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CMGT/411 PROJECT PLANNING MANAGEMENT

Start Date: 07/30/2013


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COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides the foundation for understanding the broad concepts of successful planning, organization, and implementation within the realm of information technology. This course uses real-world examples and identifies common mistakes and pitfalls in project management. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking, and controlling.

WEEK 1 - TOPIC 1: PROJECT INITIATION


Objectives
Define the importance of establishing the project charter and overall goals. Describe project planning integration and its connection to the project management plan.

Materials
Week One Read Me First EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 2, Conceptualizing and Initializing the IT Project, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value. EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 3, Developing the Project Charter and Baseline Project Plan, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . ARTICLE: Week One Electronic Reserve Readings Supplemental Resources: EBOOK COLLECTION: Microsoft Office Project 2010. SkillSoft Registration: The first time you access SkillSoft, you need to register. Do the following to register for SkillSoft: Go to the SkillSoft Link. Register by clicking on Register. The Register button is in the lower right corner, below the login boxes. Leave the Organization Code field blank. Use your phoenix.edu e-mail address. Use your student website login name as your user ID (the name before the @email.phoenix.edu). Click Submit. WEB LINK: Recommended SkillSoft Course(s): Introduction to Project 2010. WEB LINK: Recommended SkillSoft Course(s): Getting Started with Visio 2010. NOTE: If you need additional information on topics in the Read Me Firsts, first search the Supplemental Resources, then the eBook Collection.

Assessment
Please see the instructor's syllabus for this week's assignments.

WEEK 2 - TOPIC 1: SCOPE MANAGEMENT PLAN AND SCHEDULE MANAGEMENT PLAN


Objectives

Compare a product scope statement and a project scope statement. Apply best practices to the creation of a scope baseline. Differentiate schedule development from schedule control. Apply best practices to the creation of a schedule baseline.

Materials
Week Two Read Me First EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 5, Defining and Managing Project Scope, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 7, The Project Schedule and Budget, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . ARTICLE: Week Two Electronic Reserve Readings Refer to Supplemental Resources in Week One.

Assessment
Please see the instructor's syllabus for this week's assignments.

WEEK 3 - TOPIC 1: COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT PLAN AND PLAN QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Objectives
Perform a stakeholder analysis of requirements, expectations, influence, and communication. Determine a project's communication requirements including the information to be communicated, resources involved, frequency, and time frame. Apply best practices to the creation of a quality baseline. Differentiate quality assurance from quality control.

Materials
Week Three Read Me First EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 10, IT Project Quality Management, ofInformation Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . ARTICLE: Week Three Electronic Reserve Readings Refer to Supplemental Resources in Week One.

Assessment
Please see the instructor's syllabus for this week's assignments.

WEEK 4 - TOPIC 1: RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN AND PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN


Objectives
Analyze the effects of risk by identifying, assessing and combining the probability of occurrence and impact. Develop measures that reduce the possibility of impact of negative risks and increase the possibility of positive risks.

Determine project resources to be acquired and the source(s) of those resources.

Materials
Week Four Read Me First EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 9, Project Communication, Tracking, and Reporting, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 11, Managing Organizational Change, Resistance, and Conflict, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . ARTICLE: Week Four Electronic Reserve Readings Refer to Supplemental Resources in Week One.

Assessment
Please see the instructor's syllabus for this week's assignments.

WEEK 5 - TOPIC 1: COST MANAGEMENT AND STAFFING MANAGEMENT PLAN


Objectives
Develop cost estimating, cost budget, and cost baseline. Apply best practices to the creation of cost control. Define team acquisition, team development, and team management activities using a responsibility assignment matrix (RAM).

Materials
Week Five Read Me First EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 8, Managing Project Risk, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . EBOOK COLLECTION: Read Ch. 12, Project Procurement Management and Outsourcing, of Information Technology Project Management: Providing Measureable Organizational Value . ARTICLE: Week Five Electronic Reserve Readings Refer to Supplemental Resources in Week One.

Assessment
Please see the instructor's syllabus for this week's assignments

CMGT/411 PROJECT PLANNING MANAGEMENT


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides the foundation for understanding the broad concepts of successful planning, organization, and implementation within the realm of information technology. This course uses real-world examples and identifies common mistakes and pitfalls in project management. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking, and controlling.

TOPICS AND OBJECTIVES


PROJECT INITIATION

Define the importance of establishing the project charter and overall goals. Describe project planning integration and its connection to the project management plan.

SCOPE MANAGEMENT PLAN AND SCHEDULE MANAGEMENT PLAN


Compare a product scope statement and a project scope statement. Apply best practices to the creation of a scope baseline. Differentiate schedule development from schedule control. Apply best practices to the creation of a schedule baseline.

COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT PLAN AND PLAN QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Perform a stakeholder analysis of requirements, expectations, influence, and communication. Determine a project's communication requirements including the information to be communicated, resources involved, frequency, and time frame. Apply best practices to the creation of a quality baseline. Differentiate quality assurance from quality control.

RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN AND PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN


Analyze the effects of risk by identifying, assessing and combining the probability of occurrence and impact. Develop measures that reduce the possibility of impact of negative risks and increase the possibility of positive risks. Determine project resources to be acquired and the source(s) of those resources.

COST MANAGEMENT AND STAFFING MANAGEMENT PLAN


Develop cost estimating, cost budget, and cost baseline. Apply best practices to the creation of cost control. Define team acquisition, team development, and team management activities using a responsibility assignment matrix (RAM).

READ ME FIRST

WEEK ONE

INTRODUCTION

You may have discovered that some projects work out well and others fail miserably. Some are over budget and fall behind schedule, whereas others do not even fulfill the needs for which the project was intended. What makes the difference? Following an effective project management methodology is the key difference. If you apply the science of project management, a sound methodology, and management skills, you can ensure having success each time. Some key items must be defined and procedures must be followed. This is not difficult, but the results can be devastating if you do not know what they are. This course exposes these items and procedures, while teaching the sound methodology as defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI).
THIS WEEK IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE COURSE AND THE PROGRAM

The first week of this course begins with an overview of project planning and integration between all the aspects as they relate to each other. This weeks readings cover the following topics:

Define the importance of establishing the project charter and overall goals. Describe project planning integration and its connection to the project management plan.

HINTS FOR A READING STRATEGY OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS

As you read and reflect on your assignments this week, keep in mind that there is no one right or wrong way to plan a project; there are just better ways and best practices. That is what PMI is, defining best practices.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK AS YOU HONE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING

As you read, ask yourself why it would be disastrous to run a project without a charter or real sponsorship. Ask yourself how the project manager knows he or she is on the right track according to what the sponsor has in mind. Ask yourself what an overall project plan, the integration of the pieces, and the approach does to set the stage for project success.
SUMMARY

The skills that you learn in this course are essential for becoming a professional project manager. Even if you do not plan to work as a project manager, there is a

chance that you will work for an organization that relies on project managers to develop, enhance, and help the organization grow. If you are in management for such an organization, you may be a stakeholder in projects, and may even work on a project team. Understanding everything involved in projects and their success enables you to work effectively within the organization. This weeks learning activities provide a good start.

WEEK TWO

INTRODUCTION

This week teaches you think like a project manager. Discussion focuses on the difference between the product of the project and the project itself, and how they relate. The main deliverables of the product are defined in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure components are included in the project plan that achieves the desired outcome. The work should be decomposed into the WBS to ensure only the work needed is planned. The scope statement, WBS, and a WBS dictionary make up the scope baseline. Completing a project on time is always important, so this week looks at defining what the schedule plan is, including getting all stakeholders to buy in on what work is possible to do realistically with the resources available. This process should result in a negotiation of time, budget, resources, quality, and scope. When all parties agree, the schedule baseline can be taken. Then, the execution phase of the project can be measured against that baseline to stay on track.

THIS WEEK IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE COURSE AND THE PROGRAM

The schedule is one aspect of project planning. Software is often used to help track the schedule; however, it is not the only and not always the most important aspect of the project. Determining the project driver is critical to complete all the planning and controlling aspects.

Topics covered this week include the following:

Compare a product scope statement and a project scope statement. Apply best practices to the creation of a scope baseline. Differentiate schedule development from schedule control. Apply best practices to the creation of a schedule baseline.

HINTS FOR A READING STRATEGY OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS

As you read and reflect on your assignments this week, consider the importance of finding all the requirements and developing a scope statement. Understand that the schedule, although important, is not the only thing used to measure project success. Understand the difference between the product scope and the project scope.

SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK AS YOU HONE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING

As you read, ask yourself how one identifies all the requirements any stakeholder may have to ensure the scope is correct. Ask if you understand the importance of a WBS it is a key planning piece that should never be skipped.
SUMMARY

The skills you learn this week are essential for a project manager. If the requirements are not right, the project will fail.

WEEK THREE

INTRODUCTION

This week explores project communication and quality aspects. During this week, you are introduced to stakeholders and the related identification and analysis. Knowing all the stakeholder groups is critical to obtaining all the right requirements for scope and quality. If one group or individual is excluded, you will encounter trouble, lots of changes, and risk project failure. Once people are involved in anything, communication issues will occur. Communication is the top problem in business and in project management. A fully developed communication plan based on how each stakeholder wants to be communicated with helps prevent problems.

Quality must be defined with measurable metrics. You must make a plan as to what to measure, how and when, and what metric needs to be met to declare the project a success at the end. Just stating it must be fast or increase sales is not specific enough and cannot be measured.
THIS WEEK IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE COURSE AND THE PROGRAM

During this week, you are introduced to communication and quality aspects of projects. Topics covered this week include the following:

Perform a stakeholder analysisrequirements, expectations, influence, and communication. Determine a projects communication requirements including the information to be communicated, resources involved, frequency, and timeframe. Apply best practices to the creation of a quality baseline. Differentiate quality assurance from quality control.

HINTS FOR A READING STRATEGY OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS

As you read the third weeks assigned chapters and articles, ask yourself what could be done to adjust and make the schedule and budget realistic for the quality and scope desired. Think of examples of communication problems you have been involved with and how a formal plan could have prevented those problems.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK AS YOU HONE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING

As you read, ask yourself how you could start the scope plan without knowing all the stakeholders. Think about how much you need to understand each stakeholder and what they want. What they say is not always everything they mean. How can you figure out what their expectations are?
SUMMARY

Project managers are in a liable position and must have good negotiation and communication skills to explain to stakeholders that what they want cannot be done for the money or time they are willing to provide. Stakeholder analysis is key to getting the project plan right. Their differing levels of influence affects which requirements are met. Digging further to define expectations will lead to additional requirements. Managing a team of people has never been easy and on projects, they may not know each other and may not ever meet in person. Bringing individuals together to function collectively is a skill a project manager must develop. Having communication skills and a plan defined can aid in avoiding misunderstandings and problems during the project.

WEEK FOUR
INTRODUCTION

This week teaches about risk and procurement. A risk is an uncertain event that may or may not occur and can have a positive or negative effect on the project. Outsourcing or transferring the problem to another organization is one of the mitigation strategies used to deal with risks.
THIS WEEK IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE COURSE AND THE PROGRAM

This week begins with identifying possible problems that could have a negative effect on the projects success. Those are negative risks; however, good things might happen that one could take advantage of, possibly saving money, time, or benefiting the project in some other way. A project manager and team could spend the projects time fixing problems as they arise. Alternatively, they can think through the whole project in detail before they start and create a list of things they anticipate could happen. Make a plan on how to deal with the most important ones and continue to reassess the smaller ones in case they change over time. Having a plan of action results in a more controlled project. The team will have confidence that things are in control and success is possible.

Topics covered this week include the following:

Analyze the effects of risk by identifying, assessing, and combining the probability of occurrence and impact. Develop measures that reduce the possibility or impact of negative risks and increase the possibility or effect of positive risks. Determine project resources to be acquired and the sources of those resources.

HINTS FOR A READING STRATEGY OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS

As you read and reflect on your assignments this week, think of problems that have disrupted the workflow in your current workplace. Could that have been anticipated? Could there be plans in place to deal with problems or opportunities reducing chaos? Does buying insurance transfer a risk? Does outsourcing the work or adding contractors always make the problem go away?
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK AS YOU HONE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING

As you read, ask yourself how many problems arise on a daily basis, causing extra time in meetings and rework for which could have been anticipated and planned. Ask yourself if any opportunities have slipped by because the organization did not think of them ahead of time.
SUMMARY

This course has discussed several aspects of project management. By now, you should be able to recognize how much they are all interrelated and how integration of all the pieces is a critical element. Project management is much more than tracking a schedule and includes many skills, talents, knowledge, and a sound methodology.

WEEK FIVE

INTRODUCTION

The costs should always be estimated in ranges and include everything needed, not just labor. Include all materials supplies, overhead, capitol equipment, the cost of producing a quality product, and the cost of performing project management. This week also addresses the team and how groups develop into performing teams.
THIS WEEK IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE COURSE AND THE PROGRAM

Once the scope is well defined and the WBS is decomposed, the project manager and the project planning team can determine duration and cost estimates. Previously, this course discussed time in the schedule section. Similarly, project managers use resource estimating and duration to help determine costs along with any other materials needed. The difference is not adding up from the front to the end of the project as is done with time; therefore, use bottom-up addition. If there is good decomposition in the WBS, estimate the bottom rows for cost, add them together to get the estimate for the next level up, and continue on to the top of the project. By estimating small pieces of work, project managers achieve an accurate estimate for time and cost. Then, these are compared to the constraints issued by upper management. If the estimate is not on target or close, it is an opportunity to negotiate for more time, money, the removal of scope, or a decrease in quality. Detailed estimating is more accurate than analogous estimating and project managers should not start any project knowing they cannot successfully meet the budget or schedule with the scope and quality required; this sets up the project for failure from the start. The WBS and estimates are the proof of how long and how much the project will cost for the quality and scope outlined. Identifying what categories of workers will be required to do the project work, when, and if that type of staff is available based on their percentage of allocation to other work is a major issue in project planning.

Topics covered this week include the following:

Develop cost estimating, cost budget, and cost baseline. Apply best practices to the creation of cost control. Define team acquisition, team development, and team management activities using a Responsibility Assignment Matrix.

HINTS FOR A READING STRATEGY OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS

As you read and reflect upon the assignments this week, think about ways to discuss unrealistic schedules and budgets with upper management and the ramifications of doing the project under those conditions. Would that be ethical or fair? Think about what to do when staff members are already working overtime and you need them to work on yet another project.
SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK AS YOU HONE YOUR CRITICAL THINKING

As you read, ask yourself how many problems arise on a daily basis, causing extra time in meetings and rework for which could have been anticipated and planned. Ask yourself if any opportunities have slipped by because the organization did not think of them ahead of time.
SUMMARY

This course has discussed several aspects of project management. By now, you should be able to recognize how much they are all interrelated and how integration of all the pieces is a critical element. Project management is much more than tracking a schedule and includes many skills, talents, knowledge, and a sound methodology.