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PROJECT SCOPE

MANAGEMENT

STUDY NOTES
PMBOK 2000 based, Version 7
In Preparation For
PMP® Certification Exam

IBM Education and Training


Worldwide Certified Material
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Initially Prepared By: Kim Ulmer


Edited By: Peter Dapremont

March 2002 Edition

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management


Study Notes

Reference Material to study:


ü A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), Chapter 5 (2000
edition)
ü PMP Exam Practice Test and Study Guide, 4th Edition, by Ward, J. LeRoy, PMP ,
2001
ü PMP Exam Prep, 3rd Edition, by Mulcahy, Rita, PMP, 2001
ü ESI PMP Challenge!, 3rd Edition, Scope Section, Ward, J. LeRoy, 2001
ü Project Planning, Scheduling & Control, Chapters 1-4, 16, Appendix A,
Lewis, James P., 1995
ü The New Project Management, Chapters 8, 12-13, Frame, J. Davidson, 1994

What to Study?
ü Chapter 5 of the PMBOK on the Project Scope Management processes: Initiation,
Scope Planning, Scope Definition, Scope Verification, and Scope Change Control.
(Be familiar with Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs for each phase)
ü Know the difference between project and product scope.
ü Know the difference between a scope statement and a statement of work (SOW).
ü Know key definitions (see list in study notes or PMBOK glossary).
ü Know what a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is and what it is used for.
ü Know what a work package is and how it relates to the WBS.
ü Know how to label the levels of a WBS chart.
ü Know what a project plan is and how it is used.

“PMBOK" is a trademark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. which is registered in the United States and other nations.
“PMI” is a service and trademark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. which is registered in the United States and other nations.
“PMP” and the PMP logo are certification marks of the Project Management Institute which are registered in the United States and other
nations.

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Project Scope Management

Key Definitions
Accountability Matrix A structure which relates the project organizational structure to the
work breakdown structure to help ensure that each element of the
project’s scope is assigned to a responsible individual. Also
referred to as a Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM).
Baseline The original plan plus or minus approved changes.
Change Control A formally constituted group of stakeholders responsible for
Board (CCB) approving or rejecting changes to the project baselines.
Chart of Accounts Any numbering system used to monitor project costs by category
(e.g., labor supplies, materials). The project chart of accounts is
usually based on the primary performing organization’s corporate
chart of accounts.
Code of Accounts Any numbering system used to uniquely identify each element of
the work breakdown structure.
Deliverable Any measurable, tangible, verifiable outcome, result, or item that
must be produced to complete a project or subproject.
Delphi Technique A form of participative expert judgment, it is a anonymous,
interactive forecasting technique used to derive consensus about
future events on a project. The purpose of the Delphi technique is
to elicit information and judgments from participants to facilitate
problem-solving, planning, and decision-making.
Fast Tracking Compressing the project schedule by overlapping activities that
would normally be done in sequence. Also used to imply
overlapping of normally sequential phases in a project life cycle.
Linear Responsibility The same as an accountability matrix or responsibility assignment
Chart matrix.
Product Scope The features and functions that characterize a product or service.
Project Scope The work that must be done in order to deliver a product with the
specified features and functions.
Project A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or
service.
Project Charter A formal document issued by senior management which explains
the purpose of the project including the business need the project
addresses and the resulting product. It provides the project
manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to
project activities.
Project Management The members of the project team who are directly involved in
Team project management activities. On some smaller projects, the
project management team may include virtually all of the project
team members.
Project Plan A formal, approved document used to guide both project execution
and project control. The primary uses of the project plan are to
document planning assumptions and decisions, to facilitate
communication among stakeholders, and to document approved
scope, cost, and schedule baselines.

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Project Scope Management

Key Definitions, cont.

Project Notebook A device which houses the project plan. It can be as simple as a
3-ring binder or more complex such as a Lotus Notes database.
The notebook is updated throughout the life of the project.
Project Scope The work that must be done to deliver a product with the specified
features and functions.
Project Team The people who report either directly or indirectly to the project
Members manager.
Responsibility A structure which relates the project organization structure to the
Assignment Matrix WBS to help ensure that each element of the project’s scope of
(RAM) work is assigned to a responsible individual. Also called an
Accountability Matrix, Responsibility Chart, or Responsibility
Matrix.
Scope Change Any change to the project scope.
Scope Change Controlling changes to project scope.
Control
Scope Definition Decomposing the major deliverables into smaller, more
manageable components to provide better control.
Scope Planning Developing a written scope statement that includes the project
justification, the major deliverables, and the project objectives.
Scope Management A plan which describes how project scope will be managed and
Plan how scope change will be integrated into the project. Includes an
assessment of how likely and frequently the project scope may
change and a description of how scope changes will be identified
and classified.
Scope Statement A documented description of the project as to its output,
approach, and content. (What is being produced?, How is it being
produced?, and What is included?)
Scope Verification Process of verifying that that all identified project deliverables
have been completed correctly and satisfactorily and obtaining
formal acceptance of the project scope from the stakeholders.
Statement of Work A narrative description of products or services to be supplied
(SOW) under contract.
Stakeholder Individuals and organizations who are involved in or may be
affected by project activities.
Work Authorization Process of sanctioning all project work.
Work In cases where work is to be performed in segments due to
Authorization/Release technical or funding limitations, work authorization/release
authorizes specified work to be performed during a specified
period.
Work Breakdown A deliverable-oriented grouping of project elements which
Structure (WBS) organizes and defines the total scope of the project.
Work Package A deliverable at the lowest level of the work breakdown structure.
A work package may be divided into activities.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Processes

Project Scope Management:


Ÿ Includes the processes necessary to ensure that the project includes all the work
required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully.
Ÿ Primarily concerned with defining and controlling what is and what is not included in the
project.

Initiation (5.1): (Process Group: Initiating)


Ÿ Authorizes the organization to begin a new project or the next phase of an existing
project.
Ÿ Formally recognizes that a new project exists or that an existing project should continue
to its next phase.
Ÿ Links the project to the ongoing work of the performing organization.
Ÿ Inputs include: product description, strategic plan, project selection criteria, and
historical information
Ÿ Product description: the characteristics of the product or service that the project
was undertaken to create.
Ÿ Strategic plan: all projects should be aligned with the performing organizations
strategic goals.
Ÿ Historical information: includes the results of previous project selection decisions
and previous project performance.
Ÿ Methods used during initiation include: project selection methods and expert judgment
from: other units within the organization, consultants, industry groups, or
professional/technical associations.
Ÿ Project selection methods:
· Include decision criterion and a means to calculate value under uncertainty.
Known as the decision model and calculation method.
· Also includes choosing alternative methods of performing the project.
· Fall into one of two categories: benefit measurement methods (comparative
approaches, scoring models, benefit contribution, economic models) or
constrained optimization methods (mathematical models using linear,
nonlinear, dynamic, integer, and multi-objective programming algorithms).
· Decision models include generalized techniques such as decision trees,
forced choice as well as specialized ones such as Analytic Hierarchy Process
and Logical Framework Analysis.
Ÿ Outputs include: the project charter, an assigned or identified project manager,
constraints, and assumptions.
Ÿ Project charter:
· A document that formally authorizes a project and is issued by management.
· Includes (directly or through reference) the business need for the project and
the product description.
· Provides the project manager with the authority to apply organizational
resources to project activities.
Ÿ Constraints: factors that limit the project team’s options.
Ÿ Assumptions: factors which for planning purposes are considered to be true.

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Project Scope Management Processes, cont.

Scope Planning (5.2): (Process Group: Planning)


Ÿ The process of progressively elaborating and documenting the project work (project
scope) that produces the product/service of the project.
Ÿ Inputs include: the product description, project charter, constraints, and assumptions.
Ÿ Methods used during scope planning include: product analysis, benefit/cost analysis,
alternatives identification, and expert judgment.
Ÿ Product analysis:
· Involves developing a better understanding of the product of the project.
· Includes techniques such as product breakdown analysis systems
engineering, value engineering, value analysis, function analysis, and quality
function deployment.
Ÿ Benefit/cost analysis:
· Involves estimating tangible and intangible costs (also called outlays) vs.
benefits (returns) of various project/product alternatives.
· Involves using financial measures such as return on investment or payback
period to access the relative value of the alternatives.
Ÿ Outputs include: scope statement, supporting detail, and scope management plan.
Ÿ Scope statement:
· Provides a documented basis for making future project decisions and for
confirming or developing common understanding of project scope among the
stakeholders.
· As the project progresses, the scope statement may need to be revised or
refined to reflect approved changes to the scope of the project.
· Includes, either directly or by reference, the project justification, the project
product/service, project deliverables, the project objectives (quantifiable
criteria that must be met for the project to be considered successful).
· Forms the basis for an agreement between the project team and the project
customer.
Ÿ Supporting detail: includes documentation of all identified assumptions and
constraints.
Ÿ Scope management plan:
· Describes how project scope will be managed and how scope changes will be
integrated into the project.
· Includes an assessment of the expected stability of the project scope.
· Includes a clear description of how scope changes will be identified and
classified.
· May be formal or informal, highly detailed or broadly framed depending on the
project needs.
· A subsidiary component of the project plan.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Processes, cont.

Scope Definition (5.3): (Process Group: Planning)


Ÿ The process of subdividing the major project deliverables into smaller, more
manageable components to:
Ÿ Improve the accuracy of the cost, duration, and resource estimates.
Ÿ Define a baseline for performance measurement and control.
Ÿ Facilitate clear responsibility assignments.
Ÿ Proper scope definition is critical to project success.
Ÿ Inputs include: scope statement, constraints, assumptions, other planning outputs, and
historical information.
Ÿ Other planning outputs: process outputs from other knowledge areas should be
reviewed for possible impact on project scope definition.
Ÿ Historical information: history from previous projects should be considered during
scope definition including information regarding errors and omissions.
Ÿ Methods used during scope definition are: work breakdown structure templates (or
WBS from a previous project), and decomposition (subdivision).
Ÿ Decomposition:
· Involves subdividing the major project deliverables or sub deliverables into
smaller, more manageable components until the deliverables are defined in
sufficient detail to support development of project activities.
· Involves identifying the major deliverables of the project, including project
management. The deliverables should be defined in terms of how the project
will be organized. (i.e., The first level of decomposition may be the phases of
the project cycle followed by the project deliverables at the second level.)
· Decides if adequate cost and duration estimates can be developed at this
level of detail for each deliverable.
· Identifies constituent components of the deliverable. Constituent elements
should be described in terms of tangible, verifiable results in order to facilitate
performance measurement. Should always be defined in terms of how the
work of the project will actually be organized and accomplished.
· Verifies the correctness of the decomposition. Are the lower level items both
necessary and sufficient? Is each item clearly and completely defined? Can
each item be appropriately scheduled, budgeted, assigned?
Ÿ Output from defining scope: work breakdown structure (WBS). (see below)

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Processes, cont.

Scope Verification (5.4): (Process Group: Controlling)


Ÿ The process of obtaining formal acceptance of the project scope by the stakeholders
(sponsor, client, customer, etc.)
Ÿ Requires reviewing deliverables and work results to ensure that all were completed
correctly and satisfactorily.
Ÿ Differs from Quality Control in that Scope Verification is primarily concerned with
acceptance of the work results while Quality Control is primarily concerned with the
correctness of the work results. Both processes are generally performed in parallel.
Ÿ Inputs include: work results (completed or partially completed deliverables, incurred or
committed costs, etc.), product documentation (plans, specifications, technical
documentation, etc.), WBS, scope statement, and the project plan.
Ÿ The method used in verifying scope is: inspection (measuring, examining, reviewing
and testing to determine if results conform to requirements)
Ÿ Output from verifying scope: formal acceptance by client or sponsor of the major
deliverable(s).

Scope Change Control (5.5): (Process Group: Controlling)


Ÿ The process of controlling changes to project scope.
Ÿ Scope Change Control is concerned with:
Ÿ Influencing the factors that create scope changes to ensure that changes are
agreed upon.
Ÿ Determining that a scope change has occurred.
Ÿ Managing the actual changes when and if the changes occur.
Ÿ Must be thoroughly integrated with the other control processes such as Schedule
Control, Cost Control, Quality Control, etc.
Ÿ Inputs include: WBS, performance reports, change requests, and the scope
management plan.
Ÿ Performance reports: provide information on scope performance such as which
interim deliverables have been completed and which have not.
Ÿ Change requests:
· May occur in many forms - oral, written, direct, indirect, externally initiated,
internally initiated, legally mandated or optional.
· May require expanding or reducing the scope.
· Are generally the result of an external event; an error or omission in defining
either the scope of the project or product; a value-added enhancement, a
response to a risk.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Processes, cont.

Ÿ Methods for controlling scope change include: scope change control, performance
measurement, and additional planning.
Ÿ Scope change control:
· Defines procedures by which the project scope may be changed.
· Includes the paperwork, tracking systems, and approval levels necessary for
authorizing changes.
· Should be integrated with the Integrated Change Control Process and any
system(s) in place to control product scope.
· Must comply with all relevant contractual obligations.
Ÿ Performance measurement: assists in assessing the magnitude of any variations
that do occur.
Ÿ Additional planning: additional planned modifications such as to the WBS or
analysis of alternative approaches.
Ÿ Outputs include: scope changes, corrective action, lessons learned, and adjusted
baseline.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Concepts

Generic Project Life Cycle:


A generic project life cycle may have the following phases:
Ÿ Initiation/Concept/Feasibility: Someone has identified a need that must be met. The
definition of the problem to be solved may be fuzzy. Feasibility studies may be done
during this phase to clarify the problem before preceding. Order of magnitude costs
may be obtained. Other items that may be identified at this phase include
stakeholders, risk, goals and objectives, strategy, potential team, and alternatives.
The output of this phase is the project charter which grants permission for the project to
proceed to the next phase.

Ÿ Development/Planning: The purpose of this phase is to determine exactly what is to


be done. A problem statement is developed along with objectives, strategies for
achieving the objectives, and detailed work plans to support the strategies. The scope
baseline is determined. Budgetary costs are determined, and the budget is
developed. A risk assessment is done. The WBS is established. The players are
identified along with the levels of authority, responsibility, and accountability. Control
systems are developed (if not already in place) and quality standards determined.
Detailed planning is completed and documented in the project plan. The project plan
is kept within a hard-copy or electronic device called a project notebook. The project
plan/notebook serves as the controlling document throughout the life of the project.

Ÿ Implementation/Execution: The lines of communication between teams and team


members are established. Work packages are established and implemented.
Definitive estimates are determined. Goods and services are procured. Scope,
quality, time, and cost are directed, monitored and controlled. Problems are resolved.

Ÿ Termination/Close-out: The product is finalized, reviewed and accepted. Product


responsibility is transferred. The project is evaluated and the results documented along
with lessons learned in the project notebook. Resources are redirected or released,
and the project team is reassigned.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Concepts, continued

Feasibility Phases of the Life Cycle:


Ÿ The feasibility phases are the concept and development phases of a generic project life
cycle. Generally speaking, these phases count for approximately 25% of the project
time.
Ÿ While the feasibility phases are critical to project success, they are also the most often
neglected. These phases are often compromised by implementation pressure.
Ÿ The principle issues during these phases are cost, time, quality, and risk.
Ÿ Project controls should be established. Some characteristics of a good project control
system:
Ÿ The controls should be tailored to each project
Ÿ The controls should limit informal changes in scope
Ÿ The controls should be designed to “avoid surprises”
Ÿ The frequency and type of control is project phase dependent.
Ÿ Depending on the control, there may be varying degrees of management
involvement.
Ÿ The focal point for scope change control is the WBS.

Acquisition Phases of the Life Cycle:


Ÿ The acquisition phases are the implementation and termination phases of a generic
project life cycle. Generally speaking, these phases count for approximately 75% of
the project time.
Ÿ Project controls during the implementation phase:
Ÿ Emphasize performance measurement against cost, quality, and schedule
baselines.
Ÿ Maintain scope, cost, time and quality balance.
Ÿ Types of reports: cost, schedule, performance status; S curves; earned value;
variances; trends, and exceptions

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Concepts, continued

Work Breakdown Structure:


Ÿ An output of the Scope Definition Process. Used as input into the Scope Verification
Process.
Ÿ A deliverable-oriented grouping of project components that organizes and defines the
total scope of the project.
Ÿ Used to develop or confirm a common understanding of project scope.
Ÿ A detailed representation of the scope of the project expressed in terms of work,
resource, and cost.
Ÿ Each descending level represents an increasingly detailed description of the project
deliverables.
Ÿ Lowest level of the WBS may be referred to as the work package, especially in
organizations that follow earned value management practices. Work packages may be
further decomposed in a subproject WBS (such as contracting work to another
organization.)
Ÿ Developing a WBS (from class notes by Infotech):
1. Identify major issues.
2. Break down each issue into smaller deliverable units.
3. Subdivide deliverables into measurable units.
4. Define each work package as subcontractable units of work.
5. Review for patterns and anomalies.
6. Review again.
Ÿ Developing a WBS (from Project Planning, Scheduling & Control by Lewis):
1. What tasks must be done?
2. Who will do each one?
3. How long will each task take?
4. What materials/supplies are required?
5. How much will each task cost?
Ÿ Examples of names of WBS structure levels:
1. Program
2. Project
3. Task
4. Sub-Task
5. Work Package
Ÿ See PMBOK pgs. 58-60 for examples of WBS’s.

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Project Scope Management

Project Scope Management Concepts, continued

An example of numbering a WBS:

1.1 1.2 1.3

1.1.1 1.1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.3

Work Package:
Ÿ The lowest level of a WBS.
Ÿ Work packages are further broken down into activities during the Activity Definition
Process. (part of Project Time Management)

Role of Project Manager:


Ÿ Produce end item with available resources, within time, cost and performance
constraints.
Ÿ Make all required decisions regarding the project.
Ÿ Act as interface with customer and top functional managers.
Ÿ Negotiate with functional managers to accomplish necessary work within time, cost,
and quality goals.
Ÿ Resolve conflicts.

Functions Performed by Project Manager:


Ÿ Planning and scheduling, performance analysis, progress reporting
Ÿ Client/consultant relations
Ÿ Project and cost trend analysis, logistics management, cost control
Ÿ Organization and resource planning
Ÿ Contract and materials administration and estimating

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Project Scope Management

Sample Questions

1. Which of the following could be an appropriate WBS code for a work package at the
fourth level in a WBS where the top level code is 1?
A. 1.4
B. 1.1.1.1
C. 1.2.3.4
D. b and c

2. Which of the following Project Scope Management processes involves subdividing the
major project deliverables into smaller, more manageable components?
A. Scope Planning
B. Scope Decomposition
C. Scope Change Control
D. Scope Definition

3. A clear definition of the customer’s needs serves as the direct basis for which of the
following? (choose best answer)
A. WBS
B. Functional requirement
C. Project cost estimate
D. Project charter

4. A technical requirement has which of these characteristics? (choose best answer)


A. Easy for a lay person to comprehend
B. Written in non-technical language.
C. Developed in cooperation with the customer.
D. Typically describes physical dimensions or performance requirements.

5. Project scope is:


A. The work that must be done in order to deliver a product with the specified features
and functions.
B. The features and functions that characterize a product or service.
C. A narrative description of work to be performed under contract.
D. all of the above

6. What is the purpose of the WBS?


A. To show which work elements have been assigned to organizational units.
B. To ensure that all work within a project is identified and defined within a common
framework.
C. To show the organizational structure of a program.
D. To indicate which individuals have responsibility for which work packages.

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Project Scope Management

Sample Questions, continued

7. The unique identifiers assigned to each item of a WBS are often known collectively
as:
A. The work package codes
B. The project identifiers
C. The code of accounts
D. The element accounts

8. Change requests can occur due to:


A. An external event such as a change in government regulation.
B. An error or omission in defining the scope of the product.
C. A value-adding change.
D. all of the above

9. What is the difference between scope verification and quality control?


A. There is no difference.
B. Scope verification is primarily concerned with the correctness of work results while
quality control is primarily concerned with the acceptance of work results.
C. Scope verification is concerned with ensuring that changes are beneficial while quality
control is concerned that the overall work results are correct.
D. Scope verification is primarily concerned with the acceptance of work results while
quality control is primarily concerned with the correctness of work results.

10. Which of the following are outputs of the Scope Verification Process?
A. Inspection
B. Work results
C. Formal acceptance
D. Scope changes

11. Which of the following are outputs of the Scope Change Control Process?
A. Scope changes and scope management plan
B. Corrective action and formal acceptance
C. Schedule updates and corrective action
D. Scope changes, corrective action, lessons learned, and adjusted baseline.

12. Who should contribute to the development of the project plan?


A. Project manager
B. Entire project team including project manager
C. Senior management
D. Just the planning department

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Project Scope Management

Sample Questions, continued

13. A Gantt chart is useful in determining:


A. The level of effort for a task.
B. When a task starts and stops.
C. How tasks are related to each other.
D. Who is assigned to each task.

14. Which of the following tools and techniques are commonly used in the Scope Definition
Process?
A. Inspection
B. Decomposition
C. WBS templates
D. b and c

15. Which of the following is NOT an example of a type of schedule report?


A. Gantt chart
B. Milestone chart
C. fishbone diagram
D. network diagram

16. What is the primary purpose of a milestone chart?


A. To show task dependencies.
B. To show resource constraints.
C. To show significant events in the project such as completion of key deliverables.
D. To highlight the critical path.

17. What is a linear responsibility chart?


A. An accountability matrix.
B. A RAM.
C. An OBS.
D. a and b.

18. Completion of the product scope is measured against:


A. The product requirements
B. The Project Plan
C. The Project Charter
D. The Change Control Plan

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Sample Questions, continued

19. A document which describes how project scope will be managed and how scope changes
will be integrated into the project is: (choose the best answer)
A. A project plan
B. A risk analysis
C. A scope management plan
D. A scope statement

20. Which of the following statements concerning a scope statement are true?
A. It provides a documented basis for making future project decisions and for developing
common understanding of the project scope among stakeholders.
B. Scope statement and Statement of work are synonymous.
C. Project justification and project objectives are not included or referenced in the scope
statement.
D. Once written, the scope statement should never be revised.

21. What is the relationship between work packages and activities?


A. There is no relationship.
B. Work packages are further broken into activities as part of the Activity Definition
Process.
C. Activities are broken into work packages as part of the Scope Planning Process.
D. Work packages and activities are synonymous.

22. Which of the following documents is not an input to Initiation?


A. Product description.
B. Strategic plan
C. Historical information
D. Project Charter

23. Scope Change Control is primarily concerned with:

A. Influencing the factors that create scope changes.


B. Defining a baseline for performance measurement and control.
C. Developing a written scope statement which will serve as the basis for future project
decisions.
D. Assigning work elements to the proper organizations.

24. A technique used to validate that the project can meet the required performance and
business objectives is:
A. Cost/Benefit Analysis
B. Statistical Regression Analysis
C. Pareto Analysis
D. Decomposition

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Course materials may not be reproduced in whole or in part
without the prior written permission of IBM.
Project Scope Management

Sample Questions, continued

25. A high-technology project has been initiated. This project will require the coordination of
several different high technology functional areas. What kind of organizational
structure would be appropriate for this project ?
A. Functional
B. Matrix
C. Strong Matrix
D. Balanced Matrix

26. Which of the following statements is not true about the WBS?
A. The WBS indicates when certain activities are to be done.
B. The WBS is a hierarchical breakdown of the project deliverables.
C. The WBS represents the entire scope of the project.
D. The WBS shows both products and services.

27. A work package is:


A. The code of accounts
B. The definition of the scope statement
C. Items at the lowest level of the WBS
D. Activity that can be assigned to more then one person

28. Which of the following is an output of the Scope Verification Process?


A. WBS
B. Project Plan
C. Formal Acceptance
D. Lessons Learned

29. The baseline may be modified for what reasons? (choose the best answer)
A. The project manager decides to expand the scope of the project.
B. A change in a government regulation has occurred which impacts the project.
C. A change request for enhanced function has been received and approved through the
Scope Change Control Process.
D. b and c.

30. Decomposition involves:


A. Identifying the major elements of the project.
B. Deciding if adequate cost and duration estimates can be developed at this level of
detail for each element..
C. Identifying the constituent elements of the deliverable.
D. All of the above.

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002 Project Scope Management 2-19


Course materials may not be reproduced in whole or in part
without the prior written permission of IBM.
Project Scope Management

Answer Sheet

1. a b c d 16. a b c d

2. a b c d 17. a b c d

3. a b c d 18. a b c d

4. a b c d 19. a b c d

5. a b c d 20. a b c d

6. a b c d 21. a b c d

7. a b c d 22. a b c d

8. a b c d 23. a b c d

9. a b c d 24. a b c d

10. a b c d 25. a b c d

11. a b c d 26. a b c d

12. a b c d 27. a b c d

13. a b c d 28. a b c d

14. a b c d 29. a b c d

15. a b c d 30. a b c d

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without the prior written permission of IBM.
Project Scope Management

Answers

1 D Old PMI Sample Exam
2 D PMBOK Guide, pg. 57
3 B 1991 PMI Sample Exam #15
4 D 1991 PMI Sample Exam #16
5 A PMBOK Guide, pg. 51. The distinction between project scope and product scope
is very fine. “B” is product scope. “C” is statement of work.
6 B Definition “A” is an OBS. See PMBOK, pgs. 59-60
7 C PMBOK Guide, Glossary
8 D PMBOK  Guide, pg. 63
9 D PMBOK Guide, pg. 61
10 C Answer “D”, scope changes, is an output of the Scope Change Control Process.
PMBOK Guide, pg. 61
11 D PMBOK Guide, pg. 62
12 B
13 B 1991 PMI Sample Exam #17
14 D PMBOK Guide, pg. 57
15 C PMP Challenge!, question 18
16 C
17 D A linear responsibility chart is defined in the Lewis book. See PMBOK Guide,
Glossary.
18 A PMBOK Guide, pg. 51
19 C PMBOK Guide, pg. 56
20 A PMBOK Guide, pg. 56
21 B PMBOK Guide, pg. 67
22 D PMBOK Guide, pg. 53
23 A PMBOK Guide, pg. 62
24 A PMBOK Guide, pgs. 55-56
25 C Multiple, specialized functions will require strong guidance and control from the
Project Manager
26 A PMBOK Guide, pgs. 57-61
27 C PMBOK Guide, pg. 60
28 C PMBOK Guide, pg. 61
29 D PMBOK Guide, pgs. 63-64
30 D PMBOK Guide, pgs. 58-59

© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002 Project Scope Management 2-21


Course materials may not be reproduced in whole or in part
without the prior written permission of IBM.
Project Scope Management

PMP® Certification Exam Preparation

What did I do wrong ?

I would have answered a larger number of Number


questions correctly if I had ___________.

1. Read the question properly and identified the keywords _________

2. Read the answer properly and identified the keywords _________

3. Read ALL the answers before answering the question _________

4. Used a strategy of elimination _________

5. Known the formula _________

6. Known the PMBOK® definition _________

7. Checked the mathematics _________

8 Used the PMI® rather than my own perspective _________

9. Reviewed my answer after reading the other questions _________

10. NOT rushed to finish _________

Total _________

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without the prior written permission of IBM.