Sie sind auf Seite 1von 6

N.

Cannon
EDTECH 597 Spring 2013
Lesson Plan Probability and Statistics I can count! video creation project Day 1of 7-10
Background: High school Advanced Algebra level students having completed the in-class discovery &
discussion on mathematical counting during a 45 normal school day. Reviewing the
formulas we covered:
- Arithmetic sequence formula The n
th
term of an arithmetic sequence with the 1
st
term
1
a
and a
common difference d is given by: ( )d n a a
n
1
1
+ =
- Sum of a finite arithmetic series formula The sum of the 1
st
n terms of an arithmetic series is:
|
.
|

\
| +
=
2
1 n
n
a a
n S
- Geometric sequence formula The n
th
term of a geometric sequence with the 1
st
term
1
a
and a
common ratio r is given by:
1
1

=
n
n
r a a
- Sum of a finite geometric series formula The sum of the 1
st
n terms of a geometric series with a
common ratio 1 = is:
|
|
.
|

\
|

=
r
r
a S
n
n
1
1
1
.
- Theoretical probability How you can compute/ figure out how likely something has a chance of
happening is by setting up a ratio (a.k.a. fraction) of
events of number Total
successes of number Total

Standards covered:
Wisconsin's model academic standards for information and technology literacy:
A.12.1, A.12.2, A.12.4, A.12.5, A.12.6, B.12.7, C.12.4, D.12.1, D.12.2
Common Core State Standards for Mathematics:
A -RE I 1, A-RE I 2, Modeling Standards, G-GMD 1. S-CP 1
Set-up: Give between 7-10 calendar days from the beginning of the project until the end. Do your best to
include two weekends.
Groups: Have the class break themselves into groups of 2-4 people. If there is a person who wants to work
by themselves, inform them that they will be subject to the same rubric as every other group.
Materials: Hand out the Probability and Statistics I Can Count! video project worksheet describing the
assignment. Go over what NEEDS to be in the video and the physical and technical guidelines of
the project. Inform each group that they need a planning meeting with you with in the first
two days of the project being assigned. They need to inform you of the genre, story line, roughly
when and where the filming will be completed, and who will be doing the editing with what
software. This is to get the group moving on the project instead of waiting until the last minute.
Creation: Inform the students that whatever device and/or software they wish to use is fine, but you will not
be supplying any technical advice (since there are so many video software creation programs out
there, it could be incredibly difficult to offer the same level of advice/help to all the groups in order
to be fair.) The video has to be loaded to a school appropriate YouTube channel in order to be
viewed by all in class on the assigned date.
Grading: Hand out a copy of the rubric to each group. Point out that 60% of the grade is structured around
the content, mathematical accuracy and presentation of the video. The other 40% is based on
teacher observation of work being done in class (divide the 42 points evenly between the number of
days assigned for the project and give each individual student a daily grade.) There is also a grade
for what is done outside of the classroom that the teacher cannot see. Through an anonymous
vote that only the myself and the voter will see, the voter can critique the group members without
peer pressure. These points make up the grade that the group gave the individual.
Due date: Have the due date give the educator plenty of time to evaluate the postings to YouTube and
make sure that they have met all of the classroom appropriate standards to be shown to the
class. If it is not, take the appropriate measures needed as outlines by the district and/or any
other official entity.
Resources/hand outs: The handouts and resources for the video project are on the next four pages.



References
Fortier, J. D. (1998). Wisconsin's model academic standards for information and technology literacy. Madison,
Wis: Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction.
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010).
Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Washington, DC: Authors.





Probability and Statistics I can count! video project
Summer is almost here and I know you want to get outside. Well, here is your chance. Your group of 2 4
people (groups are final and have to be approved by me) will create a video (or animated video) documenting your
groups normal day in the surrounding area of Monroe and the probability and statistics that you might/will face.
Be appropriately creative!!! Your video needs to stumble upon (in no particular order) across examples of all 5
PLUS an extra one of the required 5 making a total of 6:
- The fundamental counting principle of 3 or more events
- Permutation of n objects taken r at a time
- Permutations with repetition
- Combination of n objects taken r at a time
- Theoretical probability OR Geometric probability
Guidelines:
- Myself, parents, grandparents, relatives, administration and any one else should not find anything offensive
or inappropriate with any part of your video. If there is, severe consequences will be made AND a zero
earned by all groups members on the project.
- No swearing or inappropriate gestures in any way, shape or form anywhere in the movie.
- As close to equal time in front of the camera for each group member as possible.
- Projects should be between 6 8 minutes long with an opening title and THE END.
- Your project must include the 6 requirements in order to receive a grade.
- Your group must also select (and have approved by me) a genre that their film will follow (i.e. Western,
Romance, Comedy, Mystery, etc.)
- Have at least one update/check-in with Mr. Cannon to let me know how your movie is going.
- You must follow all the rules of MHS, the School District of Monroe, the city/town of Monroe, and any
other jurisdiction not mentioned (including another county, state, country and/or international laws).
- NO drug, alcohol or sexual references of ANY sort!
- If any extras are on camera with your group, you need to acknowledge them at the end.
- If you are shooting with a business in the shot, you need to get permission from the owner before your
groups video recording can take place.
- I will be grading you as a group and individually. You will help me by giving input based on what you
observed your group members did or did not actually do behind the scenes.
- This video is to be completed and turned in by the end of the day ______________ to be shown in class on
_________________!
Probability and Statistics I Can Count! RUBRIC:
Here is how the project will be graded:

REQUIREMENTS:
_____/ 20___ The fundamental counting principle of 3 or more events
_____/ 20___ Permutation of n objects taken r at a time
_____/ 20___ Permutations with repetition
_____/ 20___ Combination of n objects taken r at a time
_____/ 20___ Theoretical probability OR Geometric probability
_____/ 20___ One of the 5 requirements done again

_____/ 120___
INDIVIDUAL/GROUP:
_____/ 42___ The individual grade that I have observed of you during class time AND on video.

_____/ 38___ The grade your group gave you. (possibly 19 x 2)

_____/ 80___
TIME multiplier: The closer to 1.00 you are, the better for your group. You start at the lower value and
based on your artistic skill/creativity, you will move up in the multiplier range.

x 0.90 1.00 Time between 6:00 8:00 minutes
x 0.80 0.89 Time between 5:00 5:59 OR 8:01 8:59
x 0.70 0.79 Time between 4:00 4:59
x 0.60 0.69 Time 0:00 3:59 OR anything over 9:00

_____ ____ (what I will multiply your two summed categories by.)
TOTAL:

_____/ 200___

EACH REQUIREMENT
2 1.5 1 0.5
Mathematical
Terminology and
Notation
Correct terminology
and notation are always
used, making it easy to
understand what was
done.
Correct terminology
and notation are usually
used, making it fairly
easy to understand
what was done.
Correct terminology
and notation are used,
but it is sometimes not
easy to understand
what was done.
There is little use, or a
lot of inappropriate use,
of terminology and
notation.
Mathematical
Concepts
Explanation shows
complete
understanding of the
mathematical concepts
used to solve the
problem(s).
Explanation shows
substantial
understanding of the
mathematical concepts
used to solve the
problem(s).
Explanation shows
some understanding of
the mathematical
concepts needed to
solve the problem(s).
Explanation shows very
limited understanding
of the underlying
concepts needed to
solve the problem(s) OR
is not written.
Mathematical
Reasoning
Uses complex and
refined mathematical
reasoning.
Uses effective
mathematical reasoning
Some evidence of
mathematical
reasoning.
Little evidence of
mathematical
reasoning.
Mathematical Errors
90-100% of the steps
and solutions have no
mathematical errors.
Almost all (85-89%) of
the steps and solutions
have no mathematical
errors.
Most (75-84%) of the
steps and solutions
have no mathematical
errors.
More than 75% of the
steps and solutions
have mathematical
errors.
Explanation
Explanation is detailed
and clear.
Explanation is clear.
Explanation is a little
difficult to understand,
but includes critical
components.
Explanation is difficult
to understand and is
missing several
components OR was not
included.
Neatness and
Organization
The work is presented
in a neat, clear,
organized fashion that
is easy to understand.
The work is presented
in a neat and organized
fashion that is usually
easy to understand.
The work is presented
in an organized fashion
but may be hard to
understand at times.
The work appears
sloppy and
unorganized. It is hard
to know what
information goes
together.
Presentation
Well-rehearsed with
smooth delivery that
holds audience
attention.
Rehearsed with fairly
smooth delivery that
holds audience
attention most of the
time.
Delivery not smooth,
but able to maintain
interest of the audience
most of the time.
Delivery not smooth
and audience attention
often lost.
Originality
Product shows a large
amount of original
thought. Ideas are
creative and inventive.
Product shows some
original thought. Work
shows new ideas and
insights.
Uses other people\'s
ideas (giving them
credit), but there is little
evidence of original
thinking.
Uses other people\'s
ideas, but does not give
them credit.
Requirements
All requirements are
met and exceeded.
All requirements are
met.
One requirement was
not completely met.
More than one
requirement was not
completely met.
Oral Presentation
Interesting, well-
rehearsed with smooth
delivery that holds
audience attention.
Relatively interesting,
rehearsed with a fairly
smooth delivery that
usually holds audience
attention.
Delivery not smooth,
but able to hold
audience attention
most of the time.
Delivery not smooth
and audience attention
lost.
Individual evaluation
Your group has been given 19 points to be divided (into whole numbers!!) between your group
members. How many points each person receives depends on how you felt they contributed to the group.
Write down the names of all the members in the group (including yourself) and use the following questions to
help you determine who should receive how many points.

- Participation within the group (did that group member help out with the work?)
- Did that person help share the responsibilities of the group?
- Did that person offer insight that was helpful to the groups presentation?
- Did that person ask for help from others within the group if they were not getting it? OR Did
that person offer help to other members within the group?

When you add up all the points that you gave to yourself and your group members, they should equal
19 points. NO MORE, NO LESS! Here is an example of one persons review of themselves and their group
members.

EX.

(Your name) ________Johnny___________ (# of points) ____6_____
(Group member #1) ________Suzie____________ (# of points) ____4_____
(Group member #2) ________Timmy___________ (# of points) ____2_____
(Group member #3) ________Sarah____________ (# of points) ____7_____

TOTAL ___19____

If you do NOT have 4 people in your group, then fill in as many blanks as you have group members.
REMEMBER, your total has to add up to 19!!!
If, as an individual, you average: above a 4.4 (for groups of 4); above a 6.2 (for groups of 3); above a 9.4
(for groups of 2) using my formula
n
evals student all of Sum
where n is the number of group members, then
you will earn ALL 19 points (there can be multiple 19 point earners in each group).