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INTRODUCTION Industry Profile

Media in India Market Definition The media industry consists of the advertising, broadcasting & cable TV, publishing and movies & entertainment markets. The advertising market consists of agencies providing advertising including display advertising services. The market value reflects income of the agencies from such services. The broadcasting & cable TV market consists of all terrestrial, cable and satellite broadcasters of digital and analog television programming. The market is valued as the revenues generated by broadcasters through advertising, licensing (or public donations) and subscriptions.

The publishing market is valued at the retail sale of books, newspaper and magazines. The movies & entertainment market includes both producers and distributors of public entertainment formats, such as movies, music and sports. The sports and movie box office sectors have been valued as the revenues received by box offices from total annual admissions. The music and video sectors have been valued using the retail selling price (RSP) of items, such as DVD, VHS and CD.

The Indian media industry had total revenue of $17.1 billion in 2010, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.5% for the period spanning 2006-2010. The broadcasting & cable TV segment was the industries most lucrative in 2010, with total revenue of $7.3 billion, equivalent to 42.9% of the industry's overall value. The performance of the industry is forecast to accelerate, with an anticipated CAGR of 12.8% for the five year period 2010-2015, which is expected to drive the industry to a value of $31.2 billion by the end of 2015

Market Analysis The Indian media industry has experienced very strong, double digit growth in recent years, and this trend is expected to continue throughout the forecast period. The broadcasting & cable TV segment showed strong, double-digit growth in 2010, whilst the publishing segment showed moderate growth.

The Indian media industry had total revenue of $17.1 billion in 2010, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.5% for the period spanning 2006-2010. In comparison, the Chinese industry increased with a CAGR of 7.8%, and the Japanese industry declined with a compound annual rate of change (CARC) of -0.5%, over the same period, to reach respective values of $44.5 billion and $98.5 billion in 2010.

The broadcasting & cable TV segment was the industry's most lucrative in 2010, with total revenue of $7.3 billion, equivalent to 42.9% of the industry's overall value. The publishing segment contributed revenue of $4.2 billion in 2010, equating to 24.3% of the industry's aggregate value. Comparatively, the Chinese and Japanese industries will grow with CAGRs of 9.7% and 1.1% respectively, over the same period, to reach respective values of $70.6 billion and $104.1 billion in 2015.

Market Value The Indian media industry grew by 11% in 2010 to reach a value of $17.1 billion. The compound annual growth rate of the industry in the period 200610 was 10.5%.

Market Segmentation I Broadcasting & Cable TV is the largest segment of the media industry in India, accounting for 42.9% of the industry's total value. The publishing segment accounts for a further 24.3% of the industry.

Market Segmentation II India accounts for 8.9% of the Asia-Pacific media industry value. Japan accounts for a further 51.2% of the Asia-Pacific industry.

Competitive Landscape The media industry will be analyzed taking broadcasting companies and publishers as players. The key buyers will be taken as individual consumers, advertisers and retail outlets, and production companies, paper merchants, and suppliers of printing equipment as the key suppliers. Technological advancements are having a profound affect on the worlds media with everyone from publishers to TV stations investing heavily in new technology to improve their service offering. Due to high differentiation between segments of the media industry, the analysis presented will focus on two of the industrys leading segments: broadcasting and cable TV, and publishing. The media are adapting as technology advances. For example, technological advancements have impacted on broadcasting with many major TV stations now having online media players. Within the media industry, players often differentiate themselves by targeting specific key demographics and niche markets, as well as specializing in specific sectors.

In publishing, printing is still the most commonly used method of mass-producing books, newspapers and magazines but the ever-increasing popularity of online media is encourages new, innovative ways of reaching consumers, which will invariably attract new players to the market. Broadcasting players will be taken as public broadcasting companies and independent broadcasters. Companies within the broadcasting and cable TV market gain their revenues through a range of different channels. Public broadcasting companies typically gain their revenues through state enforced licensing fees, government funding and advertising. Other broadcasting companies gain revenues through the sale of advertising time and subscription fees. There are therefore essentially two types of buyers with respect to the market, consumers paying subscription fees and advertisers buying screen-time. Individual consumers have very little buyer power as the price is fixed by the state and is a legal requirement upon owning a TV. Individuals can only make an impact as a whole by displaying preferences of a product through viewing figures. They can though, choose whether or not to subscribe to pay TV services.

However, as these services often hold exclusive broadcasting rights for sport and leading dramas, they are viewed as a necessity by some consumers.

In the case of the publishing market, players will be considered as publishers (who produce, serve and/or market media in the disciplines of: books; magazines and newspapers) and retail outlets (such as bookstores, independent retailers, and supermarkets) as buyers. However, consumer preference will likely have a strong pull-through on these outlets; especially in relation to books.

Supermarkets and independent retailers have finite shelf-space dedicated to published media, so consumer preference is even more significant in relation to what is stocked (bookstores will dedicate a lot more space to cater for different consumer needs), and this selectivity increases buyer power to an extent. Online distributors are not affected by this issue of 'shelf space' and therefore titles can be sold to order (including back-issues of magazines and newspapers). Customers will have preference towards certain titles, and customer loyalty to specific newspapers is particularly apparent. Overall, buyer power is moderate.

Production companies form a major supplier to broadcasters, who either commission the production of programming or purchase broadcast rights for programming. The supplier power of production companies typically depends upon the quality of content, dictated by viewing figures, to make the product saleable to advertising businesses. For example, a production company tendering the rights for a successful television series would be expected to have significantly more supplier power than a production company searching for a broadcaster to commission a new series. In addition, transmission service providers provide vital technical services for the broadcasting of terrestrial channels. There are a small number of large players within the managed transmission service industry.

Suppliers to publishers include paper merchants, suppliers of printing equipment, renters of office space, computer manufacturers etc. These various suppliers vary in size and number depending on the specific supply. For example there are a greater number of computer manufacturers and suppliers than there are paper merchants, so computer manufacturers have a much stronger position relative to market players, which illustrates how supplier power can differ depending on the specific supply. Furthermore, paper is a key resource to this market and

the price of specific varieties of paper varies depending on quality, which increases the supplier power of paper merchants to an extent. Overall, supplier power is moderate.

The success of individual broadcasters is determined by overall viewing figures and individual consumers incur no switching costs, unless they opt to pay for subscription TV services. A significant barrier to the entrance of new players into terrestrial broadcasting is the limited choice of available frequencies and therefore licenses in many countries. However, the switch off away from analogue television broadcasting will free-up frequencies for digital broadcasting. This will enable more channels to be broadcast via the terrestrial platform and therefore may present opportunities for new players to enter the market. The threat of new entrants is significantly higher with respect to cable and satellite broadcasting platforms due to their higher channel capacity. However, viewing figures and therefore advertising revenues are typically considerably lower than those of terrestrial channels. Moreover, it is difficult for new entrants to secure the rights to popular programs such as CSI as these command large amounts of money.

The use of the internet as a broadcasting platform is becoming increasingly popular, with unlimited broadcasting capacity. Leading broadcasters have invested significantly in online broadcasting platforms and have very strong brand images. Such players are able to maintain high levels of capital expenditure in purchasing rights to the most popular content, which presents a significant impediment to the success of new players.

Customers will have preference towards certain titles, and customer loyalty to specific newspapers is particularly apparent. Overall, buyer power is moderate. Production companies form a major supplier to broadcasters, who either commission the production of programming or purchase broadcast rights for programming. The supplier power of production companies typically depends upon the quality of content, dictated by viewing figures, to make the product saleable to advertising businesses. For example, a production company tendering the rights for a successful television series would be expected to have significantly more supplier power than a production company searching for a broadcaster to commission a new series. In addition, transmission service providers provide vital technical

services for the broadcasting of terrestrial channels. There are a small number of large players within the managed transmission service industry.

Suppliers to publishers include paper merchants, suppliers of printing equipment, renters of office space, computer manufacturers etc. These various suppliers vary in size and number depending on the specific supply. For example there are a greater number of computer manufacturers and suppliers than there are paper merchants, so computer manufacturers have a much stronger position relative to market players, which illustrates how supplier power can differ depending on the specific supply. Furthermore, paper is a key resource to this market and the price of specific varieties of paper varies depending on quality, which increases the supplier power of paper merchants to an extent. Overall, supplier power is moderate.

The success of individual broadcasters is determined by overall viewing figures and individual consumers incur no switching costs, unless they opt to pay for subscription TV services. A significant barrier to the entrance of new players into terrestrial broadcasting is the limited choice of available frequencies and therefore licenses in many countries. However, the switch off away from analogue television broadcasting will free-up frequencies for digital broadcasting. This will enable more channels to be broadcast via the terrestrial platform and therefore may present opportunities for new players to enter the market. The threat of new entrants is significantly higher with respect to cable and satellite broadcasting platforms due to their higher channel capacity. However, viewing figures and therefore advertising revenues are typically considerably lower than those of terrestrial channels. Moreover, it is difficult for new entrants to secure the rights to popular programs such as CSI as these command large amounts of money.

The use of the internet as a broadcasting platform is becoming increasingly popular, with unlimited broadcasting capacity. Leading broadcasters have invested significantly in online broadcasting platforms and have very strong brand images. Such players are able to maintain high levels of capital expenditure in purchasing rights to the most popular content, which presents a significant impediment to the success of new players.

In the publishing market, paper is a key resource and new entrants would need to establish relations with a paper merchant for regular supplies beforehand. The availability of cheap, high quality printing in many Asian countries is producing an escalation in local piracy including commercial photocopying of standard texts. This may affect new entrants having relative success in the Indian publishing market, (as well as impacting on the operations of existing players), and may well act as a deterrent to entry. Furthermore, the presence of strong incumbents, such as News Corporation and The Times Group, who benefit from large economies of scale and distribution networks, makes it difficult for new players to establish themselves. However, strong double-digit growth both in recent years and forecast for the future may still be enough to attract new players. Overall, there is a moderate threat of new entrants.

Other forms of entertainment such as film, PCs and video games, can be considered as potential substitutes to the broadcasting and cable TV market. A significant increase in popularity of other entertainment forms could possibly impact upon viewing figures and thus advertising revenue.

The rise of downloading programs through the internet, both legally and illegally, has a substantial impact as people download episodes of hit shows before they are shown on TV or to avoid paying subscription fees. TV is still the most effective form of advertising for a company but it is generally more expensive than internet, radio and game advertising. Substitutes to the publishing market include other forms of media, educational material and entertainment, such as television, CD-ROM learning software and computer gaming, to name but a few.

The internet allows for a substitution from the physical format of books, newspapers and magazines, with the option of online versions and e-books, with the advantage of updated versions and revisions being much easier and more cost-effective to implement. However, publishers are attempting to utilize the internet as part of their business and this separate distribution channel is gaining popularity and is therefore not a true substitute. Overall, the threat of substitutes is considered to be strong.

Players do not compete directly for revenues from end-users, but for viewing figures, which in turn determine advertising revenue for commercial players. Individuals incur no switching costs when choosing between broadcasters channels (unless switching to pay TV services) which raises competition for viewing numbers. Rivalry is strong between broadcasters to purchase the broadcasting rights for the most popular programs, events and sporting events. Players within the market are typically large, owning multiple television channels; they, therefore, have a high level of assets, with high fixed costs and exit costs. There is a high degree of differentiation between players within the market, with rivalry greater between players broadcasting shows and events of similar genres. Large publishers dominate the Indian market, and although they are diversified through various subsidiaries spanning a broad range of media, there is strong rivalry. Strong double-digit industry growth and the extent of product differentiation ease rivalry. However, the dominance of leading players, coupled with the relative low cost of expansion and capacity increases allow them to further expand, diversify and target related markets, which could increase rivalry. Players differentiate themselves through the type of works that they publish, although essentially the process of production is very similar between players. Overall, there is a moderate degree of rivalry.

Magazine Industry Sectors Magazines are periodicals that can be categorized as belonging to one of these magazine industry sectors:

Consumer Magazines (General and Specialist) Business / Trade / B2B Magazines Customer Publishing / Contract Publishing / Custom Publishing Newspaper Supplements.

Other types of periodicals include part works and academic journals. Part works have a fixed number of issues and are designed to be collected as a set on a particular topic. Ad Spend Share by Medium Ad Spend Trends ($bn)

There are 3,831 number of consumer magazine. There are 34% newsstand sales, 3.95bn is the ad expenditure and 21% share of ad spend.

Top 10 Advertisers RANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ADVERTISER Hindustan Unilever Reckitt Benckiser (India) Coca Cola India Bharti Airtel ITC LG Electronics India Cadbury's India Pantaloons Retail India Procter & Gamble L'Oreal India

Source: Nielsen Global AdView Pulse Q4/2009

Top 10 Women's Magazines TITLE Vanitha (Malyalam) Meri Saheli (Hindi) PUBLISHER MM Publications FREQUENCY PRICE Fortnightly 50/-

Pioneer Book Company Monthly Fortnightly Fortnightly Fortnightly Fortnightly Fortnightly Monthly Monthly

Griha shobha (Hindi) BDelhi Press Group Grihlakshmi Vanitha (Hindi) Sarita (Hindi) Femina Womens Era Good Housekeeping Cosmopolitan Mathrubhumi MM Publications Delhi Press Group Worldwide Media Delhi Press Group Living Media India Living Media India

FIPP World Magazine Trends 2010-2011

Topic Introduction
Brand extension or brand stretching is a marketing strategy in which a firm marketing a product with a well-developed image uses the same brand name in a different product category. The new product is called a spin-off. Organizations use this strategy to increase and leverage brand equity (definition: the net worth and long-term sustainability just from the renowned name). An example of a brand extension is Jello-gelatin creating Jello pudding pops. It increases awareness of the brand name and increases profitability from offerings in more than one product category. A brand's "extendibility" depends on how strong consumer's associations are to the brand's values and goals. Ralph Laurens Polo brand successfully extended from clothing to home furnishings such as bedding and towels. Both clothing and bedding are made of linen and fulfill a similar consumer function of comfort and hominess. Arm & Hammer leveraged its brand equity from basic baking soda into the oral care and laundry care categories. By emphasizing its key attributes, the cleaning and deodorizing properties of its core product, Arm & Hammer was able to leverage those attributes into new categories with success. Another example is Virgin Group, which was initially a record label that has extended its brand successfully many times; from transportation (aeroplanes, trains) to games stores and video stores such a Virgin Megastore. In the 1990s, 81% of new products used brand extension to introduce new brands and to create sales. Launching a new product is not only time consuming but also needs a big budget to create awareness and to promote a product's benefits. Brand extension is one of the new product development strategies which can reduce financial risk by using the parent brand name to enhance consumers' perception due to the core brand equity. While there can be significant benefits in brand extension strategies, there can also be significant risks, resulting in a diluted or severely damaged brand image. Poor choices for brand extension may dilute and deteriorate the core brand and damage the brand equity. Most of the literature focuses on the consumer evaluation and positive impact on parent brand. In practical cases, the failures of brand extension are at higher rate than the successes. Some studies show that negative impact may dilute brand image and equity. In spite of the positive impact of brand extension, negative association and wrong communication strategy do harm to the parent brand even brand family.

Product extensions are versions of the same parent product that serve a segment of the target market and increase the variety of an offering. An example of a product extension is Coke vs. Diet Coke in same product category of soft drinks. This tactic is undertaken due to the brand loyalty and brand awareness they enjoy consumers are more likely to buy a new product that has a tried and trusted brand name on it. This means the market is catered for as they are receiving a product from a brand they trust and Coca Cola is catered for as they can increase their product portfolio and they have a larger hold over the market in which they are performing in. Brand awareness Brand awareness refers to customers' ability to recall and recognize the brand under different conditions and link to the brand name, logo, jingles and so on to certain associations in memory. It helps the customers to understand to which product or service category the particular brand belongs and what products and services are sold under the brand name. It also ensures that customers know which of their needs are satisfied by the brand through its products (Keller). Brand awareness is of critical importance since customers will not consider your brand if they are not aware of it. 'Brand love', or love of a brand, is an emerging term encompassing the perceived value of the brand image. Brand love levels are measured through social media posts about a brand, or tweets on sites such as Twitter. Becoming a Facebook fan of a particular brand is also a measurement of the level of 'brand love'.

Brand extension may be successful or unsuccessful. Instances where brand extension has been a success arei. Wipro which was originally into computers has extended into shampoo, powder, and soap. ii. Mars is no longer a famous bar only, but an ice-cream, chocolate drink and a slab of chocolate. Instances where brand extension has been a failure are-

i.

In case of new Coke, Coca Cola has forgotten what the core brand was meant to stand for. It thought that taste was the only factor that consumer cared about. It was wrong. The time and money spent on research on new Coca Cola could not evaluate the deep emotional attachment to the original Coca- Cola.

ii.

Rasna Ltd. - Is among the famous soft drink companies in India. But when it tried to move away from its niche, it hasnt had much success. When it experimented with fizzy fruit drink Oranjolt, the brand bombed even before it could take off. Oranjolt was a fruit drink in which carbonates were used as preservative. It didnt work out because it was out of synchronization with retail practices. Oranjolt need to be refrigerated and it also faced quality problems. It has a shelf life of three-four weeks, while other softdrinks assured life of five months.

Advantages of Brand Extension Brand Extension has following advantages: 1. It makes acceptance of new product easy. a. It increases brand image. b. The risk perceived by the customers reduces. c. The likelihood of gaining distribution and trial increases. An established brand name increases consumer interest and willingness to try new product having the established brand name. d. The efficiency of promotional expenditure increases. Advertising, selling and promotional costs are reduced. There are economies of scale as advertising for core brand and its extension reinforces each other. e. Cost of developing new brand is saved. f. Consumers can now seek for a variety. g. There are packaging and labeling efficiencies. h. The expense of introductory and follow up marketing programs is reduced.

There are feedback benefits to the parent brand and the organization. a. The image of parent brand is enhanced. b. It revives the brand. c. It allows subsequent extension. d. Brand meaning is clarified. e. It increases market coverage as it brings new customers into brand franchise. f. Customers associate original/core brand to new product, hence they also have quality associations. Disadvantages of Brand Extension 1. Brand extension in unrelated markets may lead to loss of reliability if a brand name is extended too far. An organization must research the product categories in which the established brand name will work. 2. There is a risk that the new product may generate implications that damage the image of the core/original brand. 3. There are chances of less awareness and trial because the management may not provide enough investment for the introduction of new product assuming that the spin-off effects from the original brand name will compensate. 4. If the brand extensions have no advantage over competitive brands in the new category, then it will fail.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Title of the project: Consumer awareness and analysis of Femina Buyology, a brand extension of Femina Background: Femina Buyology", is the brand extension of "Femina Magazine". It's a unique platform to reach out to the Femina readers in Chandigarh. Femina Buyology caters to a broad market with featured ideas that appeal to the modern Life & Style of an ever changing Chandigarh. It is a ready reckoner on Chandigarh made for Chandigarhans. The supplement contains information on Page 3 circle, Best places for shopping, property deals and much more. Femina Buyology comes as a supplementary issue which is circulated with the main Femina Magazine. This magazine is for the women of today, primarily Chandigarhans, to inspire her, give her space, inform about whats new in the city, where and help her prepare her It List Keeping this as the back ground, a survey was conducted to find out if the market is aware of the supplementary issue and also what the readers expect out of it. Objective: To understand the readers preference towards women magazines. To find out the level of awareness of Femina Buyology. To analyze the readers attitude towards Femina Buyology. To analyze the readers preference in terms of feature like promotions, events, products in market etc. To promote Femina Buyology. To understand the potential market in Chandigarh for Femina Buyology. .

Research Data Collection The data for the study of the consumer awareness collected through two main sources broadly classified into: Primary Sources Primary source of data was collected through questionnaire method which was filled by random people. The questionnaire contained fourteen questions. The respondents had to tick the options that were given or give their feedback on blank space in each question. After the questionnaire was designed the field work was organized. The questionnaire was distributed and the feedback was taken personally. After collecting the required information the questionnaire was transferred to the work sheet. A master chart was prepared with tally marks. The findings were finally recorded and the data was represented in tables and charts graphically. Secondary Sources Computers and information technology have played a major role in providing information in todays world. Through extensive use of internet information, requirements were fulfilled. These include information on all brands and current market scenario of Women magazines. The companys profile was extracted from the internet and through other independent surveys conducted by reliable sources. Sample Surveys Experience from the experts reveals that it is not realistically possible to approach all customers. Thus careful sampling of representative customers is essential. Different cross sections of the customers that make up the bulk of the market were selected in Chandigarh. In total 250 respondents were approached personally in colleges, malls, residential areas, fashion boutiques, beauty parlor and coffee shops.

Plan of Analysis To analyze the objectives of Femina Buyology, 250 respondents were randomly sampled to fill the questionnaire. The questionnaire contains questions relating to the consumer awareness of Femina Buyology as a brand extension of Femina. The survey took a month to complete. After the questionnaires were filled the analysis of the answers will be done and converted into a graph to make the study much easier. Finding and suggestions were given after the analysis is done. Limitations of the Study There were few limitations in conducting the research. They are as following: The research work had to be completed in a stipulated time. The cost factor of the research also was a limitation. Unwillingness on the part of customers to give the feedback in the questionnaire. Only nearly half of the respondents read the questions honestly to give the feedback. The survey was restricted to selected areas in Chandigarh.

COMPANY PROFILE
The Times Group The Times Group, one of Indias leading media groups, provides media publishing services. The company offers newspapers, magazines, internet, and electronic commerce information publication services. Additionally, it provides radio and television programs production and distribution, and mobile value added services. The company was founded in 1838 as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce and changed its name to The Times of India in 1861.

The group reaches out from 11 publishing centers, 15 printing centers, 55 sales offices, over 7,000 employees, 5 dailies including two of the largest in the country, with approx 4.3 million copies circulated daily, 2 lead magazines, 29 niche magazines reaching 2,468 cities and towns and 32 Radio Stations (figures as of 2008). Its brands include: The Economic Times, Times of India, Femina, Sandhya Times, Times FM, and Filmfare. The companys most popular title is The Times of India (TOI) - a popular English language broadsheet daily newspaper in India. It has the widest circulation among all English-language daily newspapers in the world, across all formats (broadsheet, compact, Berliner and online). The Times of India comes with several cityspecific supplements, such as: Delhi Times, Calcutta Times, Bombay Times, Hyderabad Times, Kanpur Times, Lucknow Times, Indore Times, Nagpur Times, Chandigarh Times, Pune Times, Ahmedabad Times and Chennai Times, The Times of South Mumbai, The Times of Doon, Meerut Plus, Haridwar Plus, and Bhopal Plus.

In 2008, the newspaper reported that (with a circulation of over 3.1 million) it was certified by the Audit Bureau of Circulations as the world's largest selling English language daily newspaper, placing it as the 8th largest selling newspaper in any language in the world. The first edition of the newspaper appeared on November 3, 1838, then known as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce. The newspaper was published twice a week under editor J.E. Brennan. In January 2007, the Kannada edition was launched in Chandigarh and in April 2008 the Chennai edition was launched. The Times Group flagship company is Bennett, Coleman & Co. Limited. The Times Groups subsidiary companies include: Times Infotainment Media Limited (TIML) & Entertainment Network India Limited (ENIL) that together control: Radio Mirchi (national network of Private

FM stations), 360 Degrees (Event Management), Times Outoors (Outdoor Advertising & Billboard Marketing), Mirchi Movies Limited (Movie production, Entertainment); Times Internet Limited (TIL), which has: Indiatimes portal and Times of Money (an online payments portal specializing in remitting money to India and other parts of the world); Times Global Broadcasting Limited - previously a Joint Venture with Reuters. The company heads: Times Now (a news channel), Zoom (a lifestyle channel); Times Business Solutions controls: TBSL (corporate website of TBSL), Times Jobs (a jobs portal), SimplyMarry earlier known as TimesMatri (a matrimonial portal), Magic Bricks (a real estate portal), Yolist (free classifieds portal), Ads2Book (online classifieds booking system for print publications); World Wide Media - a magazine joint venture between BCCL and BBC magazines.

WWM heads: Filmfare, Filmfare Awards, Femina, Femina Miss India, A Beauty Paegent, Top Gear India, Hello, BBC Good Homes, TIML Golden Square Limited which purchased Virgin Radio (soon to be called Absolute Radio) in the United Kingdom. This company is a direct subsidiary of BCCL (not through TIML or ENIL). In 2009, the company launched its latest business channel entitled ET Now. Key Metrics The company recorded a turnover in excess of $700 million in 2008. Further financial details are not available.

WorldWide Media Pvt Ltd In the year 2004, the media landscape witnessed the inception of a strategic alliance, when India's largest media and entertainment conglomerate, The Times Group, and The BBC WorldWide, which is a household name the world over, came together to form World Wide Media (WWM). Worldwide Media is a 50:50 company owned by BBC Worldwide and The Times Group, Indias largest media group. The company publishes more that 25 magazine titles. Among them are Femina - Indias largest English language womens magazine and Filmfare Indias largest

English language movie magazine. After the collaboration, WWM successfully launched the Indian edition of BBC Top Gear Magazine and Hello as well. In India, there is an avid interest about glamorous lifestyles of the rich and famous. There is a huge untapped market potential for international and national celebrity content in a glossy magazine format. Therefore we at WWM are now on the threshold of releasing two international luxury magazines. We would like to invite you to be a part of this journey by associating with the brand and partnering us in ancillary events. Want a page-by-page panorama of the modern Indian woman and find out what echoes with her today? Simply pick up the latest issue of Femina which for over 50 years has been a friend, a companion and an inspiration for Indian women. If there is one name that cuts across genres and age groups in the country, it's Bollywood! And Filmfare has been the window into this magical world for generations of Indians TRENDS, one of the most widely read architecture and design magazines in the world. Currently in 10 countries, India is the 11th edition of this magazine. Launched in India as the Home TRENDS series, the magazine is well poised to meet the demand for a world-class source of reference on Architecture and Design. With its outstanding and pertinent features, Home TRENDS is all set to raise the bar by catering to the varied and evolving design sensibilities of today's India. This is Bookazine for professionals, is a very practical source of ideas and inspiration with comprehensive details of each project featured.

Science Enthusiast? History Buff? Nature Lover? BBC Knowledge brings the latest and the best from the fields of Science, History and Nature to satisfy the curious mind.

Having become the definitive life and lifestyle guide for progressive Indian women, extending Femina to fit the needs of the Hindi-speaking woman seemed like the next thing to do. In 2008, Femina Hindi was launched - speaking to the modern Hindi-speaking woman in a language and style that she is most comfortable with.

Brands in WWM Femina The story of Femina, India's first and most read women's English magazine, reads much like the story of the urban Indian woman. For over 50 years now, Femina has been capturing the essence of the modern woman, and how she has been evolving.

Now, looking back, there's only one thing they have to say: they've both come a long way. From the first Miss India in the 60s, the sexual revolution of the 70s, the makeup and fashion mores of the 80s, the fairytales of Sushmita Sen and Aishwarya Rai in the 90s, to the reality TV boom of the noughties, much has changed however; some things haven't changed at all. Femina has long been the definitive life and lifestyle guide for progressive women. In this brave new age of the multi-faceted, multitasking woman, Femina still remains the referral point for women who are expanding their roles, and exploring new frontiers. And continues to talk to forward- thinking women on issues that matter most to them. To celebrate how far the progressive Indian woman has come, Femina, decided to give them self a total makeover. Femina now sports a bold new look and attitude, and covers a whole lot of fresh content and topics that appeal to the young, confident and outgoing woman of today. Even the advertising has moved from our tagline, 'Believe' to 'For all the women you are'. Over the years, Femina's readership has constantly grew, with over 60% of its English edition readers in the age group of 25-45 years and over 76% of its Hindi edition readers in the age group of 16-45 years. Today, the reader is not 'just' a housewife or 'just' a professional, but she's both & more. And like the readers, they too evolved. Theyve made waves in other circles as well. For example, the biggest, internationally recognized properties India has ever developed 'Femina Miss India. Over the years, it has become a symbol of elegance, intelligence, wit and beauty. Renowned names like Persis Khambata, Zeenat Aman, Sushmita Sen, Aishwarya Rai and Priyanka Chopra began life as a Femina Miss India contestant before taking centre-stage in every household.

Femina in Hindi, an extension of the brand Femina was launched in October 2008. It brings to the table; the values, content and quality which the Indian woman has come to expect from

Femina English. It addresses similar issues as Femina while speaking to her in a language she is comfortable with.

In 2008, Femina went on to launch 'Femina What to Wear', which is India's first ever shopping magazine. Acting as the ultimate shopping guide, it quite literally tells the shopper what to wear & as an added bonus tells her where it is available as well. Crossing boundaries, it also covers international trends while giving readers the know-how to carry it off or create their own style.

Femina, along with its various verticals like Femina Brides, the Femina Book of Travel, the Cookbook and the Femina Book of Parenting, went hand in hand with women & progress which came with every page turn. Today, Femina has its online incarnation: 'www.Femina.in'. With it, Femina aims at reaching out to women 24 hours of the day. The website covers a bandwidth of topics including Fashion, Relationships, Beauty, Buzz, Health, Food, Your Space and Spotlight making it a one-stopdestination for women online. The website also features user-generated content in the form of tips, communities, forums, polls, contests and other interactive content formats which add to the experience of the end user.

Filmfare For over five decades now, Filmfare has been the official handbook on everything Bollywood for the diehard fan, which, in India is almost everyone. It is also a magazine that film stars think of first & trust most when they want to open up to their fans.

With its exclusive interviews, classy photo-shoots, insider stories, sneak peeks, Bollywood fashion coverage, movie reviews & special features, Filmfare captures Bollywood's biggest stars and divas at their most colourful & candid best.

As India's No. 1 entertainment magazine, Filmfare has through the years, turned from a monthly into a fortnightly, launched an edition devoted to the southern film industry and gained a readership of more than 2 million fans!

There's no better evidence of Filmfare's hold on the industry than the Filmfare Awards. Considered the Oscars of India, it has become the benchmark for excellence in mainstream cinema, and a much sought after accomplishment by industry professionals. Over the years, the awards night has evolved into a glamorous extravaganza featuring star performances, drawing millions of people to their TV sets.

The Southern Filmfare Awards were also started in conjunction with the main Bollywood awards. It was a celebration of excellence in four languages-- Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil and Telugu. From a modest ceremony which lasted for less than a couple of hours, the Filmfare Awards ceremony has morphed into the most breathtaking and marvelous show that the country waits for with bated breath each year. The awards ceremony has always been marked by a distinct brand of elegance, dignity and unparalleled magic. Today it's an exclusive and a 'by invitation only' event for the creme-de-la-creme of the industry.

On the web, www.Filmfare.com provides exclusive movie and celebrity content on the web and aims to be the ultimate film portal.

Grazia Grazia India, the 10th edition of this hugely popular title that was voted UK's No. 1 Magazine two years in a row, is a monthly fashion magazine with a powerful and unique editorial formula that makes it stand out from other publications in its genre.

Grazia works on a distinctive 'Easy Chic' philosophy, decoding fashion and the latest trends, keeping style upscale but wearable, chic but real. Grazia takes its readers to the front row of prt and couture shows in the fashion capitals of the world, updating them on trends as they break globally, introducing them to designers and delivering interviews with the hottest stars. Not surprisingly, Grazia appeals greatly to fashionistas across the country.

Grazia also follows a 'News with Shoes' formula, keeping its readers abreast with not only the latest in style, but also world news and women's issues. So if you're looking to reach a discerning fashion savvy woman, your search ends here, with Europe's No.1 style magazine. HELLO! Want to get up close with celebrities from around the world and feel welcomed in a world full of royalty, celebrities, society doyennes, the NRI diaspora, the arterati and the lifestyle moguls? Pick up the next copy of HELLO! - the world's most loved and celebrated celebrity magazine.

Over the years, HELLO! has given its readers access from closed-door parties by corporate giants to world exclusives worth millions of dollars. It is easily the only magazine that can boast of taking its readers where no other magazines have ever dared to venture - right into the celebrities' personal spaces.

While HELLO! is your easy access into the celebrities' lives, it also allows the celebrated personalities to open up with you on various subjects and issues of the world. One of the best features of HELLO! is its interviews, which makes readers feel that they have met the celebrity, visited him or her and come away as a friend.

Established in the 1930s in Spain, HELLO! has over 11 international editions, giving it

unmatched depth and variety. Its Indian edition, launched in April 2007 has captivated a huge set of loyal readers, advertisers and celebrities for its exclusive and dignified portrayal of personalities. HELLO! India celebrated its 3rd anniversary in April 2010.

BBC Top Gear When it comes to being driven by passion for cars, there is one magazine that fuels it up for the whole new breed of enthusiasts who see cars as a lifestyle, not a data sheet - the BBC Top Gear. Being the world's leading motoring magazine, BBC Top Gear has editions covering 50 countries, capturing every little action and thrills of the motoring world. BBC Top Gear brings in its pages 'the real story' - an honest, irreverent and humorous view of driving the world's most exciting cars to their limit. To give the readers the real experience every month, BBC Top Gear puts them in the driver's seat and powers it with opinionated, entertaining material, like Features - where we conduct road tests with a twist, taking the cars to the limit in situations that bring out their true character; Metal which gives you a sneak preview of the coolest new and concept cars from around the world; Faces - where you come face-to-face with the who's who of the auto world; Drives - which offers know-it-all dope on latest cars; TG2 Wheels - where the newest and fastest bikes get the TG treatment; Gear- where you can check out the latest products, accessories, games, movies and more; Buyers Guide - which is a comprehensive guide to every single car and bike available in the market. A heady mix of torture-tests of fresh wheels on exotic locations, sneak peek at cool automotive trends and the wit of world-renowned columnists like Jeremy Clarkson, makes Top Gear a great read for both petrol heads and just about anyone who enjoys a good story. BBC GoodHomes Home is where the heart is, and that is exactly where the heart of BBC GoodHomes lies. Today it is one of the most preferred & leading d cor magazines that inspire its readers with innovative ideas that fit every space & budget.

From kitsch to classic, simple to sublime, understated to ostentatious, no matter what the design

sensibility or individual style, BBC GoodHomes offers its readers an eclectic mix of d cor suggestions and DIY tips.

Some of the many reasons that make BBC GoodHomes a precious pick are its 8 editorial pillars. These comprise Cover Features - which offer interesting and fun advice that are easy and practical in nature to be implemented at homes. Real Homes - that open doors to the world of the liveliest and engaging homes. Decorating - This is a comprehensive source of beautifying techniques and d cor course. Art - This brings experts interpretation of form, colour and space to simplify it for the readers. Gardens and Flowers - which offer a bouquet of ideas & tips from bonsais to flower arrangements. Travel - that gives you suggestions on where to go and how to bring the local essence back home. Technology - that talks about combining convenience and style along with aesthetics. Problem Solved - This is where you get answers to your queries from the experts on good homes and better living.

BBC GoodHomes is supported by a celebrated advisory board that include renowned personalities like Hafeez Contractor - the scion of Indian architecture; Nisha Jamvwal - award winning interior and fashion designer; Tripat Kalra - the leader of the revolution in Indian art; JJ Valaya - the name synonymous with posh ensembles and d cor. Anjaleka Kriplani - a renowned interior designer.

Lonely Planet Magazine India

After 35 years of sending world travelers to parts known and unknown; Lonely Planet Magazine, the world's most trusted and thumbed-through source on travel made its way to India as a monthly magazine.

Lonely Planet Magazine India aims to inspire and enable travelers to connect with the world. Encourage them to leave behind the mundane daily grind & sample different cultures first-hand. Discover people, history and the land like a true traveler.

The magazine looks at travel not as destinations to visit, but as experiences. It opens up readers

to fresh and unique travel experiences, be it unheard-of places or entirely new ways of looking at familiar places.

The magazine offers readers everything it takes to travel interestingly. A great mix of travel destinations, both international and Indian, a fresh take on all things travel and extremely practical and handy travel resources.

It is tailored to the tastes and preferences of Indian travelers and caters to the kind of experiences they seek and the complexities they face. From 'Five Best' lists to celebrity travel experiences. From 5-easy trips and stopovers to travel activity guides, where to find restaurants serving Indian cuisines to tasting the world on a plate. Lonely Planet Magazine India has the world covered for its readers.

TRENDS Back in 1984, TRENDS was launched in New Zealand to fulfill the need gap for an authoritative source of reference on contemporary architecture and design. Since then, TRENDS has grown from strength to strength to become one of the most loved and referred to magazines across 11 countries including Australia, USA, UAE, China, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Hong Kong. Making it probably the most widely read architecture and design magazine in the world.

Launched in India in 2010 as Home TRENDS, the magazine is well-poised to meet the increase in demand (due to the real estate boom in India) for a world-class source of reference in Architecture and Design. Home TRENDS is all set to raise the bar of Indian architecture and cater to the evolving sensibilities of today's India.

As a special interest publication, Home TRENDS is targeted towards architects, interior designers, builders and developers, home appliance vendors and other trade professionals looking for specific information or simply inspiration.

TRENDS was launched in New Zealand to fulfill the need gap for an authoritative source of reference on contemporary architecture and design. Since then, TRENDS has grown from strength to strength to become one of the most loved and referred to magazines across 11 countries including Australia, USA, UAE, China, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Hong Kong. Making it probably the most widely read architecture and design magazine in the world. Launched in India in 2010 as Home TRENDS, the magazine is well-poised to meet the increase in demand (due to the real estate boom in India) for a world-class source of reference in Architecture and Design. Home TRENDS is all set to raise the bar of Indian architecture and cater to the evolving sensibilities of today's India. As a special interest publication, Home TRENDS is targeted towards architects, interior designers, builders and developers, home appliance vendors and other trade professionals looking for specific information or simply inspiration. Home TRENDS with its unique approach and superior paper quality, is not just a magazine but an architecture and design book that is driven by volume and not date. Every issue of Home TRENDS will have a really long shelf life and will stay in the stands with the newer issues.

Besides the trade, Home TRENDS will play a role in the lives of young, suave and well-travelled urban Indians for whom a home is not just a place they live but a statement they make. A home is their biggest and prized possessions and they leave no stone unturned in making it the most beautiful place on earth. Home TRENDS will help them do so. Its an architecture and design book that is driven by volume and not date. Every issue of Home TRENDS will have a really long shelf life and will stay in the stands with the newer issues.

Besides the trade, Home TRENDS will play a role in the lives of young, suave and well-travelled urban Indians for whom a home is not just a place they live but a statement they make. A home

is their biggest and prized possessions and they leave no stone unturned in making it the most beautiful place on earth. Home TRENDS will help them do so. BBC Knowledge Well-researched, handpicked stories are matched with arresting visuals and graphics to elucidate subjects covering history, science and nature.

BBC Knowledge provides simple explanations for complex phenomenon, broaching topics like forensics, chaos theory, artificial intelligence and animal behaviour. Insights on psychology give perspective on why we behave the way we do, while curious questions are quenched by articles that look into the mechanics of everyday life.

Written by renowned academics and experts in the fields, BBC Knowledge's wide-range of features provide riveting and up-to-date information on subjects ranging from treasure hunting in the 21st century, Darwin's theory of evolution, the atomic bombing of Japan, global warming to the rivers of the Amazon. With material that is meant to stimulate the mind, this magazine looks to empower a young generation of readers.

The first edition, launched in the United States in August 2008, was an instant success; the magazine was voted among the Top 10 newly-launched magazine's of 2008 by Library Journal, USA. It is also available internationally in the United Kingdom, Brazil, Singapore and Bulgaria. With its unique content and style, BBC Knowledge holds the key to the mysteries of the world.

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


The age of the respondents: Table I No. of Age 18 24 25 32 33 39 40 48 49 plus Total Chart I Respondents 53 74 48 41 34 250 Percentage 21.20% 29.60% 19.20% 16.40% 13.60% 100.00%

Age of the Respondent


14% 16% 19% 30% 21% 18 24 25 32 33 39 40 48 49 plus

Analysis: It is observed that majority of the respondents were between the age group of 25 32 and 18 24.

The occupation of the respondents: Table II No. of Occupation Student Professional Employee Self Employed Home Maker Total Chart II Respondents 37 67 33 39 74 250 Percentage 14.80% 26.80% 13.20% 15.60% 29.60% 100.00%

Occupation of the Respondent


15% 29% 27% 16% 13% Student Professional Employee Self Employed Home Maker

Analysis: 29% of the respondents were home makers and 27% were professional, we could see that homemakers preferred reading women magazines.

The marital status of the respondents: Table III Marital Status Single Married Total Chart III No. of Respondents 73 177 250 Percentage 29.20% 70.80% 100.00%

Marital Status of the Respondent


29% Single 71% Married

Analysis: It was observed that 71 % of the married women prefer reading womens magazine.

The Family Monthly Income of the respondents: Table IV Family Monthly Income Less than 20,000 20,000 50,000 50,000 1,00,000 More than 1,00,000 Total Chart IV No. of Respondents 31 51 75 93 250 Percentage 12.40% 20.40% 30.00% 37.20% 100.00%

Family monthly Income of the Respondents


13% 37% 20% Less than 20,000 20,000 50,000 50,000 1,00,000 30% More than 1,00,000

Analysis: The Family monthly income of 37% of the respondents is more than 1, 00,000.

Women reading Magazine and women reading magazines based on marital status: Table V Women Reading Magazine (Yes/ No) Particulars Yes No Total Table VI Women Reading magazines based on marital status Particulars Single Married Total Yes 59 154 213 Percentage 27.70% 72.30% 100.00% No 14 23 37 Percentage 37.84% 62.16% 100.00% Total 73 177 250 No. of Respondents 213 37 250 Percentage 85.20% 14.80% 100.00%

Chart V

Chart VI

No. of Respondents reading Women Magazines


15% Yes 85% No

Women Reading magazines based on marital status


28% Single 72% Married

Analysis: It is observed that 85% of the respondents read womens magazine, whether once in a while or regularly. Out of which 72% are married.

Comparative study of women magazine based on age of the respondents: Chart VII - 1 Chart VII - 2

Femina
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48

Vogue

18.52 29.637.41%18.52 25.93

20.00 60.000.00%20.000.00% 21.05 42.11 21.05 10.535.26%

40 48 8.82%5.88%20.59 32.35 32.35 33 39 0.00%0.00%35.00 22.50 42.50 25 32 0.00%4.76%14.29 28.57 52.38 18 24 4.76%14.29 30.95 28.57 21.43

33 39 0.00%22.22 44.44 16.67 16.67 25 32 0.00%16.00 28.00 28.00 28.00 18 24 0.00%6.06%24.24 33.33 36.36

Chart VII - 3

Chart VII - 4

Cosmopolitan
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus

New Woman
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

46.6740.006.67%0.00%6.67%

49 plus 0.00% 0.00%25.0035.7139.29 40 48 2.86% 0.00%14.2922.8660.00 33 39 5.71% 0.00%22.8617.1454.29 25 32 14.8114.8118.5218.5233.33 18 24 38.1028.5728.570.00% 4.76%

40 48 27.2745.4527.270.00%0.00% 33 39 3.85%7.69%19.2326.9242.31 25 32 0.00%6.67%23.3323.3346.67 18 24 0.00%2.50%22.5032.5042.50

Chart VII - 5

Chart VII - 6

Marie Claire
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Elle

50.0033.3316.670.00%0.00%

49 plus 33.33% 66.67% 0.00%0.00%0.00% 40 48 28.57% 57.14% 0.00%0.00% 14.29% 33 39 7.14% 35.71% 14.29% 21.43% 21.43% 25 32 22.22% 5.56% 22.22% 27.78% 22.22% 18 24 0.00%0.00% 46.88% 21.88% 31.25%

40 48 28.5742.8614.290.00%14.29 33 39 0.00%20.0040.000.00%40.00 25 32 0.00%22.2233.3333.3311.11 18 24 0.00%4.35%21.7447.8326.09

Chart VII - 7

Chart VII - 8

Grazia
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Good Housekeeping
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

49 plus 0.00%0.00%0.00%0.00%0.00% 40 48 0.00%0.00%25.000.00%75.00 33 39 18.1813.6422.7318.1827.27 25 32 5.26%5.26%47.3726.3215.79 18 24 8.70%4.35%47.8317.3921.74

49 plus 0.00%0.00%24.14 44.83 31.03 40 48 0.00%0.00%11.76 47.06 41.18 33 39 0.00%0.00%15.00 30.00 55.00 25 32 0.00%0.00%19.44 22.22 58.33 18 24 0.00%8.00%20.00 16.00 56.00

Chart VII 9

Rating of the Magazine


60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Femina Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5 4.85% 9.22% 21.84% 26.70% 37.38% Vogue 5.00% 21.00% 27.00% 24.00% 23.00% Cosmopoli New tan Woman 9.02% 13.11% 20.49% 22.13% 35.25% 10.27% 6.85% 21.23% 19.86% 41.78% Marie Claire 7.81% 18.75% 26.56% 26.56% 20.31% Elle 11.69% 18.18% 27.27% 19.48% 23.38% Grazia 10.29% 7.35% 38.24% 19.12% 25.00%

Good Housekee ping 0.00% 1.22% 17.68% 32.32% 48.78%

Analysis: It is observed that in the women magazine sector most women are aware of the magazine Femina and Good Housekeeping, followed by New Woman. While doing the analysis Good Housekeeping was rated the highest and then Femina followed by New Woman among the age group 25 32. Magazines like Cosmopolitan and Grazia were mostly preferred by the youth who are between the age group 18 24. Vogue received an average response. And in case of the magazines Marie Claire and Elle, the level of awareness was fairly low and the ratings received by these magazines were also low in comparison to other women magazines as these magazines are fashion magazine which cater to women.

Rating of the aspects important for women magazines based on age of the respondent: Chart VIII - 1 Chart VIII - 2

Fashion & Shopping


100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

Recipes & Food Review


100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

1 34.78% 23.91% 19.57% 13.04% 8.70%

2 13.43% 13.43% 23.88% 41.79% 7.46%

3 4.00% 15.00% 16.00% 31.00% 34.00%

1 4.35% 4.35% 8.70% 26.09% 56.52%

2 1.79% 5.36% 16.07% 51.79% 25.00%

3 20.15% 23.13% 22.39% 22.39% 11.94%

Chart VIII - 3

Chart VIII - 4

Beauty Treatment & Spa


100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

Events & Exhibitions


100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

1 25.64% 28.21% 23.08% 10.26% 12.82%

2 9.33% 13.33% 21.33% 34.67% 21.33%

3 12.12% 14.14% 16.16% 35.35% 22.22%

1 8.70%

2 19.28%

3 18.03% 21.31% 18.03% 26.23% 16.39%

11.59% 12.05% 27.54% 13.25% 34.78% 30.12% 17.39% 25.30%

Chart VIII - 5

Chart VIII - 6

Social Awareness Topics


100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

Health Related Topics


100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

1 2.22% 8.89% 22.22% 26.67% 40.00%

2 7.94% 14.29% 22.22% 23.81% 31.75%

3 21.90% 20.95% 16.19% 36.19% 4.76%

18.75% 10.20% 14.19% 12.50% 10.20% 18.92% 25.00% 26.53% 16.22% 18.75% 34.69% 30.41% 25.00% 18.37% 20.27%

Chart VIII - 7

Family Trips
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

1 11.24% 5.62% 20.22% 30.34% 32.58%

2 20.00% 20.00% 12.73% 27.27% 20.00%

3 11.59% 27.54% 23.19% 33.33% 4.35%

Chart VIII 8

Rating of the aspects important for women magazines


80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Fashion & Shopping Series1 Series2 Series3 21.60% 31.46% 46.95%

Beauty Treatment & Spa 18.31% 35.21% 46.48%

Health Related Topics 7.51% 25.35% 67.14%

Family Trips 41.78% 25.82% 32.39%

Events & Exhibitions 32.39% 38.97% 28.64%

Recipes & Food Review 10.80% 26.29% 62.91%

Social Awareness Topics 21.13% 29.58% 49.30%

Analysis: It has been observed that the age group of the women influences their choice of content in the magazines they read. According to the survey, the younger women falling between the age group of 18 24 and 24 32 give more importance to fashion and shopping and beauty treatments and spas. Whereas the older women falling between the age group of 33 49 plus prefer reading about social awareness topics, health related topics and recipes. Events and exhibitions were given an average rating. Health related topics were given the most importance with 67%, Recipes & Food Review is given more importance with 63% and Family trips were given less importance in comparison to other aspects of the magazine.

Awareness of the magazine Femina by respondents: Table IX Particulars Yes No Total No. of Respondents 235 15 250 Percentage 94.00% 6.00% 100.00%

Chart IX

Awareness of the magazine Femina


6%

Yes No 94%

Analysis: Femina has predominantly been a market leader in the womens magazine sector and majority of the Indian women whether young or old are aware of Femina. According to the survey 94% of the women are aware of the magazine i.e. readers and non readers.

No. of years the magazine Femina is known by the respondents: Table X No. of years Femina is known Particulars 0-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15 yrs n above Total No. of Respondents 42 51 61 52 206 Percentage 20.39% 24.76% 29.61% 25.24% 100.00%

Chart X

No. of years Femina is known


25% 20% 0-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 25% 30% 10-15 yrs 15 yrs n above

Analysis: It has been observed that most of the women have known the magazine for a long time.

Magazine known that cater to Chandigarh: Table XI Magazine known that cater to Chandigarh Total Particulars Femina Buyology Jade o80 Chandigarh Timeout Others None of the above Total No. of Respondents 93 49 31 81 0 86 340 Repondents 213 213 213 213 213 213 Percentage 43.66% 23.00% 14.55% 38.03% 0.00% 40.38%

Chart XI

Magazine known that cater to Bangalore


43.66% 38.03% 23.00% 14.55% 0.00% Femina Buyology Jade o80 Bangalore Timeout Others None of the above 40.38%

Analysis: It has been observed that 40.38% of the respondents are not at all aware of any magazines that cater to Chandigarh. Whereas the remaining respondents, 43.66% of them are aware of Femina Buyology and 38.03% of them are aware of Chandigarh Timeout. (I.e. taking 213 respondents for calculating percentage for each magazine) Awareness of the magazine Femina Buyology by respondents: Table XII Awareness of the magazine Femina Buyology Particulars Yes No Total Chart XII Awareness of the magazine Femina Buyology
45% 55%

No. of Respondents 93 113 206

Percentage 45.15% 54.85% 100.00%

Yes No

Analysis: It has been observed that 45% of the women who read Femina are aware of its supplementary issue Femina Buyology.

What respondents like to read in Femina Buyology? Table XIII What do you like to read in Femina Buyology Total Particulars Get inspired Promotions Your It List Your Space City Events Travel Total No. of Respondents 51 27 76 21 34 21 230 Respondents 93 93 93 93 93 93 Percentage 54.84% 29.03% 81.72% 22.58% 36.56% 22.58%

Chart XIII

What do you like to read in Femina Buyology


81.72% 54.84% 29.03% 36.56% 22.58% 22.58%

Get inspired

Promotions Your It List Your Space

City Events

Travel

Analysis According to the respondents the most preferred topic in Femina buyology is Your it list and Get inspired and the topics like Your Space and Travel are given comparatively less importance by the readers. (I.e. taking 93 respondents for calculating percentage for each aspect) What the respondents would like to see in Femina Buyology? Table XIV What would you like to see more in Femina Buyology No. of Particulars Recipes Promotions City Events Travel Astrology Puzzles Beauty & Health Restaurants (Food Review) Total Respondents 81 45 36 23 77 67 80 58 467 Total Respondents 93 93 93 93 93 93 93 93 Percentage 87.10% 48.39% 38.71% 24.73% 82.80% 72.04% 86.02% 62.37%

Chart XIV

What would you like to see more in Femina Buyology


87.10% 48.39% 82.80% 38.71% 24.73% 86.02% 72.04% 62.37%

Analysis: It has been observed that most women would like to read more about Beauty and Health, Astrology, Recipes and Puzzles in future and there are very few who would like to read more on travel and city events. Promotions and Restaurants are given good importance. (I.e. taking 93 respondents for calculating percentage for each aspect)

How often the respondent would like to read Femina Buyology? Table XV How often would you like to read Femina Buyology? Particulars Fortnightly Monthly Quarterly Total No. of Respondents 21 55 17 93 Percentage 22.58% 59.14% 18.28% 100.00%

Chart XV

How often would you like to read Femina Buyology?


18% 23% 59% Fortnightly Monthly Quarterly

Analysis: According to the survey most women preferred reading Femina Buyology on a monthly basis and there are very few i.e. 23% of them who would like to read it fortnightly and 18% of them who would like to read it quarterly.

Women Reading Femina Buyology based on Marital Status: Table XVI Women Reading Femina Buyology based on Marital status Particulars Single Married Total Yes 28 65 93 Percentage 30.11% 69.89% 100.00% No 27 86 113 Percentage 23.89% 76.11% 100.00% Total 55 151 206

Chart XVI Women Reading Femina Buyology based on Marital status


30% Single 70% Married

Analysis: It has been observed that most of the women who read Femina Buyology are married.

Women reading Femina Buyology based on Occupation: Table XVII Women reading femina Buyology based on occupation Occupation Student Professional Employee Self Employed Home Maker Total No. of Respondents 15 26 8 13 31 93 Percentage 16.13% 27.96% 8.60% 13.98% 33.33% 100.00%

Chart XVII

Women reading femina Buyology based on occupation


33% 16% Student Professional 28% 14% 9% Employee Self Employed Home Maker

Analysis: According to the survey most of the women i.e 33% of them who read Femina Buyology are homemakers, 28% of them are professionals and the remaining are students, employees and selfemployed.

Rating of the aspects in Femina Buyology by Respondents: Chart XVIII - 1 Chart XVIII - 2

Content
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Travel

49 plus 20.00% 40.00% 30.00% 10.00% 0.00% 40 48 6.67% 33.33% 13.33% 13.33% 33.33% 33 39 5.26%5.26% 36.84% 10.53% 42.11% 25 32 12.90% 0.00% 41.94% 32.26% 12.90% 18 24 0.00%0.00% 61.11% 22.22% 16.67%

49 plus 30.00% 10.00% 300.000.00% 30.00% 40 48 26.67% 6.67% 13.33% 13.33% 40.00% 33 39 36.84% 21.05% 21.05% 5.26% 15.79% 25 32 25.81% 22.58% 29.03% 12.90% 9.68% 18 24 27.78% 11.11% 27.78% 22.22% 11.11%

Chart XVIII - 3

Chart XVIII - 4

Promotion
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Get inspired

49 plus 40.00%0.00%20.00% 30.00% 10.00% 40 48 25 32 6.67% 6.67%20.00% 60.00%6.67% 9.68%12.90% 32.26% 35.48%9.68% 33 39 15.79% 10.53% 31.58% 26.32% 15.79% 18 24 22.22% 22.22% 22.22% 27.78%5.56%

49 plus 20.00% 10.00% 10.00% 40.00% 20.00% 40 48 25 32 6.67% 6.67% 6.67%40.00% 40.00% 6.45%19.35% 22.58% 29.03% 22.58% 33 39 26.32% 10.53% 21.05% 21.05% 21.05% 18 24 16.67% 27.78% 33.33% 16.67%5.56%

Chart XVIII - 5

Chart XVIII - 6

City Events
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 49 plus 40 48 33 39 25 32 18 24

Your It list

49 plus 20.00%10.00%50.00%0.00%20.00% 40 48 20.00%26.67%26.67%13.33%13.33% 33 39 25 32 18 24 0.00%31.58%31.58%26.32%10.53% 0.00%19.35%22.58%22.58%35.48% 0.00%33.33%50.00%16.67%0.00%

30.00%10.00%40.00% 0.00% 20.00% 0.00% 0.00% 13.33% 6.67% 80.00% 0.00% 10.53%15.79%21.05%52.63% 0.00% 9.68% 9.68% 19.35%61.29% 0.00% 0.00% 5.56% 27.78%66.67%

Chart XVIII 6

Rating of the aspects in Femina Buyology


70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5 Content 8.60% 10.75% 38.71% 20.43% 21.51% Promotion 16.13% 11.83% 26.88% 35.48% 9.68% City Events 5.38% 24.73% 33.33% 18.28% 18.28% Travel 29.03% 16.13% 24.73% 11.83% 18.28% Get inspired 13.98% 16.13% 20.43% 27.96% 21.51% Your It list 3.23% 6.45% 13.98% 17.20% 59.14%

Analysis: It has been observed that the respondents have given an average rating of 3 to all the topics. Your it list is been given the highest rating of 59% followed by promotion by 35%. Content is been rated as average with 39%. City Events, Travel and Get Inspired are rated as average.

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
1. The magazine Femina, is read by the age group 25 32. 2. Home makers and professional preferred reading women magazine. 3. 85% of the respondents read womens magazine, out of which 72%of the respondents are married. 4. Femina, Good Housekeeping and New Woman are the magazines which are preferred by the age group 25 32. Magazines like Cosmopolitan and Grazia were mostly preferred by the youth who are between the age group 18 24. 5. Vogue, Marie Claire and Elle received an average response as it concentrated more on fashion. 6. Fashion and Shopping, Beauty Treatments and Spas were given more importance by the younger generation, while Social Awareness Topics, Health Related Topics and Recipes were preferred by the older generation. 7. 45% of the women who read Femina are aware of its supplementary issue Femina Buyology. Most of them are married and are home makers and professional. 8. According to the respondents the most preferred topic in Femina buyology is Your it list and Get inspired and the topics like Your Space and Travel are given comparatively less importance by the readers. 9. Most women would like to read more about Beauty and Health, Astrology, Recipes and Puzzles in future and there are very few who would like to read more on travel and city events. Promotions and Restaurants are also preferred by Women. 10. The respondents have given an average rating of 3 to all the topics in Femina Buyology. Your it list is been given the highest rating while City Events, Travel and Get Inspired are rated as average.

SUGGESTIONS
Since Femina has a separate section which concentrates on the events, exhibitions and other activities happening in the south Indian cities like Chandigarh, Chennai and Hyderabad, WWM could use this section to publicize and advertise about Femina Buyology as this magazine caters specially to the city Chandigarh. By doing this Femina buyology would become more visible to the general readers of Femina.

According to the survey many readers were not happy with the content of Femina Buyology and the feedback received was very poor. Therefore, WWM should work on improvising the content of the magazine.

Femina Buyology could also introduce a section containing the readers feedback because interactions would make the magazine more interesting and in turn attract more readers.

It has been observed that many women wanted to read more about recipes and astrology and they also wanted more puzzles and games, therefore these topics should also be introduced into the next issue of the magazine inorder to fulfill the expectations and interests of the readers.

An improvisation should be done to the logo of Femina Buyology because it has been proved through the survey that most women consider Femina and Femina Buyology to be one and the same.

According to the conversation I had with the retailers, it has been found that Femina Buyology is not at all visible in the package of the magazine, and this is also another reason why most people do not recognize Femina Buyology as an independent magazine.

Therefore, an innovative packaging pattern should be adopted where both Femina as well as Femina Buyology should be equally visible at the point-of-purchase.

Femina Buyology could also use strategy by organizing fun games and giving away attractive prizes to its readers. This would help in gaining more attention towards the magazine and in turn would also increase the readership of the magazine.

As they have a tie up with Mantri Square Mall, they could promote Femina Buyology by having kiosk in the mall, as it would attract people who visit the mall and help increase readership.

CONCLUSION
Femina is one of the most read magazines by women in India and as the market is broadening, Femina Buyology was launched as a brand extension in Chandigarh. To find out the awareness level of Femina Buyology a study was conducted. From its analysis and findings, It can be said that WorldWide Media needs to redesign its Logo and promote its magazine in order to gain awareness. It was found that the readers thought the magazine content was average, hence it requires improvisation. Femina and Femina Buyology are considered as one and the same, WorldWide Media should try improving the logo. This will also help in building a brand image and awareness. They could add topics like cooking recipes, astrology and restaurant review as these topics interest women readers.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Books

1. Silbiger, Steven, The 1O Day MBA, 2005 Edition, Piatkus , Printed in Great Britain,
Year 2005.

2. Kotler, Philip, Marketing Management, 11th Edition, Prentice Hall, Printed in India,
Year 1999.

Websites 1. www.knowthis.com 2. www.learnmarketing.net 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brand_extension 4. http://www.managementstudyguide.com/brand-extension.htm 5. http://www.marketreports.com/Sample/Netscribes/B2B_Publishing_Market_in_India_20 10-Sample.pdf 6. http://www.mandmglobal.com/media-passport/india/market-data.aspx 7. http://www.magforum.com/sectors.htm 8. "http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=54735746&site=ehos t-live">Media Industry Profile: India.</a> 9. http://www.worldwidemedia.in/