Kelly McCullough
and Brian Hayes spent a week in the
Bahamas studying marine biology in
the Caribbean and Atlantic oceans.
Nary Airman Recruit Timothy
Olson was deployed aboard the air-
craft carrier USS Theodore Roos-
evelt, passing through the Suez Canal
from the Mediterranean Sea to the
Red Sea. He is the son of Dennis and
Darlene Olson, Walworth.
The Geneva Lakes Community
Tennis Association had twins Ryan
and Tyler Gibson, 8, and Emily and
Melissa Lewis, 6, enrolled in the
lesson program at the Maple Park
courts.
July 24, 2003
Two Flight for Life helicopters
landed on Highway 50 at Knollwood
Drive following a trafc accident July
18. David Chappel, Delavan, died
and a Virginia woman was seriously
injured.
Genoa City Master Gardeners
Barb Gudowicz and Jo Ann Hol-
lander recently completed numerous
plantings and beautication projects
at Veterans Memorial Park as part of
their ongoing certication require-
ments.
Eight Big Foot High school stu-
dents, including Ben Stewart, Alison
Schaid, Bill Blum and Leah Houghtby,
and their teacher, Barb Macovec,
spent 12 days in Costa Rica touring
the rain forest and learning about the
Costa Rican culture.
Jacob Duros, Lake Geneva, was
among 36 U-14 Wisconsin soccer
players selected for the Wisconsin
2003 Olympic Development Pro-
gram, to begin in January.
The decorative fountain in Hyer
Park, Walworth, has been completed
following a year and half of planning.
Memory is a funny thing.
We cant remember where we left our
keys, but we know where we were more than
50 years.
We remember the exact moment when
something happened. We can summon
details, remember locations, recall feelings.
That was the case with the people who
shared the following memories of the riots of
July 4th 1967 in Lake Geneva.
We ran a story on the event in our July
4th issue and the response has been amaz-
ing.
Besides the stories this week, there are
others to be told which well run in next
weeks Regional News.
One was a newspaper article written
by Jennifer Schaefer, the daughter of Trish
Schaefer of Lake Geneva. She interviewed
some of the notable people involved in the
event.
Another perspective was presented by
Curtis A. Woods of Lyons. He takes a view
thats different than those expressed by most
people. The headline for his story is July 4th,
1967: Assault, batteries and riot by police.
Check out this section next week for the
rest of the story.
John Halverson, editor
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 3D
OBITUARIES DEATH NOTICES
Alyce Lottig Britton, 77, Lake Geneva,
died Thursday, July 11, 2013, at Aurora St. Lukes Medical
Center in Milwaukee. Services at 2 p.m., Thursday, July 14, at
Linn Presbyterian Church, with the Rev. William J. Ingersoll,
ofciating. Visitation from 4 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, at Toynton
Funeral Home in Walworth.
Eve M. Bronaugh, 93, Lake Ivanhoe, died
Thursday, July 11, 2013, at the Aurora Memorial Hospital of
Burlington. Services at 11 a.m., Tuesday, July 16, at the Steinke
Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva. Visita-
tion one hour before the services.
Richard H. Burton, 84, Walworth, formerly
of Harvard, Ill., died Friday, July 12, 2013, at his home. Ser-
vices at 1 a.m., Tuesday, July 16, at Faith Lutheran Church in
Walworth, with the Rev. James Mehltretter ofciating. Visi-
tation one hour prior to the service at the church. Toynton
Funeral Home of Walworth assisted the family with arrange-
ments. Memorials may be directed to Faith Lutheran Church
of Walworth or the Walworth County Fair Foundation.
Joseph A. Caldrone, 90, Lake Geneva, died
Sunday, July 14, 2013, at his home. Funeral services at 12:30
p.m., Tuesday, July 23, at Toynton Walworth Funeral Home
in Walworth.
Walter E. Grady, 89, Lake Geneva, died
Friday, July 12, 2013, at Aurora Memorial Hospital of Burling-
ton. Services at 3 p.m., Tuesday, July 16, at the Steinke Funeral
Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva, with the Rev.
Brian Metke, of Trinity Lutheran Church, Pell Lake, ofciating.
Burial at St. Johns Cemetery, Slades Corners. Visitation at the
funeral home from 1 p.m. to the time of services on Tuesday.
Kathleen Lee Dangereld Kirk-
patrick, Walworth, died unexpectedly at her home July
7, 2013. Visitation at Toynton Walworth Funeral Home in Wal-
worth from 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, July 19. Memorial service at 11
a.m., Saturday July 20, at Brick Church, N1504 Brick School
Road , Walworth. Private family burial at Walworth Cemetery.
In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, memorials to the
family would be appreciated.
Adina M. Tina Mancini, 96, a long-
time resident of Lake Geneva, died Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at
Village Glen in Lake Geneva. Funeral Mass of Christian burial
will be celebrated at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, July 22, at St. Fran-
cis de Sales Catholic Church in Lake Geneva. Burial will follow
in Oak Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be Monday, in the church,
from 10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. In lieu of other expressions of
sympathy memorials are requested in Tinas name to: St. Fran-
cis de Sales Human Concerns, 148 Main St., Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
Gertrude S. Oldenburg, 97, Burling-
ton, formerly of Genoa City, died Friday morning, July 12,
2013, at Arbor View in Burlington. Funeral services at noon
Wednesday at the First Congregational United Church of
Christ, Genoa City. Interment in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake
Geneva. Visitation from 10 a.m. Wednesday until time of ser-
vices at the church. Memorial remembrances may be made to
the Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS,
66675. The Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home of
Genoa City handled the arrangements. For online guestbook,
visit haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Diane F. Purcell, 78, Lake Geneva, died
peacefully at her home on Sunday, July 13, 2013, with her ve
children at her side. A celebration of Dianes life Thursday,
July 18, at 6:30 p.m. in the chapel of Derrick Funeral Home
and Cremation Services in Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Jim
Scheurman ofciating. Visitation Thursday at the funeral
home, from 4:30 until 6:30 p.m. In lieu of other expressions
of sympathy memorials are requested in Dianes name to
Twin Oaks Homeless Shelter, W9965 Highway 14, Darien,
WI, 53114.
Mary B. Watson, 92, formerly of Loves Park,
Ill., died Monday, July 8, 2013, at the Williams Bay Care
Center, Williams Bay. Memorial gathering for friends and
family from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, July 18, at the Steinke
Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva.
Kathleen Lee
Dangereld
Kirkpatrick
July 7, 2013
Kathleen Lee Dangereld Kirkpatrick, Walworth, died
unexpectedly at her home July 7, 2013.
She is survived by her three sons, John (Sherry), Seth
(Shelly) and Adam; her sister,
Mary Dangereld and Tami
(Bob) Brown; brothers, Phillip
and Steve (Cindy) Dangereld;
grandchildren, Bailey, Mitch-
ell, Sydney, and Zachary; and
many family and friends.
Kathy was preceded in
death by her parents, Gordy
and Mona Dangereld.
Visitation at Toynton Wal-
worth Funeral Home in Wal-
worth from 4 to 8 p.m., Friday,
July 19. Memorial service at 11
a.m., Saturday July 20, at Brick
Church, N1504 Brick School
Road , Walworth. Private family
burial at Walworth Cemetery.
In lieu of other expressions of
sympathy, memorials to the
family would be appreciated.
Kathy will always be loved
and missed by all.
Walter E. Grady
Oct. 28, 1923 - July 12, 2013
Walter E. Grady, 89, Lake Geneva, died Friday, July 12,
2013, at the Aurora Memorial Hospital of Burlington.
He was born Oct. 28, 1923, in Lyons Township, the son of
James and Molly Rice Grady. He married Juanita M, Kaskin
Sept. 18, 1942, in Slades Corners. Walter served in the U.S.
Army during World War II and was a foreman at Trostels
LTD Manufacturing Company, Lake Geneva, for 35 years,
retiring in 1987.
He is survived by his wife, Juanita; sons, Dennis (Debo-
rah) Grady, Beaver Falls, Pa., and Roger (Jean) Grady, Lake
Geneva; three grandchildren; ve great-grandchildren; and a
sister, Alice Frietag, Paddock Lake.
Walter was preceded in death by his parents; ve sisters;
and two brothers.
Services at 3 p.m., Tuesday, July 16, at the Steinke Funeral
Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva, with the Rev.
Brian Metke, of Trinity Lutheran Church, Pell Lake, ofciat-
ing. Burial at St. Johns Cemetery, Slades Corners. Visitation
at the funeral home from 1 p.m. to the time of services on
Tuesday. For online guest registry, go to www.steinkefuner-
alhomeinc.com.
Richard H. Burton
Oct. 2, 1928 - July 12, 2013
Richard H. Burton, 84, Walworth, formerly of Harvard, Ill.,
died Friday, July 12, 2013, at his home.
He was born Oct. 2, 1928, at Harvard, Ill., to parents Harold
and Ella Koltz Burton. He married Marion Guetschow on Feb.
17, 1952, in Harvard. Richard proudly served his country in
the United States Army during the Korean conict. He was
a member of the Williams Bay Veterans of Foreign Wars. He
worked with his father in Burton Electric. Richard was then
employed for many years at Dean Foods as an electrician.
He is survived by his wife, Marion; son, David Burton,
Walworth; daughter, Susan (Bob) Pruessing, Walworth; spe-
cial daughter, Ida Lise Salberg of Norway; brother, Dan (Diane)
Burton, Loveland, Colo.; grandchildren, Matthew (Becky)
Pruessing, Walworth, Katie (Chris) Schwarz, Westby, Sarah
Powers, Chili, and Claire (Sean) Baker Burton,Taos, N.M.;
great-grandchildren, Dyllon, Cody, Conner, Zachary Pruessing,
Noah, Madelyn Schwarz, and a seventh great-grandchild, due
in November.
Richard was preceded in death by his parents; two daugh-
ters, Lynna in 1972, and Sarah in 1963; and two sisters, Dolores
Murray and Barbara Bleiler.
Services at 1 a.m., Tuesday, July 16, at Faith Lutheran
Church in Walworth, with the Rev. James Mehltretter of-
ciating. Visitation one hour prior to the service at the church.
Toynton Funeral Home of Walworth assisted the family with
arrangements. Memorials may be directed to Faith Lutheran
Church of Walworth or the Walworth County Fair Foundation.
Alyce Lottig Britton
May 6, 1936 - July 11, 2013
Alyce Lottig Britton, 77, Lake Geneva, died Thursday, July
11, 2013, at Aurora St. Lukes Medical Center in Milwaukee.
She was born in Lake Geneva on May 6, 1936, to parents
Ralph F. and Alene Bingham Lottig.
She graduated from Walworth High School, class of 1953.
Alyce received her degree in primary education from Racine-
Kenosha Rural Normal School, class of 1955, and Wisconsin
State College in Whitewater, class of 1960. She taught in sev-
eral local schools prior to accepting a teaching position in the
Department of Defense Dependents School System (DoDDS)
in Karlsruhe, Germany, where she taught for 30 years. Upon
her retirement in 1993 she returned to live in the Lake Geneva
area.
Alyce married Robert L. Britton on April 4, 1975, in Bern,
Switzerland.
She enjoyed her teaching career, traveling and life in gen-
eral, but her true love was of family, her extended DoDDS
family and her European friends. Her talk was always about
her family and friends and her fond memories of them.
She is survived by her husband, Robert; her two step-
daughters, Laura A. (Dean) Melvin and Lynn L. (Tom) Dyal,
Drummond Island, Mich.; their children and grandchildren;
as well as three generations of Lottig nieces and nephews that
are held close and dear to her heart.
Alyce was preceded in death by her parents, Ralph F. and
Alene Bingham Lottig; her brothers, Walter and Ralph Jr.; and
her sisters, Ethel Lottig and Mary Norem.
Services at 2 p.m., Thursday, July 14, at Linn Presbyterian
Church, with the Rev. William J. Ingersoll, ofciating. Visita-
tion from 4 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, at Toynton Funeral Home
in Walworth.
Joseph A. Caldrone
Nov. 11, 1922 - July 14, 2013
Joseph A. Caldrone, 90, Lake Geneva, died Sunday, July
14, 2013, at his home.
He was born Nov. 11, 1922, in Chicago, the son of Nick
and Della Pintozzi Caldrone. He married Eleanore Sunny
Margiotta July 5, 1948, in Chicago.
Joseph was a veteran of the U.S. Army, serving from 1942
to 1945. He retired from the Cook County Sheriff Department
as assistant chief in 1986, was a member of the American
Legion, VFW and St. Benedict Catholic Church in Fontana.
He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Sunny; and chil-
dren, Steven (Cathy Norini) and Adria (Fred Pira).
Funeral services at 12:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 23, at Toyn-
ton Walworth Funeral Home in Walworth.
Diane F. Purcell
May 21, 1935 - July 13, 2013
Diane F. Purcell, 78, Lake Geneva, died peacefully at her
home on Sunday, July 13, 2013, with her ve children at her
side.
The former Diane Fox was born in Salinas, Calif., on May
21, 1935, the daughter of the late Jared W. and Marie Chipman
Fox. On Feb. 4, 1955, in Silver Springs, Md., she married James
E. Purcell. He preceded her in death on May 11, 2012.
She had a masters degree in counseling and had worked
for many years as an addiction counselor. She was an active
member of the Lake Geneva Lioness Club and the Geneva
Lakes Womens Association. She was a strong supporter of the
Twin Oaks Homeless Shelter in Darien.
Diane is survived by her ve children, Jared (Cynthia) Pur-
cell, Hinsdale, Ill., Juli Powers, Dallas, Texas, Gregory (Julie)
Purcell, St. Charles, Ill., Heather (Peter) Richter, Hinsdale, and
Tina (Marc) Schwartz, Grayslake, Ill.; and 14 grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by a brother, Jared W. Fox III.
A celebration of Dianes life Thursday, July 18, at 6:30 p.m.
in the chapel of Derrick Funeral Home and Cremation Ser-
vices in Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Jim Scheurman ofciat-
ing. Visitation Thursday at the funeral home, from 4:30 until
6:30 p.m. In lieu of other expressions of sympathy memorials
are requested in Dianes name to Twin Oaks Homeless Shel-
ter, W9965 Highway 14, Darien, WI, 53114. To sign the online
guest registry, go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
Adina M. Tina
Mancini
Feb. 4, 1917 - July 16, 2013
Adina M. Tina Mancini, 96, a longtime resident of Lake
Geneva died Tuesday July 16, 2013, at Village Glen in Lake
Geneva.
The former Adina Marie Clementi was born in Melrose
Park, Ill., on Feb. 4, 1917, the daughter of the late Lazaro and
Christina (Casa) Clementi. In April of 1936 she was united
in marriage to Anthony Mancini. He preceded her in death
on Oct. 26, 1991. She was a member of St. Francis de Sales
Catholic Church in Lake Geneva. She was a member of the
Lake Geneva Garden Club and a former member of the Pink
Ladies at Lakeland Hospital in Elkhorn.
Tina is survived by two children, Carl Mancini of Lake
Geneva, and Carol (Bill) Greenwald of Lake Geneva; three
grandchildren, Anthony Mancini, Timothy Greenwald and
Andrew Greenwald and two great-grandchildren, Max and
Hunter.
Funeral Mass of Christian burial will be said at 11:30 a.m.
on Monday July 22, 2013, at St. Francis de Sales Catholic
Church in Lake Geneva. Father Jim Scheurman will ofci-
ate. Burial will follow in Oak Hill Cemetery. Visitation will
be Monday, in church, from 10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. In lieu
of other expressions of sympathy memorials are requested
in Tinas name to St. Francis de Sales Human Concerns, 148
Main St., Lake Geneva, WI 53147.
Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva is assisting the
Mancini family with arrangements. To sign the on-line guest
registry please go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
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Their love is never lost when
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4D The Regional News July 18, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Time Is Now/Legal and moral obligation to pay child support
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
Slow paced, predicable plot, no surprise ending, but interesting none-the-less
Good reading for government buffs
I will try my best to
temper my enthusiasm.
The last time I wrote
about the countys Jour-
nal of Proceedings book I
remarked that I looked for-
ward to its annual release
as if it were the latest Dan
Brown thriller.
A few weeks later, during
a question and answer ses-
sion following a presenta-
tion I made, an audience
member told me that if I really felt that
way I should get a life.
That person was probably right, but
the book contains so much information
that I cant help but nd it interesting.
The Journal is an indexed compila-
tion of a years worth of Walworth County
Board meetings.
It fullls two separate statutory direc-
tives that require the county clerk to
record at length, in a book every resolu-
tion adopted, order passed and ordinance
enacted and to keep and record in a book
true minutes of all of the proceedings of
the board.
Rather than capturing a calendar year,
the Journal follows a county board year,
which starts in April at its organizational
meeting.
This years 2012 Journal, therefore,
also includes the rst three months of
2013.
Our clerk, Kim Bushey, compiled the
latest book in record time, releasing it
shortly after the Board completed its
March meeting.
The Journal is interesting to me at two
levels.
First, it provides a historical record of
County Board activities.
Clerks have been keeping these books
for a long time. I have a duplicate copy
from 1903 in my ofce, but much older
editions are kept in the
Clerks vault.
Aside from learning
some interesting history,
however, the journals pro-
vide insight into changes in
the county boards workload
over time.
Of particular inter-
est to me is how signicant
amendments to the boards
operating rules, made a
decade ago, have impacted
the decision-making process.
Two measures, contained in the jour-
nals, provide a sense of how the board
is accomplishing its work; these include
communications and ordinances.
The term communications refers
to a portion of the boards agenda that is
reserved for letters and correspondence
from the public,
County staff and even Board Supervi-
sors that provide information to the board
or urge a particular course of action.
The number of communications pro-
cessed by the Board rose dramatically fol-
lowing a 2002 amendment to the countys
operating rules.
That change encouraged the use of
such letters as a way for supervisors and
citizens to bring their ideas to the board.
Rather than just complaining about
issues but never taking action on them,
Supervisors and the public can commit
their views to writing and submit them to
the board.
These letters
are distributed to
each supervisor and
placed on the boards
monthly agenda.
The board, in
turn, typically refers the communications
to one of its standing committees.
If the idea has merit, the communica-
tion will be returned to the board in the
form of a proposed ordinance or resolu-
tion.
Prior to the rule change, during the
period of 1994 to 1996, for example, the
Board was presented with an average of
just 18 items of correspondence per year.
In 2012, this gure had increased to
115.
Prior to looking at this years Journal,
I would have sworn that the number of
communications received by the Board
has been increasing each year.
In reality, 10 years after the rule
change, the numbers appear to be fairly
stable.
Supervisors were presented with 160
communications in 2010 and 148 in 2011.
A second trend, illustrated by the jour-
nals, is how the board governs the county,
through the adoption of resolutions and
ordinances.
In general, resolutions resolve issues
on a case-by-case basis.
Ordinances are of a more permanent
nature and seek to deal with problems by
establishing uniform guidelines by which
staff, committees or the whole board may
make decisions.
For many years, the countys ordi-
nances were not codied, that is, col-
lected in a single book.
Given the lack of emphasis on a code
book, it isnt surprising that the board
adopted few ordinances.
Instead, resolutions were enacted to
deal with issues on a case-by-case basis
or committees and
managers simply
made decisions
without guidance
from the board.
It wasnt until
1998 that a formal code book was main-
tained.
In the three years immediately pre-
ceding codication, from 1994 to 1997,
Supervisors adopted just 30 non-zoning
ordinances.
In 2012, alone, the Board considered
45 of them.
As was the case with items of cor-
respondence, the number of ordinances
considered by the board, on an annual
basis, appears to have stabilized.
Supervisors processed 55 and 53 ordi-
nances in 2010 and 2011, respectively.
Aside from generating some interest-
ing trivia, there is a point to all of this
number-crunching; ordinances and com-
munications present opportunities for
elected leaders to make decisions.
When the boards workload, as
reected by these two measures, was rel-
atively low, it didnt mean that decisions
werent being made; it simply meant that
decisions were being made by others, most
often by staff.
There is nothing wrong with allowing
managers to manage their operations.
Not all oversight by elected leaders,
however, is micromanagement.
Supervisors serve an important func-
tion when they establish policy and bring
forward new ideas and constituent con-
cerns.
As measured by ordinances and com-
munications, the county board expanded
its role, a decade ago, and continues to
sustain this increased level of oversight.
We will have to wait for the 2013 Jour-
nal of Proceedings to see whether this
trend continues.
At the risk of being told to get a life,
I will admit that I can hardly wait until it
is released.

The opinions expressed in this column
are those of the author and not necessar-
ily those of the Walworth County Board
of Supervisors.
Normally, I do not get
involved but when a woman
is choked and the children
are left to suffer, I cannot
stand by and ignore the situ-
ation.
I arrived at the second
address and this time I was
in luck.
The second woman
answered and yelled into the
apartment to the ex-husband,
telling him he had a visitor.
When he came to the
door I told him who I was. I
told him his children were
having a hard time since he
stopped paying his child sup-
port.
The second woman
was listening in disbelief.
Before he could even react I
informed him I knew where
he was now working.
I reminded him of his
legal and moral obligation
to pay child support and
informed him I was aware
of his psychological threats
and physical attacks made
against his wife. I showed
him some photos, several in
fact of myself and The Time
Is Now to Help supporters.
I told him he had to catch
up on his child support, his
wife was ling a complaint
with authorities and I was
going to stand by his children.
By then the rst woman I vis-
ited pulled up with another
person driving her.
I could see the torment
on the exs face. I asked him if
he was going to live up to his
commitment to his children.
He sheepishly said, Yes,
I will.
I reminded him that I
would be following up and
making sure he fullled his
commitment. With that I
left him to the mess he had
created for himself with his
selsh lifestyle and abandon-
ment of his children.
The next day I met with
the mother. She said her ex-
husband had stopped by and
given her a check for the three
months of child support in
arrears.
She said, My ex-husband
said he had met you. What
happened?
I told her, I informed
him of his neglect of the chil-
dren and the authorities are
going to be informed of his
threats to you.
She looked relieved and
actually smiled when she
said, Thank you.
With relief of poverty
the mother and children will
continue to have a place to
call home.
Health and happiness,
God bless everyone,
W.C./Sal
New mailing address
We have a new mailing
address. Make checks pay-
able to:
The Time Is Now to Help
P.O. Box 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
The Time Is Now to Help
is a federally recognized
501(c)3 charitable organiza-
tion licensed in the states of
Wisconsin and Illinois. You
will receive a tax deductible,
itemized thank you receipt
showing how your donation
provided assistance for the
poverty stricken.
A very special thank
you
Fox Charities, Lake
Geneva School of Cooking,
Chef John Bogan, Pentair
Foundation, The Summer-
time Foundation, Dick and
Jean Honeyager, Jim and
Ardith Drescher, Nestor and
Bien Alabarca, Dr. Gerald
Theune, Bill and Susan Bos-
worth, Suzanne Sampson,
Gerald and Anita Heinz,
Wayne Reuter, Keith Gibson,
William and Carol Dick,
Michael Glass, Violet De
Wind, Clifford and Louise
Morris, Albert and Ellen
Burnell, James and Karen
Goodrick, William and Jean
Isaacson, Lauren Grady, Beth
Rendall, Michael and Kathe
Beach, Leon and Mary Ster-
ken, W.C. Family Resource
Center/Food Pantry volun-
teers, and all the God loving
volunteers of all our caring
food pantries, all of you who
support The Time Is Now to
Help donation boxes, and
the businesses that allow our
donation boxes.
Anyone who would like
a Time Is Now donation box
in your business, please call
(262) 249-7000.
Memorials
David and Stephanie
Honan in memory of Ralph
Graber.
Side by Side upcoming
event
Side by Side will be
having a fundraiser dinner at
Simple Restaurant, Tuesday,
July 30, 2013. Seatings are at
5, 6 and 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5
children under age 8.
Tickets are available
at member churches or at
Simple Restaurant, 525
Broad St., Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
Chris Anns Resale
Shop
I will continue to ask
Chris Anns Resale shop for
furniture and household
necessities to help our pov-
erty stricken fellow Ameri-
cans. The poverty stricken
we help are hidden away.
Some are hard to nd, but I
make it a point to nd them
and make a difference. Many
years ago I helped Love, Inc.
in Burlington start up. Now
Chris Anns needs our help.
Chris Ann was a cleaning
lady with a big heart, never
saying no to The Time Is Now
to Helps requests. Now she
is trying to make the resale
shop a success. That success
in turn allows Time Is Now
to pull from the inventory to
provide much needed house-
hold items for those living
without. I am forever using
Chris Anns as a holding area
to take, yes take, anything
and everything for the pov-
erty stricken.
Chris Ann has rent, utili-
ties and other expenses she
needs to pay to keep open.
Please stop by and spend a
few dollars. Everything is
a bargain. Your purchases
will continue to help us help
others. Thank you for taking
the time to make Chris Anns
a regular visit and please tell
all your friends.
If you have anything you
would like to donate please
call (262) 348-9088. They
are located at 406 Highway
120 North, Lake Geneva, in
the old Floor Store building
across from the Next Door
Pub. Look for the American
ags.
Desperately need cars
Please donate a used car
to help our fellow Americans
get to work and other daily
necessities.
Please visit
www.timeisnowtohelp.org.
Supervisors processed 55 and
53 ordinances in 2010 and 2011,
respectively.
You Havent Changed A Bit!
H
a
p
p
y
B
irthday, M
u
r
p
h
Reasonable doubt
won the day
By Beth Kassab
Orlando Sentinel
Like it or not, the jury
got this one right. Nobody
wants to see two parents
who already lost their
teenage son also lose out
on what they saw as jus-
tice. As painful as it may
be, though, acquitting
George Zimmerman was
the only verdict the jury
could logically reach. The
state simply didnt prove
second-degree murder. Or
manslaughter. As much
as I dont like many of the
choices Zimmerman made
the night he killed Trayvon
Martin, the evidence pre-
sented at trial gave way to
more than one reasonable
doubt about Zimmermans
guilt.
Florida likes dogs
better than blacks
By Craig Pittman
Slate
Florida juries have
proven to be very lenient
even in cases that dont
involve Stand Your
Ground. Two years ago,
as you probably heard, a
Florida jury found Casey
Anthony not guilty of
murdering her daughter.
Two months ago, a Florida
jury acquitted 70-year-
old Ralph Wald of murder
for gunning down his 41-
year-old wifes 32-year-old
lover, whom Wald caught
with his pants around his
knees. In 2007, despite
seeing a videotape of
seven guards kicking and
beating a 14-year-old boy
named Martin Lee Ander-
son to death at a juvenile
boot camp, an all-white
jury acquitted them and a
nurse whod failed to stop
the killing of manslaugh-
ter charges. The guards
and nurse said they were
just following normal boot
camp rules and proce-
dures.
Afterward, the familys
attorney told reporters,
You kill a dog, you go to
jail you kill a little black
boy and nothing happens.
Shooting based on
proling
By USA Today
Zimmermans success-
ful defense depended on
getting jurors to focus on
the ght that occurred just
before he shot the 17-year-
old, unarmed Martin, and
not on the events that pre-
ceded it. The lawyers estab-
lished doubt about which
man screamed for help, as
well as other details of the
confrontation holes that
invited an acquittal under
Floridas laws.
But the fact remains
that Zimmerman, a neigh-
borhood watch volun-
teer and cop wanna-be,
instantly identied Martin
as a (expletive) punk who
looks like hes up to no
good. The fact remains
that Martin was doing
nothing wrong; he was
returning from a snack
run at a convenience store,
heading for the house of
his fathers girlfriend. And
the fact remains that had
Zimmerman stayed in his
truck, as advised by the
police, Martin would be
alive today.
He should have
never been charged
By John Lott
Fox News
The George Zimmer-
man case should never have
been brought. Saturday
night after the not guilty
verdict was delivered, State
Attorney Angela Corey jus-
tied bringing the case to
put the facts out there.
But criminal cases should
never be brought simply
to put the facts before
the public. No one should
be charged with a crime
unless prosecutors them-
selves really believe that
the person committed a
crime. Yet, the prosecution
and their own experts lan-
guage consistently showed
a lack of certainty.
Lets look at the
facts
By Cathy Young
Newsweek
George Zimmermans
acquittal on criminal
charges in the fatal shoot-
ing of Trayvon Martin
has sparked anguish and
outrage across America.
These passions stem from
a starkly racial view of the
incident: a light-skinned
man singles out a black
teenager as suspicious,
stalks him with a gun, pro-
vokes a confrontation, and
gets away with murder.
But, as with any criminal
case that comes to dra-
matize larger controver-
sies, the symbolic narra-
tive often overshadows the
actual facts.
While Zimmerman, a
neighborhood watch leader,
had called police 44 times
over eight years before the
night of the shooting, only
four calls were about pos-
sibly suspicious people
identied as black, and at
least three about whites.
The assumption that Zim-
merman targeted Martin
for racial reasons was
common from the start,
partly due to misleading
media reports ... in which
Zimmerman appears to
stress that the possibly
suspicious person is black
but he was responding
to the dispatchers ques-
tion about the individuals
race.
None of this negates the
possibility that Zimmer-
mans suspicions toward
Martin, were partly race-
based consciously or
not.
Racism is hardly dead;
Internet discussions of this
indisputably tragic story
have been plagued by vile
racist comments directed
at the dead teenager. But
the rush to declare Zim-
merman guilty of both
murder and racism,
regardless of facts, is also
a form of racism and
injustice.
Have an opinion?
email John Halverson at
jhalverson@lakegenev-
anews.net.
Wed prefer to use
names and city addresses,
but for this feature only
well accept name with-
held. Well be selective in
what we run based on it
being a representative,
intelligent view of the
issue.
TODAYS ISSUE
July 18, 2013 The Regional News 5D
A cross section of opinions from national media on the most controversial trial of the year
Multiple views of the George Zimmerman decision
Twitter.com
@ReqionalRob @MikeRamc/yk17 @ JboReort
News To
Talk
About
SCHOOL NOTES
Upper Iowa
University deans list
Upper Iowa Univer-
sity named Jeffrey Klean,
Elkhorn, to its 2013 spring
deans list. To be honored,
the undergraduate must
have earned a minimum
3.50 grade point average for
the semester and be enrolled
as a full-time student.
Founded in 1857 in Fay-
ette, Iowa, Upper Iowa Uni-
versity is a private, not-for-
prot university providing
undergraduate and graduate
degree programs and lead-
ership development oppor-
tunities to about 6,200 stu-
dents at its Fayette campus
and learning centers world-
wide.
UW-River Falls
deans list
The UW - River Falls
spring semester deans
list honoring 1,384 stu-
dents has been released.
To be named to the list, a
full-time undergraduate
student must earn a grade
point average of at least 3.5
on a scale of 4.0.
Local students included
were Corey Bockelmann,
Genoa City, and Amanda
Gyger, Lyons.
UW-River Falls is
located on 226 acres 30
miles from downtown St.
Paul, Minn.
Hack receives
scholarships
Kayla Hack, Elkhorn, has
been awarded Presidential
and Dordt College FFA schol-
arships and the Presidential
Grant for Future Leaders
from Dordt College, Sioux
Center, Iowa, as an incoming
freshman.
Dordt College has a
vibrant community of approx-
imately 1,400 students, most
of whom live on campus, and
has 96 percent of those who
graduate employed within six
months of graduation.
214 Broad Street, Lake Geneva 262.248.6988
www.facebook.com/CornerstoneShop
"It was so much fun to work on this video with Joy and Phil -
everyone had a great time putting it together and they made it
easy for us to get it done! We love it!
- Karin & Bruce Bennett (Owners) Cornerstone Shop & Gallery
A wonderful opportunity for you to recognize properties that add charm to our
community. Could be your own property. Awards for both residences and businesses.
Help Us Identify These Properties
To enter, submit the completed form below with a minimum of three non-returnable
photos, mailed to Beautification Committee, 1566 Orchard Lane, Lake Geneva, WI
53147, or e-mail: lgbeautification@genevaonline.com. Applications also available at
City Hall. Deadline to submit nominations is Aug. 30, 2013.
(Entries to be within Lake Geneva postal area).
Both Residential and Business
CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
Creativity
Use of Color
Appearance and curb appeal (must be viewable)
Design technique
10th Annual Mayors Landscape Awards
Presented by the
The Committee for the Beautification
of Lake Geneva, Inc.
ENTRY FORM
Name:
Business (if applicable):
Address:
Phone Number E-mail:
Owner authorizes the Beautification Committee to publish the property photo
and property address.
Owner Signature: Date:
get peace of mind
6D The Regional News July 18, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Services directory
Garbage & Rubbish Removal
Commercial-Industrial-Residential
608-752-8210
Serving Walworth County
WASTE MANAGEMENT
of
GENEVA LAKES
GARBAGE REMOVAL
SEAL COATING
LANDSCAPING
CLEANING
LAWNCARE
ALTERATIONS
K&L FASHIONS, INC.
SEWING ALTERATIONS
252 Center St. Lake Geneva
262-248-1840
Kris Nish
Laura OHalleran
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 10-5
Wed. 10-3, Sat. 10-2
After Hrs. Appts. Available
& CUSTOM CLOTHIER
Got skills?
Show them off here.
Call your
LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
ad representative today.
262.248.4444
New Construction Carpet Cleaning Winter Watch Program
Windows & Gutters Power Washing Snow Removal
Stephanie Nicewarner
homecleaning@sbcglobal.net
www.home-cleaning-service.webs.com
LAWNCARE
Spring Clean-Up Weed and Feed
Power Raking Core Aeration
Seeding Sod Mowing
Pruning Property Maintenance
GRADUATE HORTICULTURIST & TURFGRASS MGMT.
Specialty Lawncare Co.
262.248.4829
B.L.G. SERVICE
262-249-1455
Friendly, Dependable
LAWN SERVICE
SEASONAL CLEANUP
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
BRUSH & TREE CUTTING
Topsoil Manure Traffic Bond Sand Gravel Stone
MATERIAL DELIVERY-BOBCAT WORK
Aftermath Paving, Inc.
Residential and Commercial Seal Coating
www.aftermathpaving.com
Paving Repair and Replacements
Overlays Striping
Patching Infrared Patching
New and Existing Construction
LAKE GENEVA ~ 262.812.9150
CONSTRUCTION
FREE
ESTIMATES
(262)
620-6170
Providing Quality Service and Craftsmanship for over 20 years
Bathrooms
Kitchens
Windows
Doors
Siding
Soffit & Fascia
Residential
Repairs
Home
Maintenance
R
&
N
D
LANDSCA
P
I
N
G
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL FULLY INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
JOSE
(262) 745-7069
MARIO
(262) 745-0219
OUR SERVICES
MULCH COMPOST TOPSOIL SOD TRIMMING TREES MOVING
TREES PLANTING TREES & FLOWERS MOWING & EDGING
PATIOS (BRICK & STONE) RETAINING WALLS SNOW REMOVAL
WOOD FENCES TIMBER WALLS CLEANUPS
As an easy to eat, portable, neat and delicious food
item always an easy choice cookies come in endless
variety. They go well with a cup of coffee, tea or hot choco-
late, beside a dish of ice cream, warm and chewy out of the
oven or cool and crisp with a glass of cold milk. Old favor-
ites will always be around and here are a few others to try
they may become old favorites.
Chocolate Drop Cookies come from a cookbook pub-
lished by a church in 1950 and are just as delicious now as
they were then. Three ounces of baking chocolate, or three
squares, with sour milk assure richness and avor. They
go together quickly and can have nuts added to them, if
desired.
A cookie becomes a special treat when Dipped Short-
bread is served. The soft, rich dough is formed into balls
before baking. When cooled, each cookie has the top or one
edge dipped into a chocolate mixture, then into chopped
nuts. The recipe makes six dozen.
Gum Drop Cookies actually include cut up gum drops.
Brown sugar, eggs, our and salt are the remaining ingre-
dients. The cookies bake in a pan and are cut when n-
ished, then each one is rolled in powdered sugar.
The convenience of this recipe makes Butterscotch Ice
Box Cookies popular. The dough can be double wrapped
and frozen or stored in the refrigerator until needed and
baked a little at a time, if desired. These cookies, rich with
brown sugar and chopped nuts, became popular when ice
boxes came into use, preceding the modern refrigerator.
CHOCOLATE DROP COOKIES
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, beaten
3 squares baking chocolate, melted
1/2 teaspoon soda
1/2 cup sour milk or buttermilk
3 cups our
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease baking sheets or
spread with parchment paper.
Cream sugar, butter and salt. Add eggs and chocolate.
Mix soda in milk and add to dough alternately with sifted
our. Drop by teaspoon onto baking sheet. Bake at 350
degrees 10 to 12 minutes, depending on size of cookies.
Cool on wire rack.
Note: To sour milk, add 1/2 teaspoon vinegar to 1/2 cup
milk; let stand for a few minutes before using.
GUM DROP COOKIES
4 eggs
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
2 cups our
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup shopped nuts
1 cup gum drops, cut into equal pieces
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch
baking pan.
Beat eggs well and add sugar; blend completely. Fold in
our, nuts and gum drops. Spread into prepared pan and
bake at 350 degrees about 20 minutes. Cool 10 minutes;
cut into small bars and roll in powdered sugar.
DIPPED SHORTBREAD
2 cups our
1 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup confectioners sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup chocolate chips
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup nuts, nely chopped
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
In large bowl, combine our, butter, sugar and vanilla,
working with hands, if necessary. Shape into 1-inch balls,
using a teaspoonful of dough for each cookie.
Place on ungreased baking sheet and bake at 350
degrees; bake until light brown on edges, 10 to 12 minutes.
Cool completely.
Melt chocolate chips and butter. Dip top or one edge
of cookie into chocolate, then into nuts. Allow chocolate to
set, refrigerating if necessary. Makes six dozen.
BUTTERSCOTCH ICE BOX COOKIES
1/2 cup margarine or shortening
1 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 cups our
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Cream shortening; add sugar, then egg; mix well. Sift
dry ingredients and add to creamed mixture. Stir in vanilla
and nuts. Dough will be stiff.
Form into two rolls, about two inches in diameter; wrap
separately in waxed paper or plastic and chill overnight.
When ready to bake, preheat oven to 375 degrees. Slice
dough about 1/4-inch thick with sharp knife; place on
baking sheets, allowing some room to spread. Bake until
lightly browned, eight to 10 minutes. Store tightly covered.
Note: Double the ingredients and put half of the
wrapped rolls into a heavy plastic bag and freeze. Take
out one roll at a time as needed. They can be sliced while
still frozen. Allow to sit a few minutes on the baking sheets
before going into the oven.
COMMUNITY NOTES
Worship on the
Water July 24
The community is
invited to Worship on
the Water, sponsored
by the Anchor Covenant
and Immanuel Lutheran
churches of Lake Geneva.
Join the service on
the Lady of the Lake on
Wednesday, July 24, from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wor-
ship will be spirited and
informal, with an uplift-
ing praise band from both
congregations and a special
message for all. The public
is welcome.
Thanks to the generos-
ity of Gage Marine, there is
no cost for the evening.
A reservation is essen-
tial due to space restric-
tions on the boat. Call (262)
248-4211 for reservations.
Vacation Bible Camp
July 28-Aug. 1
Vacation Bible Camp
will be held Sunday, July
28 through Thursday, Aug.
1, at Immanuel Lutheran
Church and Anchor Cov-
enant Church, both at 1229
Park Row, Lake Geneva. All
children from 4K through
sixth grade are welcome.
Volunteers are needed,
with openings for group
leaders to accompany the
kids to each camp station.
Any help, even if not
every night, would be
great.
The Kingdom Rocks
Adventure begins each
evening in the sanctuary,
singing songs and learn-
ing about Gods love. The
adventure continues each
night with games, crafts
and dinner, followed by
more songs and a wrap-up.
Thursday, Aug. 1, is Finale
Night, with snow cones, a
petting zoo, singing, enter-
tainment and more.
CDs and T-shirts with
the camp logo are on sale
at the church on Sundays
between services.
For registration and
more information, call the
church ofce at (262) 248-
4211.
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