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Radical Idealism: Danger and Delusion

Term paper Outline


Dominique Nelson

2012

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

I.

Introduction A. What is Idealism?


1.

The belief that ideals can be achieved, even if this does not seem likely to others. The belief in the philosophy that objects in the world are ideas that only exists in the mind of God or people who see them. (DM)

2. 3. 4.

The practice of forming or pursuing ideals, esp. unrealistically The idealism of youth Vs. realism

a. The attitude or practice of accepting a situation as it


is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly

b.
5.

Virtually opposite ideas

Pros

a. Optimistic outlook on life b.


6.

Oblivious to things that can upset you

Cons

a. Being disappointed when things dont turn out the


way you expected

b.

Oblivious to the dangers you pose to yourself because of the refusal to accept what you do not favor.

B. What is being a radical


1. 2.

(Esp. of change or action) Relating to or affecting the fundamental nature of something; far-reaching or thorough (Adj) extremist, radical, ultra ((used of opinions and actions) far beyond the norm) "extremist political views"; "radical opinions on education"; "an ultra conservative"

3.

Vs. being moderate

a. Virtually opposites

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

b. c.

Average in amount, intensity, quality, or degree (adj) moderate (being within reasonable or average limits; not excessive or extreme) "moderate prices"; "a moderate income"; "a moderate fine"; "moderate demands"; "a moderate estimate"; "a moderate eater"; "moderate success"; "a kitchen of moderate size"; "the X-ray showed moderate enlargement of the heart"

d. S: (adj) moderate, temperate (not extreme) "a


moderate penalty"; "temperate in his response to criticism""
4.

Pros

a. High determination, b. persistence


5.

Cons

a. Extreme b. ruthless, c. desensitized


C. What is Delusion
1.

An idiosyncratic belief or impression that is firmly maintained despite being contradicted by what is generally accepted as reality or rational argument, typically a symptom of mental disorder

D. What dangers do all three pose on oneself and those around them
1. 2. 3. 4.

Loss of ethic standards trying to attain ones goal Beginning of insanity People die-> it always happens because someone goes Cray Cray Reality becomes warped, one may become unable to trust, or blind to dangers around them or other people.

II.

Romeo and Juliet

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

A. Both Romeo and Juliet wanted an eternal love and nothing is eternal
1. We met, we wooed and made exchange of vow,/Ill tell thee

as we pass, but this I pray:/That thou consent to marry us today. 2. Whats here? A cup, closed in my true loves hand?/Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end./O churl, drunk all, and left no friendly drop/To help me after? Act 5 scene 3 pg 8
3.

B. The families would not agree under any circumstances to such an unconventional idea due to their hatred for one another. And they know that
1. is she a capulet? Oh, this is a heavy price to pay! My life is

in the hands of the enemy romeo act 1 scene 5 pg 6


2. my only love sprung from my only hate Juliet act 1 scene 5

page
3. oh romeo oh romeodeny thy father and refuse thy

name Juliet act 2 scene 2 page 2 C. Romeo and Juliet employed any methods to find a way to be together, oblivious to the danger.
1. With loves light wings did I o'erperch these walls,/For stony

limits cannot hold love out,/And what love can do, that dares love attempt./Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me. Romeo act 2 scene 2 page 3 2. tell her to devise a plan romeo act 2 scene 5 page 9
3. But come what sorrow can,/It cannot countervail the

exchange of joy/That one short minute gives me in her sight. Romeo act 2 scene 6 page 1 4. I must be gone and live, or stay and die. Romeo act 3 scene 5 pg 1 5. God joined my heart to Romeos. You joined our hands. And before Iwho was married to Romeo by youam married to another man, Ill kill myself. julliet Act 4 scene 1 pg 3 6. When youre in bed, take this vial, mix its contents with liquor, and drink. Then a cold, sleep-inducing drug will run

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

through your veins, and your pulse will stop. friar act 4 scene 1 pg 4 7. Im afraid that its poison. And yet, it shouldnt be poison because he is a trustworthy holy man. What if, when I am put in the tomb, I wake up before Romeo comes to save me? Juliet act 4 scene 3 pg 2 8. Let me have a shot of poison, something that works so fast that the person who takes it will die as fast as gunpowder exploding in a canon. Romeo 3 act 1 scene 5 pg 3
9.

D. Romeo, Juliet, and a bunch of other people die because they are stupid.
1. Romeo, who was overcome with the desire for

revengeTybalt was dead benvolio act 3 scene 1 page 9 2. Wilt thou provoke me? Then have at thee, boy romeo act 5 scene 3 pg4 3. The dashing rocks thy seasick, weary bark./Heres to my love! (drinks the poison) O true apothecary,/Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. Romeo act 5 scene 3 pg 5 4. Yea, noise? Then Ill be brief. O happy dagger,/This is thy sheath. There rust and let me die./(stabs herself with ROMEOs dagger and dies) III. The Great Gatsby A. Gatsby is infatuated with Daisy
1. the officer [Gatsby] looked at daisy when she was speaking,

in a way that every young girl wants to be looked at some timeIt seemed so romantic to me Jordan Baker pg. 75
2. he hadnt once ceased looking at daisynick in narration

pg. 91 B. Gatsby decided to employ any tactics to impress her, especially getting rich, which was what held back their relationship in the past=daisy is shallow
1. He [Gatsby] wants to knowif youll invite Daisy to your

house some afternoon and then let him come over Jordan Baker pg. 78
2. I want the grass cut Gatsby pg. 82

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

3. my house looks well doesnt it he [Gatsby] demanded nick

in narration pg. 89
4. I keep it full of interesting peopleinteresting things

Gatsby pg. 90
5. When I asked him what kind of business he was in thats

my affair 90
6. I think he revalued everything in his house according to the

measure it drew from her well-loved eyes. Nick in narration pg. 91 C. Gatsby thinks solely of Daisy and having their love once again He tries to recreate the past, him and Daisy happily in love, years later which is impossible
1. Gatsby bought that house so Daisy would be just across the

bay. Jordan Baker pg. 78


2. he had waited five years and bought a mansion where he

dispensed starlight to casual monthsso that he could come over some afternoon to a strangers garden Nick(in narration) pg. 78
3. Consumed with wonder at her presence. He [Gatsby] had

been full of the idea so long, dreamed itat an inconceivable pitch of intensity nick in narration pg. 92
4. Compared to the great distance that had separated him

[Gatsby] from daisynow it was again a green light on a dock. His count to enchanted objects had diminished by one nick in narration pg. 93
5. he [Gatsby] wanted nothing less of daisy than that she

should go to tom and say I never loved you nick in narration pg. 109
6. cant repeat the past? He replied incredulously. Why of

course you can! Gatsby pg 110

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

7. Im going to fix every thing just the way it was beforeshell

see Gatsby pg 110


8. she never loved you, do you hear?...it was a terrible

mistake, but in her heart she never loved anyone but me Gatsby pg. 130 D. Gatsby did not acknowledge and was distressed by the existence of the even short-lasted love between Daisy and Tom, or even Pammy the product of that love.
1. They shook hands briefly [Gatsby and Buchanan], and a

strained, unfamiliar look of embarrassment came over Gatsbys faceI turned towards Gatsby but he was no longer there. Nick (in narration) pg. 74
2. He [gatsby] was profoundly affected by the fact that tom

was there. Nick in narration pg. 101


3. took the small reluctant handlooking at the child with

surprisedont think he had ever really believed in its existence before IV. Cases of crazy wenches who want what they cant have and then kill people A. Kristin Rossum
1. 2.

Wanted to continue her affair with her true love the chief toxicologist Killed her husband to maintain that relationship by stealing chemicals from work

3.

Set up as a suicide. Avoided responsibility to continue her affair

4. 1.

Charged with first degree murder, life without parole

B. Crimes of Passion Crime of passion n. a defendant's excuse for committing a crime due to sudden anger or heartbreak, in order to eliminate the element of "premeditation." This usually arises

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

in murder or attempted murder cases, when a spouse or sweetheart finds his/her "beloved" having sexual intercourse with another and shoots or stabs one or both of the coupled pair. To make this claim the defendant must have acted immediately upon the rise of passion, without the time for contemplation or allowing for "a cooling of the blood." It is sometimes called the "Law of Texas" since juries in that state are supposedly lenient to cuckolded lovers who wreak their own vengeance. The benefit of eliminating premeditation is to lessen the provable homicide to manslaughter with no death penalty and limited prison terms. An emotionally charged jury may even acquit the impassioned defendant. All up in Romeo and Juliets alley (the cousin, the best friend)
2. 3. 4.

Could suicide be considered a crime of passion Being distraught over the death of a loved one trying to bring that ideal over to the next world

V.

Hitler A. His ideals


1.

Winning the lottery at a young age so he and his friend Kubizek could build a house and happily always live together. He possessed no doubt after carefully selecting something for him to win.

2.

Finding out his loss he went into a raging storm of inappropriate behavior cursing the lottery as a fraud, and cursing the state for abusing his money

3.

The beginning of his stubborn idealism for what he wants, temper tantrums as a young adult. Really, though?

B. His view of himself, and mini autobiography in a letter requested by a doctor for some biographical info
1.

It was inaccurate and misleading

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION


2.

DOMINIQUE NELSON

It was said he believed it himself

RADICAL IDEALISM: DANGER AND DELUSION

DOMINIQUE NELSON

o http://www.bioscience-bioethics.org/i.htm o Google dictionary def 1 o http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=radical o http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=moderate o http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=moderate o Google dictionary def 1 o http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=cray+cray o (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristin_Rossum) --> (http://www.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2011/09/13/0955666.pdf)o http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/crime+of+passion o Pg. 48 The life and death of Adolf Hitler by Robert Payne o Pg. 165 The life and death of Adolf Hitler by Robert Payne o Crowther, John, ed. No Fear Romeo and Juliet. SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2005. Web. 8 Jun. 2012.