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Young mother fromShavertown enduring
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HEALTH, 1C BUSINESS, 8B
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NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 4A
State 6A
Obituaries 5A, 8A
Editorial 9A
Weather 10A
SPORTS: 1B
Business 8B
HEALTH: 1C
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INSIDE
Lyme disease
bigger threat
than thought
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE, PA Tuesday, August 20, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
Where could minimum
wage be on the rise?
Grifth spot might stayvacant
Two who applied to be controller fll-in thinking of withdrawing
20 1 3
ELECTION
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Unless an applicant surfaces
today, Luzerne County Council may
have no one to ll the rest of Walter
Grifths controller term through
the end of the year.
The only two people who had
applied as of Monday evening were
Carolee Medico Olenginski and
Karen Ceppa-Hirko, but both are
strongly considering removing their
names from consideration.
Ceppa-Hirko said Monday she
is reconsidering in light of the
Republican Partys decision Sunday
to choose Medico Olenginski over
her to be the Republican controller
candidate in the November general
election.
Im frustrated and very
disappointed, Ceppa-
Hirko said. They werent
focusing on education. It
was about who would be
able to get the votes.
Medico Olenginski said
she has second thoughts about com-
pleting Grifths term because she
applied before the party put her on
the ballot.
Now that I received the ballot
nomination, I think it would be
best to withdraw from complet-
ing the rest of the controller term.
Id love to get started in the ofce,
but dont want anyone to
say that I have received an
unfair advantage, Medico
Olenginski said.
Fairness issue raised
Democrat Michelle
Bednar, who will run against
Medico Olenginski for con-
troller, has questioned the fairness
of putting Medico Olenginski in the
temporary post because it would
provide public exposure that could
benet her as a candidate for the
ofce. Bednar could not be reached
for comment Monday.
The controller elected Nov. 5 will
take ofce in January and receive
$64,999 annually for four years.
Medico Olenginski questions
why some people are challenging
her qualications for the ballot nom-
ination. She has a masters degree
in human resources administration
from the University of Scranton, 20
years of experience as a manage-
ment consultant, seminar facilita-
tor and staff trainer and was twice
elected county prothonotary.
I have a masters degree and
eight years of experience in gov-
ernment, she said Monday.
Ceppa-Hirko has a masters
See CONTROLLER | 10A
Fracking not welcome in England
AP photo
Environmental activists lock themselves together at the main entrance to the Cuadrilla exploratory drilling site in Balcombe, England, as anti-fracking demonstra-
tions continued Monday. The action comes on the first of two days of what campaigners have called a mass civil disobedience to highlight their stance against the
controversial gas extraction method. The banner reads: Leave it in the ground.
As many as 300,000 are
actually diagnosed each year
MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer
ATLANTA Lyme
disease is about 10 times
more common than pre-
viously reported, health
ofcials said Monday.
As many as 300,000
Americans are actually
diagnosed with Lyme
disease each year, the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
announced.
Usually, only 20,000
to 30,000 illnesses are
reported each year. For
many years, CDC of-
cials have known that
many doctors dont
report every case and
that the true count was
probably much higher.
The new gure is the
CDCs most comprehen-
sive attempt at a better
estimate. The number
comes from a survey of
seven national laborato-
ries, a national patient
survey and a review of
insurance information.
Its giving us a fuller
picture and its not a
pleasing one, said Dr.
Paul Mead, who over-
sees the agencys track-
ing of Lyme disease.
The ailment is named
after Lyme, Conn.,
where the illness was
rst identied in 1975.
Its a bacteria transmit-
ted through the bites
of infected deer ticks,
which can be about
AP file photo
Infected deer ticks transmit
Lyme disease to humans.
See LYME | 10A
Hanger wants to put
college within reach
Gubernatorial candidate touts
new proposal in Wilkes-Barre
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
FormerstateDepartment
of Environmental
Protection head John
Hanger came to the
fringes of the Marcellus
Shale on Monday, but
the gubernatorial candi-
date wasnt here to talk
about fracking.
Instead, Hanger, 55,
stood on Public Square
with the Luzerne County
Community Colleges
Wilkes-Barre center as
his backdrop and touted
an education proposal
he believes will posi-
tion Pennsylvania fami-
lies for the future both
nancially and from an
employment factor.
He is pushing a
plan hes dubbed The
Keystone Opportunity
Fund that would grant
high school graduates
two years of community
college or one year at a
public university at no
immediate cost with the
idea that once those stu-
dents graduate and gain
employment, between
1.2 and 2.2 percent of
their pay will be sent
back to the state to pay
off the college costs over
a 15-year period.
My (plan) would
make higher educa-
tion affordable for all
Pennsylvanians and can
be implemented imme-
diately, Hanger said.
The (fund) would be
initially nanced with
a $1.5 billion bond and
a total of $3.4 billion of
bond nancing needed
over 10 years. The fund
would become self-sus-
taining through gradu-
ate repayments within
22.5 years. The Keystone
Opportunity Fund will
end the era of crushing
college debt that can fol-
low students and fami-
lies to the grave.
Hanger said that once
graduates enter the
workforce, those who
participated in the com-
munity college portion
of the program would
pay back 1.2 percent
of their incomes, state
university graduates
See HANGER | 10A
Ground brokenfor newWeinberg Food Bank
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
JENKINS TWP. The brochure dis-
tributed at Mondays groundbreaking
for the new location for the Weinberg
Food Bank stated, The vision is grow-
ing, and the reality is the demand for
food among the regions needy is grow-
ing as well.
The Commission on Economic
Opportunity broke ground for the new
Monsignor AndrewJ. McGowanCenter
for Healthy Living in the Center Point
Commerce and Trade Park East. The
50,000-square-foot facility will be built
on 6.3 acres donated by Rob Mericle of
Mericle Development, whose company
also prepared the site for construction.
William Sordoni of Sordoni
ConstructionCo. saidwork will beginin
Sue Gin McGowan,
president of the
board of The
William G. McGowan
Charitable Fund,
breaks ground
Monday for the
Monsignor Andrew
J. McGowan
Center for Healthy
Living in Jenkins
Township. At left
is Gene Brady,
executive director
of the Commission
on Economic
Opportunity and
at right is Luzerne
County Judge Hugh
F. Mundy, president
of the Board of
Directors CEO.
Clark Van Orden |
The Times Leader
See FOOD BANK | 10A
PAGE 2A Tuesday, August 20, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 3-5-0
BIG4 - 6-0-4-2
QUINTO - 3-2-9-4-6
TREASURE HUNT
10-13-16-18-19
EVENING DRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 3-5-3
BIG4 - 5-3-5-1
QUINTO - 1-0-7-1-1
CASH5
04-07-11-16-38
MATCH6
07-20-38-44-46-48
No player matched
all fve numbers in
MondaysCash 5
jackpot drawing. Todays
jackpot will be worth
$500,000.
Lottery ofcials reported
115 players matched four
numbers, winning
$176 each;
3, 908 players matched
three numbers, winning
$8.50 each;
and 42,665 players
matched two numbers,
winning $1 each.
No player matched all
six numbers in Mondays
Match 6jackpot
drawing. Thursdays
jackpot will be worth
$4.1 million.
OBITUARIES
Balash, Eva
Devlin, Thomas
Holtz, Robert
James, Larry
Keib, George Jr.
Keiper-Quinn, Linda
Kester, Edward
Lispi, Brenda
Madurski, Edmund
Makuch, Catherine
Petrosky, Jane
Saba, James
Scott, Eleanor
Spernoga, Anna
Tacconelli, Hazel
Thompson, Kathryn
Waclawski, Veronica
Walsh, Ray
Wilson, Warren
Worth, Delbert
Pages 5A, 8A
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2013-232
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLL
Convicted robber wants charges tossed or newtrial
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A Philadelphia
man sentenced last month on charges
relating to the May 2012 robbery of a
Plymouth Township strip club has asked
a judge to acquit him of the
charges or give him a new trial.
Kevin Williams, 31, was sen-
tenced on July 8 to 10 to 20 years
in state prison after being con-
victed by a Luzerne County jury
in May of robbery, trespassing,
theft, receiving stolen property
and two counts of criminal con-
spiracy.
Through court papers led
by his attorney, Paul Galante, Williams
makes the requests based on his claim
that inconsistent and contradictory evi-
dence was presented at his trial.
Prosecutors say Williams and his co-
defendant, William Gronosky, entered
the Carousel Lounge on U.S. Route 11
in March 2012, pointed guns at the clubs
owner and left with cash and other items.
According to court papers, on March
15, 2012, Julius Greenberg,
owner of the Carousel Lounge,
told police he arrived at his busi-
ness and was in his ofce when
two men entered wearing dark-
colored hooded sweatshirts, ski
masks and gloves.
Greenberg told police both
men pointed handguns at him
and ordered him to the oor.
One hit him in the head with a
gun while the other pushed him down.
Police said the pair, later identied
as Williams and Gronosky, 30, of
Nanticoke, took cash from safes and a
register and stole items fromGreenbergs
pockets.
Greenberg said one of the men told
him not to get off the oor or he would
be shot. The men then ed.
Courtney Sadusky, 24, is awaiting
trial on charges relating to the robbery;
she allegedly told police she was with
Gronosky and Williams that day and they
told her to drive them to the Carousel
Lounge.
Sadusky said the two men were in
the club for about 15 minutes before
Gronosky told her to drive to her home
in Bear Creek so they could count
money. She later dropped them off at the
Wyoming Valley Mall in Wilkes-Barre
Township.
Gronosky later allegedly told Sadusky
that guns, gloves and a bag were left in
her car and she should get rid of them,
according to court papers. Sadusky then
alerted police about the items.
Williams said Greenberg and Sadusky
gave inconsistent and contradictory tes-
timony about the gloves used in the case,
as well as the length of time the assault
and robbery took.
Court papers also say DNA evidence
on the gloves and an alleged weapon did
not match Williams, and the guilty ver-
dict in the case was based on specula-
tion and conjecture because Williams
was present and participated in the
alleged crimes.
If an acquittal or new trial is not grant-
ed, court papers say, then Williams asks
that his sentence be reduced. Gronosky
is scheduled to stand trial on related and
charges stemming from other incidents
in September.
Williams
Man charged with buying vehicles with bad checks
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE City police arrest-
ed a man on Wednesday they say went on
a vehicle spending spree using a closed
checking account.
Police allege Tyler Williams, 23, of East
Chestnut Street, Wilkes-Barre, issued bad
checks to purchase ve vehicles and a trail-
er and tried to buy another vehicle, but the
sale was denied.
Williams was arraigned on 12 counts
of theft, six counts of receiving stolen
property, ve counts of bad checks, four
counts of criminal mischief, two counts
of criminal mischief to commit theft and
a single count of criminal attempt to pass
a bad check. He was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for lack of
$20,000 bail.
According to the criminal compliant:
Plains Township police recovered a
1999 Ford that was reported stolen to
Wilkes-Barre police when Williams was
taken into custody on an arrest warrant
on Nov. 3.
Police said the vehicles purchased by
Williams with bad checks included:
A 2007 Chrysler Sebring on Aug. 22,
2012, with a $13,987 check to MotorWorld
in Wilkes-Barre. The Chrysler was
returned by a family member with $4,363
in damage.
A 2007 Ford Escape on Sept. 4, 2012,
with a $11,654 check to Crossroad Motors
in Hanover Township. A family member
returned the Ford with $638 worth of
damage.
A 2012 Nissan Altima that Ken
Pollick Nissan in Wilkes-Barre Township
declined to sell to Williams on Oct. 25,
2012, due to his credit history. Williams
presented a $20,332 check to Ken Pollick
and was advised to return with cash or a
cashiers check. Williams failed to return
to complete the sale.
A 2011 Yamaha ATV at Two Jacks
Cycle in Wilkes-Barre for a $7,400 check
on Oct. 26. Police recovered the ATV from
a residence in White Mills.
A 1999 Ford for an $8,000 check to
Roches Garage in Wilkes-Barre on Nov. 1.
A 2011 trailer from Albert Lohman
East Coast Trailers in Honesdale for a
$1,070 check on Nov. 2..
A 2001 Chevrolet Silverado for a
$7,653 check on Jan. 29 to Auto Buddies
in Plains Township. Williams returned the
vehicle when the business was closed.
Plymouth police arrest pair on burglary charges
Family sleeping when residence burglarized
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
PLYMOUTH Police allege two
people went on a burglary spree,
stealing cigarettes, cellphones, a hair
trimmer and in the process ooded
the basement of one residence by
turning on a garden hose.
Britany Lynn Suda, 22, of East
Shawnee Avenue, and Marquise
Rashid Brogdon, 20, of High Street,
both in Plymouth, were arrested
when police found them inside 64 E.
Main St. at about 6:20 a.m. Saturday.
Police allege Suda and Brogdon
forced open a basement door at the
East Main Street residence and tried
to hide when confronted by ofcers.
Suda and Brogdon were arraigned
Saturday by District Judge Joseph
Carmody in West Pittston.
Suda was charged with two counts
each of burglary and criminal tres-
pass, and one count each of receiving
stolen property, loitering and prowl-
ing at night and public drunkenness.
Brogdon was charged with three
counts each of burglary and criminal
trespass, two counts of criminal mis-
chief, and one count each of theft,
receiving stolen property, loitering
and prowling at night, public drunk-
enness and purchase of alcohol by a
minor.
Suda was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for lack
of $25,000 bail and Brodgon locked
up for lack of $30,000 bail.
According to the criminal com-
plaints:
A woman leaving her residence in
Martz Manor was confronted by Suda
and Brogdon early Saturday morning.
The womans husband stood outside
and watched the pair walk toward 100
Martz Manor and a short time later
toward East Main Street.
Police caught the pair inside 64 E.
Main St. with cellphones, a cellphone
charger, keys, a hair trimmer, two
packs of cigarettes, cologne and food
items.
After their arrests, another resi-
dent of Martz Manor told police his
residence was burglarized while his
family, including a 1-year-old girl,
slept. The resident said his cell-
phone, food items and two packs of
cigarettes were stolen, and a garden
hose was turned on, whch caused sub-
stantial ooding in his basement, the
complaints say.
A resident at 100 Martz Manor
reported a storm door was forced
open and hand prints were found near
the door, according to the complaints.
Preliminary hearings are scheduled
on Aug. 28.
PLAINS TWP. Township police
reported the following:
Justin Jarski, of Plains Township,
was arrested at 3:20 p.m. Aug. 12 after
police observed him allegedly looking
inside parked vehicles and stealing items
from them at the Weis Plaza on North
River Street. Jarski had in his possession
a Nintendo 3DS and a Tom Tom GPS
along with drug paraphernalia, police
said.
Jarski was charged with theft by unlaw-
ful taking, receiving stolen property and
possession of drug paraphernalia. He
was transported to the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility and jailed for lack
of $2,500 bail. His preliminary hearing is
scheduled for today before District Judge
Diana Malast.
Joshua Gordner, of Montoursville,
was cited with disorderly conduct after
police responded to the Mohegan Sun
Casino at 12:30 a.m. Sunday for a report
of a male being combative with security
ofcers.
Shawn Davis was cited with public
drunkenness and harassment against his
wife after police responded to a domestic
disturbance at 20 Sand St. at 12:17 a.m.
Aug. 11.
Ball hitches were stolen from several
trucks parked overnight at the Extended
Stay Hotel on state Route 315 between
Aug. 10 and 11.
Police arrested Anthony Fanelli,
who was wanted by the Luzerne County
Sheriffs Department, after responding to
a domestic disturbance at 217 Ridgewood
Road at 12:29 a.m. Sunday, police said.
Fanellis girlfriend, Jennifer Wisniewski
also was wanted, but she ed the area,
police said.
Lori Trapane, of Hunlock Creek, was
taken into custody and transported to
the county lockup at 8:18 p.m. Thursday
after police responded to the Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs casino at Breakers
for a female employee who was wanted
by the county Sheriffs Department for
failure to appear for a hearing, police
said.
POCONO TWP. Four people from
the Wyoming Valley were arrested on
drug charges after a trafc stop in the
Poconos on Thursday.
Police said they found suspected
marijuana, methamphetamine and
heroin after a trafc stop at about 3:30
a.m. Thursday on Interstate 80 West in
Pocono Township.
Juan Carlos Reyes, Joseph Angel
Santiago and Markel Jermille Esnard, all
of Wilkes-Barre, and Jasmin Santiago, of
Plymouth, face charges of multiple drug
violations, state police in Swiftwater said.
Police said they initially stopped the
vehicle, a silver Chevrolet Cruze with
Florida registration, for speeding. During
the stop, ofcers detected multiple
indicators of criminal activity and found
about 8.6 ounces of suspected marijuana
during a consent search.
A later search with a warrant uncov-
ered 250 bags of suspected heroin and 50
capsules containing suspected metham-
phetamine also in the vehicle.
POLICE BLOTTER
W-BArea CTC committee updated on newnursing facility
JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
PLAINS TWP.
Finishing work is under way
in the brand-new school of
practical nursing at Wilkes-
Barre Career & Technical
Center, and members of
the centers Joint Operating
Committee were invited
to tour the facility before
it opens to students next
week.
The new facility features
larger classrooms, labs and
patient exam areas that
look like hospital facilities,
a simulation lab where staff
can observe students work-
ing on a realistic dummy
patient, and expanded
ofce, storage and student
and faculty lounge areas.
Practical nursing school
administrators Mary
Beth Pacuska and Laura
Zdancewicz said the new
facility will provide a state-
of-the-art, realistic educa-
tional experience for stu-
dents when the rst classes
begin using them next
Tuesday.
At the joint operating com-
mittees meeting Monday, a
number of items pertaining
to the practical nursing cen-
ter were approved, includ-
ing a $25 increase in stu-
dent fees to cover the cost
of drug screening mandated
by all clinical facilities; pay-
ment of $91 to attorney
Raymond Wendolowski for
legal services; payments
totaling $26,585 to Bognet
Inc. for HVAC and plumbing
construction services on the
new center; and payments
totaling $9,311 to Everon
Electrical Contractors Inc.
for construction-related
electrical services.
In personnel-related mat-
ters, the board ratied the
retirement of Harry Miller,
diversied cooperative edu-
cation teacher; appointed
Eugene Marley as graphic
arts teacher associate,
Amy Brady as cosmetol-
ogy teacher associate and
George Albright as auto
mechanics instructor, all
at the rst stop of the cur-
rent professional bargaining
agreement.
Beau Biden, son of vice president, undergoes tests
RANDALL CHASE
Associated Press
WILMINGTON, Del. Beau
Biden, the Delaware attorney gener-
al and the son of Vice President Joe
Biden, is undergoing medical testing
in Texas after being hospitalized last
week for weakness and disorientation,
his ofce said Monday night.
The younger Biden, who suffered a
mild stroke in 2010, began experienc-
ing the new symptoms last Wednesday
night after driving to Indiana for a
family vacation, said Jason Miller,
a spokesman for the Delaware
Department of Justice.
Biden, 44, was admitted to
Northwestern Memorial Hospital in
Chicago and traveled the next morn-
ing to Jefferson University Hospital in
Philadelphia to consult with his doc-
tor.
He was discharged and spent the
weekend at home in Wilmington.
Miller said Biden currently is under-
going testing in Houston to determine
the cause of his symptoms.
The White House says the vice
president, who had been at his home
in Delaware for the past several days,
accompanied his son to Houston.
There was no word on how long Vice
President Biden would remain in
Texas.
Miller said Beau Biden spoke by
telephone with Chief Deputy Attorney
General Ian McConnel over the week-
end, and had been in touch with his
ofce Monday evening.
Ofcials with Bidens ofce said they
had no comment beyond the prepared
statement Monday, but that further
information would be forthcoming.
Bidens Twitter account on Sunday
posted a photo of him and his father
sitting on a porch and smiling while
sending a message of encouragement
to a Delaware team that was in the
Little League World Series.
This isnt the rst health scare
for the younger Biden, who became
Delawares attorney general in 2007.
After suffering a mild stroke in May
2010, he spent a week in the Jefferson
University hospital and more than a
month recuperating at home.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 3A
IN BRIEF
LOCAL
Times Leader file photo
Luzerne Countys free-and-clear back-tax auction Thursday is expected to draw a crowd
similar to this packed group of bidders at the countys August 2011 sale.
Popular back-tax auction set for Thursday
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
A total 130 bidders have registered
for Thursdays popular free-and-clear
Luzerne County back-tax auction so
far, and more are expected to sign up
before Wednesdays 4:30 p.m. dead-
line.
Free-and-clear auctions typi-
cally draw large crowds of bidders
because back taxes, mortgages and
other liens tied to the properties are
forgiven. Most properties will be list-
ed at starting bids under $1,000 to
recoup only the tax claim ofce costs
to bring the parcels to auction.
Properties are eligible for auction
if real estate taxes are unpaid for two
years.
The inventory of properties wont
be nalized until the sale begins at
10 a.m. in the county courthouse
because property owners have until
the morning of the sale to get their
properties removed by paying,
obtaining court orders or ling for
bankruptcy.
The list of properties had been
reduced from around 400 to 268 as
of Monday afternoon.
Keystone Garden Estates, an
assisted-living facility in Larksville,
is one of the largest properties that
was still in the sale Monday due to
a back-tax debt of $367,919 dating
back to 2007. The property owner
has maintained the taxes will be paid
through a renancing before the sale.
The Four Seasons Golf Club in
Exeter is out of the sale because
owners Amita and Ragesh Patel
recently paid $194,600 in taxes owed
from 2010 through 2012, according
to Northeast Revenue Service LLC,
the countys tax-claim operator.
A judge agreed to temporar-
ily remove the former Hottles
Restaurant on South Main Street in
Wilkes-Barre from auction because
property owners William and Lynn
Kravits said they are transitioning to
newmanagement of the once thriving
dining establishment, which closed
in the fall of 2010 after 73 years in
business, Northeast Revenue said.
William and Lynn Kravits owe
$26,717 in property taxes from 2010
through 2012, county records show.
In addition to Hottles, 66 proper-
ties have been removed from the sale
due to court orders or concerns that
all lien holders have not been suf-
ciently notied of the sale. These
properties will be listed in a special
free-and-clear auction on Nov. 14 if
taxes are not paid.
Among the other properties con-
tinued to the Nov. 14 auction, accord-
ing to Northeast Revenues records:
The former Coal Crackers bar
and restaurant on Alter Street in
Hazleton. Owner Carol Sheman
owes $12,881 in taxes from 2010 to
the present.
Six properties owned by Hazle
Township businessman James
Lagana, including his 6,600-square-
foot mansion on Butler Terrace Drive
in the township, which is assessed
at $675,000. Lagana owes $38,000
in taxes on the residence from 2010
through 2012.
A 2,700-square-foot residential
property on Wyoming Road in Dallas
Township assessed at $481,900.
Frank M. Henry Jr. owns the 10.3-
acre property and owes $31,942 in
taxes from 2010 to the present.
A list of available parcels and
information on bidding is available
at www.luzernecountytaxclaim.com.
SCRANTON
Time scheduled
for Obama visit
Two sources have conrmed
President Barack Obamas appearance
at Lackawanna College is scheduled for
3:30 p.m. Friday. The presidents stop
in Scranton is part of a two-day bus trek
through New York and Pennsylvania dur-
ing which he will discuss
his plan to help the middle
class and curb higher edu-
cation costs.
Vice President Joe
Biden, a Scranton native,
is expected to join the
president at his appear-
ance in the city, according
to Scranton Mayor Chris
Doherty and a White House ofcial.
On Thursday, Obama will deliver
remarks at the University at Buffalo and
Henninger High School in Syracuse, N.Y.
On Friday, the president will participate
in a town hall event at in the morning at
Binghamton University and then deliver
remarks at Lackawanna College.
WILKES-BARRE
Geisinger sets
Wellness Fair
Its that time of year again, as kids, teens
and young adults are heading back to
school, and Geisinger experts will hold a
health fair in the city to help students with
the transition. Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre, 25 Church St., will hold a Back-to-
School Wellness Fair on Wednesday, 3
to 7 p.m., to offer tips on topics from re-
programming sleep patterns, to homesick-
ness, vaccinations and illness symptoms
that should keep your children home.
The event will include health screen-
ings, games and information booths
staffed by health experts and designed to
prepare families for the new school year.
All ages are welcome and healthy refresh-
ments will be served. For more informa-
tion, go to: Geisinger.org/tipsheet.
WILKES-BARRE
Dallas mans thef
trial is moved
A trial scheduled to be held this week
for a Dallas man charged with taking
money from a non-school youth basketball
league has been rescheduled to October.
Judge Lesa Gelb rescheduled the trial
for Christopher Walsh, 37, to begin on
Oct.28, after requests made by attorneys.
Walsh is charged with stealing the
money from the Luzerne County
Lightning Youth Basketball League
between October 2011 and July 2012.
WILKES-BARRE
Man faces assault
charges in Mich.
A Wright Township man charged with
sexually assaulting the same two girls for
a period of time in Michigan and Luzerne
County has appeared in Michigan to
face charges. David Zarn, 46, who has
been free on bail, jailed and then released
on bail again within recent weeks, has
appeared voluntarily to Michigan authori-
ties to face charges there.
Prosecutors say Zarn faces a possible
life sentence on the charges in Michigan.
Zarn previously sought to withdraw a
waiver of his extradition to Michigan, but
in a one-page order led Monday, Judge
Lesa Gelb said that request is no longer
valid because Zarn has gone to Michigan.
In a criminal complaint outlining the
charges Zarn faces in Michigan included
in the prosecutors ling, Zarn allegedly
sexually assaulted two girls between 2002
and 2006 in Detroit.
KINGSTON
Veterans Bridge
to switch lanes
Motorists who frequently travel across
the Veterans Memorial Bridge (Pierce
Street) will see a change beginning today.
The contractor will be switching all
trafc to the newly constructed deck from
the old deck. One lane in each direction
will be in use until the summer of 2014 to
complete phase 2 of construction on the
bridge. The switch will take place 7 a.m.
to 5 p.m. and may cause trafc delays.
Flaggers will be used to direct trafc.
Motorists are advised to follow the
new signs and pavement markings when
approaching the bridge from Wilkes-Barre
and Kingston.
PLYMOUTH
Neighborhood
Watch will meet
Plymouth Neighborhood Watch will
meet at Goodwill Hose Company No. 2
at 7 p.m. today.
Obama
Judge hears requests in Hazleton homicide
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A
Luzerne County judge on
Monday heard testimony in
the case of two men charged
with robbing and killing
another man in an alleged
drug deal gone bad, includ-
ing that a condential infor-
mant wore a wire to get
information from one man.
Judge Richard Hughes, at
a hearing for Breon Judon,
20, and Mitchell Dedes, 18,
heard testimony in a number
of requests made by Judon
defense attorney Allyson
Kacmarski, including that
statements he made to inves-
tigators and information
obtained through a wiretap
should be thrown out.
Judon and Dedes are
charged in the death of Aaron
Reznick, 29, of Hazleton, in
August 2012. The two men
are scheduled to stand trial
on Sept. 23. Hughes said
hell make rulings in the
cases within the next three
weeks.
During Mondays hear-
ing, First Assistant
District Attorney Samuel
Sanguedolce testied he
approved a wire to be worn
by a police informant to
obtain information from
Judon.
Sanguedolce said he spoke
with the informant and
approved that he agreed to
wear a wire during an Aug.
18, 2012, conversation.
In that conversation,
Hazleton police Detective
Sgt. David Bunchalk testi-
ed the informant learned
Judon told him Judon and
Dedes confronted Reznick,
took his iPhone, stripped
him, assaulted him and put
him in the trunk of a car.
Reznick escaped the trunk
and was laying in the middle
of a roadway when the two
men got out of the car and
left after realizing Reznick
was dead.
Bunchalk also testied he
interviewed Judon in the
days after the incident, dur-
ing which time Judon said he
knew why he was there and
blamed Dedes for Reznicks
death.
But he never denied actu-
ally being there, Bunchalk
said.
Bunchalk also testied he
had searched a home Judon
had lived in where four guns
were found, numerous types
of ammunition, two cell-
phones and a bloodstained
T-shirt and bed sheet.
Hughes said he would
accept additional court
papers regarding defense
attorneys requests.
Hughes will consider
photos to be shown at the
trial if needed, prosecutors
requests to present evidence
of prior bad acts of both men
and a request to sever the
Judon and Dedes trials.
Shortly before Mondays
hearing began, Dedes asked
to be moved away from
Judon inside the courtroom
because he overheard a dis-
cussion between Judon and
an investigator working on
his case. The two men were
sitting next to each other.
Dedes said the investigator
and Judon were talking about
him and referred to him as a
punk. Investigators and
sheriff deputies intervened,
moving the men apart.
Dedes stayed for the
beginning of Mondays hear-
ing, then met with his attor-
neys, Demetrius Fannick and
Nicole Thompson, before
being taken back to the
county prison.
Dedes Judon
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
South Main Street between Blackman and Division streets in Wilkes-Barre is one of several paving projects being done in the city.
Pennsylvania Ave. paving starts today
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@civitasmedia.com
WILKES-BARRE Keep an eye
out for orange cones and reective
vests on Pennsylvania Avenue.
Paving work along Pennsylvania
between East Market and North
streets will begin today and is
expected to continue throughout the
week.
Drivers are advised to expect
delays.
Already on Monday, parking
meters along Pennsylvania Avenue
had been covered with orange plas-
tic bags as crews prepared to begin
their work.
The project is part of a $388,483
package of improvements to four
city streets that began earlier this
month and which is expected to
continue through September, city
spokeswoman Liza Prokop said
Monday.
According to Butch Frati, the
citys director of operations, the
affected streets are:
South Main Street, from
Blackman Street to Division Street;
Pennsylvania Avenue, from East
Market Street to North Street;
South Sherman Street, from
Amber Lane to Northampton Street;
The intersection of Darling
Street and Courtright Avenue.
The project, nanced by the
Community Development Ofce
and the federal Department of
Housing and Urban Development,
will include milling, paving, line-
painting, handicap-ramp upgrades
and other work as needed, Frati said.
There will be lane closures as nec-
essary, he added, and aggers will be
on hand to direct trafc around the
work.
American Asphalt was low bidder
for the work, Frati said.
We will be announcing each area
via press release prior to work begin-
ning to provide public notication
on trafc delays, Prokop said.
Of the four streets, the paving on
South Main near Blackman has been
completed, Prokop said.
Christie
PAGE 4A Tuesday, August 20, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
AP Photo
Chinese official comes to Pentagon
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel listens at
left as Chinese Minister of Defense Gen.
Chang Wanquan speaks during their joint
news conference Monday at the Pentagon. In
his first Pentagon meeting with his Chinese
counterpart, Hagel faces a familiar agenda
marked with tensions over U.S. missile
defenses, Chinese cyberattacks and other
defense issues.
IN BRIEF
OTTAWA
Rail company
can keep operating
A Canadian government agency has
determined that the U.S. rail company
whose runaway train crashed into a
small Quebec town, killing 47 people
last month, has adequate insurance to
keep operating for the next month and
a half.
The Canadian Transportation
Agency said the Montreal, Maine &
Atlantic Railway provided evidence
it had adequate third-party liability
insurance coverage to operate from
Aug. 20 to Oct. 1. The agencys deci-
sion reversed an Aug. 13 order that
would have halted the railroads opera-
tions from early next week.
However, agency spokeswoman
Jacqueline Bannister said Montreal,
Maine & Atlantic must show it has the
funds to pay the self-insured portion
of its operations, or the regulator will
suspend its operations from Aug. 23.
BETHEL, N.Y.
Havens ashes
fnd ftting home
The ashes of Richie Havens have
been scattered across the site of the
1969 Woodstock concert. Havens was
the rst act at Woodstock and his
performance of Freedom was a high-
light of the concert. He died in April
of a heart attack at age 72.
Havens ashes were scattered from a
plane as it ew over the upstate New
York eld during a ceremony Sunday.
About 30 family members attended
the event, which drew more than a
thousand fans.
Bethel Woods Center for the Arts,
the venue built on the Woodstock site,
hosted the tribute on the 44th anni-
versary of the nal day of the famous
three-day concert.
SIOUXFALLS, S.D.
Air Force bomber
crashes in Mont.
A B-1B bomber out of South
Dakotas Ellsworth Air Force Base
crashed in a remote area of southeast-
ern Montana on Monday but the four
crew members survived, Air Force
ofcials said. The two pilots and two
weapons system ofcers ejected from
the aircraft before the bomber crashed
near Broadus, Mont., said Col. Kevin
Kennedy, commander of the 28th
Bomb Wing. He said the crew sur-
vived but there were some injuries.
Kennedy said the Air Force will con-
duct a thorough investigation to deter-
mine the cause of the accident, which
happened about 170 miles southeast
of Billings, Mont.
ALBANY, N.Y.
Fracking impacts
Obama trip to N.Y.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo will avoid a
potentially dicey political conict by
not accompanying President Barack
Obama to parts of upstate New York
roiled over the states ban on hydraulic
fracturing for natural gas.
Obama supports the technology as
an economic windfall that helps make
the country more energy independent.
Hes expected to nd supporters as
well as protesters from environmental
groups when he visits Syracuse and
Binghamton late this week. Parts of
central New York and the Southern
Tier are on the gas-rich Marcellus
Shale formation, where energy com-
panies want to drill with the promise
of a boom to the long economically
distressed area.
Coastswarned about rising seas
DAVIDB. CARUSO
and MEGHANBARR
Associated Press
NEWYORKCoastal com-
munities should assume oods
are going to happen more fre-
quently and realize that spend-
ing nowon protective measures
could save money later, accord-
ing to a report issued by a
presidential task force charged
with developing a strategy for
rebuilding areas damaged by
Superstorm Sandy.
Most of the reports 69 rec-
ommendations focus on a
simple warning: Plan for future
storms in an age of climate
change and rising sea levels. It
calls for development of a more
advanced electrical grid and
the creation of better planning
tools and standards for storm-
damaged communities.
If we built smart, if we
build resilience into communi-
ties, then we can live along the
coast. We can do it in a way that
saves lives and protects taxpay-
er investments, said Secretary
of Housing and Urban
Development Shaun Donovan,
who discussed the report
Monday with New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Donovan was appointed chair-
man of the Hurricane Sandy
Rebuilding Task Force by
President Barack Obama.
Some of the groups key
recommendations are already
being implemented, includ-
ing the creation of new ood-
protection standards for major
infrastructure projects built
with federal money and the pro-
motion of a sea-level modeling
tool that will help builders and
engineers predict where ood-
ing might occur in the future.
It strongly opposes simply
rebuilding structures as they
were before they were devastat-
ed by Octobers historic storm.
The task force also endorsed
an ongoing competition, called
Rebuild by Design, in which
10 teams of architects and engi-
neers from around the world
are exploring ways to address
vulnerabilities in coastal areas.
Were always going to have
people, I think, want to live
in areas that are problematic
from an environmental point
of view, Bloomberg said at
Mondays news conference,
which was held overlooking a
Brooklyn water treatment plant
that stayed online during the
storm.
We still want to leave it to
you, the individual, to make
your decisions, but the federal
government has some econom-
ic incentives, he said, noting
rescue crews are needed to save
ooded-out residents, because
if you do get in trouble, were
going to have to come to your
aid anyway.
It said the government
should nd ways to encourage
the private sector to develop
fuel distribution and telecom-
munications systems that are
less likely to be crippled by
extended power outages. After
Sandy, drivers in New York and
New Jersey had problems nd-
ing gas stations that still had
fuel because of a series of prob-
lems that rippled through the
distribution system. Cellphone
networks were snuffed out in
some areas because of equip-
ment that lacked adequate bat-
tery power, or other backup
electrical supplies.
AP file phto
In this Oct. 31, 2012, photo, a view from the air shows the destroyed
homes left in the wake of Superstorm Sandy in Seaside Heights, N.J.
Possibility Mubarak to go free
HAMZAHENDAWI
Associated Press
CAIRO Jailed ex-Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak could be
released later this week, judicial ofcials
said Monday, a move that would fuel the
unrest roiling the country after the auto-
cratic leaders successor was removed in
a military coup.
Underscoring the growing anger over
Mohammed Morsis ouster, suspected
Islamic militants ambushed two mini-
buses carrying off-duty policemen in
Egypts Sinai Peninsula, forcing the men
to lie on the sand and shooting 25 of
them dead.
The brazen daylight attack raised
fears that the strategic desert region
bordering Israel and the Gaza Strip
could be plunged into insurgency.
The 25 were given a funeral with full
military honors after a plane brought
their bodies to an air base in eastern
Cairo. Interior Minister Mohammed
Ibrahim, who is in charge of the police,
and the armys Chief of Staff, Gen. Sobhi
Saleh, led the funeral.
The cofns of the victims were
draped in red, white and black Egyptian
ags and, in a show of solidarity, were
jointly carried in the funeral procession
by army soldiers and policemen. Earlier,
relatives and friends wept over the cof-
ns.
Despite the violence, Cairo, a bustling
metropolis of some 18 million people,
began to restore a sense of normalcy
although the capital remained under a
state of emergency and a dusk-to-dawn
curfew.
During his decades ruling Egypt,
Mubarak frequently warned that Egypt
would fall into chaos without him at the
helm. The 85-year-old former president
has been in detention since April 2011,
weeks after he was ousted in a revolu-
tion against his rule.
He was found guilty and sentenced
to life in prison in June last year for his
failure to stop the killing of some 900
protesters in the 18-day uprising. His
sentence was overturned on appeal and
he is now being retried, along with his
security chief and six top police com-
manders.
Two judicial ofcials, however, said
there will no longer be any grounds to
hold the 85-year-old former president if
a court accepts a petition by his lawyer
requesting his release in a corruption
case later this week.
Many analysts, however, expressed
skepticism, saying the political cost
of letting the former leader who was
widely hated for widespread abuses and
repression during his 29 years in power
could keep him in jail.
However, his release during one of
the worst bouts of turmoil since his
ouster could be a huge risk for the mili-
tary-backed government and authorities
will likely decide to keep himin custody.
Tensions in Egypt have soared since
the army ousted Morsi, who was
Egypts rst freely elected president, in
a July 3 coup following days of protests
by millions of Egyptians demanding the
Islamist president step down and accus-
ing him of abusing his powers.
On Wednesday, the military raided
two protest camps of Morsis supporters
in Cairo, killing hundreds of people and
triggering the current wave of violence.
Human Rights Watch, in a report
released on Monday, accused Egyptian
security forces of using excessive force
when they moved on Wednesday to
clear the larger of two sit-in protest
camps.
AP photo
Supporters of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi raise their hands and four fingers, a sign that protesters say symbolizes the
Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo that was cleared last week by Egyptian security forces, during a march in the Maadi district in Cairo,
Egypt, on Monday.
Christie
signs N.J.
ban on gay
therapy
ANGELADELLI SANTI
Associated Press
TRENTON, N.J. Republican
Gov. Chris Christie signed a law
on Monday barring licensed thera-
pists from trying to turn gay teen-
agers straight, the latest example of
the potential 2016 presidential can-
didate steering a
moderate course.
The governor
said the health
risks of trying to
change a childs
sexual orienta-
tion, as identied
by the American
Psychol ogi cal
Association, trump concerns over
the government setting limits on
parental choice. Government
should tread carefully into this
area, he said in the signing note,
and I do so here reluctantly.
The decision marked the third
time this month that Christie has
staked out a moderate position on
a hot-button social issue as he seeks
a second term in a Democratic-
leaning state. It also offers more
evidence that the popular governor
is positioning himself as a pragma-
tist who shuns more conservative
elements within his party.
Christie found middle ground
on medical marijuana for children
when he agreed Friday to allow
growers to cultivate additional
strains, and for marijuana to be
made in an edible form for chroni-
cally ill children. But he would not
lift an oversight provision that
could require as many as three doc-
tors to sign off on a prescription.
Last week, Christie vetoed a bill
banning .50-caliber ries that was
vigorously opposed by gun rights
advocates and gutted a proposed
overhaul of the states gun permit
law that relied on undeveloped
technology. Recently, he signed 10
less-signicant gun measures the
Democrat-led Legislature passed
after last years deadly school
shooting rampage in Newtown,
Conn.
The decisions allow Christie
to quiet some of the criticism he
could face from conservatives by
offering specic reasons why he
was taking the steps, often citing
compassion for the needs of chil-
dren and families.
His approval of the conversion
therapy ban could be met with
criticism in Christian conserva-
tive circles with inuence in early
voting states like Iowa and South
Carolina.
Conversion therapy gained
attention two years ago when for-
mer GOP presidential candidate
Michele Bachmann was ques-
tioned over whether her husbands
Christian counseling business
provided services that attempt-
ed to change gays and lesbians.
Bachmanns husband, Marcus,
denied involvement in the therapy
and the congresswoman dropped
out of the presidential campaign in
January 2012 after a poor showing
in the Iowa caucuses.
Prosecution: Woman screamed, then Pistorius fred
GERALD IMRAY
Associated Press
PRETORIA, South Africa A
woman screamed and then there was
silence, according to South African
prosecutors pressing a premeditated
murder case against Oscar Pistorius.
Next, the indictment says, witnesses
heard gunshots and more screaming at
the home of the Paralympic champion,
who says he shot his girlfriend by mis-
take on Valentines Day.
The sequence of events outlined
Monday could bolster an argument
that the double-amputee Olympian
was intent on killing Reeva Steenkamp
after an altercation and was not react-
ing fearfully to what he thought was
an intrusion in his home, as he has
said. Prosecutors revealed a list of
more than 100 witnesses, some of
whom live in the gated community
where she was killed.
Pistorius wept and prayed in court
as he held hands with his brother and
sister before being served with the
indictment. The athlete will face an
additional charge of illegal possession
of ammunition when his blockbuster
trial starts on March 3 in a court in
the South African capital, Pretoria.
The indictment in the Pretoria
Magistrates Court yielded new details
about how prosecutors will pursue
a case that has gripped the world
because of the celebrity status of
Pistorius, who overcame his disability
to become a global phenomenon, only
to see his name and accomplishments
tarnished by his role in a violent
death. The timing of the indictment
was melancholic because Steenkamp
would have celebrated her 30th birth-
day on Monday.
The main charge laid by prosecu-
tors carries a mandatory sentence of
life imprisonment with a minimum of
25 years in prison if Pistorius is con-
victed. The prosecutions allusion to
a possible ght between the couple
at Pistorius villa before the shooting
raises the possibility of a motive.
AP photo
Oscar Pistorius cries Monday as he prays
with his sister Aimee and brother Carl in the
magistrates court in Pretoria, South Africa.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com NEWS Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 5A
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FREELAND A pre-
liminary hearing is sched-
uled on Sept. 4 before
District Judge Gerald
Feissner for Jonathan
Kochie, 36, of Freeland, on
charges of driving under
the inuence and two traf-
c violations.
State police at Hazleton
said they stopped Kochie
for speeding on state Route
940 on July 7. During the
trafc stop, state police
allege Kochie displayed
signs of impairment and
as transported for a breath
test.
HAZLE TWP. A
preliminary hearing is
scheduled Sept. 11 before
District Judge James Dixon
for Eugene Rybarczyk, 42,
of Freeland, on charges of
driving under the inuence
and two trafc violations.
State police at Hazleton
said they stopped
Rybarczyk for failing to
travel within a single lane
on state Route 940 on
June 9. During the trafc
stop, state police allege
Rybarczyk displayed signs
of intoxication and was
transported to Hazleton
General Hospital for a
blood test.
HANOVER TWP.
A preliminary hear-
ing is scheduled on Aug.
27 before District Judge
Joseph Halesey for Renee
Scubelek, 40, of Old Forge,
and Arthur Partington, 37,
of Hanover Township, on
charges of driving under
the inuence and trafc
violations.
Township police said
Scubelek and Partington
were in separate vehicles
following each other when
they collided at South
Main and Dundee Road
on June 16. Scubelek and
Partington ed the acci-
dent and later found by
police allegedly intoxicat-
ed, police said.
HAZLETON A pre-
liminary hearing is sched-
uled on Aug. 28 before
District Judge Joseph Zola
for Samantha Rose Fisher,
18, of Sugarloaf, on charges
police blotter
brendaa. (James) lispi
Aug. 18, 2013
Brenda A. (James) Lispi, of
Pittston, passed away Sunday
at her home with her husband
by her side.
She was born June 9, 1955,
daughter of the late Mary Ann
(Duke) James Daley and Chalp
James.
Her husband is Raymond
Lispi.
She graduated from Pittston
Area High School and Penn
State University.
Surviving, in addition to
her husband, are son, Lee,
and Sarah Lispi, Swoyersville;
daughter, Tina Lispi, and ance
Donald Bird, Clarks Summit;
grandchildren, Aria Rose Lispi
and Enzo Raymond Lispi;
brothers, Mark James and Sam
Daley; sisters, Eva Sartorio,
Diana Lowe, Anita Amundson
and Michele Wagner; and many
aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Funeral services have been
entrusted to Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday at the funeral home.
Funeral services will begin
at the funeral home at 9 a.m.
Thursday. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held at 9:30 a.m.
Thursday in St. Joseph Marello
Parish, William Street, Pittston.
Interment Services will take
place in the Italian Independent
Cemetery, West Wyoming. For
directions to our funeral home
or to express your condolences
to Brendas family, please visit
www.GrazianoFuneralHome.
com.
Kathryn m. thompson
Aug. 18, 2013
Kathryn M. Thompson, 74,
of Noxen, passed away at home
Sunday following a lengthy ill-
ness.
Mrs. Thompson was born in
Bellefonte on March 5, 1939,
and was the daughter of the
late Benner and Louella Huey
Gummo. She worked in the for-
mer Ro-Nox dress factory for
most of her life.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
brothers and sisters.
Surviving are her husband,
Elwood Thompson Sr.; daugh-
ter, Betty Ellen Endress, and
her husband, Robert, of Wilkes-
Barre; son, Kevin Mintzer of
Tunkhannock; stepsons, Bryan
Thompson and his wife, Ami, of
Moosic, and Elwood Thompson
Jr. and his wife, Bonnie, of
Tunkhannock; sisters, Eleanore
Cole of Noxen, Evelyn Robison
of Arizona, and Sara Weber of
Tyrone; many grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
The family would like to
thank the wonderful nurses at
Celtic Hospice for the care given
to Kathryn.
At her request, private funer-
al services will be held at the
convenience of the family from
the Curtis L. Swanson Funeral
Home Inc., corner of routes 29
and 118, Pikes Creek.
There will be no calling hours.
Online condolences can be
made at clswansonfuneralhome.
com.
More OBITUARIES | 8A
Jane m. petrosKy
Aug. 18, 2013
Jane M. Petrosky, 78, of
Yatesville, passed away Sunday
in the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Pittston on April 13,
1935, she was the daughter of
the late Frank and Helen Hughes
Ulrich. Jane was a graduate of
Grand Central High School in
New Jersey. Prior to her retire-
ment, she worked in the local
garment industry.
Besides her parents, she was
preceded in death by her hus-
band Robert Petrosky on Sept.
21, 1990.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter Laura and husband Felix
Mascelli, with whom she resid-
ed in Yatesville; grandchildren
Carisa, Felix and Zach Mascelli;
sisters Margaret and her hus-
band Paul Yatko, Pittston and
Kay Cominos, Pittston; brother
Billy Tieso and his wife Sandie,
Pittston.
Funeral will be held at 9 a.m.
Thursday at the Kizis-Lokuta
Funeral Home, 134 Church St.,
Pittston. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at
9:30 a.m. in St. Maria Goretti
Church, Lain. The St. Maria
Goretti Bereavement Group
will say the Rosary in honor of
Jane at 9:30 a.m. Thursday in
the church. Interment will be in
Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
Family and friends may call 5 to
8 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral
home. In lieu of owers, dona-
tions may be made to the Plains
American Legion Baseball, 111
Achercon St., Plains, PA 18705.
delbert J. WorthJr.
Aug. 17, 2013
Delbert J. Worth Jr., 64, of
Shickshinny, died Saturday at
Berwick Hospital.
Del was born in Wilkes-Barre
on Nov. 19, 1948. He was a grad-
uate of GAR High School, Class
of 1966, and served with the
U.S. Army during the Vietnam
War. He was employed by the
Department of Corrections, SC
I Dallas, for 20 years, retiring in
2005. He was a member of Town
Hill United Methodist Church,
Shickshinny. He was a mem-
ber of the Sylvania Lodge No
334 F & AM, where he served
as Master in 2004; The Valley
of Bloomsburg Consistory and
the American Legion Post 495,
Shickshinny.
Del and his wife, the former
Susan Royer, celebrated their
39th wedding anniversary on
April 20, 2013. Del and Sue were
avid vacationers who enjoyed
going on cruises. Del often said
that they went on a cruise once
a year, if they needed it or not!
Surviving, along with his
wife, are a son, Del, and his
wife, Teresa; twin grandchildren,
David Mark and Abigail Grace,
who were the light of his life;
members of the Royer family;
his extended family, David and
Antoinette Belles and family; and
many close, cherished friends.
Funeral services
for Del will be held at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday
at the Andrew Strish
Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St.,
Larksville. Pastor Michael Bodek
will ofciate. Interment will
be private and held at a later
date. Memorial visitation will
be 4 p.m. until time of service
at 6:30 p.m. In lieu of owers,
donations may be made in Dels
memory to Town Hill United
Methodist Church, 47 Town Hill
Road, Shickshinny, PA 18655.
hazel m. domianotacconelli
Aug. 16, 2013
Hazel M. Domiano Tacconelli,
of Old Forge and formerly of
Vienna, Va., entered into Eternal
rest suddenly on Friday.
She was preceded in death by
her loving husband of 32 years,
Dominic J. Tacconelli, in January
of 1982.
She was the last living mem-
ber of her immediate family and,
as such, was preceded in death
by her parents, Matteo Rocco
Domiano and Giovanina DeRosa
Domiano; her sisters, Regina
and Jeanette Domiano, and her
brothers, Dominick, William,
Joseph, Nicholas, Fred, Martin
and Frank.
She is survived by two sisters-
in-law, Esther Domiano and
Romayne Damiano, both of Old
Forge, and several cherished
nieces and nephews.
Hazel graduated from Old
Forge schools and had a long and
exciting career with the federal
government in foreign service.
When she retired, she relocated
back to Old Forge to be closer
to her family. She was a member
of Prince of Peace Parish in Old
Forge, life member of the Ladies
Auxiliary of the Military Order of
the Purple Heart and supporter
of many charitable organizations.
Hazel traveled the world
extensively and was noted for
her excellent cooking and bak-
ing. She was an accomplished
cake decorator and candy maker
and, in her spare time, she cre-
ated elaborate needlepoint proj-
ects, sewed and pursued various
home decorating crafts and proj-
ects.
Hazel will be remembered
always as a loving wife, sister,
sister-in-law, aunt, great aunt and
friend and will be missed by all
who knew her.
The funeral will be 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday at the Palermo &
Zawacki Funeral Home Inc., 409
N. Main St., Old Forge, with
Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in Prince of Peace Parish,
Grace and Lawrence streets, Old
Forge. Interment will be in Old
Forge Cemetery. Friends may call
5 to 8 p.m. today.
edmund a. madursKi
Aug. 17, 2013
Edmund A. Madurski, 71, of
Coal Street, Glen Lyon section
of Newport Township, passed
away Saturday evening under
the care of Hospice Community
Care at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre. He had been a
patient at Birchwood Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center,
Nanticoke, since June.
Born on Sept. 22, 1941, he
was the son of the late John and
Nellie Pawlowski Madurski. He
attended the Newport Township
schools and early in life was
employed by General Cigar
Co., Nanticoke, until its closing.
Edmund later worked for the
Newport Township Road and
Street Department for nearly 20
years, retiring in 2003.
He was a member of Holy
Spirit Parish and life-long mem-
ber of St. Adalberts Church,
Glen Lyon. He enjoyed shing
in his spare time and playing on
the darts league at the American
Legion Post, Glen Lyon. He also
was a member of the Italian-
American Club.
He is survived by his sister,
Eleanor Regiec, and her hus-
band, Joseph, of Glen Lyon;
nephew, Michael Regiec, and his
wife, Kim, of Gettysburg; and
great-nephew, Andrew Regiec;
a niece, Donna McGroarty,
and her husband, John, of
Nuangola; and great-nephew,
John McGroarty.
Private funeral services will
be held from Davis-Dinelli
Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad
St., Nanticoke, with a Mass of
Christian Burial in Holy Spirit
Parish/St. Adalberts Church,
Glen Lyon, with the Rev. Louis
T. Kaminski as celebrant.
Interment will follow in St.
Adalberts Cemetery, Glen Lyon.
There will be no public visita-
tion.
of possession of a con-
trolled substance and pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia.
City police said they
found Fisher allegedly in
possession of crack cocaine
and a crack pipe while
investigating a suspicious
vehicle in the 500 block of
Alter Street on July 29.
PLYMOUTH TWP.
State police at Wyoming
cited Robert John Jones
Jr., 28, of West Nanticoke,
with harassment after he
allegedly pushed Fred Leo
Kindler, of Nanticoke, at 24
W. Poplar St. on Aug. 5.
KINGSTON TWP.
Scott Allen Alfonso Jr.,
20, of Shavertown, was
arraigned Sunday on charg-
es he assaulted a neighbor
on Oriole Lane.
Alfonso jumped out of
a window at his residence
and allegedly assaulted
Harold Whipple at about 10
p.m. Saturday, according to
the criminal complaint.
Whipple maced Alfonso
with pepper spray during
the alleged assault.
Alfonso was charged
with simple assault, disor-
derly conduct, harassment
and underage drinking. He
was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional
Facility for lack of $5,000
bail.
DUPONT Michael
Scott Davis, 44, of Dupont,
was arraigned Sunday on
a simple assault charge
after he allegedly punched
his girlfriend in the face
in their residence on
Lackawanna Avenue.
Police said the woman
suffered facial injuries.
Davis was jailed at
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $5,000 bail.
DURYEA Brian
Thomas Kobeski, 45, of
Duryea, was arraigned
Sunday on charges he
assaulted a woman during
an argument about a cell-
phone.
Kobeski was charged
with simple assault, disor-
derly conduct, harassment
and theft. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $3,000 bail.
KINGSTON
Kimberly A. Sachs, 52,
of West Dorrance Street,
Kingston, was arraigned
Sunday on charges she sold
ve Oxycondone tablets for
$100 from her residence.
Sachs was charged with
two counts of possession
with intent to deliver a
controlled substance and
a single count of crimi-
nal use of communication
facility. She was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $100,000 bail.
KINGSTON Craig
Lee Hickson, 23, of Rutter
Avenue, Kingston, was
arraigned Saturday after
police allege they found 2
pounds of marijuana hid-
den in sweatshirt during a
trafc stop.
Hickson was a passen-
ger in a vehicle stopped
when the driver, who was
not charged, failed to use
a turn signal at Rutter
Avenue and Ridge Avenue
on Friday. Police said the
car was a rental.
A search of the rented
car revealed marijuana in
a bag wrapped in a sweat-
shirt and stuffed between
seats, according to the
criminal complaint.
Hickson was charged
with possession with intent
to deliver a controlled sub-
stance, possession of a
controlled substance and
possession of drug para-
phernalia. He was released
after posting $50,000 bail
on Monday.
EXETER Jerome
Joseph Naparlo, 61, of
Slocum Avenue, was
arraigned Sunday on charg-
es he threatened to shoot a
police ofcer.
Police said they went to
Naparlos residence after
he allegedly called 911 sev-
eral times Saturday night.
Naparlo told police he was
drunk and was told by an
ofcer to stay inside.
Naparlo approached the
ofcer outside, stating he
had a gun and was going to
shoot the ofcer, according
to the criminal complaint.
Naparlo was charged
with terroristic threats,
disorderly conduct and
public drunkenness. He
was released on $5,000
unsecured bail.
JACKSON TWP.
Township police are inves-
tigating a burglary at 280
Zbiek Road on Friday.
Police believe the suspect
entered the house through
an unlocked door and stole
a television and a laptop
computer.
Anyone with information
about the burglary is asked
to call Jackson Township
police at 675-8500.
FORTYFORTAman
allegedly offered money to
police ofcers to let him
go after he was Tasered
and caught running from
a domestic disturbance on
West Pettebone Street on
Friday.
Richard Allen Brown,
25, of McKendree Road,
Shickshinny, was arraigned
on charges of terroristic
threats, resisting arrest,
disorderly conduct, harass-
ment and public drunk-
enness. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $7,500 bail.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
Police investigating a
disturbance at 11:53 p.m.
Friday spotted Brown
climbing a fence behind
the West Pettebone house.
An ofcer chased Brown
who was Tasered when he
refused to stop.
Brown offered money to
police to let him go, the
complaint says.
Brown was transport-
ed to Forty Fort Police
Department, where he
asked police to let him
escape. He allegedly told
police he knows people
who will slit the ofcers
throats, according to the
complaint.
HAZLETON City
police reported the follow-
ing:
Police said they cap-
tured Clayton Canaii, 37,
of Blakeslee, while investi-
gating a suspicious person
in the area of Fifth and
Locust streets on Monday.
Canaii was wanted by state
Department of Parole.
A pair of Ralph Lauren
were stolen after delivery
to a residence in the 500
block of Grant Street on
Monday.
Police said a 50 inch
LG television was stolen
from a residence in the 600
block of Alter Street some-
time between 1 p.m. Friday
and noon Monday.
PLAINS TWP.
Township police reported
the following:
Wesley Marincavage
reported at 10:52 p.m.
Aug. 11 that he parked
his Honda CRX in Lot A
at the Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs casino and
someone bent his window
and door frame and entered
the vehicle, stealing radio
equipment and his car
battery.
Several resident in the
area of Warner and Maffett
Streets reported that some-
time overnight between
Aug. 11 and 12, their
unlocked vehicles were
entered and several items
were removed. Residents
are strongly advised to lock
their vehicles and remove
personal items.
PAGE 6A Tuesday, August 20, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Lawyer: 25victims expected to settle with Penn St.
MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
HARRISBURG A
lawyer brought in by Penn
State to help resolve civil
claims with the sexual abuse
victims of former assis-
tant football coach Jerry
Sandusky said Monday that
he expects 25 of 31 to be set-
tled by the end of the week.
Attorney Michael Rozen
said the overwhelming
majority of the eight young
men who testied against
Sandusky last year are
among the 25.
A 25-year-old man from
suburban Philadelphia, a
trial witness referred to as
Victim5, became the rst to
nalize a deal on Friday.
Rozen said all the deals
include provisions to give
the university the right to
pursue claims against the
universitys insurer, The
Second Mile charity found-
ed by Sandusky and The
Second Miles insurer.
Sandusky is serving a 30-
to 60-year prison sentence
for child sexual abuse.
Rozen said the value of
the claims depended in part
on whether they happened
after 2001, when top-rank-
ing school ofcials were
told by a graduate assistant
about Sandusky with a child
in a team shower, or before
1998, the earliest document-
ed example of a Sandusky
complaint.
Its what did Penn State
know and what duty did
they have? Rozen said.
What did they know, when
did they know it, and what
duty, if any, did they have to
act, and to what extent?
He said claims for abuse
before 1998 also may fall
outside the statute of limita-
tions on how long victims
have to sue.
Although some lawyers
have said they were inter-
ested in settlements that
require Penn State to make
changes that might pre-
vent such abuse from re-
occurring, Rozen said those
matters have been eclipsed
by the widespread reforms
the university has adopted
or begun since an internal
report made a series of rec-
ommendations last summer.
Widowgranted
hearing on home
MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
HARRISBURG A
western Pennsylvania
woman whose $280,000
home was sold at auction
over $6.30 in unpaid inter-
est won a court decision
Monday allowing her a
fresh opportunity to argue
she should not lose her
home.
Commonwealth Court
ruled that it was a mis-
take for a Beaver County
judge to rule against Eileen
Battisti without rst hold-
ing an evidentiary hearing.
This was particularly
inappropriate because the
outstanding liability was
small and the value of the
home was far greater than
the amount paid by (the)
purchaser, wrote Judge
Mary Hannah Leavitt.
Leavitt said the state
Supreme Court has
emphasized that due pro-
cess under both the United
States and Pennsylvania
Constitutions must be
satised whenever the
government subjects a citi-
zens property to forfeiture
for nonpayment of taxes.
Battistis lawyer said she
still lives in her Aliquippa
home, even though it was
sold nearly two years ago
to S.P. Lewis of Imperial
for about $116,000.
Messages seeking com-
ment werent returned on
Monday by Lewis and his
lawyer or by the Beaver
County Solicitors Ofce.
Battisti purchased the
home outside Pittsburgh
in 1999 with her husband,
who managed their nanc-
es. She paid off the prop-
erty after he died in 2004
with proceeds from his life
insurance policy.
The opinion by Leavitt
said Battisti had difculty
taking over the nancial
matters, in part because
of a series of personal
setbacks. She fell behind
on various tax bills, but
believed she had paid them
all off, even though some
were late.
The $6.30 penalty was
added to her tax bill in
2009, which grew with
interests and costs to $235
by late 2011, when the
home was sold at auction.
She appealed the sale
to county court, which
ruled in May 2012 that
she received all notices
required by law. A month
later, Judge C. Gus Kwindis
ordered that the Beaver
County Tax Claim Bureau
could not issue a deed
to Lewis while Battisti
appealed.
An attorney for Lewis
offered to settle the dispute
last year for $160,000 from
Battisti.
David Holland wrote in a
court brief that Battisti did
have notice of the tax sale
and that she made argu-
ments in the appeal that
legal procedures should
not permit.
StAte BRieFS
BETHLEHEM
Fetus found
in bathroom
Ofcials in the Lehigh
Valley are investigating
after a dead baby was
found inside a restaurant
bathroom.
Police in Lower Saucon
Township say an employee
found the fetus inside a
toilet tank in the womens
restroom at Starters Pub
around 10 a.m. Monday.
Owner David Rank said
the fetus was discovered
by a member of the clean-
ing crew who noticed the
toilet wasnt working and
opened the tank lid to see
what was wrong.
The sports-themed bar
and restaurant was lled
with patrons Sunday night
watching the Philadelphia
Eagles preseason game.
PITTSBURGH
Topless rally
needs OK
Pittsburgh ofcials are
mulling the legality of a rally
planned by a group that
hopes to celebrate Womens
Equality Day by having
women march topless
alongside men in bikinis.
The organizers of
GoTopless.org told the
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
they believe its unfair that
women cannot be topless in
public while men can.
The mayors ofce has
yet to issue a permit for
Saturdays march, and city
Public Safety Director
Michael Huss said hes not
sure the rally would be
legal with or without a
permit under the states
indecent exposure law.
A similar rally planned
in Asheville, N.C., last year
drew hundreds of people,
instead of the thousands
expected by organizers, and
only about a dozen women
willing to go topless.
HARRISBURG
Man stabs
mom, 3 cops
A Harrisburg man was
charged with four counts of
attempted homicide after
police say he stabbed his
mother and three police
ofcers.
Authorities said the
ofcers were trying to
arrest 30-year-old Lamarkus
Williams early Sunday for
stabbing his 57-year-old
mother when he stabbed
the three of them.
One of the injured of-
cers subdued Williams
with a stun gun during the
struggle. City ofcials say
he has a mental disorder.
The ofcers were treated
at a hospital and released.
Ofcials said Williams
mother remained hospital-
ized in critical condition
Monday. Williams was sent
to Dauphin County Prison
on $1 million cash bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled for Aug. 28.
PITTSBURGH
Player grave
gets marker
A Negro League star
from Pittsburgh is the lat-
est to receive a grave mark-
er from a man dedicated to
honoring the memory of
players in the segregated
baseball organization.
The grave of Ted Page
was marked Saturday.
He played for both of the
leagues Pittsburgh-area
teams in the 1930s, the
Pittsburgh Crawfords and
the Homestead Grays.
Saturdays ceremony
was made possible by
Jeremy Krock, an anesthe-
siologist from Peoria, Ill.
Krock organized the Negro
Leagues Baseball Grave
Marker Project after visit-
ing another black players
grave and discovering it
was unmarked.
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com NEWS Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 7A
Thousands of Syrians fee to Iraq; crisis feared
SINANSALAHEDDIN
and ZEINAKARAM
Associated Press
BAGHDAD Tens of thousands of
Syrian Kurds swarmed across a bridge
into neighboring Iraqs northern self-
ruled Kurdish region over the past few
days in one of the biggest waves of refu-
gees since the rebellionagainst President
Bashar Assad began, U.N. ofcials said
Monday.
The sudden exodus of around 30,000
Syrians amid the summer heat has cre-
ated desperate conditions and left aid
agencies and the regional government
struggling to accommodate them, illus-
trating the huge strain the 2-year-old
Syrian conict has put on neighboring
countries.
The mostly Kurdish men, women and
children who made the trek join some
1.9 million Syrians who already have
found refuge abroad from Syrias relent-
less carnage.
This is an unprecedented inux of
refugees, and the main concern is that so
many of them are stuck out in the open
at the border or in emergency reception
areas with limited, if any, access to basic
services, said Alan Paul, emergency
teamleader for the Britain-based charity
Save the Children.
The refugee response in Iraq is
already thinly stretched, and close to half
of the refugees are children who have
experienced things no child should, he
said, adding that thousands of refugees
were stranded at the border, waiting to
be registered.
The U.N. said the reason for this ow,
which began ve days ago and contin-
ued unabated Monday, is unclear. But
Kurdish areas in northeastern Syria
have been engulfed by ghting in recent
months between Kurdish militias and
Islamic extremist rebel factions with
links to al-Qaida. Dozens have been
killed.
After the assassination of a prominent
Kurdish leader late last month, a power-
ful Kurdish militia said it was mobilizing
to expel Islamic extremists.
On Monday, activists said ght-
ers from al-Qaida-linked jihadi groups
shelled areas in the predominantly
Kurdish town of Ras al-Ayn with mor-
tars and artillery, coinciding with clash-
es in the area between Kurdish gunmen
and jihadi ghters.
Syrian refugees are still pouring into
Iraqs northern Kurdish region in huge
numbers, and most of them are women
and children, said Youssef Mahmoud, a
spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency
in Iraqs Kurdish region.
Today, some 3,000 Syrian refu-
gees crossed the borders, and that has
brought the number to around 30,000
refugees since Thursday.
The latest wave has brought the over-
all number of Syrian refugees in the
Kurdish region to around 195,000, he
added.
The U.N. High Commissioner for
Refugees has set up an emergency tran-
sit camp in Irbil, the capital of Iraqs
Kurdish autonomous region, to house
some of the new arrivals. Some of the
refugees were said to be staying in
mosques or with family or friends who
live in the area, according to the agency.
At one camp near Irbil, dozens of
refugees carrying their bags, belong-
ings and babies roamed through rows
of tents, footage shot by AP Television
News showed. Some men lined up to
get blocks of ice from a pickup truck.
Children huddled around a truck to
get watermelon distributed by regional
security forces.
UNHCR said it is sending 15 truck-
loads of supplies 3,100 tents, two pre-
fabricated warehouses and thousands
of jerry cans to carry water from its
regional stockpile in Jordan. It said the
shipment should arrive by the end of the
week. Kurds are Syrias largest ethnic
minority, making up more than 10 per-
cent of the countrys 23 million people.
They are centered in the poor northeast-
ern regions of Hassakeh and Qamishli,
wedged between the borders of Turkey
and Iraq. There are also several predom-
inantly Kurdish neighborhoods in the
capital, Damascus, and Syrias largest
city, Aleppo.
Bahzad Ali Adam, deputy governor
of Iraqs Dahuk province, which borders
Syria, said the latest ow will put more
strain on the budget and public ser-
vices in the region, which is also home
to thousands of mainly Iraqi Arabs and
Christians who have ed the violence in
other parts of the country.
The refugees need place to live, food
and health services, Adam, who heads
the operation room to receive Syrian
refugees, said in a phone interview from
Baghdad.
Earlier this month, the president
of Iraqs autonomous Kurdish region,
Massoud Barzani, vowed to defend
Syrias Kurds. He gave no details on
how he would do so, but Iraqi Kurdistan
boasts a powerful and experienced
armed force known as the peshmerga.
Armed intervention by Iraqi Kurds
would carry enormous risks and appears
unlikely. Still, the pledge, along with the
ghting, shows the potential of Syrias
conict to spread to neighboring coun-
tries and become a full-blown regional
war.
The Kurdish exodus is just one layer
in Syrias increasingly complex civil war,
which has killed more than 100,000 peo-
ple, ripped apart the countrys delicate
sectarian fabric and destroyed cities and
towns.
Assads regime has used warplanes,
tanks and ballistic missiles to try to
pound rebellious areas into submission.
The rebels, along with the U.S. and
other Western powers, say the Assad
regime has also used chemical weapons
in the conict. The Syrian government
and its ally, Russia, blame the opposition
for the alleged chemical attacks.
On Monday, a team of U.N. experts
began their long-awaited investigation
into the purported used of chemical
arms. The teams task is to determine
whether chemical weapons have been
used, and if so, which ones. Its mandate
does not extend to establishing who was
responsible for an attack, and that has
led some observers to question the over-
all value of the probe.
AP photo
Syrian refugees wait for buses after crossing the border Monday toward Iraq at Peshkhabour border point in Dahuk, Iraq.
Authorities:
Guns were
smuggled
on buses
TOMHAYS
Associated Press
NEW YORK A pair of
gunrunners smuggled guns
into New York City by hid-
ing them in luggage they
carried on discount buses
that offered cheap fares
and lesser odds of getting
caught, authorities said
Monday.
An undercover city police
ofcer posing as a gun bro-
ker for criminal customers
bought 254 weapons from
the men in dozens of trans-
actions since last year
the largest gun seizures in
the city in recent memory.
One of the guns was an
assault rie that was disas-
sembled and transported in
a girlfriends zebra-striped
bag, authorities said.
The alleged smugglers,
Walter Walker and Earl
Campbell, were among 19
people arrested in New York
and in North Carolina and
South Carolina states
where the guns origi-
nated as the result of
a 10-month investigation.
Also charged was an aspir-
ing rapper from Brooklyn.
Walker and Campbell
were arrested earlier this
month by local police in
their home states, authori-
ties said. The names of their
defense attorneys were not
immediately available.
There is no doubt that
the seizure of these guns has
saved lives, Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said at a news
conference.
AP photo
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg, center, and Police
Commissioner Raymond Kelly,
left, announce the arrest of
19 people and seizure of 254
guns as part of gun smuggling
between the Carolinas and New
York on Monday.
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PAGE 8A Tuesday, August 20, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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GUDAITIS - Albert Sr., funeral
10 a.m. today at the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre.
GUDZ - Stanley, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday at Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial
10 a.m. in Queen Of the Apostles
Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today.
JUDZIKOWSKI- Judith, funeral
10 a.m. Wednesday at the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home,
Plymouth. Friends may call 6 to
8 p.m. Tuesday.
KLEBON- Richard, funeral 9 a.m.
today at Knifen OMalley Funeral
Home, 728 Main St. Avoca. Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
in Queen of the Apostles
Church, formerly St. Marys, 715
Hawthorne St., Avoca.
KNICK - Lucille, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. today
in Holy Mother of Sorrows Polish
National Church, 212 Wyoming
Ave., Dupont. Family and friends
are asked to go directly to Holy
Mother of Sorrows Church for
services.
KOCHAN- Arlene, graveside
services 11:30 a.m. Saturday in
St. Francis Cemetery, Nanticoke.
KOZIC - Gerard, celebration
of life 10 a.m. Saturday at the
Kresge Funeral Home, 1763 Route
209 Brodheadsville. Friends may
call 9 a.m. until the time of the
service.
ADAMS - Kathleen, funeral
9:15 a.m. today at the Wroblewski
Funeral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Thereses
Church, 64 Davis St., Shavertown.
ARNOLD - Doris, funeral
9:30 a.m. today at the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains.
FUNERALS
LINDA KEIPER-QUINN,
57, of Hazleton, died Sunday
morning with her parents,
Henry and Lillian Keiper, by her
side.
Funeral arrangements are
being nalized by the Lehman
Family Funeral Service, Inc.,
403 Berwick St., White Haven.
For more information, visit the
funeral home website, at www.
lehmanfuneralhome.com.
LARRY A. BUTCH
JAMES, 65, of Nanticoke, died
suddenly Sunday at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Andrew Strish
Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St.,
Larksville.
ROBERT E. HOLTZ, 52, of
Wyoming, passed away Saturday
in Jackson Township after inju-
ries he suffered in a motorcycle
accident.
Arrangements are pend-
ing from the Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave.,Wyoming.
GEORGE KEIB JR., of
Wyoming, passed away Monday
in the Commonwealth Hospice
Inpatient Unit of St. Lukes Villa,
Wilkes-Barre.
Arrangements are pend-
ing from the Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming.
EVA BALASH, 96, formerly
of Edwardsville, died Saturday,
Aug. 17, 2013, at Kingston
Health Care Center. Born in
Edwardsville, she was the
daughter of the late Joseph and
Anna Piech Balash. She was edu-
cated in the Larksville schools
and was formerly employed in
the garment industry. Eva was a
member of St. Johns Orthodox
Church of Edwardsville. She
was a loving and caring aunt
to all her nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by
sisters, Anna Balash, Mary
Sinko, Agnes Gould, Helen
Price and Julia Dringo; broth-
ers, Theodore, Michael, John
and Joseph. Surviving are nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
9 a.m. Wednesday at the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township, with Requiem
Service at 9:30 a.m. in St. Johns
Orthodox Church, Edwardsville.
Interment will be in Fern Knoll
Burial Park, Dallas. There are no
calling hours.
OBITUARY POLICY
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
More OBITUARIES | 5A
VERONICA (VERNA) ANN WACLAWSKI
Aug. 15, 2013
Veronica (Verna) Ann
Waclawski, 96, formerly of West
Enterprise Street, Glen Lyon,
died on Thursday at Hampton
House, Hanover Township.
She was born in Glen Lyon
on July 26, 1917, the daughter
of the late William and Veronica
(Krajewski) Dzwilewski. Verna
lived her entire lifetime in Glen
Lyon, where she graduated
from the Newport Township
High School, class of 1934. She
was employed by various gar-
ment factories in the area as a
machine operator, retiring in
1977. She was a member of Holy
Spirit Parish, Glen Lyon, and
also a member of the ILGWU,
N.Y., N.Y. She was the 11th child
of 12 children in the family and
the last to survive.
Preceding her in death were
her husband, Adam Waclawski,
on April 21, 1986; brothers,
John, Victor, Louis, Frank,
Anthony and Peter Dzwilewski,
and Robert Ryan; and sis-
ters, Pearl Smetana, Victoria
Gizelbach, Patrina Selli and
Alexandra Schermerhorn.
Surviving are son, Eugene
Waclawski, Alden, and daugh-
ters, Sylvia Vassia, Wanamie,
and Alberta Yarasavage and
her husband, Albert, Mountain
Top; eight grandchildren and 13
great-grandchildren; and nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Thursday at the
George A. Strish, Inc. Funeral
Home, 211 W. Main St., Glen
Lyon, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Spirit
Parish/St. Adalberts Church,
Glen Lyon. Interment will be in
St. Adalberts Cemetery, Glen
Lyon. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday.
The family wishes to extend
their deep gratitude to the staff
of Hampton House for their
compassion and care given to
Verna in her time of need.
BALASH- Eva, funeral 9 a.m.
Wednesday at the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main
St., Plains. RequiemService
9:30 a.m. in St Johns Orthodox
Church, Edwardsville. No calling
hours.
BENSON- Esther, memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in the
Dorranceton United Methodist
Church, 549 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston.
CHMIL - Paul Sr., funeral 10 a.m.
Wednesday in St. Nicholas
Russian Orthodox Church, 58
Seneca St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the
Simon S. Russin Funeral Home,
136 Mafett St., Plains and 9 a.m.
until service time Wednesday.
Parastas service 6 p.m. today.
CONNELL - Jeremiah, Mass
1 p.m. Thursday in St. Nicholas
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
ANNAJ. ANGIE SPERNOGA
Aug. 18, 2013
Anna J. Angie Spernoga,
82, of Lain and formerly of the
North End section of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away Sunday
morning at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital after a brief ill-
ness.
Born in the North End sec-
tion of Wilkes-Barre, she was
the daughter of the late Joseph
and Mary (Jezerchak) Spernoga.
Angie attended Sacred Heart
Slovak Elementary School and
was a graduate of James M.
Coughlin High School, Wilkes-
Barre. She was employed by
IBM, Washington, D.C., for more
than 10 years. Returning home
to Wilkes-Barre she, along with
her family, owned and oper-
ated Spernogas Hideaway in
the North End section of Wilkes-
Barre for many years. She was
a member of St. Andre Bessette
Parish, North East Wilkes-Barre.
Angie loved the outdoors, espe-
cially gardening, swimming, and
golng.
She was preceded in death by
her sister Josephine Spernoga on
Oct. 16, 2012.
Surviving are her beloved
companion, Judy Cameron,
Lain; sisters Frances
Spernoga, Wilkes-Barre, and
Theresa Kinney, Harveys
Lake; and nephews, Barry
and Daniel Kinney.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday in St. Andre
Bessette Parish, St. Stanislaus
Kostka Church, Wilkes-Barre,
with Father Kenneth Seeger,
pastor, ofciating. Friends are
invited to go directly to church
Wednesday morning. Interment
will be in Sacred Heart Slovak
Cemetery, Dorchester Drive,
Dallas. There will be no calling
hours. Memorial donations may
be made to St. Andre Bessette
Parish, 666 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18705. Arrangements
are by the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St.,
Plains, PA 18705. Online con-
dolences may be made at www.
corcoranfuneralhome.com.
CATHERINE A. MAKUCH (MARKO)
Aug. 18, 2013
Catherine A. Makuch
(Marko), 92, of Wilkes-Barre,
passed away peacefully with her
son and daughter at her side
on Sunday at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre
on March 3, 1921, a daughter of
the late John and Mary Hudak
Swatkoski. Catherine was a grad-
uate of Coughlin High School,
class of 1939. Prior to her retire-
ment, she was employed by the
RCA Corp. in Mountain Top.
Catherine was a devoted
Catholic and attended daily
Mass. She was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Parish at St.
Marys Church of the Immaculate
Conception, Wilkes-Barre, and a
longtime member of St. Josephs
Slovak Church in Wilkes-Barre.
She and her husband, Paul, were
chosen to lock the doors for the
nal time when the church was
closed on March 21, 2010.
Catherine was a faithful and
loving wife, mother and friend.
She especially enjoyed cooking
for her family and friends.
She was preceded in death
by her brothers, George, John,
Stephen and Joseph Swatkoski,
and by her sisters, Mary Ihnat,
Anna Hogan and Elizabeth
Swatkoski.
Catherine is survived by her
loving husband, Paul R. Makuch,
with whom she celebrated 66
years of marriage on July 5,
2013. She is also survived by
her daughter, Sister Mary Beth
Makuch, SS.C.M., Wilkes-Barre;
son, Paul S. Makuch, at home;
numerous nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends, including
her dear friend, Mary Theresa
Okal of Wilkes-Barre, and also
by her dear cat, Rusty.
Catherines family would like
to extend their heart-felt appre-
ciation to the medical staff at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
and to her doctors, Dr. Michael
Grasso, Dr. David Greenwald,
Dr. John Ellis, Dr. Juan DeRojas
and Dr. Sandra Pensieri for their
compassionate and attentive
care.
Funeral Services will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Friday at the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass
of Christian Burial to follow at
10 a.m. in Our Lady of Fatima
Parish at St. Marys Church of
the Immaculate Conception, 134
S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Byzantine Catholic Cemetery,
Dallas.
Friends may call 2 to 4 and 7
to 9 p.m. Thursday at the funeral
home.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made in Catherines memory
to the Sisters of Saints Cyril &
Methodius Retirement Fund,
Villa Sacred Heart, 580 Railroad
St., Danville, PA 17821.
Online condolences may be
sent by visiting, Catherines
obituary at www.natandgawlas-
funeralhome.com.
EDWARD WILLIAMKESTER
Aug. 16, 2013
Edward William Kester, 86,
of Harveys Lake, went home
to be with our Lord, his fam-
ily and friends, Sunday at the
residence of his daughter in
Centermoreland.
Born in Courtdale, he was
the son of the late Roland and
Rachael Weidner Kester and was
a graduate of Wyoming Seminary
and The Kings College
Delaware.
Edward was a math teacher
at Dallas High School and was a
devout Christian.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, the former Sue Ann
Adams, in 1992 and a sister,
Ruth.
Surviving are a daughter, Sue,
and her husband, Chuck Horton,
Centermoreland; two grand-
children, Robert and Diana;
several great-grandchildren;
brother, Roland Kester, and his
wife, Ruth, Chestereld, Va.; two
nephews; and many other family
and friends.
Friends may call from 10 to 11
a.m. Wednesday at The Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home Inc.,
2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas.
Funeral service will follow at
the Bethel Hill Cemetery, Sweet
Valley, with the Rev. David Betts,
chaplain, Hospice of the Sacred
Heart, ofciating. In lieu of ow-
ers, memorial donations may be
made to Hospice of the Sacred
Heart, c/o 600 Baltimore Drive,
Suite 7, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or to Eaton Baptist Church.
MACKIEWICZ - Frances, Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m.
Wednesday in St. Basils
Church, Dushore. Friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the P.
Dean Homer Funeral Home, 1
Grovedale Lane, Wyalusing.
PHILLIPS - Janice, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today
in St. Benedicts Church, Austin
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
RICKEY - Michael, memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in Sweet
Valley Church of Christ, 5439
Main Road, Sweet Valley. Friends
may call 10 a.m. until time of
service.
RITTS - Marie, funeral 10 a.m.
today at Fern Knoll Burial Park.
Friends are to go directly to the
cemetery.
YURKOSKI - William, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in
St. Marthas Church, Holy Spirit
Parish, 260 Bonnieville Road,
Stillwater.
JAMES E. SABA
Aug. 18, 2013
James E. Saba, 84, of
Kingston, died peacefully
Sunday morning at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township, after a
short illness.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
the son of the late Simon and
Emily (Sappe) Saba. Mr. Saba,
along with his parents, found-
ed Sanitary Wiping Cloth and
Sanitary Industrial Laundry, the
largest wiping cloth business
in the country. They supplied
businesses across the country as
well as the U.S. Armed Services
with wiping cloths during World
War II, Korea and the Vietnam
Wars. Later, he and his parents
started S & J Enterprises and
Meyer/Saba Metal Co., one of
the larger scrap metal recyclers
in Pennsylvania.
Mr. Saba was a lifelong
member of St Marys Syrian
Orthodox Church in Wilkes-
Barre. Ordained as sub-deacon
in 1959, he served under Father
Hebert Nahas for 30 years and
was instrumental in the build-
ing of the new church on South
Main Street. He was a Shriner
and a Mason and an avid golfer,
having helped to grow The Irem
Temple Country Clubs Golf
Course through many years. He
was a pilot and enjoyed ying
his own plane for pleasure for
many years.
Mr. Saba was a family man,
raising four sons on Butler
Street in Kingston with his
late wife, the former Rosemary
Corcoran.
He leaves behind sons, Simon
Saba and his wife, Merry, of
Sparta N.J.; James M. Saba and
his ance, Theresa McGrane,
Harveys Lake; Christopher E.
Saba, Swoyersville, and Francis
Saba and his husband, Victor
Rivera, of Philadelphia and
Dallas; seven grandchildren and
ve great-grandchildren; wife,
the former Esther Hannon; sis-
ter Kathleen Line, Wilkes-Barre,
and many nieces and nephews.
Preceding him in death,
in addition to his rst wife,
Rosemary, was his sister Shirley
Xanthopoulos of Lewistown.
Private Entombment was
held at the convenience of the
family in St. Mary Antiochian
Orthodox Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Contributions
may be made to the Shriner
Hospitals for Children, Ofce
of Development, 2900 Rocky
Point Drive, Tampa, FL 33607
in the memory of James E.
Saba. A memorial/reception
will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday
at the Saba family home, 198
Idetown Road, Dallas. All are
welcome. Arrangements are
by the Corcoran Funeral Home
Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains, PA
18705. Online condolences may
be made at www.corcoranfuner-
alhome.com.
RAY M. WALSH
July 21, 2013
Ray M. Walsh, 66, passed into
the iCloud after a lengthy battle
with cancer on July 21, 2013.
Ray was the only son of Laura
and Michael Walsh from the
Minooka section of Scranton.
Ray attended the Scranton pub-
lic schools and was a 1966 grad-
uate of Penn State University,
Scranton Campus. Ray served in
the U.S. Army from1969 to 1971
during Vietnam and received an
Honorable Discharge in 1971.
Ray retired from The Babcock
& Wilcox Co. after 25 years of
service at both the Scranton and
St Petersburg, Fla., locations.
Ray was an active member of his
Homeowners Association and
served on its Board of Directors
for more than 10 years. Ray was
an avid computer hobbyist and
was always there to help those
in need.
Ray is survived by numer-
ous cousins, friends and some
wonderful neighbors who
helped him through some
very difcult times.
A funeral Mass will
be at 10:30 a.m. Friday
in the Divine Mercy
Parish at St. Josephs
Church, 312 Davis St., Scranton,
with the Rev. Francis Pauselli
ofciating. Interment will be in
Cathedral Cemetery, Scranton,
immediately following.
Arrangements are by the
Eagen-Hughes Funeral Home
2908 Birney Ave., Scranton.
THOMAS F. DEVLIN
Aug. 18, 2013
Thomas F. Devlin, 84, of
Plains Township, passed away
Sunday in Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Plains Township,
Oct. 16, 1928, he was a son of
the late Thomas F., Sr. and Ruth
Brady Devlin. He attended Plains
High School. Mr. Devlin was a
faithful member of The Second
Presbyterian Church, Pittston,
where he served as a elder, a
member of the Mens Club, an
usher, and in 2011 was selected
as Church Member of the Year.
He was an Army Veteran
serving during World War II
in Japan and Korea, a member
of American Legion Post 558
Plains, and an avid contributor to
Disabled Veterans of America, for
which he received many awards.
Thomas was employed in the
shoe industry, and for the last
20 years prior to his retirement
he was manager of the Dietary
Department at ManorCare,
Kingston.
The family of Thomas would
like to thank Dr. M. Fath, Dr.
John Ellis, Dr. Kerrigan, the staff
of CCU and the sixth oor south
of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
for their kind and compassionate
care.
He was preceded in death by
his brother PFC John Devlin, and
sister Alice Devlin Sparling.
He is survived by his wife of
62 years, Jean Di Buono Devlin;
son, John Devlin, at home; sisters
Ruth E. Scannell, Harpers Ferry,
W.Va.; Anna June Miller, Glen
Burnie, Md.; and several nieces
and nephews.
The funeral will be
held at 10:30 a.m. Friday
at the Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston,
with services at 11 a.m. in Second
Presbyterian Church, Parsonage
Street, Pittston. The Rev. David
Brague will ofciate. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday and 10
to 10:30 a.m. Friday at the funeral
home. Interment will be in West
Pittston Cemetery. Memorial
donations may be sent to Second
Presbyterian Church, Parsonage
Street, Pittston, PA 18640.
WARRENMAXWILSON
Aug. 18, 2013
Warren Max Wilson, 87,
formerly of Allentown, died
peacefully at Kirkland Village on
Sunday.
Anyone who knew him will
tell you that his life was crammed
full of the sounds of Sousa,
train whistles and laughter. He
was born the son of Dara and
Charlotte Wilson in Kingston,
on Dec. 20, 1925. His childhood
was spent in a closely knit circle
of creative family members who
encouraged him to develop his
passion for music. By the age of
14, he was playing the trombone
in the Kingston High School
Band and for money in Wyoming
Valley dance bands. After gradu-
ation from high school, Max was
drafted into the United States
Army and served in France and
Germany in the 100th Infantry
Division eld artillery unit.
Claimingthat his trombone saved
his life, he was reassigned to an
Army dance band that toured the
perimeter of the European battle
theater until the end of World
War II. Immediately after leaving
the service, he enrolled in Kings
College and was in the rst grad-
uating class in 1950, where he
was a catcher on its rst baseball
team.
During his college years, he
met and married the love of his
life, Ruth. He was recalled into
the Army in 1950 and served
as an artillery supply ofcer
at Fort Sill, Okla. He spent his
entire working career as a claims
adjuster and ofce manager
for Royal Insurance Co., retir-
ing in 1988. His musical legacy
included performing in the
Scranton Symphony, Allentown
Symphony, Pioneer Band and the
Allentown Band, for which he
served as president and business
manager for many years until his
retirement from the organiza-
tion in 2011. He also served as
president of the Windjammers
Unlimited, an organization
devoted to circus band music.
He played with the Big Band
Ambassadors and Bud Raders
Dance Band, perpetuating the
music of the 1940s and 1950s.
In 2008, Warren Wilson was pre-
sented the Arts Ovation Award
for Service to the Community.
His service to his neighborhood
included coaching the Midway
Manor baseball team and as
treasurer of the Midway Manor
Association. Max approached
life with passion that earned him
the love and respect of his family
and friends.
The family thanks the staff at
Kirkland Village and the team
from St. Lukes VNA Hospice
for their kind and gentle care for
Max, especially during his lifes
nal journey.
SURVIVORS: Not one to
allow his professional life to
interfere with his true loves, fam-
ily and music, Max left a legacy of
devotion to his children, Daralyn
Foster and husband Robert, Ross
Wilson and wife Jan, grandchil-
dren Justin and wife Ashley,
Adam and Zachary Gottwald,
Joshua and Erin Wilson, and
two great-grandchildren, Leo
Gottwald and Ethan Gottwald.
His wife, Ruth Plieskatt
Wilson, predeceased him in
2011, and a sister, Nadine
Beckus, in 1996.
SERVICES: A mili-
tary burial ceremony
will be held at 10:45 a.m.
Saturday in Cedar Hill
Memorial Park, Airport Road,
Allentown, after which a celebra-
tion of Warren Wilsons life will
be held in the Kirkland Village
auditorium at noon with a lun-
cheon to follow. Arrangements
are by Bachman, Kulik &
Reinsmith Funeral Home,
Allentown.
CONTRIBUTIONS: In lieu
of owers, the family suggests
a contribution to the Allentown
Band, VNAHospice of St. Lukes,
1510 Valley Center Parkway,
Suite 200, Bethlehem, PA 18017
or St. Peters Lutheran Church,
1933 Hanover Ave., Allentown,
PA 18109.
ELEANOR SCOTT
Aug. 16, 2013
Eleanor Scott, 83, of
Freehold, N.J., passed away sur-
rounded by her family on Friday
at Jersey Shore University
Medical Center, Neptune, N.J.
Eleanor was born and raised
in Wilkes-Barre and had lived in
Philadelphia, East Brunswick
and Champaign, Ill., before set-
tling to Freehold Township in
1991. She was a homemaker
and also worked at the East
Brunswick High School and
at the University of Illinois.
Eleanor was a member of the
First Presbyterian Church of
Freehold. She was a devoted
wife, loving mother and ador-
ing mommom.
Eleanor was predeceased
by her brothers, Robert and
William Maharty.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 62 years, Frederick
David Scott; two daughters,
Kimberley Lanouette and her
husband, Roger, of Pennington,
and Venessa Rittman and
her husband, Scott, of
Mountainside; a son; 10 grand-
children; a brother, Donald
Maharty of Virginia; and two
sisters, Mildred Eckenrode of
Arizona and Dorothy Evans of
Wilkes-Barre.
A visitation will be held 6
to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday at
the Clayton & McGirr Funeral
Home, 100 Elton-Adelphia
Road (Route 524), Freehold
Township, with her funeral
service to follow at 8:30 p.m.
Relatives and friends are invit-
ed to gather at the funeral home
at 9:30 a.m. Friday for the pro-
cession to Brig. Gen. Wm. C.
Doyle NJ Veterans Memorial
Cemetery, Arneytown, for her
10:30 a.m. Committal Service.
In lieu of owers, contributions
in Eleanors memory may be
made to Freehold Area Open
Door Inc., 39 Throckmorton
St., Freehold, NJ 07728. For
information, directions or con-
dolence messages to the family,
visit www.claytonfuneralhome.
com.
OUR OPINION: BRANDON MATTHEWS
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
COMMENTARY: JOSEPH GRILLI
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 9A
Editorial
OTHER OPINION: TEACHER UNION
online learning needs strong support
Joseph
Grilli
Contributing
Columnist
Pittston High Dufer
swings into big time
BILL TARUTIS | TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
Brandon Matthews in November, 2011, when he was named Golfer of the Year while playing for
Pittston Area High School.
Take a look at the fresh-scrubbed
face, the boy-next-door smile, the casu-
al (but not too casual) fashion state-
ment of polo shirt over T-shirt. Its
Brandon Matthews in 2011, right after
being named high school golfer of the
year. Do you see promise?
By the time this photo was taken,
Matthews, a Pittston Area High School
grad, had already won a PIAA state
golf championship in 2010. He also
medaled twice in the states.
Matthews honed his skill on the
greens of Fox Hill Country Club in
Exeter, and in 2012 teamed with Rick
Laneski to win that clubs biggest
event, the John A. Allan Tournament.
He went to Temple University on
a Division I scholarship and immedi-
ately stroked the teams best average,
winning three consecutive games.
Matthews led the Owls to their rst
tournament title in two seasons at
Villanovas Wildcat Invitational, and
was named Atlantic 10 Conference
rookie of the week for his efforts in
2013.
And last week the Pittston Patriot
with the gifted swing landed in the
quarternals of 113th U.S. Amateur.
That put him among the top eight of
more than 7,000 who initially gunned
for qualication.
True, Matthews struggled through
is quarternal bout and was ultimately
eliminated. I felt it on the range, he
said. I just didnt have it today.
But that hardly diminishes his
accomplishment. He had reached the
top one-tenth of one percent of those
who competed at the start of it all.
And theres no reason to assume his
trajectory will go anywhere but up.
Hes been that good that good con-
sistently for years.
But regardless of his future, his pres-
ent deserves special note. As popu-
lar as it is, golf is not a sport on the
radar of many local residents, and his
accomplishment at the Country Club
in Brookline, Mass., put him in a rar-
eed atmosphere of this regions elite
athletes.
Brandon Matthews is not a local
boy done good.
He is a local man doing great.
Teacher union is right to
engage dissenters head
he National Education Association
is keenly aware that its teachers are
not a political monolith. The nations
largest labor union is now making a
pragmatic shift from simply tolerat-
ing its internal dissenters to engag-
ing them.
The NEAs most visible strategy
is a yearlong fellowship that starts
this fall. Teachers will travel to
Washington for policy meetings and
participate in monthly Web-based
training in policymaking and advo-
cacy.
The 3.2 million-member union and
a national teacher leadership organi-
zation, Teach Plus, selected 53 teach-
ers from around the country.
Criticism of the union as inex-
ible on pressing issues including pay
and performance has weakened its
bargaining position. Reaching out to
some of its most vocal critics is part
inclusion and part survival.
The NEA has acknowledged that
it must listen to members who want
to participate in the union but were
also concerned that they are not
acting in the interest of students or
elevating the profession of teaching,
says Christopher Eide, executive
director of Teachers United.
This is a step toward keeping
the union alive and relevant, Eide
astutely notes.
The fellowships largest cohorts
are from Washington, Colorado and
Massachusetts, key education-reform
battleground states. Bill Raabe,
senior director of the NEAs Center
for Great Public Schools, says that
is a coincidence. But he notes that
bringing in teachers from reform
states could benet an organization
looking to hear from different voices.
Raabe says that among the ques-
tions the fellows will help the union
explore: What are the things that we
need to do to ensure student learn-
ing? What are the appropriate assess-
ments to measure student learning?
The NEAs strategy has a prec-
edent in Seattle. The election a year
ago of Jonathan Knapp as president
of the Seattle teachers union signaled
a broadening strategy of relationship-
building and compromise.
Just as Seattle became a model
for strong school district-union rela-
tions, the NEAs inclusiveness should
spread to its local afliates.
The Seattle Times
The demand for online learning
among college students continues
to grow unabated. From 2002 to
2011, the industry experienced a
staggering 418-percent increase in
the number of students enrolling in
online courses from 1.6 million to
6.7 million, according
to a report by Inside
Higher Ed. In one year
alone, online learn-
ing grew by 600,000
students between
the 2010 to 2011 fall
semesters.
A lot of the reason
for the healthy growth
in online learning is
the continued develop-
ment of online tools
that facilitate instruc-
tion for academic
classes and interaction among stu-
dent and instructor. Online learning
also appears to meet the needs of the
21st century student by providing
exible scheduling, formatting and
convenience.
As the demand for online pro-
grams continues to grow, though,
drop-out rates at some colleges have
become an increasing concern. It is
debatable whether or not this rapid
growth in online learning will contin-
ue, but what has become clear is that
colleges and universities must devel-
op support mechanisms to ensure
online learners have a better chance
to succeed while also maintaining
the same academic rigor that is pres-
ent in the traditional classroom.
Colleges and universities must
carefully examine the various
support mechanisms available to
students as a key component to
retention, student satisfaction, and
the ability to achieve course and pro-
gram outcomes.
In a survey of 196 institutions con-
ducted by the Blackboard Institute,
support services for online learning
are a critical component to student
success, but they may also by very
different than those provided in a
traditional learning environment.
The survey results revealed a clear
connection between consistent
student services combined with
superior academic content working
hand-in-hand to support student
achievement.
The challenge for an institution
is to develop a comprehensive,
consistent student support services
program that is available around the
clock. Early intervention is impor-
tant and should begin during the
recruiting process well before
the rst day of class. Clear com-
munication of course expectations,
enrollment assistance, advisory
services, nancial aid counseling,
and a complete orientation to institu-
tional policies and to the information
technology system are all critical ele-
ments of a successful online learning
experience.
Engaging student prospects sev-
eral times throughout the application
and enrollment process conveys a
sense of security and begins to build
condence, particularly for those
adult learners who have been away
from school for a number of years.
Once classes start, an advisor
who acts as a counselor and mentor
should be assigned to the student
through graduation. This relation-
ship provides consistency and match-
es the advising services available to
students on the traditional campus
to the online learning. Technical
support is also available at all times,
affording the online learner with the
ability to have live interaction with
a technology staff person so issues
can be quickly resolved. Online
access to library and other research
materials, reference assistance, and
instructions on library use are criti-
cally important to the online learner
as well.
Any discussion about a quality
education begins with a program
that is intended specically to serve
the online student. Misericordia
University has embraced this con-
cept for adult learners who choose
to complete some or all of their
course work online. The academic
excellence and learning support that
is available to traditional students
is present in all online courses. The
result will be increased student satis-
faction, improved retention rates and
successful students.
With more than 1,000 students
projected to take online classes in
2013, it is critically important that
Misericordia University and other
institutions of higher education
serve online learners with the same
set of services and support that are
afforded to the traditional student
population.
Joseph J. Grilli is the director of Corporate
and Institutional Recruitment at Misericordia
University in Dallas, Pa.
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
Make Sterling
a visitors center
The site of the former Hotel
Sterling should be a visitors center
preserving its legacy.
Pictures describing the once-
popular department stores, eateries
and entertainment places can be dis-
played, recalling the way downtown
Wilkes-Barre used to be.
Shopping: the Boston Store,
the Hub, Pomeroys, Isaac Longs,
Peoples Outtting.
Theaters: Comerford, Paramount
Eateries: Boston Candy Kitchen,
The Spa, Percy Browns.
Items such as t-shirts, post cards,
key chains etc. , with pictures of
these places can be sold.
The center could feature a short
video showing the rise and fall of the
Hotel Sterling.
Possibly a museum could be added,
including various artifacts native to
the hotel. Groups theater, dance,
scouts, seniors, etc. could on occa-
sion display their talents.
The history of our center city
should be remembered, not forgot-
ten!
Culture could be added to our
downtown the Hotel Sterling
could rise again, welcoming guests.
Lets call it:
The Sterling Welcome Center.
Gerri Leo
Wilkes-Barre
Thank doctors
for excellent care
I recently required coronary
artery bypass surgery due to several
blocked arteries.
I was rst seen by Dr. Joseph S.
Briskie, a cardiologist, who identi-
ed the issue, and who referred me
to Dr. Michael Harostock, a cardiac
surgeon.
Both physicians, in my opinion, are
the best doctors anyone could ask for.
They were both kind, courteous,
honest, patient, and took the time
from their busy practices to explain
to me and my family the risks vs. ben-
ets involved in this type of surgery.
Neither one rushed me to make a
decision, nor did they push for a par-
ticular hospital.
These two physicians helped give
me another chance at life; for this I
will be forever grateful.
May God bless Dr. Joseph S.
Briskie and Dr. Michael Harostock.
Ron Komoroski
West Nanticoke
PAGE 10A Tuesday, August 20, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
95/72
Chihuahua
90/59
Los Angeles
82/64
Washington
88/69
New York
87/70
Miami
90/80
Atlanta
82/71
Detroit
85/66
Houston
92/73
Kansas City
88/68
Chicago
88/70
Minneapolis
90/72
El Paso
96/72
Denver
93/63
Billings
90/62
San Francisco
70/57
Seattle
76/55
Toronto
86/66
Montreal
85/68
Winnipeg
88/56
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
WED FRI
SAT SUN
THU
MON
TODAY
84
61
Partly
sunny
89 65
Times of
clouds and
sun
83 59
Plenty of
sunshine
79 54
Sunny
to partly
cloudy
83 59
Thunder-
shower
88 63
A t-storm
in the area
79 57
Fog in
the a.m.;
partly
sunny
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 4
Month to date 70
Year to date 599
Last year to date 728
Normal year to date 468
Anchorage 61/55/r 62/53/sh
Baltimore 88/67/pc 90/69/pc
Boston 87/69/s 89/71/s
Buffalo 84/64/s 86/66/pc
Charlotte 84/70/t 86/68/t
Chicago 88/70/s 88/70/s
Cleveland 84/63/pc 86/67/pc
Dallas 98/73/pc 99/77/pc
Denver 93/63/pc 96/64/pc
Honolulu 90/71/s 88/76/s
Indianapolis 86/69/s 88/69/s
Las Vegas 101/83/s 102/86/s
Milwaukee 84/68/s 85/68/s
New Orleans 90/76/t 91/77/t
Norfolk 84/72/t 87/74/pc
Okla. City 94/68/s 96/70/s
Orlando 92/75/t 92/75/t
Phoenix 109/90/s 108/88/pc
Pittsburgh 85/61/pc 85/65/pc
Portland, ME 83/57/pc 82/62/s
St. Louis 88/69/s 90/73/s
San Francisco 70/57/pc 68/57/pc
Seattle 76/55/s 80/55/pc
Wash., DC 88/69/pc 90/73/pc
Bethlehem 1.99 -0.04 16
Wilkes-Barre 2.76 -0.57 22
Towanda 1.66 -0.30 16
Port Jervis 2.88 -0.05 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Monday.
Today Wed Today Wed Today Wed
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Aug 20 Aug 28
Sept 5
Full Last
New First
Sept 12
6:18 a.m.
7:23 p.m.
7:55 p.m.
5:45 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 73-79. Lows: 53-59. Sunny to partly cloudy and seasonably
warm today. A moonlit sky tonight. Partly sunny tomorrow.
Highs: 79-85. Lows: 66-72. Sunny to partly cloudy and more humid
today. Partly cloudy and humid tonight. Partly sunny tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 81-87. Lows: 56-62. Areas of fog during the morning; other-
wise, partly sunny today. A moonlit sky tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 87. Low: 70. Sunny to partly cloudy, warm and more humid
today. A moonlit sky tonight. Partly sunny tomorrow.
High: 89. Low: 70. Sunny to partly cloudy, warmer and more humid
today. Partly cloudy tonight. Partly sunny tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Monday
High/low 81/57
Normal high/low 80/59
Record high 92 (1899)
Record low 46 (1977)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.80"
Normal m-t-d 2.16"
Year to date 17.74"
Normal y-t-d 23.78"
84/61
84/58
89/70
87/64
84/61
86/62
86/63
82/59
86/58
82/55
82/59
84/59
84/59
86/59
87/70
Summary: Thunderstorms and showers will persist in the Southeast today while
hot air in the Plains advances through the Midwest and Northeast. The West will
be dry with afternoon thunderstorms in the Rockies.
(570) 825-8508
Even with Spring Showers Our
Service Is Always Blooming
www.sectv.com
Sponsored By:
Unlike satellite,
our picture stays
crystal clear, no
matter the weather
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
John Hanger, a Democratic candidate for governor, announces a
proposal that he says will put a college education within reach of
middle class families in Pennsylvania on Monday afternoon during
a stop in Wilkes-Barre.
From page 1A
Hanger
pay back 1.4 percent of their incomes, and
state-related graduates would pay 2.2 percent
back into the fund for 15 years.
State universities include 14 schools such
as Bloomsburg, East Stroudsburg, Manseld
and Slippery Rock. State-related schools
include Penn State, Temple, Pittsburgh and
Lincoln.
Hanger, who served as secretary of the DEP
during the Gov. Ed Rendell administration,
came to the United States in 1970 and became
a citizen in 1977. He was born in Nairobi,
Kenya, and also lived in Ireland for a time.
Blueprint for future
He said hes come to understand the impor-
tance of an education for all, regardless of
nances, and believes his blueprint could
make a difference for the nations future.
The biggest barrier to higher education
for middle-class families is the high cost of
attending college, said Hanger. This plan
would remove that barrier and assure that
graduates would not be burdened with huge
college loan debts. Since graduates would pay
a percentage of income once they enter the
workforce, if they lost a job or experienced a
reduction in wages, they would pay little dur-
ing hard times.
Of course, if they create the next Google or
become a doctor, lawyer or some other high-
paying career, theyll wind up paying much
more back to the state than they nancially
received. But just giving those students that
opportunity to succeed is what the programs
benets are all about, Hanger, of Hershey,
said.
He said what his program offers is a chance
they might not have otherwise had. He said
Pennsylvania has become a laggard in educa-
tion. We need to become a leader.
$1.5 billion bond
The initiative would rst be funded through
a $1.5 billion bond the state would oat. Then
as the fund begins being sustained with grad-
uates paying their legally agreed upon share,
it should become self-sustaining.
Until the fund becomes self-sustaining, the
average annual taxpayer cost over 20 years
is $200 million. There are multiple ways to
nance the (fund) like continuing the Capital
Stock and Franchise Tax or allocating a por-
tion of a real drilling tax, said Hanger. But
over time, as more and more graduates pay
back into the fund, it will become self-sustain-
ing.
Hanger said his numbers show that wont
be the case for about 22 years. But he said the
state can no longer continue to do nothing but
cut education funding.
We can throw open the door for public
education for every Pennsylvanian, Hanger
said as his rented school bus hes campaign-
ing in drove around Public Square.
THE CANDIDATES
Former Pennsylvania Auditor General
Jack Wagner told the Associated Press on
Monday he is seriously weighing whether to
enter the already crowded 2014 Democratic
race for governor.
If the Pittsburgh resident runs, Wagner
would be the only western Pennsylvanian
in a feld of at least eight candidates vying
for the chance to challenge Republican Gov.
TomCorbetts re-election bid.
The others are:
Former DEP Secretary John Hanger
State Treasurer Rob McCord
U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz
Former DEP Secretary Katie McGinty
TomWolf, a millionaire businessman
Max Myers, a businessman and former
pastor
Lebanon County Commissioner Jo Ellen
Litz
From page 1A
Controller
degree in business admin-
istration with an account-
ing concentration and has
held several private sector
controller and accounting
positions. She said she is
currently laid off from her
position as a tax accountant
at DeAngelo Brothers Inc.
in Hazleton.
Council will meet at 7
tonight to discuss the appli-
cations and a plan to inter-
view and select someone
to complete Grifths term.
Interested Republicans have
until 4:30 p.m. today to
apply.
A temporary appointee
would be paid $1,406 every
two weeks through Jan. 3.
Councils options
Council Chairman Tim
McGinley said council
may drop the matter if no
Republicans are willing to
interview for the post.
Controllers ofce senior
auditor Patricia Llewellyn
has served as acting control-
ler since Grifths recent
resignation.
The only other potential
applicant who has publicly
expressed an interest in
completing Grifths term
is Alice Coffman, a certied
public accountant who has
owned her own accounting/
tax business Coffman &
Associates in Conyngham
since 1996. Coffman
was undecided last week
and could not be reached
for comment Monday on
whether she will apply.
County Councilman Rick
Morelli, a Republican, said
Medico Olenginskis entry
in the controllers race has
raised questions about how
she would interact with
county Manager Robert
Lawton and council if she is
elected.
Medico Olenginski is the
countys elected prothono-
tary until her term expires
the end of this year, when
the position is permanently
eliminated under home rule.
Lawton instructed Medico
Olenginski to stay home
in September 2012 after
the two disagreed over her
responsibilities under home
rule.
I want someone who will
be a watchdog but not try to
undermine the manager and
council and the entire home
rule government system,
Morelli said.
Medico Olenginski said
she would approach the
ofce with an open mind
but believes opposing views
are healthy for govern-
ment.
My agenda has always
been good government.
Now that we have home
rule, we have to work to
make it the best we can. I
dont want us to have anoth-
er crisis, she said.
From page 1A
Lyme
size of a poppy seed.
Symptoms include a
fever, headache and fatigue
and sometimes a telltale
rash that looks like a bulls-
eye centered on the tick
bite. Most people recover
with antibiotics. If left
untreated, the infection can
cause arthritis and more
severe problems.
In the U.S., the major-
ity of Lyme disease reports
have come from 13 states:
Connecticut, Delaware,
Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Minnesota,
New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York,
Pennsylvania, Vermont,
Virginia and Wisconsin.
The newstudy, which can
be found online at: http://
www.cdc.gov/lyme/ did not
nd anything to suggest the
disease is more geographi-
cally widespread, Mead
said.
From page 1A
Food bank
in September, and he expects the
center to open next July.
Gene Brady, executive direc-
tor of CEO, said the McGowan
Center will be home to the
Weinberg Regional Food Bank
and will promote healthy eating
by increasing the availability of
nutritious food, including fruits
and vegetables, for free distribu-
tion through a network of food
pantries, soup kitchens and
other non-profit agencies.
Its main mission is to help the
residents, especially children,
of Northeastern Pennsylvania
move from hungry to healthy,
Brady said.
The food bank distributed
more than 4.8 million pounds of
food last year, more than three
times the amount distributed in
its first year of operation. Brady
said more people each year rely
on the food bank to feed them-
selves and their families.
Nutritional needs
Sue Gin McGowan, wife of
the late William G. McGowan,
whose charitable fund donated
$2 million toward the $6.4 mil-
lion center, said the McGowan
Fund believes that meeting the
immediate nutritional needs of
a vulnerable population will lead
to self-sufficiency.
It is with joy and humility
that we come together to break
ground for this wonderful new
facility, McGowan said. One
of the many accomplishments
of Father Joe (Monsignor
McGowan) was establishing this
Food Bank. We are here today to
celebrate the expansion of their
original facility.
The original food bank opened
in 1993 with an announcement
by Brady joined by Monsignor
McGowan, former Gov. Bob
Casey, Robert Kelly of the
Weinberg Foundation and then
Luzerne County Commissioner
Chairman Frank Crossin. Kelly
and Crossin attended Mondays
press conference, as did Ellen
Casey, wife of the late governor.
Judge Hugh Mundy, chairman
of the CEO board of directors,
opened the festivities.
Developing the center, he said,
was the culmination of years-
long efforts to provide expanded
facilities for the ever-growing
food bank and fulfillment on the
part of CEO and the McGowan
family to provide more nutri-
tious options for eating among
the food bank clients.
McGowan said the values of
her late husband and brother-in-
law led to creating the center.
She said that when completed,
the Center for Healthy Living
will store and distribute healthy
food products for about 80,000
low-income residents of Luzerne,
Lackawanna, Susquehanna and
Wyoming counties, with an
emphasis on children and the
elderly. The center will also pro-
vide nutritional information.
Brady said a community-wide
fundraising effort would soon
begin to garner public support
for the facility.
This is a major financial
undertaking, he said. CEO
cant do it alone, even with only
the considerable assistance of
the people and groups here today.
We need help from the people of
Northeastern Pennsylvania to
finish the job.
Sue Gin McGowan said 20
years ago she and a group of
close friends and family gathered
met to discuss how to honor the
life and values of Bill McGowan,
founder of MCI Corp.
From humble roots right here
in northeastern Pennsylvania,
Bill achieved international busi-
ness success, she said. Leading
our conversation was Bills
brother, Monsignor Andrew
J. McGowan also known
as Father Joe. Bill believed in
the power of education, the
promise of medicine and medi-
cal research, and the urgency
of meeting community needs.
We established The William G
McGowan Charitable Fund to
further these ideals.
McGowan Fund
McGowan said that since
1993, the McGowan Fund has
granted more than $100 million
to viable groups in the areas of
education, health care and medi-
cal research, and basic human
needs.
The Rev. McGowan chaired
The McGowan Fund board until
his death in 2006.
Gert McGowan, Esq., said the
project to build a new center has
been in the works for years.
We are all thrilled to have the
opportunity to see this begin
to come to fruition, she said.
This is great for the McGowan
Foundation, the community
and for those who will benefit
from the center the people
who were so near to my uncles
heart.
McGowan said the Weinberg
Foundation played a key role
in the project and she said she
hopes the two foundations can
continue to work together.
Kelly, whose involvement
with the food bank began two
decades, said the new facility is
five times the size of the original
space we had.
Following uncles lead
Dan McGowan, vice president
of the CEO board of directors,
said he was proud to follow his
uncles legacy.
We see the need growing
every day, he said. Were proud
to be part of taking this step to
provide for future generations.
Brady thanked Mericle for
donating the land valued at $1.2
million; state Sens. Lisa Baker
and John Yudichak for securing
a $1 million government contri-
bution via the Redevelopment
Capital Assistance Program;
Kelly of the Harry & Jeanette
Weinberg Foundation, which
donated $1 million for this proj-
ect; Luzerne County for contrib-
uting $500,000 through a bond
issue.
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey said
the new food bank will help
Northeastern Pennsylvanians
who are struggling with hunger.
He said CEO and the Weinberg
Foundation deserve praise for
their efforts.
This July, I co-sponsored leg-
islation to provide tax incentives
to encourage businesses and
farms to donate surplus food to
their local food banks, Casey
said. Passing this legislation
can help ensure this food bank
and others in the region have the
resources they need to continue
to help people.
ABOUT CEOS WEINBERG FOOD BANK
The food bank collects donated wholesome food fromthe food
industry, and then works with faith-based and approved non-proft
community organizations to distribute it.
The new50,022-square-foot center will augment the food banks
impact by increasing the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables.
Amulti-purpose meeting roomwith cooking equipment for nutrition
education training.
Ability to store, transport and distribute fresh produce to 138 member
agencies in four counties.
Then and now
18 member agencies in 1996; 138 today.
Just over 1 million pounds of food distributed in 1996; nearly 5 million
pounds today.
36,900 dierent individuals served in 1996; 53,800 in 2011.
In 2008, 30,072 meals were served at 26 locations for children during
the summer; that number grewto 99 locations and 85,410 meals in
2012.
In 2008, 91,029 pounds of fresh produce was distributed; in 2013,
219,643 pounds was distributed.
We are all thrilled to have
the opportunity to see
this begin to come to frui-
tion. This is great for the
McGowan Foundation, the
community and for those
who will benefit from the
center the people who
were so near to my uncles
heart.
Gert McGowan
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Tuesday, August 20, 2013
SPORTS
Robert D. Clements & Duane R. Sprau
Friendly Ofce Expert Sta Timely Service
30 Foster Street, Dallas 570.675.4321
cl ementsdenti str y. com
Smile....its time for Summer Sports!
MICHAEL RUBINKAM
Associated Press Writer
ALLENTOWN From the minor-
league baseball club that gave you the
worlds rst urinal gaming systemcomes
a promotion thats more 6 feet under
than it is over the top: One lucky fan
will win a free funeral package.
The Triple A afliate of the
Philadelphia Phillies, the Lehigh Valley
IronPigs, plans to announce the winner
of its latest, and perhaps most bizarre,
fan giveaway at Tuesday nights game
in Allentown.
Minor-league clubs are notorious for
the wacky promotions they run to help
put fans in the seats, and the IronPigs
are no exception. Earlier this year, the
team boasted about the new gaming
system it had installed in mens rest-
rooms at Coca-Cola Park.
But a free funeral? Talk about bury-
ing the competition.
Its one of our best out-of-the-box
promotions. Or maybe I should say one
of our best in-the-box promotions,
quipped IronPigs General Manager
Kurt Landes.
Fans had to submit an essay describ-
ing their ideal funeral and explain why
they deserved a free one. More than 50
essays were turned in.
IronPigs are ofering
lucky fan free funeral
AP photo
Mark Martin waits for practice to begin for the Pure Michigan
400 race at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn,
Mich., on Saturday.
DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
Out for the season with a bro-
ken leg, Tony Stewart turned to
one of NASCARs most respect-
ed drivers to take over the No.
14.
At 54, Mark Martin is up
for the challenge of taking the
wheel for his good friend.
Hopefully, we can turn the
14 car back over to Tony an
even stronger organization than
what it was when he stepped
away and got injured, Martin
said. Thats the thing that I
really want to work hard to do,
is when its all said and done
with, I hope that they can look
back and say they were glad
that they had me as a part of the
organization.
Martin was released from his
part-time schedule at Michael
Waltrip Racing on Monday and
will drive the No. 14 Chevrolet
in 12 of the nal 13 Sprint Cup
races for Stewart-Haas Racing.
Stewart, a three-time Cup cham-
pion, will miss the rest of the
season while he recovers from
Stewart to miss
rest of season
INSIDE
Busch making impressive
bid for Chase spot; Andretti
talking to Montoya about
IndyCar return.................... 5B
INSIDE
Eager Eagles ready to wear
down opponents; more news
fromaround the NFL ......... 4B
INSIDE
IronPigs top RailRiders, 8-2........... 7B
See STEWART | 3B See FUNERAL | 7B
MATT GELB
The Philadelphia Inquirer
There is no nameplate out-
side Room 1.20.13 at Citizens
Bank Park, the ofce space
reserved for the Phillies man-
ager. Ryne Sandberg is its
interim tenant in a transition
that will require more than
three days. Sunday was bet-
ter for the 53-year-old Hall of
Famer; his Phillies actually
scored.
Deciding how to evaluate
Sandberg in this seasons twi-
light is one of the nal conun-
drums of 2013. The Phillies
stopped Los Angeles 10-game
winning streak with a 3-2 vic-
tory gifted by two ninth-inning
Hanley Ramirez errors. For one
day, they basked in Sandbergs
accomplishment.
Sandberg is not guaranteed
the job, but his promotion is
probable. The Phillies have
long admired his way with
players, both veteran and
young. Still, his interim post
is a trap for immediate failure.
What if the losing lingers and
the Phillies drop behind Miami
for last place?
Until Sunday, the Dodgers
were 30-0 in their last 50 games
when scoring rst. Michael
Young tapped what could have
been an inning-ending double-
play ball to Ramirez, who
booted it. Casper Wells, who
reached on an earlier Ramirez
error, scored the winning run.
The Phillies sought a fresh
start in Sandberg. Changing
the manager did not alter the
awed roster, which contains
11 players who have spent time
at triple A in 2013.
Beyond wins and losses,
the Phillies will watch how
he interacts with players,
other coaches and the media.
Sandberg, of course, has been
a member of the staff all sea-
son and is familiar with much
of the clubhouse.
Phillies general manager
Ruben Amaro Jr. said it is pos-
sible Sandberg is the sole can-
Sandberg fnally a
winner with Phillies
AP photo
Philadelphia Phillies interim manager Ryne Sandberg hits the ball for
fielding drills before a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, on Friday in
Philadelphia.
AP photo
NewYork Yankees Alex Rodriguez throws to first base on a ground out by Boston Red Soxs Jonny Gomes in the third
inning Sunday in Boston.
RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK A lawyer
for Alex Rodriguez declined
Major League Baseballs chal-
lenge to make
public the
drug evidence
that led to
the 211-game
suspension of
the New York
Yankees star.
MLBexecutive vice president
Rob Manfred wrote to lawyer
Joseph Tacopina on Monday,
urging him to waive his clients
condentiality under baseballs
Joint Drug Agreement so the
documents could be released.
Tacopina had said he wanted to
discuss evidence publicly but
was constrained by the provi-
sion.
We will agree to waive those
provisions as they apply to both
Rodriguez and the ofce of
commissioner of baseball with
respect to Rodriguezs entire
history under the program,
including, but not limited to, his
testing history, test results, vio-
lations of the program, and all
information and evidence relat-
ing to Rodriguezs treatment by
Anthony Bosch, Anthony Galea
and Victor Conte, Manfred
wrote in the letter, which was
released by MLB.
Bosch was head of the
Biogenesis of America anti-
aging clinic accused of distrib-
uting banned performance-
enhancing drugs. Galea pleaded
guilty two years ago to a federal
charge of bringing unapproved
drugs into the United States
from Canada. Conte was head
of the Bay Area Laboratory
Co-Operative, the target of a
federal investigation that led to
criminal charges against Barry
A-Rod declines MLB challenge
League ofers
to release
confdential
info with
Yanks OK
INSIDE
JimLitke:
A-Rods got
guts..... 6B
See A-ROD | 7B See SANDBERG | 7B
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Injuries, penalties aplenty as Redskins top Steelers
JOSEPHWHITE
AP Sports Writer
LANDOVER, Md. Robert
Grifn IIIs surgeon ended up
tending to Grifns backup.
LeVeon Bell got hurt again.
There were 15 penalties and
seven turnovers, including a
sequence of three giveaways in
ve plays.
What a mess it was when
the Washington Redskins beat
the Pittsburgh Steelers 24-13
Monday night.
Good thing the preseason
doesnt count, except when it
hurts.
Kirk Cousins, the insurance
policy in case Grifn isnt ready
for the Redskins regular-season
opener, sprained his right foot
early in the second quarter.
Bell, the second-round pick
who was supposed to have the
inside track on the up-for-grabs
Steelers running back job, hurt
his right foot in the rst quar-
ter, another injury to go with
the sore left knee that kept him
out of Pittsburghs preseason
opener.
Grifn didnt play, even
though he suited up again in his
yearning to get on his eld as he
makes his way back from recon-
structive right knee surgery.
Hes been cleared by Dr. James
Andrews for practice, but not for
games.
Andrews, owner Dan Snyder
and general manager Bruce
Allen chatted before the game
while Grifn was warming up,
and no doubt a prime topic was
the protocol for determining
whether last years Offensive
Rookie of the Year will be ready
for the regular-season opener
Sept. 9.
Grifn raised eyebrows when
he dressed in full uniform
before the preseason opener
at Tennessee on Aug. 8, even
though he knew he wasnt going
to play. He did the same Monday
night, right down to the bulky
black brace on his right knee.
Earlier, he walked onto the
eld wearing a white T-shirt
with the words OPERATION
PATIENCE, his ad hoc theme
throughout training camp meant
to temper his unhappiness with
coach Mike Shanahans cautious
practice plan.
Cousins started and went 2
for 3 for 19 yards before he got
injured the same way Grifn did
during a game last season
while getting tackled at the end
of a run.
He grabbed his right foot after
being dragged down along the
sideline by linebacker Lawrence
Timmons and was examined by
Andrews before walking to the
locker room.
The Steelers were so anxious
to see what Bell could do that
they gave himthe ball on the rst
four offensive plays of the game.
The ex-Michigan State back
gained 4, 3, 1 and 2 yards, left
the game and never returned.
24
Redskins
13
Steelers
PAGE 2B Tuesday, August 20, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
Colorado -120 at Philadelphia +110
Los Angeles -140 at Miami +130
Atlanta -140 at NewYork +130
at Cincinnati -155 Arizona +145
Washington -115 at Chicago +105
St. Louis -130 at Milwaukee +120
Pittsburgh -120 at San Diego +110
American League
at NewYork (G1) -175 Toronto +165
at NewYork (G2) -120 Toronto +110
at Baltimore -115 Tampa Bay +105
at Detroit -230 Minnesota +210
at Texas -210 Houston +190
at Kansas City -175 Chicago +165
at Los Angeles -130 Cleveland +120
at Oakland -175 Seattle +165
Interleague
Boston -135 at San Francisco +125
NFL PRESEASON
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
at Detroit 1 1 (45) NewEngland
at Baltimore 3 3 (42) Carolina
Friday
Seattle 3 2 (42) at Green Bay
Chicago 3 3 (38) at Oakland
Saturday
at Washington 3 3 (42) Bufalo
at N.Y. Giants 2 2 (39) N.Y. Jets
at Indianapolis 2 3 (43) Cleveland
at Miami 2 3 (40) Tampa Bay
at Pittsburgh 3 3 (40) Kansas City
Philadelphia 3 3 (43) at Jacksonville
at Tennessee 2 3 (43) Atlanta
at Denver 7 6 (43) St. Louis
at Dallas 2 3 (43) Cincinnati
at Arizona 4 4 (40) San Diego
Sunday
at Houston 2 3 (43) NewOrleans
at San Francisco 4 4 (40) Minnesota
LATEST LINE BULLETIN BOARD
local calendar football
auto raci ng
what s on tv
baseball
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Rochester (Twins) 72 59 .550
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 69 60 .535 2
Bufalo (Blue Jays) 67 63 .515 4
LehighValley (Phillies) 67 63 .515 4
RailRiders (Yankees) 62 68 .477 9
Syracuse (Nationals) 61 70 .466 11
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham(Rays) 80 50 .615
Norfolk (Orioles) 69 62 .527 11
Charlotte (White Sox) 59 70 .457 20
Gwinnett (Braves) 56 75 .427 24
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 73 58 .557
Columbus (Indians) 63 68 .481 10
Louisville (Reds) 60 71 .458 13
Toledo (Tigers) 55 76 .420 18
Mondays Games
Toledo 6, Gwinnett 0
Syracuse 6, Indianapolis 2
Norfolk 7, Columbus 2
Lehigh Valley 8, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 2
Pawtucket 3, Bufalo 0
Rochester 7, Louisville 0
Charlotte 1, Durham0
Tuesdays Games
Norfolk at Columbus, 12:05 p.m.
Louisville at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Lehigh Valley,
7:05 p.m.
Bufalo at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Binghamton (Mets) 80 48 .625
Trenton (Yankees) 66 61 .520 13
NewHampshire (Blue Jays)62 64 .492 17
Portland (Red Sox) 61 66 .480 18
NewBritain (Twins) 59 69 .461 21
Reading (Phillies) 53 74 .417 26
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Erie (Tigers) 67 60 .528
Harrisburg (Nationals) 67 60 .528
Richmond (Giants) 65 62 .512 2
Bowie (Orioles) 64 63 .504 3
Akron (Indians) 60 67 .472 7
Altoona (Pirates) 59 69 .461 8
z-clinched playof spot
Mondays Games
Reading 4, Altoona 2, 1st game
Binghamton 3, Bowie 2, 10 innings
Portland 3, NewHampshire 2
Trenton 10, NewBritain 3
Akron 10, Erie 9
Harrisburg at Richmond, ppd., rain
Altoona 3, Reading 2, 2nd game
Tuesdays Games
Harrisburg at Richmond, 5:35 p.m., 1st game
NewHampshire at Portland, 6 p.m.
Bowie at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Reading at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Trenton at NewBritain, 7:05 p.m.
Akron at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Richmond, 8:05 p.m., 2nd game
Wednesdays Games
NewHampshire at Portland, 12 p.m.
Bowie at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Reading at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Akron at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at NewBritain, 7:05 p.m.
NEWYORk - PENN LEAGUE
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Aberdeen (Orioles) 30 26 .536
Brooklyn (Mets) 30 29 .508 1
HudsonValley (Rays) 27 32 .458 4
Staten Island (Yankees) 24 35 .407 7
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Jamestown (Pirates) 35 23 .603
State College (Cardinals) 35 23 .603
Batavia (Marlins) 29 27 .518 5
Williamsport (Phillies) 29 29 .500 6
MahoningValley (Indians) 23 34 .404 11
Auburn (Nationals) 20 38 .345 15
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Lowell (Red Sox) 34 23 .596
Tri-City (Astros) 35 25 .583
Vermont (Athletics) 29 31 .483 6
Connecticut (Tigers) 27 32 .458 8
Mondays Games
Brooklyn 3, Staten Island 2, 1st game
Vermont 7, Tri-City 2
Lowell 6, Connecticut 2
Jamestown 8, Auburn 7
Williamsport 4, MahoningValley 2
Aberdeen 5, HudsonValley 3
State College 2, Batavia 1, 11 innings
Staten Island 5, Brooklyn 2, 2nd game
Tuesdays Games
Vermont at Tri-City, 7 p.m.
Staten Island at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
State College at Williamsport, 7:05 p.m.
Batavia at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
HudsonValley at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Connecticut at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at MahoningValley, 7:05 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Auburn at Batavia, 5:05 p.m., 1st game
Brooklyn at Staten Island, 7 p.m.
Lowell at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Aberdeen at HudsonValley, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Vermont, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at State College, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at MahoningValley, 7:05 p.m.
Auburn at Batavia, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
SUNDAYS LATE BOxScORE
Yankees 9, Red Sox 6
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 5 0 2 3 0 1 .271
I.Suzuki rf 6 1 2 0 0 1 .272
Cano 2b 5 0 3 0 0 1 .301
A.Soriano lf 6 0 0 0 0 1 .306
A.Rodriguez 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .319
Granderson dh 5 2 1 0 0 0 .275
Nunez ss 3 0 3 1 0 0 .248
1-J.Nix pr-ss 1 2 0 0 0 1 .230
Overbay 1b 2 1 1 1 0 1 .257
a-Mar.Reynoldsph-1b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .219
C.Stewart c 4 1 1 1 1 0 .230
Totals 43 9 17 9 1 6
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Ellsbury cf 4 1 0 0 1 4 .296
Victorino rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .280
Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .291
D.Ortiz dh 4 0 2 1 1 1 .327
J.Gomes lf 2 0 0 1 2 0 .236
Saltalamacchia c 4 1 2 1 1 0 .270
Nava 1b 2 0 0 1 1 2 .290
Drewss 3 0 0 1 0 2 .245
Middlebrooks 3b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .223
Totals 32 6 9 6 7 10
NewYork 021 004 1019 17 0
Boston 201 210 0006 9 0
a-singled for Overbay in the 7th.
1-ran for Nunez in the 6th.
LOBNew York 13, Boston 9. 2BCano (24),
Granderson (4), Victorino (19), D.Ortiz (28),
Saltalamacchia (33), Middlebrooks (16). 3B
Gardner (7). HRA.Rodriguez (2), of Dempster;
Middlebrooks (10), ofSabathia. RBIsGardner 3
(42), A.Rodriguez 2 (6), Nunez (18), Overbay (51),
Mar.Reynolds (52), C.Stewart (20), D.Ortiz (78),
J.Gomes (35), Saltalamacchia (47), Nava (55),
Drew (48), Middlebrooks (29). SBGranderson
(5), Nunez 2 (7), J.Nix (12). SNava. SFOver-
bay, J.Gomes, Drew.
Runners left in scoring positionNew York 9
(A.Soriano 4, Gardner 2, Granderson 3); Boston 5
(Nava, Drew 2, Ellsbury, Saltalamacchia). RISP
NewYork 5 for 21; Boston 1 for 9.
Runners moved upI.Suzuki, A.Soriano,
A.Rodriguez, D.Ortiz. GIDPSaltalamacchia.
DPNewYork 1 (J.Nix, Cano, Mar.Reynolds).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
SabathiaW,11-10 51-3 7 6 6 5 5 103 4.83
Kelley H, 7 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.40
Logan H, 8 1 0 0 0 1 1 9 2.86
D.RobertsonH, 29 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 1.74
M.Rivera S, 36-41 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 2.38
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
DempsterL,6-9 51-3 9 7 7 1 3 107 4.77
D.BrittonBS,2-2 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 10 3.77
Workman 1 1 1 1 0 1 13 4.75
F.Morales 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 18 6.14
Tazawa 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.50
R.De La Rosa 1 2 1 1 0 0 26 4.76
Inheritedrunners-scoredKelley 1-0, D.Britton
3-3, Workman 2-0, F.Morales 1-1, Tazawa 2-0.
IBBof Sabathia (Saltalamacchia). HBPby
Dempster (A.Rodriguez), by F.Morales (Gardner),
by R.De La Rosa (J.Nix, Cano). WPSabathia,
D.Robertson, Dempster, R.De La Rosa.
UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Fieldin
Culbreth; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Adrian John-
son.
T4:12. A37,917 (37,499).
TUESDAY
H.S. GIRLSTENNIS
Berwick at Tunkhannock
Coughlin at HazletonArea
Dallas at GAR
WyomingArea at PittstonArea
Wyoming Seminary at MMI Prep
WyomingValley West at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Crestwood at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
H.S. GOLF
Berwick at HazletonArea
Coughlin at PittstonArea
Dallas at Tunkhannock
GAR at WyomingArea
Holy Redeemer at Meyers, 4 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
WyomingValley West at Crestwood, 3:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
H.S. GIRLSTENNIS
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Dallas
HazletonArea at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Coughlin, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at WyomingValley West
PittstonArea at Wyoming Seminary
Tunkhannock at WyomingArea
FRIDAY
H.S. FOOTBALL ScRIMMAGES
Wallenpaupack at Wyoming Valley West, 10
a.m.
Dunmore at PittstonArea, 5 p.m.
Holy Cross at Nanticoke, 5 p.m.
Bangor at HazletonArea, 6 p.m.
Central Dauphin at Berwick, 6 p.m.
Meyers at MidValley, 6 p.m.
Northwest at Athens, 6 p.m.
Tunkhannock at WesternWayne, 6 p.m.
Coughlin at Scranton, 7 p.m.
Crestwood at Lackawanna Trail, 7 p.m.
Dallas at GAR, 7 p.m.
Honesdale at Hanover Area, 7 p.m.
Riverside at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Valley Viewat WyomingArea, 7 p.m.
H.S GOLF
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
WyomingArea at Meyers
H.S GIRLSTENNIS
Crestwood at Tamaqua, 4 p.m.
SATURDAY
H.S FOOTBALL ScRIMMAGE
Holy Redeemer at Col-Montour Vo-Tech, 10a.m.
cOLLEGE MENS SOccER
Kings vs. Geneva, 7 p.m. at Midd-West High
School
cYcLING
4 p.m.
NBCSN USA Pro Challenge, stage 2, Aspen
to Breckenridge, Colo.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
ESPNWorld Series, consolation, teams TBD,
at SouthWilliamsport
4 p.m.
ESPN World Series, elimination, teams TBD,
at SouthWilliamsport
8 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, elimination, teams
TBD, at SouthWilliamsport
MLB
1 p.m.
YES Toronto at N.Y. Yankees
7 p.m.
CSNColorado at Philadelphia
MLB Regional coverage, Arizona at Cincin-
nati or Tampa Bay at Baltimore
SNYAtlanta at N.Y. Mets
WQMY, WWOR Toronto at N.Y. Yankees
10 p.m.
ROOTPittsburgh at San Diego
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
SE2, WYLN Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Le-
highValley
SOccER
2:30 p.m.
FS1 UEFA Champions League, AC Milan at
Eindhoven
8 p.m.
FS1 CONCACAF Champions League, Hous-
ton vs. W Connection, at Marabella, Trinidad and
Tobago
WNBA
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Los Angeles at Seattle
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERIcAN cONFERENcE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Bufalo 2 0 0 1.000 64 36
NewEngland 2 0 0 1.000 56 43
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 54 39
Miami 1 2 0 .333 64 51
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 51 30
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 40 56
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 16 64
Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 40 49
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 71 39
Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 61 29
Cleveland 2 0 0 1.000 51 25
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 13 18
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 1 0 .500 20 46
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 39 45
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 26 32
San Diego 0 2 0 .000 38 64
NATIONAL cONFERENcE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 22 21
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 30 33
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 36 40
Dallas 1 2 0 .333 48 51
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 2 0 0 1.000 45 33
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 33 31
Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 33 61
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 37 69
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 50 52
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 32 41
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 19 24
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 29 47
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 29 7
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 71 20
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 21 23
St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 26 46
Thursdays Games
Cleveland 24, Detroit 6
Baltimore 27, Atlanta 23
Philadelphia 14, Carolina 9
Chicago 33, San Diego 28
Fridays Games
Bufalo 20, Minnesota 16
NewOrleans 28, Oakland 20
San Francisco 15, Kansas City 13
NewEngland 25, Tampa Bay 21
Saturdays Games
Arizona 12, Dallas 7
Cincinnati 27, Tennessee 19
N.Y. Jets 37, Jacksonville 13
Green Bay 19, St. Louis 7
Houston 24, Miami 17
Seattle 40, Denver 10
Sundays Game
Indianapolis 20, N.Y. Giants 12
Mondays Game
Pittsburgh at Washington (n)
Thursday, Aug. 22
NewEngland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 23
Seattle at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 24
Bufalo at Washington, 4:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 8 p.m.
Cincinnati at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
NewOrleans at Houston, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
NAScAR SPRINT cUP
Points Leaders
Through Aug. 18
1. Jimmie Johnson, 813.
2. Clint Bowyer, 772.
3. Carl Edwards, 762.
4. Kevin Harvick, 749.
5. Kyle Busch, 706.
6. Matt Kenseth, 688.
7. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 679.
8. Brad Keselowski, 667.
9. Kurt Busch, 665.
10. Greg Bife, 663.
11. Kasey Kahne, 659.
12. MartinTruex Jr., 653.
13. Joey Logano, 646.
14. Jef Gordon, 637.
15. Ryan Newman, 636.
16. Jamie McMurray, 622.
17. Paul Menard, 599.
18. Tony Stewart, 594.
19. Aric Almirola, 587.
20. Jef Burton, 561.
21. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 556.
22. Marcos Ambrose, 554.
23. Juan Pablo Montoya, 549.
24. Casey Mears, 492.
25. Denny Hamlin, 439.
26. David Ragan, 420.
27. Danica Patrick, 418.
28. David Gilliland, 395.
29. Mark Martin, 379.
30. Dave Blaney, 343.
31. Bobby Labonte, 337.
32. David Stremme, 314.
33. David Reutimann, 314.
34. J.J. Yeley, 297.
35. Travis Kvapil, 291.
36. AJ Allmendinger, 278.
37. Michael McDowell, 115.
38. Timmy Hill, 114.
39. Michael Waltrip, 102.
40. Scott Speed, 94.
41. Terry Labonte, 77.
42. Ken Schrader, 68.
43. Boris Said, 48.
44. Ron Fellows, 31.
45. Alex Kennedy, 21.
46. Justin Marks, 14.
47. Victor Gonzalez Jr., 10.
48. Scott Riggs, 10.
49. Brian Keselowski, 9.
50. Tomy Drissi, 8.
Moore makes ace
Jason Moore, Shavertown, aced
the 180-yard ffth hole at the
Huntsville Golf Club with a 7 iron
Aug. 7. Chris Wade witnessed the
hole-in-one.
Sperling sinks hole-in-one
JimSperling, Dallas, aced the 177-
yard 15th hole at the Huntsville
Golf Club with a 7 iron Aug. 7. Joe
Sullivan witnessed the hole-in-
one.
Novak knocks in ace
Dan Novak aced the 168-yard
18th hole at the Berwick Golf
Club with a 5 iron Aug. 7. Dave
Dienias and Jack Wilk witnessed
the hole-in-one.
Popovitch drains hole-in-one
IremGolf Association member
Rich Popovitch aced the 17th hole
at the IremCountry Club Aug.
7. Davis Janus, Dr. John Konicki
and JimFinn witnessed the hole-
in-one.
Saraka aces Huntsville 5th
Justin Saraka, Shavertown,
recorded a hole-in-one Thursday,
Aug. 8 at the Huntsville Golf Club
in Lehman Township. Saraka aced
the No. 5 hole fromthe white tee
markers using an 8 iron. His shot
was witnessed by Kasey Corbett.
HOLES-IN-ONE
transacti ons
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Sent 3B Wilson Bete-
mit to Frederick (Carolina) for a rehab assign-
ment. Recalled DH Danny Valencia from Norfolk
(IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS Acquired 1B Japhet
Amador and OFLeonardo Heras fromDiablos Ro-
jos del Mexico (Mexican) for cash considerations.
Called up LHPWade LeBlanc fromOklahoma City
(PCL). Optioned OF Marc Krauss to Oklahoma
City.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Sent OF Desmond Jen-
nings to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Reinstated SS
Munenori Kawasaki from the paternity list. Op-
tioned RHPThadWeber to Bufalo (IL).
National League
PITTSBURGHPIRATESSent RHPJames Mc-
DonaldtotheGCLPirates for arehabassignment.
can-AmLeague
ROCKLAND BOULDERS Released RHP Na-
thaniel Roe.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS Released P Will Bat-
son, CKyle Quinn and G-CScott Wedige.
BALTIMORE RAVENS Released CB Chris
Johnson.
BUFFALOBILLS Released PKRian Lindell.
DALLAS COWBOYS Waived/injured LB
Alex Albright, DT Travis Chappelear and DE Toby
Jackson.
DETROIT LIONS Waived LB Cory Green-
wood.
HOUSTON TEXANS Activated WR DeVier
Posey fromthe active/PUPlist.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Placed RB Dan
Moore on the waived-injured list.
JACKSONVILLEJAGUARS ReleasedWRMo-
hamed Massaquoi and G-CJason Spitz.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Traded WR Jon Bald-
win to San Francisco for WRA.J. Jenkins.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Released CB Jacob
Lacey.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Reached an in-
jury settlement with TE Brandon Ford. Released
LBA.J. Edds, OLR.J. Mattes and DLScott Vallone.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Placed WR Danario
Alexander on the waived-injured list.
TENNESSEE TITANS Activated TE Delanie
Walker fromthe PUPlist.
Womens Indoor Football League
WIFL Signed coach Rick Reeder to a three-
year contract.
HOckEY
National Hockey League
MONTREAL CANADIENS Signed G Dustin
Tokarski to a one-year, two-way contract.
EcHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS Agreed to terms with
FTaylor Vause.
cOLLEGE
HAMPDEN-SYDNEY Named Nick Goins
linebackers coach and special teams coordinator.
RANDOLPH-MACON Named Joe Meehan
mens assistant basketball coach.
ONTHE MARk
MARk DUDEk
For The Times Leader
The Battle Of Brandywine certainly lived up to its
billing Saturday night at The Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs.
Sunshine Beach, reined by Brian Sears, raced gigan-
tic as he went down the road and was dead-game in
holding off superstar Captain Treacherous in an unbe-
lievable 1:47.4 thriller. What a duel the two pacers had
down the stretch. It was a race for the ages and just
may have been the best race in the history of Pocono
Downs.
Breeders Crown night cant come soon enough. Its
going to be just an amazing night come Oct. 19.
BEST BET: TWEET ME (11TH)
VALUE PLAY: SINCERELY YOURS S (4TH)
Post time 6:30 p.m.
All races 1 mile
First-$9,000 cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5
3 Miss Annie J G.Napolitano 5-5-5 Should dust these 5-2
2 Destinys Chance M.Kakaley 2-5-1 Still trying to fnd her stride 7-2
5 Carolines Cullen N J.Pavia 8-5-6 Pavia stabled pacer 5-1
4 Jets Are On M.Simons 3-1-7 3yr old tackles older 4-1
7 Miss Pinky Pie R.Pierce 6-6-6 One better than sixth 8-1
1 Market Dynamics M.Romano 5-7-5 Doesnt like to win 6-1
9 Bestest Hanover E.Carlson 6-7-5 Best is long gone 20-1
8 Ok Destiny T.Buter 5-8-6 Moves out of claimers 12-1
6 Rock Concert A.Miller 4-6-6 Lacks sound 15-1
Second-$20,000 The Stallion Series
1 Rockenonbroadway R.Pierce 1-1-x Ready at frst asking 6-1
5 Dancing Dynamite D.Miller 1-7-9 Already a stakes winner 5-2
4 Simply Sassy T.Buter 2-1-2 Nice maiden win two back 3-1
7 Czech It Out A.McCarthy 2-3-4 Fast of the wings 10-1
8 Martini Master A.Miller 2-3-7 Miller catch drives 9-2
6 Keepsake Hanover M.Kakaley 3-5-1 Has experience edge 4-1
3 SchlimSchlamma M.Aukamp 3-4-2 Lear Jetta flly 12-1
2 Cantana R.Schnittker 4-4-5 Folds tent 15-1
Third-$20,000 The Stallion Series
5 Bikini So Teeny C.Norris 7-2-7 Best of weak division 7-2
1 Explosive Attitude J.Wagner 1-1-1 Wags in for rare visit 9-2
2 Fastlane Anover D.Minor 5-2-3 Deshawn with the steer 5-2
3 Outsourced Hanover M.Kakaley 2-4-4 Burke stabled pupil 3-1
4 Samba Gal D.Swick 5-2-4 Cant stay on feet 12-1
6 MMs Roanie Tn.Schadel 3-6-5 Gaps 6-1
7 Isabella Hanover T.Jackson 1-1-5 Best work done at fairs 8-1
Fourth-$20,000 The Stallion Series
7 Sincerely Yours S D.Miller 3-4-6 Victory is mine 8-1
6 Sally Savannah M.Simons 5-2-2 One to catch 5-2
1 Tuonela T.Jackson 4-1-2 Locally stabled trotter 6-1
2 Best By Test R.Pierce 2-4-7 Stays in good hands 7-2
4 EmHanover R.Tharps 2-3-7 Umno 3-1
5 Pixel Queen E.Neal 3-2-3 Eric in for night 9-2
3 Itsawomansthang M.Romano 7-7-7 Swallowed up 12-1
Fifth-$4,500 clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000
2 Lucky Land G.Napolitano 3-6-6 Drops and pops 3-1
7 My Fella A.Napolitano 4-3-1 Veteran more than capable 6-1
4 Articulate E.Carlson 6-4-8 Much better draw 7-2
3 Captain Greg T.Jackson 7-1-2 Hung mile last week 9-2
6 Lost Bliss K.Wallis 7-5-2 Been burning cash 4-1
1 Only In America R.Pierce 9-5-5 Note the driver change 8-1
9 Lifetime Louie A.Santeramo 5-5-2 It would take a lot 10-1
8 Spike Hanover J.Drury 6-8-4 Drury back in town 15-1
5 Touch Of Steel J.Kakaley 4-7-7 Of since May 20-1
Sixth-$20,000 The Stallion Series
3 Psychobabble T.Jackson 1-3-3 Looked good in AM 7-2
4 Gilda De Vie A.Miller 1-5-4 Just broke the ice 5-2
6 Medallist D.Miller 4-3-2 Glidemaster flly 3-1
5 Curvature Hanover T.Schadel 7-5-5 Raced weakly in Historic 9-2
7 Step On It J.Pavia 5-8-4 Not hit board in 4 starts 8-1
1 Ideal Emma E.Neal 1-3-3 Goes for teamNeal 6-1
2 Deb On Broadway R.Pierce 4-6-x Never involved 12-1
Seventh-$20,000 The Stallion Series
8 Champagne Dreams B.Miller 3-1-3 Brett in for Hall trotter 5-2
1 Fay R.Schnittker 2-7-2 Ray having of season 3-1
2 SJs Proposal R.Pierce 5-5-4 Ronnie a money driver 4-1
6 South Carolina J.Takter Jr 5-9-8 Lone win came with Jr 9-2
4 False Modesty T.Jackson 4-5-2 Just second career start 6-1
5 Flirt The Issue B.Burgess 3-5-2 Canadian import 10-1
7 Rarely Wrong T.Buter 6-3-7 Wrong often 12-1
3 Pink Marble J.Johnson 7-4-x Last of all 15-1
Eighth-$15,000 cond.Pace;n/w 4 pm races life
3 Power Pack Hanover A.Miller 1-6-7 Jogged last visit here 5-2
9 Mattie Terror Girl R.Pierce 7-1-5 Dont overlook this one 12-1
5 Goddesss Rosa B.Miller 1-1-3 Looking for three in a row 4-1
2 Tiger Boudoir G.Napolitano 3-1-2 Nap gets live mount 3-1
1 Shucked E.Neal 3-5-5 Very good race 15-1
4 Traveling Jeanie S.Allard 3-4-2 TeamAllard red hot 5-1
7 Antigua Hanover T.Buter 2-3-5 Tyler remains very cold 6-1
6 Juice Hanover M.Romano 5-1-1 In with tough group 10-1
8 Sapere Hanover J.Pavia 8-6-2 No answers 20-1
Ninth-$20,000 The Stallion Series
3 Nitro Nittany H.Parker 1-1-1 Explodes to easy score 2-1
1 Pinking Of You D.Miller 2-6-1 Illnois owned trotter 3-1
2 Highest Peak A.McCarthy 5-3-3 Daley done well with youngsters4-1
6 DreamThat Dream R.Schnittker 7-3-2 Schnittker owns and drives 5-1
7 Mitys Winner S.Allard 6-1-6 Looking to stay fat 15-1
8 Dynamite Honey R.Pierce 5-4-5 Explosive Matter frster 8-1
5 Lindys Fireworks D.Ackerman 5-4-4 Adud 12-1
4 Check The Order B.Burgess 6-6-7 Keep checking 10-1
Tenth-$15,000 cond.Pace;n/w 4 pm races life
4 Ts Electric J.Marohn Jr 7-4-2 Should have won last wk 4-1
6 Allaboutme Hanover M.Kakaley 1-3-2 Certainly a live one 3-1
1 TSMCrusin Usa A.McCarthy 4-4-6 Back fromMeadows 10-1
3 Knocking Around A.Napolitano 3-5-1 Picks up the pieces 8-1
7 Here Comes Swifty A.Miller 1-4-2 Cant hold up in here 7-2
2 Lupara M.Simons 8-1-7 Does get a better post 9-2
9 Beachfront G.Napolitano 6-2-2 Been tiring late 6-1
8 Spartacus Pv E.Carlson 4-6-3 Fumbles 15-1
5 Banging The Drum J.Antonelli 6-8-5 Hard to recommend 20-1
Eleventh-$20,000 The Stallion Series
5 Tweet Me D.Miller 1-2-1 The best bet 5-2
2 Minerva Bi T.Buter 3-8-3 Race is for place 7-2
1 Miss Geneva B.Miller 4-1-2 D Miller opted of 3-1
3 Explosive Victory F.DelCid 3-3-3 Been getting nice checks 9-2
4 Winky Dink A.Miller 6-1-5 Green trotter 6-1
6 Youre Catching On C.Norris 2-5-6 Dont catch 8-1
7 Tipsy Tiara J.Wagner 4-7-4 Tipped over 12-1
Twelfth-$18,000 clm.Hndcp Trot;clm.price $25-30,000
4 Take Heart K.Wallis 4-2-2 Worth one more shot 4-1
9 Zumba Mouse A.Napolitano 1-1-7 Keeps on suprising 3-1
3 Cash Value R.Pierce 7-5-8 In fromthe Bronx 5-1
7 Prismatica C.Norris 7-3-1 Live longshot 8-1
8 Iron Will G.Napolitano 5-1-4 Bounced of big win 9-2
1 DCs Piggy Bank D.Miller 2-8-1 Much better on the post 7-2
6 April Sunshine J.Pavia 8-5-2 Lost his late kick 10-1
5 Bar Wine M.Kakaley 7-3-3 Plummets to the back 15-1
2 Blomkvist T.Jackson 8-9-8 Troubled trotter 20-1
Thirteenth-$9,000 cond.Pace;n/w $4,000 last 5
2 Upfront Ticket R.Pierce 2-9-5 Barn change does it 4-1
1 In Mint Condition A.Napolitano 3-7-8 The one to beat 5-2
9 Gotta Go Hanover M.Kakaley 6-4-5 Gets some class relief 5-1
4 Laurent Hanover K.Wallis 2-3-6 Way overbet last out 3-1
3 Ryan Again M.Romano 3-3-4 Matt batting just .159 6-1
8 Ronny B Fast J.Pavia 4-4-3 Slows 10-1
7 Highland Boreas S.Allard 4-6-6 Washes away 15-1
6 Perfect Terror G.Napolitano 3-5-7 Lacks that late drive 12-1
5 Wild For Real B.Miller 8-4-7 Stomped 20-1
Fourteenth-$12,000 clm.Trot;clm.price $15,000
5 Luv Ya Tyler S.Allard 2-4-9 Stays fat and cruises 4-1
3 Cheetah Hall G.Napolitano 2-2-2 Again grabs second 3-1
6 Pegasus Blue Chip J.Pavia 3-2-9 First start of the claim 6-1
1 NowYou See Him R.Pierce 6-4-6 Pierce hops in bike 7-2
9 QuantumLightning W.Mullin 2-6-1 Mullin hops in the sulky 10-1
2 Myology A.McCarthy 9-5-6 Back to level of purchase 9-2
4 Looking To Score M.Kakaley 3-7-6 No runs on the board 8-1
8 Thekeptman A.Santeramo 6-8-2 Atoss 15-1
7 Kandian Klub A.Miller 7-8-2 ..next 20-1
Fifteenth-$13,000 cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
3 Lord Of Misrule M.Kakaley 1-1-4 Been dominant so far 5-2
7 Classics Greatwish A.Miller 8-2-1 Could be any kind 5-1
1 Red Hot Native B.Miller 5-1-3 Brett picks up live drive 4-1
2 Ofcial Warning H.Parker 6-8-1 Struggled since that win 3-1
9 Preparty R.Pierce 5-1-1 Meadows invader 10-1
4 Kings Barns M.Simons 5-3-6 Western Terror gelding 6-1
5 Ofcially Crazy K.Wallis 3-6-6 Has to reach down for more 12-1
6 Howabout Hanover R.Schnittker 7-7-5 Howabout not betting 15-1
9 Po Po Dee A.McCarthy 5-5-x One more race to go 20-1
Sixteenth-$13,000 cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
4 Conors Concord R.Pierce 1-5-6 No problems in fnale 3-1
1 Dancing Cruiser B.Miller 1-4-4 Pocket trip for exacta 6-1
8 Moving Up Fool G.Napolitano 4-4-4 Rounds out the tri 9-2
3 Johnny The Wire J.Pavia 5-2-8 Fast early on 4-1
2 ImBanksy T.Jackson 6-2-7 Just 1-for-13 lifetime 7-2
9 Boy Stuf D.Rawlings 4-5-9 Not happening 20-1
6 Happy NewYears K.Wallis 7-6-7 Wrong time of year 8-1
7 Western Nation M.Kakaley 8-6-1 Going south 10-1
5 Jv Hanover E.Carlson 6-3-4 See you tomorrow 15-1
LEAGUES
checkerboard Inn Bowling
League has openings for fve-
man teams. Teams can roster
eight men. The league bowls
Wednesdays at 6:45 p.m. at
Chackos Family Bowling Center.
It is an 80 percent handicap
mens league that currently has
11 teams and will begin league
play Aug. 21. If interested, call
Frank at 675-7532 or Chackos
Family Bowling Center.
kingston Recreation center is
now accepting teams for its fall
softball leagues. League fees for
mens teams playing Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
as well as Sunday coed are $125
per team. Sunday mens leagues
are $75 per team. Call for more
information at 287-1106.
Midnight Hoops Fall
Basketball League will be
played Sundays and Wednesdays
beginning Sept. 4, at the
Kingston Rec Center for boys in
grades 9-12. The cost is $100.
Players can sign up online, or
print and mail a form to 84
South Church Road, Mountain
Top, PA, 18707. A check must be
sent to the above address. No
online payments are accepted
and checks should be made
payable to Steve Modrovsky. For
more information, email Steve
Modrovsky at smlng@ptd.net or
call him at 793-3280.
St. conrads Bowling League is
looking for bowlers to fll a team.
The league bowls Wednesday
nights at 6:45 p.m. at Chackos
starting Sept. 4. To register, call
Butch at 954-6009.
MEETINGS
GAR Memorial High School
Football Booster club will meet
Thursday Aug. 22, at 5:30 p.m.
in the Choral Room at the high
school.
North End Slovak club
Dart League will have a
reorganization meeting
Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 7:30 p.m.
at the club. Returning members
from last year should attend.
The league plays on Wednesday
nights at 7 p.m. New members
are welcome.
Wyoming Area Boys Soccer
Parents will hold a meeting
Sunday Sept. 8, at 6 p.m. for
the parents of the boys soccer
team. The meeting will be held at
Butler Street Park in Wyoming.
Wyoming Area Girls Soccer
Parents will hold a meeting on
Wednesday, Aug 21, at 6:30 p.m.
We will meet at the secondary
center-outside gym entrance.
UPcOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Eric Brielmeier Memorial Golf
Tournament will be held Sunday,
Sept. 1, at Sand Springs Country
Club. Registration begins at
noon with a four-man scramble
format. Cost is $75 per golfer,
$300 per team. For information
or to register call 788-5845
ext. 1.
Father-Son Baseball
Tournament and Home Run
Derby to beneft The Dallas
Foundation is set for Sat., Sept.
7. at the Back Mountain Little
League Field. There will be a
9-10 year old game (10 a.m.),
Home Run Derby (noon), and
an 11-12 year old game (1:30
p.m.). Registration fee is $50
for each father/ son team
(includes t-shirts). Child must
be league age to participate. The
registration deadline is Aug. 24.
For more information, call Frank
at 675-1191 or email cooksrx@
aol.com.
Greater Wilkes-Barre chamber
of commerce will have its
annual golf tournament at Blue
Ridge Trail Golf Club, Mountain
Top, on Aug. 23. Registration
and continental breakfast are
at 10 a.m., and a shotgun start
at 11 a.m. Following golf, there
will be a cocktail hour, bufet
dinner, prizes for fight winners,
tee prizes and a gift for each
participant. The cost is $440
for a group of four or $125 a
person. To attend the dinner and
reception only, the cost is $50.
Sponsorship opportunities are
available. For more information,
email John Maday at john@
wilkes-barre.org or call 823-2101,
ext. 131.
kingston/Forty Fort Little
League Board of Directors has
nominations for all positions.
In order to submit your name
for nomination, please email
bbordow@ptd.net indicating
your interest. Nominations for all
positions will be submitted at the
KFF Board meeting on Monday,
Sept. 16. A detailed description
of these positions are available
on our website- www.kfl.org.
knights of columbus Wilkes-
Barre council 302 will hold
its charities golf tournament
on Sunday, Aug. 25, at Sand
Springs Country Club in Drums.
Cost is $65 per person with an
8 a.m. shotgun start. For more
information call Joe Lisckosky
at 239-0133 or Jerry Nash at
262-8983.
Nescopeck State Park 9th
Annual 5k and 10k Trail
Runs will be Saturday, Aug.
24, in Drums. The event
benefts the Hazleton Chapter
of the American Red Cross.
Registration is $15 or $20 with a
T-shirt. Participants may register
until the race starts at 9 a.m.
at Lake Frances Field. Walkers
are also welcome to participate.
For more information, call Frank
Gaval at 788-4219 or email
him at BARB123@PTD.NET.
The entry form can be found at
neparunner.com.
Northwest Junior Rangers
is holding a beneft at 2 p.m.
on Saturday, Aug. 24 at the
Shickshinny American Legion
Post 495. Proceeds will beneft
the Junior Rangers. There is a
$15 cover charge that includes
food and beverages. Attendees
must be 21 or older. There will be
live bands throughout the day.
Plains Rotary club will have its
28th Memorial Golf Tournament
Aug. 23 at Mount Laurel Golf
Course. The tournament starts
at 1:30 p.m. Proceeds will go to
the Plains Rotary Club charities
including winter coats for needy
children, Christmas party and
gifts for children with special
needs and the local food pantry.
If interested in playing or a
sponsorship, call tournament
chair Joe Gelli at 825-7435.
South Wilkes-Barre Little
League will be having its annual
closing day ceremonies for all
players on Saturday, Aug. 24 at
5 p.m. at our feld. Anyone who
would like to volunteer please
be at the feld by 4 p.m. We
can use volunteers for games,
concession stand, setting up,
etc. Siblings and children who
did not play with our league will
be $2.
St. Francis of Assisi and St.
Vincent DePaul Soup kitchens
will have their 23rd annual golf
tournament Friday, Aug. 30
at Sand Springs Golf Course.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.
The tournament starts at 10 a.m.
The format is captain and crew.
The cost is $90 per golfer, which
includes greens fees, motor
cart, and N.Y. Strip Steak dinner.
There will be various prizes and
the opportunity to win a car in
the Hole-in-One car giveaway
sponsored by Ken Pollock
Nissan. The tournament is
sponsored by the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Postal Customer
Council. For more information,
call Dawn Chalk at 831-3420 or
Jim Sabulski at 674-6253 or visit
www.nepapcc.com.
Wyoming Area boys and girls
soccer teams will be introduced
at the Meet the Warriors Night. It
is scheduled for Aug. 26 at 6:30
p.m. in the Secondary Center
cafeteria. All varsity and junior
high players and their families
are invited to attend.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com sports Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 3B
the broken right leg suffered in a
sprint car crash Aug. 5 at Southern
Iowa Speedway.
Nationwide Series driver Austin
Dillon will drive the No. 14 on Oct.
20 at Talladega. Dillon lled in for
Stewart on Sunday at Michigan
and nished 14th.
Martin entered 16 of 23 races
as part of a shared ride in the
No. 55 with Michael Waltrip at
Brian Vickers at MWR. Vickers,
who won this season at New
Hampshire, will now drive the No.
55 Toyota for MWR in 12 of the
nal 13 races. He was originally
scheduled to drive just three more
times. Waltrip will race the No. 55
at Talladega as previously sched-
uled.
Martin has 40 wins and 56 poles
in 870 career Sprint Cup starts.
My motivation for racing is not
for points, its for racing, Martin
said. I want to race, and I want to
nish.
Martin gets his chance after
Stewarts injury cost him his shot
at driving for a fourth champion-
ship. Stewart had one win this
season and was a solid contender
to make the Chase for the Sprint
Championship. Martin will be the
third driver in the No. 14 this sea-
son. Max Papis drove the Toyota
in Stewarts absence at Watkins
Glen. The No. 14 car is 13th in the
owner standings.
Obviously, Im disappointed to
be out, Stewart said in a state-
ment. But the team is in very
good hands with Mark Martin and
Austin Dillon. Mark is someone
Ive looked up to my entire career
and I have a tremendous amount
of respect for him. Austin is a great
young talent, and he showed that
Sunday at Michigan.
Stewart is expected to return
in time for preseason testing in
January 2014.
We expect a full recovery by
Daytona or close to it, said Greg
Zipadelli, competition director at
Stewart-Haas Racing. It may be
able to be done earlier, its just not
worth it. Its a bad break to the leg,
and he needs time to go through
the process of healing, rehabilita-
tion, all those things.
Martins arrival was the only
transaction SHR was ready to
announce on a busy day of musi-
cal seats. Kurt Busch had report-
edly been offered a deal to drive a
fourth car next season for Stewart-
Haas Racing, and is mulling that
offer and others.
Stewart
From page 1B
Tenn. sluggers highlight
LLWS elimination games
JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT
Knox Prestons head turned out
to be ne. And so is the Nashville,
Tenn., players swing.
A day after being cleared by
Little League World Series doc-
tors of any signs of a concus-
sion, Preston played a big role in
Nashvilles 10-0 rout of Newark,
Del., in an elimination game
Monday.
The second baseman singled
and scored the rst run during
a six-run, second-inning rally.
He then sealed it with a two-run
homer in the bottom of the fourth
that invoked the tournaments
10-run mercy rule.
I was really nervous because,
at rst the doctor said he was
really close to saying I had a con-
cussion, said Preston, who land-
ed hard on his head after being
tripped up running to rst base
during a 10-2 win over Corpus
Christi, Texas, on Saturday.
When he told me I was able to
play, I was so happy because I
wouldve hated to just watch my
team and not be able to contrib-
ute at all.
The Southeast champions had
plenty of contributors in avoid-
ing elimination in their second
straight game.
Zane Denton hit a grand slam
in the second inning. Robert
Hassell had a double and RBI
triple.
And just as important, the
shortened game allowed manager
Chris Mercado to save his pitch-
ing as Nashville is still two wins
from having a shot at playing in
the U.S. bracket title game.
Thats how we get out of the
losers bracket, guys. We have
the pitchers to keep them down,
Mercado said. And once we start
hitting, the other teams going to
be in trouble.
Nashville advanced to face
Sammamish, Wash., which hung
on for a 6-5 win over Urbandale,
Iowa, in the late game Monday.
In International bracket elimi-
nation games, Taoyuan, Taiwan,
rallied from a 3-0 decit to pull
out a 6-4 win over San Lorenzo,
Puerto Rico. Taiwan advances
to play Aguadulce, Panama, on
Tuesday. Panama advanced with
a 12-0 win over Ottawa, Ontario.
Against Nashville, Delaware
(1-2) threatened with the bases
loaded in the third before Joseph
Davis struck out looking. Justin
Courter had the lone hit, a single,
for the Mid-Atlantic champions.
After opening the tourna-
ment with a 6-3 win over Iowa,
Delaware dropped a 15-3 decision
to California.
Newark manager John Ludman
had no difculty believing his
players would be ne after their
second lopsided loss.
Theyve gone farther than any
Newark team. They had a great
ride, Ludman said. The kids
know they accomplished a lot.
There were very little expecta-
tions for this team. They really
have been a Cinderella story.
Nashville, by comparison,
suddenly nds itself on a roll
since a series-opening 3-2 loss to
Westport, Conn.
Thats nothing new for a team
thats advanced out of the losers
bracket in each of the qualify-
ing tournaments to reach South
Williamsport. Nashville won the
Southeast title by winning four
straight after losing the opener.
As a result, nerves werent an
issue for Nashville players on
Monday.
I dont think so, Denton said.
Weve been in this same position
like four times.
Washington 6, Iowa 5
Jacob Dahlstrom drove in
two runs on four singles to help
Sammamish win despite squan-
dering a four-run lead.
Dylan Matsuokas two-run sin-
gle in the third inning extended
Sammamishs lead to 4-1. The
Northwest champions added
two more in the sixth before
Urbandale mounted a late threat.
With two out in the Iowas nal
at-bat, Brook Heinen hit a two-
run double to the wall in center,
and then scored on a wild pitch.
Reliever Will Armbruester, how-
ever, ended the game by striking
out Grant Garwood.
Brady Roberts had two singles
and scored once for the Midwest
champions.
Panama 12, Canada 0
Jean Mar Sanchez hit a three-
run homer and drove in four runs,
and Edgardo Rosales and Juan
Crisp combined on a one-hitter
to help Aguadulce stay alive.
Rosales struck out four in 2 2-3
innings, while Crisp struck out
two in 1 1-3 innings of relief.
Panama scored six times in
both the second and third innings.
Rosales started the scoring with a
solo homer before Rafael Eysseric
added a two-run triple. Sanchez
knocked home a run with a single
and Crisp added a two-run single
in the second.
Carmelo Cruz had an RBI
walk, Jean Cornejo hit a two-run
double and Sanchez homered in
the third.
Jack Walsh had the lone hit for
the Canadians.
Panama bounced back from a
13-0 loss to Mexico a day earlier.
We talked to the kids last
night and this afternoon about
just forgetting about that game,
Panama manager Luis Gonzalez
said, through interpreter Gilbert
Monell. There is nothing we can
do nowabout the loss to Mexico.
Shortstop Juan Cornejo was
impressed by how Panama
responded.
That is more like we played
in the regionals, Cornejo said,
through Monell. That is the rst
time weve played that well here
in Williamsport.
Taiwan 6, Puerto Rico 4
Huang Chao-Wei singled home
two runs during a four-run fourth
inning, and Lan Huai-Chein dou-
bled and scored in the fth in the
come-from-behind win.
The Asia-Pacic champions
had a short turnaround follow-
ing a 3-2 loss to Japan in the late
game Sunday night.
Puerto Rico (1-2) threatened
in its nal at-bat, scoring once on
a two-out, bases-loaded walk to
Edgar Baez. But Robert Addarich
bounced out to the pitcher to end
the game.
Puerto Rico starter Leonardo
Lizardi hit four batters into the
fourth inning to tie a one-game
series record set six times.
AP photo
Nashville, Tenn.s Zane Denton (17) trots home to be greeted by his teammates after hitting a grand slam home run off
Newark, Delaware, pitcher Ryan Miller in the second inning of an elimination game at the Little League World Series tour-
nament in South Williamsport on Monday. The team from Nashville, Tenn., won 10-0.
Dotzel leads Comets to victory
The Times Leader staf
DORRANCE TWP. Crestwoods Jason
Dotzel was the medalist with a 39 at the par
36 Blue Ridge course Monday, leading the
Comets to a 165-191 victory over Berwick in
Wyoming Valley Conference high school golf.
Billy Dombroski and Joe Hurn added a
pair of 40s.
Berwick was led by Matt Dalos 41. Ty
Morzilla hit a 48.
Wyoming Seminary 169, GAR 226
The Blue Knights defeated the Grenadiers
on the par 33 Hollenback Golf Course,
thanks to Jon Zirnhelds 37. Andrew Golden
tabbed a 38.
GAR was supported by Sean Paul
Williamsons 51. Eric Krzywicki scored a 54.
Wyoming Seminary 173, Meyers 213
Wyoming Seminary swept its doublehead-
er with another 37 by Jon Zirnheld. Andrew
Golden and Jarod Glodlewski recipricated
his earlier score of 38.
The Mohawks were carried by Lee Falzone
with a 44. Paul Fox supplied a 54.
MMI Prep 206, Nanticoke 210
MMI Preps Sam Harmon and Nanticokes
Joe Olszyk each medaled with a 46. Joe
Yamula hit a 50, and Devon McCarrie
notched a 53.
Mike Malshefski and Britton Ball each
posted a 52 for the Trojans.
Coughlin 156, Dallas 182
Dalton Lentini played at even par to medal
for Coughlin with a 36. Alex Anderson had
the second-lowest score with a 39.
Dallas Ryan Georgetti scored a 42. Jon
Wilson contributed with a 45.
Tunkhannock 175, Pittston Area 184
Sean Soltysak medaled with a 38 at
Shadowbrook for Tunkhannock. Jimmy
Lyons notched a 45.
Pittston Area was carried by David Zydko
(41) and Tyler McGarry (46).
GIRLS TENNIS
Jim Thorpe 4, MMI Prep 1
MMI Preps Stephanie Pudish won the rst
singles match 6-3, 6-4. The Preppers Haylee
Kirchner and Chiara DeMel dropped the
second doubles in three sets 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.
***
GOLF
Crestwood 165, Berwick 191
at Blue Ridge, par 36
BER (191) Matt Dalo 41, Ty Morzilla 48, Tyler Evans 49, Kegan Smith 52
CRE (165) Jason Dotzel 39, Billy Dombroski 40, Joe Hurn 40, Seth Korch 46
Wyoming Seminary 169, GAR 226
at Hollenback, par 33
SEM (169) Jon Zirnheld 37, Andrew Golden 38, Jarod Glodlewski 47,
Marc Lafond 47
GAR (226) Sean Paul Williamson 51, Eric Krzywicki 54, Steven Tyson 60,
Angelo Najero 61
Wyoming Seminary 169, GAR 213
at Hollenback, par 33
SEM (169) Jon Zirnheld 37, Andrew Golden 38, Jarod Glodlewski 47,
Matt Beam51
MEY(226) Lee Falzone 44, Paul Fox 54, Billy Norton 56, AJ Bonk 59
MMI Prep 206, Nanticoke 210
at Edgewood-in-the-Pines, par 36
MMI (206) Sam Harmon 46, Joe Yamula 50, Devon McCarrie 53,
Emily Serratch 57
NAN(226) Joe Olszyk 46, Mike Malshefski 52, Britton Ball 52, Kyle Rossick 60
Coughlin 156, Dallas 182
at IremCountry Club, par 36
COU (156) Dalton Lentini 36, Alex Anderson 39, Collin Krokos 45,
Corey Hauser 46
DAL (182) Ryan Georgetti 42, Jon Wilson 45, Brenden Baloh 46,
Chad DeBona 49
Tunkhannock 175, Pittston Area 184
at Shadowbrook, par 37
PA(184) David Zydko 41, Tyler McGarry 46, Braulio Garcia 47, Tyler Mullen 50
TUN(175) Sean Soltysak 38, Jimmy Lyons 45, Brett Soltysak 46, Zach Faux 46
GIRLS TENNIS
JimThorpe 4, MMI Prep 1
SINGLESStephanie Pudish (MMI) d. Gabbie Binder 6-3, 6-4; Bryanna Kehrli
(JT) d. Claire Sheen 6-0, 6-3; Haley Cope (JT) d. Gaby Becker 6-2, 6-0.
DOUBLES Maria Donati/Minke Phiefer (JT) d. Kelsy
Donaldson/Jessica Smith 6-2, 6-0; Hope Damian/Emily
Layden (JT) d. Haylee Kirchner/Chiara DeMelf 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Penguins choose
goaltending coach
McClatchy News Service
The Pittsburgh Penguins
announced today that they
have selected Mike Bales to be
the teams goaltending coach.
Bales, 42, served as the
organizations goaltender
development coach for the
last two seasons, working
with prospects and scouting
amateurs.
Bales is credited with help-
ing to restock the organiza-
tions goaltender pool. Since
he joined the Penguins, the
team has drafted three goalies
Tristan Jarry, 44th overall
in 2013; Matt Murray, 83rd
in 2012; and Ryan Maguire,
113th in 2011 and signed
NCAA standout Eric Hartzell
this spring.
Bales replaces Gilles
Meloche, who stepped down
to assume a scouting role.
A Saskatchewan native,
Bales played professionally in
various leagues for 18 years,
including 23 NHL games with
Boston and Ottawa. He played
college hockey for Ohio State.
Shady day ahead
for Eagles fans
JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
Theres nothing better than
when one of the big names from
your favorite team comes to the
area to sign autographs.
Being here in Northeastern
Pennsylvania, we are fortunate to
have plenty of pro teams to root
for. Your favorites might be from
Philadelphia, or from Pittsburgh,
or New York. There are some
deeper rooted fandoms with
teams from Baltimore or Boston
as well.
Well, Sports Fever in the
Steamtown Mall will be bring-
ing up to our area one of Phillys
nest. Former Harrisburg-
area (Bishop McDevitt) and
University of Pittsburgh running
back LeSean McCoy, now a star
with the Philadelphia Eagles,
will be signing autographs for
a couple of hours at the sports
memorabilia store.
McCoy has nearly 4,000 yards
rushinginhis rst three NFLsea-
sons, all with the Eagles, includ-
ing two 1,000-yard campaigns.
Hes also a dangerous threat out
of the backeld in the passing
game for Philadelphia, with 220
receptions for more than 1,500
yards in 58 professional games.
McCoy will be at Sports Fever
from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 30.
It would be best to secure your-
self tickets, as appearances like
these often sell out in advance.
Sports Fever can be reached at
343-7148.
Dutch treats
Former Philadelphia Phillies
catch Darren Daulton has taken
to putting his signature on a
number of items as he continues
to wage his battle against brain
cancer.
Dutch is workingwithUnder
the Radar Sports Promotions,
LLC, to make autographed
memorabilia available to his
fans everywhere. At www.under-
theradar.net, there are a variety
of autographed photos available
for $29.99, signed baseballs for
$10 more, and autographed bats
and jerseys the latter top out
at $399.99.
You can also make arrange-
ments to send your item of
choice that you already have to
Under the Radar for Daulton to
autograph. Contact information
is available on their website.
Under the Radar has some
other former Phillies that they
have partnered with, includ-
ing Mickey Morandini, Glenn
Wilson and Von Hayes. Their
website offers a variety of
baseball players from both the
American and National leagues.
According to the Morning Call
of Allentown, Under the Radar
was foundedby Craig Waters and
Todd Schafer. Waters is a teacher
and football coach at Parkland
High School, and Schafer has a
company that provides video for
almost every high school football
team in the Allentown area.
Big sales
The Associated Press report-
ed that a 1934 Lou Gehrig
baseball card sold for $125,332
and a 1916 Babe Ruth rookie
card went for $51,450 in SCP
Auctions Summer Auction that
closed Saturday.
SCP Auctions said Thursday
that the auction amassed over
$2.2 million, with a 1980-1981
Larry Bird/Magic Johnson
rookie card selling for $60,667
and Travis Jerveys 1996 Green
Bay Super Bowl ring going for
$37,610.
In the fun department, three
Johnny Manziel autographed
items Texas A&M jersey,
helmet and an NCAA football
went for $715.20. The offer-
ing included a handful of the
legendary T206 baseball cards
and items going back to the late
1800s.
AP photo
Philadelphia Eagles running back
LeSean McCoy, right, scores a touch-
down past Carolina Panthers safety
Mike Mitchell during the first half
of a preseason game Aug. 15. McCoy
will be in Scranton on Aug. 30 for an
autograph signing session.
COLLECTORS CORNER
Sagan wins 1st stage
of USAPro Challenge
The Associated Press
ASPEN, Colo. Peter Sagan
continued his stellar season with
a two-length win and assumed
the lead Monday after the
opening stage of the USA Pro
Challenge.
The 23-year-old Slovak, a four-
time stage winner in the Tour de
France who rides the Italy-based
Cannondale team, completed the
60.6-mile, three-lap circuit in 2
hours and 26 minutes.
I was the peoples favorite,
yes, said Sagan, who has trained
in Colorado for two weeks after
winning the points jersey for the
second time in last months Tour.
But I was very surprised. The
team went to the front for most
of the race. I ride tempo.
Greg Van Avermaet (BMC)
of Belgium nished second and
Kiel Reijnan (UnitedHealthcare)
of the United States was third in
the same time as Sagan.
Sagan, a pre-stage favorite,
secured his 16th stage win this
season and the 54th of his ve-
year pro career.
Since the race does not feature
any bonus times, Sagan, Van
Avermaet and Reijnan have the
same overall time, but Sagan is
the overall leader based on his
stage win.
Sagan was in third approach-
ing the nal corner with about
250 yards left. He moved to the
right and into the lead within the
nal 200 yards and was never
challenged.
Chris Froome (Sky) of Great
Britain, the reigning Tour de
France champion, struggled
on the nal climb and nished
77th nearly 5 minutes behind
Sagan.
DefendingchampionChristian
Van de Velde (Garmin-Sharp) of
the United States placed 24th in
the opening stage and was credit-
ed with the same time as Sagan.
PAGE 4B Tuesday, August 20, 2013 FOOTBALL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
517 Pierce Street Kingston (570)283-DELI (3354)
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AP photo
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, left, runs with the ball away from Denver Broncos outside line-
backer Von Miller, right, during the first quarter of a preseason game on Aug. 8, in San Francisco.
ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. Von
Miller lined up at his usual posi-
tion Monday and ashed the
freakish athletic moves that
might soon be missing from the
Denver Broncos ramshackle
defense.
The All-Pro linebacker
brushed past reporters after
another stellar practice, choos-
ing not to stop and talk about
the latest report that he could
be facing an even longer suspen-
sion that originally thought.
ESPN reported that Miller
might have to sit out at least six
games for violating the leagues
drug abuse policy. Previously, it
was believed Miller was facing a
monthlong suspension to start
the 2013 season.
Miller had repeatedly
expressed condence he was
going to successfully win an
appeal of any pending penalty,
insisting he had done nothing
wrong. Now, Miller is unlikely
to go forward with such an
appeal, which was expected to
be heard Tuesday, ESPN report-
ed.
NFL spokesman Greg Aiello
told The Associated Press, We
have nothing to report on the
matter, and Millers agent, Joby
Branion, didnt return a phone
call from the AP.
Without denitive word from
the league that a suspension was
forthcoming, the Broncos once
again had Miller line up with
the rest of the No. 1 defense at
practice.
Well, theres really no lat-
est, coach John Fox said after-
ward. We are aware of reports
and sometimes its erroneous
because I think wed probably
nd out before other people.
There is no suspension and
at which time there is, well
report that. But anything else
right now is really just talking
heads.
Miller, who has 30 sacks in
his rst two NFL seasons, is
the fulcrum of coordinator Jack
Del Rios defense, consistently
commanding double teams.
Hes a major reason, along with
Peyton Manning, that odds-
makers favor the Broncos to
represent the AFC in the Super
Bowl.
Miller facing at least
6-game suspension
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Teams
that play the Philadelphia Eagles
this season might want to spend
extra time doing cardio work.
Chip Kelly has only shown
ashes of his up-tempo offense
in the rst two preseason games
and defenses already seem tired
and confused while the Eagles
are moving the ball with ease.
Just wait until the games count.
I think we can go a lot faster,
quarterback Michael Vick said.
I see what it does to a defense
and the concepts and things that
we do really puts this team in a
position to succeed, but it has to
be done right.
The combination of Kellys
faster pace with a new, balanced
attack in which the Eagles run
the ball far more than they ever
did under Andy Reid is creating
problems for opponents.
Its so hard for defenses to
get their calls in, because we
are going so fast, running back
LeSean McCoy said. And, we
are keeping teams off balance.
When you run the ball that much,
defenses dont know whats com-
ing. Plus, were so spread out, it
can be a run play that turns into
a pass.
Then theres the fatigue factor.
Defenses, especially the line-
men, are struggling to keep up.
I got tired, Panthers rookie
defensive tackle Star Lotulelei
said after Carolinas 14-9 loss in
Philadelphia last Thursday. Just
got to ght through it, get to the
next play and keep sound funda-
mentals.
The rst-team offense led by
Vick and Nick Foles has four
touchdowns on eight-plus pos-
sessions in two games. One
drive ended with an end-zone
interception and two others
ended with fumbles.
And, its only the preseason.
The Eagles are still learning the
nuances of Kellys system and
working out the kinks. Even the
coaching staff is adjusting to
Kellys way of doing things.
I think we as coaches are
familiar with concepts but of
course how we function as an
offense, there was a lot that I
learned, offensive coordinator
Pat Shurmur said. You know,
I think Ive always felt this, but
I wish I knew now or I wish I
knew 20 years ago what I know
now. I learn something new
every day, and I think if we func-
tion the right way, we have a
chance to do good things.
Inthe preseasonopener against
New England, the Eagles started
at faster-than-normal pace with
Vick and then picked it up when
Foles came in. They went to a
hurry-up, no-huddle offense right
from the start last week against
Carolina with Foles starting and
stayed with it when Vick entered
in the second quarter.
Vick said the Eagles showed
less than one-third of their
playbook vs. the Patriots and it
wasnt much more against the
Panthers. The vanilla approach
is typical in the preseason, but
its clear the Eagles arent run-
ning an ordinary offense.
Eager Eagles
ready to
wear down
opponents
AP photo
Dr. Russell Warren, left, shows New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz
his x-rays after Cruz was injured during the first half Sunday against the
Indianapolis Colts in East Rutherford, N.J.
TOM CANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. The New York Giants
received some good news from
doctors regarding injuries to
wide receiver Victor Cruz and
center David Baas.
Cruz, the Giants leading
receiver the past two seasons,
only bruised his left heel in
the rst quarter of New Yorks
20-12 loss to the Indianapolis
Colts, coach Tom Coughlin said
Monday in a conference call.
Coughlin he doesnt know
when his dynamic playmaker
will return to practice. However,
the injury does not seem seri-
ous.
He probably will not practice
(today), Coughlin said. But
well take that as it comes.
Baas is more of a concern. He
sprained the medial collateral
ligament in his left knee on the
opening series Sunday, and his
status will be gauged on a week-
ly basis. An MCL sprain usually
takes up to six weeks to heal, so
his availability for the season
opener at Dallas on Sept. 8 is
uncertain.
Also, defensive end Justin
Tuck has a mild hamstring inju-
ry and his status is uncertain.
Jim Cordle replaced Baas, but
Coughlin said he is exploring all
options for his line.
Well discuss that, Coughlin
said. There are plenty of oppor-
tunities to play going forward,
whatever decision we make,
youll have Cordle and the other
centers all involved.
Entering his third season,
Cordle has played in 25 games
for the Giants, but he hasnt
started one.
If the coaches decide to
change things up, they can
move left guard Kevin Boothe to
center and then shufe the rest
of the line. They could move
veteran David Diehl from right
tackle to left guard and clear the
way for rst-round draft pick
Justin Pugh to take over at right
tackle.
Pugh missed the preseason
opener against Pittsburgh with
a concussion but he received
his rst NFL action Sunday
night.
Diehl, who struggled last sea-
son at right tackle, had some
problems vs. Indianapolis,
whifng on one block and put-
ting Eli Manning under pres-
sure. Moving him inside takes
away the need for the 32-year-
old to contend with the speed
rush to the outside.
The Giants (1-1) have two
preseason games to gure
things out, starting Saturday
against the New York Jets (1-1).
Coughlin, Giants evaluate injuries on ofense
AP photo
The Buffalo Bills have released longtime kicker
Rian Lindell (9). The 36-year-old spent the last 10
years in Buffalo and is the most accurate kicker in
Bills history with a field goal percentage of 83.3
percent.
MARK LUDWICZAK
Associated Press Writer
PITTSFORD, N.Y. Buffalos youth
movement continued Monday when
the Bills released longtime kicker Rian
Lindell.
Lindell, the most accurate kicker in
franchise history, was let go after 10
years in Buffalo. His release means that
rookie Dustin Hopkins has won the
teams kicking competition.
Its always tough when you have
to release a player like Rian Lindell,
coach Doug Marrone said. A true pro-
fessional thats obviously been with the
organization for quite some time. And I
have a lot of respect for him.
Lindell leaves Buffalo with a eld
goal percentage of 83.3. He connected
on 225 of 270 eld-goal attempts here.
Lindells status with the Bills had been
in question the past two years. Buffalo
has drafted kickers in each of the past
two drafts, Hopkins and John Potter.
Hopkins, 22, had signicantly more
power on his kicks throughout training
camp than Lindell, 36, who relied more
on his accuracy and consistency from
shorter distances. And Marrone felt
that Hopkins took control of the compe-
tition as camp progressed.
I think in the past 10 days Dustin
has performed better, he said, so we
made a decision to go with Dustin.
Lindell was the longest-tenured Bill
prior to his release. He joined the team
as a free agent in 2003 after spending
his rst three seasons with the Seattle
Seahawks. He had a slow start to his
Bills career, converting 17 of 24 eld
goal attempts his rst year.
But he recovered, and his name is at
or near the top of most Bills kicking
records, as a result. He holds a franchise
record for consecutive PATs (225) and
is second in teams scoring with 980
points.
Bills release longtime kicker Lindell
BOB BAUM
AP Sports Writer
GLENDALE, Ariz.
Although Arizona has won its
rst two preseason games, new
coach Bruce Arians is not at
all pleased with the Cardinals
inability to score touchdowns.
The team began the nal
week of its training camp in
the air conditioned comfort of
University of Phoenix Stadium
on Monday.
Red zone woes were a featured
topic. Through two preseason
games, in nine trips inside the
opponents 20, Arizona has one
touchdown.
Arians blamed little things
that are very easily correctable.
And Im tired of seeing
them, he said.
Thats understandable. Arians
is an offensive-minded coach
whose team has scored a total
of 29 points in two preseason
games.
Im disappointed in the red
zone because we talk about pro-
duction time, not possession
time, he said. Possession time
doesnt do anything to me. You
can hold it for 35 minutes, if you
score 15 points you probably got
beat. Its production time, what
you do with the ball when youve
got it.
Arians said he wants his
offense to score a point a min-
ute.
Its a very lofty goal, he said.
We hit it probably three or four
times last year (in Indianapolis)
with a bunch of rookies, and
have hit it a number of times in
Pittsburgh. If youre close, youre
playing pretty good football.
Cards Arians
tired of red
zone mistakes
AP photo
Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Blaine Gabbert (11) throws a pass against
the New York Jets on Saturday in East Rutherford, N.J.
MARK LONG
AP Sports Writer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Blaine Gabbert has a starting
job if hes healthy.
Jacksonville Jaguars coach
Gus Bradley named Gabbert his
starting quarterback Monday,
the same day he announced the
former Missouri standout will
miss the rest of the preseason
because of a broken thumb.
Gabbert has a hairline frac-
ture in his right thumb, an inju-
ry sustained during Saturday
nights 37-13 exhibition loss to
the New York Jets.
Gabbert completed 13 of
16 passes for 165 yards and a
touchdown in three series
arguably his best showing in
three years. He banged his hand
on a defenders helmet during
his nal throw.
Gabbert wont need surgery,
but he will wear a protective
brace while the bone heals.
The Jaguars believe he should
be able to return to practice in
two weeks and be ready for the
Sept. 8 opener against Kansas
City.
Normally a break would
require surgery or six to eight
weeks, Bradley said. Its not
the same with this injury. They
feel like in two weeks he should
have a chance to come back and
begin his prep for Kansas City.
The Jaguars insisted all off-
season that Gabbert and Chad
Henne were competing for the
starting job. But many outsiders
believe the scenario was created
to put extra pressure and strain
on Gabbert, and see how he
would respond.
Although Gabbert struggled
at times in practice and did
little in the preseason opener,
his performance Saturday
night was enough to convince
Jacksonvilles coaching staff
that hes the guy.
Bradley doesnt anticipate a
quick change, either.
The reason why we took this
length of time is so that we would
have some conviction and to stay
strong, said Bradley, who was
part of Seattles staff that stuck
with rookie Russell Wilson last
season. Russell, as the quarter-
back in the rst couple of games,
had to go through some learn-
ing and some growing, and that
conviction was in place. I think
it was really good for me to see
how that entire process took
place and the conviction and the
support you need.
Gabbert, the 10th overall pick
in the 2011 draft, is coming off
consecutive seasons in which
Jacksonville had signicant
issues around him. He had no
offseason as a rookie because
of the NFL lockout, was thrown
into the starting lineup in Week
3 and played with one of the
worst receiving corps in the
league. He was expected to
show improvement last year,
but he played behind a patch-
work offensive line and with
two young receivers in Cecil
Shorts III and Justin Blackmon.
Jags name Gabbert starter, ruled out for preseason
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AP photo
Juan Pablo Montoya competes during the NASCAR Sprint Cup race
at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich., on Sunday.
JENNA FRYER
APAuto Racing Writer
Michael Andretti is try-
ing to nd a sponsor to
bring Juan Pablo Montoya
back to IndyCar with
Andretti Autosport.
I have talked to Juan
about IndyCar and told
him Hell yeah, lets nd
a way to put something
together, Andretti told
The Associated Press
on Monday. Ive driven
against him and I think
hes one of the best drivers
Ive ever driven against. It
just comes down to spon-
sorship. So were looking,
and if its a possibility, we
want to do something with
him.
Andretti only had con-
versations with Montoya
last week after the
Colombian learned from
Chip Ganassi that he
wouldnt be re-signed to
Ganassis NASCAR team
for an eighth season.
Montoya has been out of
open wheel racing since
he left Formula One in
2006 to rejoin Ganassi in
NASCAR, and hes not rul-
ing out any series now that
hes looking for work.
He told AP on Monday
a return to IndyCar isnt
out of the question, but
wouldnt reveal what teams
hes spoken to so far.
Montoya won 11 races
in 1999 and 2000 in CART
driving for Ganassi, includ-
ing the 1999 CART cham-
pionship and the 2000
Indianapolis 500. Montoya
and Andretti raced against
each other those two sea-
sons, with Andretti win-
ning three races in that
span. The two waged one
of the most memorable
battles in series history,
with Montoya coming out
on top as the two nearly
banged wheels racing side-
by-side at 230 mph to the
nish line at Michigan
International Speedway in
2000.
Andretti believes that
Montoyas return to
IndyCar would be a huge
lift for the series.
I think he could bring
what he brought the last
time it seemed like
when he raced, half the
stands were full of ags
supporting him, Andretti
said. When he rst got to
NASCAR, he had a huge
effect there. He brings a
huge crowd, a huge sup-
port. Hes a big personal-
ity, and he could be a good
personality for IndyCar
because he denitely has
that dont give a (crap)
attitude.
Where Montoya ts
into the Andretti lineup
remains to be seen because
the marketing arm is still
working behind the scenes
to nalize the 2014 lineup.
The biggest piece of the
puzzle is James Hinchcliffe,
a three-time IndyCar win-
ner this season and break-
through star in the nal
year of his two-year deal.
Andretti Autosport much
wants Hinchcliffe back, but
an offer is contingent on a
commitment from sponsor
GoDaddy.
While Andretti waits,
Hinchcliffe is currently
free to negotiate with other
teams in the paddock.
Its all going to come
down to GoDaddy and if
they are going to play or
not. They love Hinch, we
love Hinch, but GoDaddy
needs to decide if the
return on their investment
is there or not, Andretti
said. So were just wait-
ing and Hinch is allowed
to be talking to other
teams. Hes not said that
he wants to leave, but
its only fair for him to be
allowed to see whats out
there because we dont
want him to be left with
nothing. Thats not fair to
him, thats not fair to the
series.
Hinchcliffes deal is not
tied to Andretti working
out a deal with Montoya,
he said.
Theres still a possibil-
ity of running ve cars,
Andretti said. I think we
can do it no problem, so
long as we have a properly
funded deal.
The organization is also
still trying to put together
a deal for next season
with Carlos Munoz, the
Colombian who grew up a
Montoya fan and nished
second in the Indianapolis
500 in his IndyCar debut.
He doesnt have a deal yet
in place for 2014 with E.J.
Viso.
We have a lot of irons
in the re, Andretti said.
If a sponsor falls out of
the sky for Juan, then we
dont know what wed do
to make it all work.
Andretti talking to Montoya about IndyCar return
NOAHTRISTER
AP Sports Writer
BROOKLYN, Mich.
Less than a decade
removed from a champi-
onship in NASCARs top
series, Kurt Busch is an
underdog now.
Its a role he seems
plenty comfortable with.
There are three races
remaining in the regu-
lar season, and Busch
is ninth in the points
standings, meaning he
has a decent shot at a
surprising berth in the
Chase for the Sprint Cup.
Thats quite a step for
the 35-year-old driver
whose career looked
anything but stable as
recently as last year.
Furniture Row team
is acting like a big-time
player right now, Busch
said after nishing third
at Michigan on Sunday.
We have a little bit of
weaknesses here and
there, but overall we keep
posting good results, and
its very satisfying.
Hell have to make his
run at making the Chase
while apparently contem-
plating his future.
Busch has reportedly
been offered a deal to
drive a fourth car next
season for Stewart-Haas
Racing, and is mulling
that offer and others.
The deal, rst reported
late Sunday night by
FoxSports.com, has
not been specically
addressed by either the
driver or Stewart-Haas
Racing.
Stewart-Haas Racing
constantly strives to
improve itself, and expan-
sion is something that is
often discussed, team
spokesman Mike Arning
said in a statement. If
the right opportunity
presents itself, its some-
thing the team will cer-
tainly consider.
Team co-owner Tony
Stewart said last month
the organization was not
ready to expand to four
cars in releasing Ryan
Newman.
Furniture Row Racing
is Buschs third team in
three seasons, a single-
car operation based in
Denver that is hardly a
NASCAR superpower.
His trouble-lled stint
with Phoenix Racing in
2012 was a far cry from
the days when he drove
for the likes of Jack Roush
and Roger Penske.
Busch landed with
Phoenix Racing in
December 2011 after
parting ways from Penske
Racing because of a
series of incidents mainly
related to Buschs temper.
He hoped to rebuild his
image in 2012, but he was
put on probation from an
incident at Darlington in
May he was also ned
$50,000 for reckless driv-
ing on pit road and
he was later suspended a
week for verbally abusing
a media member.
Busch eventually joined
Furniture Row to drive
the No. 78 Chevrolet, and
now the 2004 Cup cham-
pion has been quietly
re-positioning himself
among NASCARs elite.
His race at Michigan on
Sunday was his sixth top-
ve nish of the season,
and he accomplished it
without much drama or
fanfare.
His performance so far
this year speaks for itself,
and Busch is trying to
stay even keeled.
Well, its being
focused. Im excited that
were running well. Were
able to seal the deal,
when that had been some
of our struggles through
the midpoint of the sea-
son, he said. Now Im
just in that Chase mode
where we have to get in.
You cant celebrate with
a third-place nish. You
just have to feel condent
and to know that you can
go back next week and do
it again.
Theres no margin for
error. Busch is in ninth
place, and a top-10 n-
ish would put him in the
Chase but hes only
six points ahead of 11th-
place Kasey Kahne. If
Busch falls out of the top
10, hed be in trouble in
the race for a wild card
because he has no victo-
ries this year.
Busch making impressive bid for Chase spot
AP photo
NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Kurt Busch wipes his face after practice
for the Pure Michigan 400 at Michigan International Speedway in
Brooklyn, Mich., on Saturday.
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JIM LITKE
AP Sports Columnist
Most guys in his place
disappear for a while or
else crumple up faster
than a napkin.
Not Alex Rodriguez.
Somehow he still shows
up at the ballpark every
day determined to take
his licks, good and bad.
That should count for
something. So whatever
else is said about A-Rod
and every indication is
that theres still plenty to
come at least acknowl-
edge this much: The man
has guts.
Just for fun, try to come
up with another athlete
who so many people are
hoping will fail.
Rodriguez has more
haters at the moment
than anyone this side of
Lance Armstrong. His
sport wants him gone
and so do most of its
fans. The Yankees want
out from under A-Rods
contract, and even some
of his union brethren and
teammates would pay
good money for the privi-
lege of hitting him with
the door on the way out.
And every time
Rodriguez opens his
mouth, he only makes all
those things worse.
Hes been portrayed as
delusional and a serial
liar who used PEDs to get
where he is. He blamed
a cousin the rst time he
got caught, then report-
edly had someone in his
camp rat out a teammate
and conveniently a
rival to help cover his own
tracks the second time.
Even now, Rodriguez has
yet another mouthpiece
offering new and famil-
iarly cockamamie expla-
nations for why all isnt
as bad as it seems. And
maybe the best thing to be
said about that is that he
wont have to work hard to
convince his client.
With all the other
developments in the
saga, its easy to over-
look that Rodriguezs bat-
ting average is hovering
around .320, and based
on the admittedly scant
evidence of his return
a dozen games ago, his
power numbers and OPS
are lining up nicely with
some of the more pro-
ductive seasons of whats
been a very productive
career. Even more impres-
sive is the way Rodriguez
handled himself Sunday
night in Boston.
Red Sox starting pitch-
er Ryan Dempster set out
to make a statement at
A-Rods expense, throw-
ing the rst pitch behind
him, then plunking him
in the back with the last
one. Dempster denied
doing it on purpose, but
more likely he was bet-
ting there wouldnt be
much in the way of repri-
sals from either A-Rod or
his Yankee teammates, at
least nothing of conse-
quence. He turned out to
be wrong on both counts.
The benches cleared,
Yankee manager Joe
Girardi got tossed,
Rodriguez homered off
Dempster in his next bat
and his team won the
game, managing to turn
A-Rod into a sympathetic
character if only for
one night. And even if
all the talk in the New
York clubhouse after-
ward about climbing back
into the postseason race
seemed a bit premature,
well, at least it provided
his teammates a way to
answer questions about
A-Rod that didnt include:
Should he even be on the
eld?
Of course, that didnt
stop one reporter from
asking A-Rod the same
question about Dempster,
and his answer was price-
less:
Im the wrong guy to
be asking about suspen-
sions, he said, smiling
slyly. Holy mackerel.
A-Rod is probably the
wrong guy to be ask-
ing, too, about how hes
managed to come back
from a serious injury at
the advanced age of 38
and at least for the
time being perform
the way he did at 28, with
the added burden of his
unpopularity and ongoing
legal proceedings weigh-
ing on him.
Rodriguez says its his
faith, while his detrac-
tors suspect its the ben-
et of all that PED use.
And most people believe
that either way, failure
is bound to come crash-
ing down on him soon
enough. A-Rod never
quite ashed the bravado
of Barry Bonds or Roger
Clemens or Armstrong
for that matter, yet its
hard to imagine his story
ending any better than
theirs did.
Still, its hard not see
a guy deantly thumb
his nose at all the people
booing him and marvel at
whatever it is propping
him up.
JimLitke is a national sports col-
umnist for The Associated Press.
Write to himat jlitke@ap.org and
followhimat Twitter.com/JimLitke.
Give A-Rod this much hes got guts
AP photo
New York Yankees Alex Rodriguez hits a single in the seventh
inning Sunday against the Boston Red Sox in Boston.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com BASEBALL Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 7B
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 73 53 .579 3-7 L-1 40-23 33-30
Tampa Bay 71 52 .577 5-5 W-2 41-23 30-29
Baltimore 67 57 .540 5 3 4-6 L-1 35-27 32-30
NewYork 64 59 .520 7 6 7-3 W-1 34-27 30-32
Toronto 57 67 .460 15 13 4-6 L-1 31-32 26-35
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 73 51 .589 5-5 W-2 40-21 33-30
Cleveland 66 58 .532 7 4 4-6 L-1 38-25 28-33
Kansas City 64 59 .520 8 6 4-6 L-2 33-28 31-31
Minnesota 54 69 .439 18 16 3-7 L-4 28-33 26-36
Chicago 49 74 .398 23 21 6-4 W-3 28-32 21-42
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas 72 53 .576 7-3 W-1 36-27 36-26
Oakland 70 53 .569 1 6-4 W-1 38-23 32-30
Seattle 57 66 .463 14 13 5-5 W-1 31-32 26-34
Los Angeles 55 68 .447 16 15 4-6 L-1 31-34 24-34
Houston 41 83 .331 30 29 4-6 L-1 19-43 22-40
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 76 48 .613 7-3 W-1 44-18 32-30
Washington 60 64 .484 16 10 6-4 L-2 36-29 24-35
NewYork 57 66 .463 18 13 5-5 W-1 25-32 32-34
Philadelphia 55 69 .444 21 15 3-7 W-2 31-29 24-40
Miami 48 75 .390 27 22 5-5 W-2 28-34 20-41
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 72 51 .585 3-7 L-2 42-22 30-29
St. Louis 71 52 .577 1 5-5 W-2 36-23 35-29
Cincinnati 71 54 .568 2 7-3 W-2 38-20 33-34
Chicago 54 70 .435 18 16 4-6 W-1 25-38 29-32
Milwaukee 54 70 .435 18 16 5-5 L-1 29-33 25-37
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 72 52 .581 8-2 L-2 37-25 35-27
Arizona 64 59 .520 7 6 6-4 L-1 36-26 28-33
Colorado 58 68 .460 15 13 6-4 L-3 36-27 22-41
San Diego 56 68 .452 16 14 4-6 W-2 33-29 23-39
San Francisco 55 68 .447 16 15 5-5 L-1 31-31 24-37
MLB STANDINGS STATS MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sundays Games
Detroit 6, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 7, Colorado 2
Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 1, 10 innings
ChicagoWhite Sox 5, Minnesota 2
Seattle 4, Texas 3
Houston 7, L.A. Angels 5
Oakland 7, Cleveland 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Boston 6
Mondays Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Minnesota 1
Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 3
Texas 16, Houston 5
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Toronto (Rogers 3-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 6-4),
1:05 p.m., 1st game
Tampa Bay (Cobb 7-2) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonza-
lez 8-5), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 9-7) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes
4-12), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-10) at Detroit (Porcello 9-6),
7:08 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-0) at Texas (Blackley 1-1), 8:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-10) at Kansas
City (E.Santana 8-6), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson
13-6), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 10-12) at Oakland (Gray 1-1),
10:05 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 9-5) at San Francisco (Vogelsong
2-4), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sundays Games
Miami 6, San Francisco 5
Arizona 4, Pittsburgh 2, 16 innings
Baltimore 7, Colorado 2
Philadelphia 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Atlanta 2, Washington 1
Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 1
San Diego 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Mondays Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Minnesota 1
Philadelphia 5, Colorado 4
Cincinnati 5, Arizona 3
Miami 6, L.A. Dodgers 2
Chicago Cubs 11, Washington 1
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 12-6) at Philadelphia
(Cloyd 2-2), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 12-3) at Cincinnati (Cingrani
6-2), 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 2-0) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler
5-2), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-6) at Miami (Ja.Turner
3-4), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 7-11) at Chicago Cubs (Rusin
2-2), 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 13-6) at Milwaukee (Lohse 8-8),
8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 5-8) at San Diego (T.Ross
3-5), 10:10 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 9-5) at San Francisco (Vogelsong
2-4), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 6:40 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Phillies 5, Rockies 4
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Fowler cf 4 1 0 0 1 3 .264
Co.Dickerson lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .315
Tulowitzki ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .315
Cuddyer rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .323
W.Rosario c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .284
Helton 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .254
Arenado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .262
LeMahieu 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .270
Manship p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-R.Wheeler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100
Francis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Blackmon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257
W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
d-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222
Totals 33 4 7 4 4 11
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246
Ruiz c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .270
Utley 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .277
D.Brown lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .277
Ruf 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .270
Asche 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .193
Mayberry cf 3 1 1 3 0 0 .242
C.Wells rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .063
E.Martin p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Frandsen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Lu.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 31 5 7 5 1 7
Colorado 000 000 2204 7 0
Philadelphia 000 410 00x5 7 0
a-fied out for Manship in the 6th. b-struck out
for Francis in the 7th. c-bunted out for De Fratus
in the 7th. d-grounded out for Brothers in the 9th.
LOBColorado 6, Philadelphia 3. 2BHelton
(13), Ruiz (7). HRTulowitzki (21), of E.Martin;
Mayberry (9), of Manship; Ruiz (3), of Manship.
RBIsTulowitzki (66), W.Rosario 2 (65), Helton
(40), Ruiz (15), Asche (9), Mayberry 3 (35). SB
Cuddyer (9). CSLeMahieu (5).
Runners left in scoring positionColorado 3
(Blackmon, Arenado 2); Philadelphia 2 (D.Brown,
C.Wells). RISPColorado 2 for 7; Philadelphia 1
for 5.
Runners moved upMayberry.
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Manship L, 0-3 5 6 5 5 1 4 83 7.80
Francis 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 6.44
W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.25
Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 1.58
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.MartinW, 2-2 61-3 4 2 2 2 6 90
5.23
De Fratus H, 7 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.82
Lu.Garcia H, 1 1-3 2 2 2 2 1 19 5.63
Diekman H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 3.70
Papelbon S, 21-27 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 2.64
Inherited runners-scoredDe Fratus 2-0, Diek-
man 2-0. BalkDiekman.
UmpiresHome, Jim Joyce; First, Jef Nelson;
Second, JimWolf; Third, Mike Estabrook.
T2:51. A35,269 (43,651).
Mets 6, Twins 1
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .247
Dan.Murphy 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .275
Byrd rf 5 2 2 1 0 1 .288
I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .202
A.Brown dh 4 0 2 1 1 1 .282
Flores 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .282
T.dArnaud c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000
Lagares cf 4 2 2 0 0 2 .258
Quintanilla ss 4 0 2 1 0 2 .229
Totals 38 6 14 6 3 11
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243
Mauer c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .324
Willinghamlf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .219
Morneau 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .261
Doumit dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .244
Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .257
Ploufe 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .234
Thomas cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227
Florimon ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .216
Totals 34 1 7 0 1 9
NewYork 110 200 1016 14 1
Minnesota 000 000 1001 7 0
EDan.Murphy (16). LOBNewYork 8, Minne-
sota 7. 2BFlores (3), Mauer (35), Morneau (30),
Ploufe (14). HRByrd (20), of Burton. RBIsE.
Young (21), Dan.Murphy (57), Byrd (68), A.Brown
(14), Flores (11), Quintanilla (18).
Runners left in scoring positionNew York 5
(Flores 2, Dan.Murphy, Byrd, T.dArnaud); Minne-
sota 5 (Mauer, Arcia, Morneau 2, Thomas). RISP
NewYork 6 for 12; Minnesota 0 for 10.
Runners moved upDozier, Willingham, Flo-
rimon. GIDPFlores, Morneau.
DPNew York 1 (I.Davis, Quintanilla); Minne-
sota 2 (Florimon, Dozier, Morneau), (Ploufe).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gee W, 9-8 7 2-3 6 1 0 1 9 99 3.60
Rice 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.42
Atchison 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 3.23
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gibson L, 2-4 3 2-3 10 4 4 2 2 72 6.53
Swarzak 3 3 1 1 1 5 55 2.87
Duensing 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 19 3.91
Burton 1 1 1 1 0 1 9 3.00
Inherited runners-scoredRice 1-0, Swarzak
2-0, Duensing 2-0.
UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Ron
Kulpa; Second, TomHallion; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T2:53. A30,913 (39,021).
Rays 4, Orioles 3
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De.Jennings cf 4 0 1 0 1 2 .258
Zobrist 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .270
Longoria 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .273
W.Myers rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .310
Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .310
Y.Escobar ss 3 2 1 0 1 0 .263
Joyce lf 3 1 2 2 0 0 .249
a-Bourgeois ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143
Fuld lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .201
J.Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .242
Ke.Johnson dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 .250
b-S.Rodrgz ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253
Totals 36 4 10 4 2 6
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Roberts 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .265
Machado 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .296
C.Davis 1b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .305
A.Jones cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .300
Wieters c 5 1 3 2 0 1 .235
Hardy ss 5 1 3 0 0 1 .258
2-A.Casilla pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228
Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .279
Valencia dh 4 0 3 1 1 1 .244
Pearce lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .250
1-McLouth pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Totals 41 3 15 3 4 9
Tampa Bay 110 200 0004 10 0
Baltimore 011 000 1003 15 1
a-grounded out for Joyce in the 8th.
1-ran for Pearce in the 7th. 2-ran for Hardy in
the 9th.
EMachado (10). LOBTampa Bay 7, Balti-
more 15. 2BJ.Molina (9), C.Davis (36), Wiet-
ers (23), Valencia (7). HRLongoria (25), of
Tillman; Joyce (16), of Tillman; Wieters (18), of
Jo.Peralta. RBIsLongoria (66), Joyce 2 (38),
Ke.Johnson (50), Wieters 2 (59), Valencia (11).
CSA.Casilla (2).
Runners left in scoring positionTampa Bay 5
(De.Jennings, Zobrist 3, Bourgeois); Baltimore 9
(B.Roberts 3, Markakis 2, C.Davis, Pearce 2, Wiet-
ers). RISPTampa Bay 2 for 9; Baltimore 2 for 14.
Runners moved upB.Roberts.
DPBaltimore 1 (C.Davis, Hardy).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Price W, 7-5 5 10 2 2 2 6 99 3.29
J.Wright H, 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 3.10
Jo.Peralta H, 31 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 25 3.23
McGee H, 22 11-3 1 0 0 0 2 20 4.04
Rodney S, 28-35 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.91
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tillman L, 14-4 6 5 4 4 1 5 107 3.79
Patton 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.40
Fr.Rodriguez 1 3 0 0 1 1 31 4.22
Matusz 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.30
Tom.Hunter 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 2.67
Inherited runners-scoredMcGee 2-0,
Fr.Rodriguez 1-0, Matusz 2-0. WPFr.Rodriguez.
UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Joe West; Third, SamHolbrook.
T3:56. A25,044 (45,971).
Marlins 6, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Crawford lf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .288
Puig rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .351
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .295
H.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .349
Ethier cf 3 1 0 0 0 3 .268
A.Ellis c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251
Uribe 3b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .281
M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .278
Ryu p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .191
Withrowp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Schumaker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268
Totals 34 2 6 2 3 11
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Yelich lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .287
D.Solano 2b 3 1 2 1 1 1 .273
Stanton rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .241
Morrison 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .278
Lucas 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .240
Hechavarria ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .232
Marisnick cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .193
Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194
Fernandez p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .150
A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Ruggiano ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 32 6 10 6 2 6
Los Angeles 000 011 0002 6 0
Miami 002 001 03x6 10 1
a-struck out for A.Ramos in the 7th. b-lined out
for Marmol in the 9th.
ELucas (5). LOBLos Angeles 9, Miami
4. 2BC.Crawford (20), Uribe (16), Yelich (5),
Morrison 2 (13). HRStanton (15), of Withrow.
RBIsC.Crawford (20), Uribe (36), Yelich (7),
D.Solano (24), Stanton (38), Morrison (26), Lu-
cas (17), Hechavarria (28). SBHechavarria (10).
CSD.Solano (1).
Runners left in scoring positionLosAngeles 4
(Ethier, Ad.Gonzalez, Ryu, Puig); Miami 3 (Hecha-
varria 2, Marisnick). RISPLos Angeles 0 for 8;
Miami 4 for 6.
GIDPHechavarria.
DPLos Angeles 2 (A.Ellis, A.Ellis, M.Ellis),
(H.Ramirez, M.Ellis, Ad.Gonzalez).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ryu L, 12-4 7 1-3 6 3 3 2 5 112 2.95
Withrow 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 10 2.61
Howell 0 3 2 2 0 0 15 2.37
Marmol 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 5.35
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Fernandez W, 9-5 6 4 2 1 3 8 109 2.41
A.Ramos H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 3.46
Qualls H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.77
Cishek 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.75
Howell pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredMarmol 1-0. IBB
of Ryu (Lucas), of Fernandez (M.Ellis). HBPby
Fernandez (Ethier). WPHowell.
UmpiresHome, John Hirschbeck; First,
Quinn Wolcott; Second, James Hoye; Third, Jim
Reynolds.
T2:53. A27,127 (37,442).
Reds 5, Diamondbacks 3
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
G.Parra rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .270
Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242
Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .296
A.Hill 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .317
Prado 3b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .280
Kubel lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .223
Nieves c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .331
Gregorius ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .265
c-Pennington ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238
Delgado p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .263
b-Davidson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248
Totals 35 3 10 3 0 8
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .278
Frazier 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .234
Votto 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .316
Phillips 2b 4 2 3 0 0 1 .267
Bruce rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .270
Ludwick lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .167
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Cozart ss 3 0 0 2 0 1 .236
Hanigan c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .199
Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .087
a-Hannahan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Heisey lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214
Totals 29 5 8 5 4 10
Arizona 000 102 0003 10 0
Cincinnati 010 310 00x5 8 0
a-struck out for Arroyo in the 6th. b-grounded
out for Delgado in the 7th. c-singled for Gregorius
in the 9th. d-fied out for W.Harris in the 9th.
LOBArizona 6, Cincinnati 5. 2BLudwick (1).
3BPhillips (1). HRA.Hill (9), ofArroyo; Frazier
(13), of Delgado. RBIsA.Hill (33), Prado 2 (58),
Frazier (56), Bruce (81), Ludwick (1), Cozart 2
(42). CSChoo (9). SFCozart.
Runners left in scoring positionArizona 3
(A.Hill, Nieves, Eaton); Cincinnati 3 (Hanigan,
Choo 2). RISPArizona 1 for 7; Cincinnati 2 for 7.
Runners moved upCozart. GIDPA.Hill,
Nieves, Frazier.
DPArizona 1 (Gregorius, A.Hill, Goldschmidt);
Cincinnati 2 (Votto, Cozart, Arroyo), (Cozart, Phil-
lips, Votto).
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Delgado L, 4-4 6 7 5 5 3 6 114 3.82
Thatcher 11-3 1 0 0 1 2
21 2.62
W.Harris 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 2.45
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ArroyoW, 12-9 6 7 3 3 0 6 87 3.40
M.Parra H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.21
Hoover H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.72
A.Chapmn S, 31-361 2 0 0 0 0 9 3.04
HBPby Arroyo (A.Hill). WPDelgado. PB
Hanigan.
UmpiresHome, Gary Darling; First, Jerry
Meals; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Will Little.
T2:47. A20,349 (42,319).
8
IronPigs
2
RailRiders
Some of the contes-
tants took a lighthearted
approach. A fan of movie
Westerns wrote how his
funeral would feature the
William Tell Overture
and a photo of the Lone
Ranger. A woman joked
that she wanted bouncers
to remove mourners who
werent sufciently mourn-
ful.
Others were far more
serious. One fan, recently
diagnosed with ALS, wrote
how his family is watching
his life quickly draining
from my body. No one was
prepared, emotionally or
nancially, for the loss or to
prepare a nal memorial.
The winner of the essay
contest, to be announced
during the sixth inning,
gets a casket, embalming
or cremation, hearse, head-
stone, owers and a funeral
or memorial service, all
valued at nearly $10,000. A
nearby funeral home is the
sponsor.
Lest they be accused
of poor taste, the
IronPigs have opted to
call Tuesday nights give-
away Celebration of Life
Night. Grim reapers and
tombstones are out, angel-
ic music and a release of
doves at home plate in.
It wont become
Halloween, Landes said.
Funeral
From page 1B
Mayberry, Ruiz lead
Phillies past Rockies
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA
John Mayberry Jr. and
Carlos Ruiz each homered
to lead Philadelphia past
the Colorado Rockies 5-4
Monday night, giving the
Phillies and interimmanager
Ryne Sandberg two straight
wins for the rst time since
the All-Star break.
Ethan Martin (2-2)
tossed two-hit ball and
struck out six over 6 1-3
innings for the win.
Cubs 11, Nationals 1
CHICAGO Nate
Schierholtz homered twice
and drove in a career-
high six runs, powering
Jeff Samardzija and the
Chicago Cubs to a victory
over Washington.
Donnie Murphy added
a pair of solo homers
and Dioner Navarro had
a three-run shot for the
Cubs, who managed just
12 runs total in their pre-
vious eight home games.
Junior Lake doubled twice
and scored two runs.
Marlins 6, Dodgers 2
MIAMI Jose
Fernandez bested Yasiel
Puig and beat the Dodgers.
Fernandez allowed only
one earned run in six
innings for Miami, giving
Los Angeles consecutive
losses for the rst time
since June 20-21. Puig went
0 for 3 against Fernandez in
the rst matchup between
the Cubans.
Reds 5, Diamondbacks 3
CINCINNATI Ryan
Ludwick drove in his rst
run of the season with a
double, and the Cincinnati
Reds kept up their August
surge, beating Arizona for
their seventh win in nine
games.
Bronson Arroyo (12-
9) won his third straight
start, allowing three runs
in six innings. Aaron Hill
hit a solo homer, extend-
ing his hitting streak to 12
games.
INTERLEAGUE
Mets 6, Twins 1
MINNEAPOLIS
Dillon Gee pitched into the
eighth inning for the New
York Mets in a victory over
the Minnesota Twins in a
makeup game from April
14.
Gee (9-8) turned in yet
another quality start, and
the offense for the Mets
was about as balanced as
could be with RBI singles
by Eric Young, Daniel
Murphy, Andrew Brown,
Wilmer Flores and Omar
Quintanilla. All ve of
them had two hits, as did
Marlon Byrd, who hit his
20th home run.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Rays 4, Orioles 3
BALTIMORE Evan
Longoria and Matt Joyce
homered, David Price
grinded through ve chal-
lenging innings to win his
fourth straight decision
and the Tampa Bay Rays
beat the Baltimore Orioles
in a duel between AL con-
tenders.
AP photo
Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jonathan Papelbon is congratulated
by catcher Carlos Ruiz, right, after defeating the Colorado Rockies
5-4 on Monday in Philadelphia.
Lawsuit details Brauns eforts to fght drug test
M.L. JOHNSON
Associated Press Writer
MILWAUKEE A former col-
lege classmate sued Ryan Braun,
saying the Brewers slugger sought
his help in ghting a failed drug
test, balked on paying him and
then disparaged him when asked
why their friendship soured.
Ralph Sasson, a Milwaukee law
student, said Brauns agent hired
him in November 2011 to do legal
research aimed at clearing Braun
after the left elder tested positive
for steroid use. The agent later
asked him to investigate the man
who collected Brauns urine, Dino
Laurenzi Jr., and Braun person-
ally asked him to prank call two
journalists working on a story
about the failed test, according
to the lawsuit
led last month
in Milwaukee
County court.
Braun was
the rst baseball
player to success-
fully challenge a
drug-related pen-
alty in a grievance. He accepted
a longer, 65-game suspension last
month amid reports of ties to a
Florida clinic accused of distribut-
ing performance-enhancing drugs
to major leaguers but did not pub-
licly admit using banned drugs.
Sasson said the initial deal called
for him to be paid $2,000 for his
research and $5,000 if Braun was
exonerated. But Braun and his
agent, Onesimo Balelo, balked at
paying him the full amount after a
baseball arbitrator overturned the
left elders 50-game suspension in
February 2012. Sasson eventually
got paid, but he said his relationship
with Braun soured and the baseball
player lied when asked why.
Braun has engaged in advanc-
ing the proposition that the reason
for his falling out with Sasson was
because Sasson had been rude to
staff at Miller Park; Braun had
received word that complaints
had been led due to Sassons
abhorrent behavior; that Sasson
had acted like an ass; and that
Sasson is crazy, the lawsuit says.
It seeks more than $10,000 for
defamation and emotional distress.
This lawsuit is an unfortunate
attempt tocapitalize onRyans recent
press attention for taking responsibil-
ity for his actions, Brauns attorney,
Howard Weitzman, said in an email
to The Associated Press during the
weekend. The factual allegations
are untrue and the legal claims have
absolutely no merit. We believe the
lawsuit will be dismissed.
Weitzman had no further comment
Monday. According to his lawsuit,
Sasson and Braun had been friends
since junior high school and attended
the University of Miami together.
Sasson said Balelo did not mention
Brauns name when he initially hired
Sasson, but Sassonbelievedtheplayer
he was workingtoclear was his friend
because there was no reason other-
wise for an agent of Balelos stature
to call a law student with very little
practical experience.
Sasson said Braun later con-
rmed he was the player who
failed the drug test.
Braun
Bonds, Marion Jones and
others.
Manfred proposed that
both sides disclose infor-
mation and documents
relating to:
All drug tests that
were conducted on
Rodriguez under the pro-
gram and their results;
All prior violations of
the program committed by
Rodriguez, and;
All documents relat-
ing to the issue of whether
Rodriguez obstructed the
ofce of the commission-
ers investigation.
Tacopina, a lawyer with
one of the four rms rep-
resenting Rodriguez, said
the players association
would have to agree to
waive condentiality.
The letter was noth-
ing more than a cheap
publicity stunt, Tacopina
said in a statement. The
letter that was addressed
to my law ofce with the
words Via Hand Delivery
on top was in fact never
delivered to my ofce but
was instead given to the
Today show, which in
and of itself is yet anoth-
er violation of the con-
dentiality clause of the
JDA. They know full well
that they have to address
the letter to the MLBPA
and such a waiver would
require the MLBAPA to
be party of the agree-
ment and signatures. Its
nothing but a theatrical
trap hoping I would sign
knowing that I couldnt
and in fact would have me
breaching the JDA agree-
ment if I did.
The union didnt imme-
diately respond to a
request for comment.
A-Rod
From page 1B
candidate considered. The
front ofce is still talking
about it internally.
Were going to be as
open minded as we can
be, Amaro said.
Arizona manager Kirk
Gibson inherited a simi-
lar situation. He, too, was
53 when he became an
interim manager with the
Diamondbacks. Gibson
was afforded more time;
he managed the nal 83
games of the 2010 season.
His team won 94 games
the next season.
If youre an interim guy,
youre kind of evaluating
and preparing for if you
do get the permanent job,
Gibson said. Then you
can communicate exactly
what you see and what you
think you should do, things
like that. You can be more
prepared to implement it.
[Sandberg will] know
the team better. He should
know the system pretty
good right now. Hes been
in the minor leagues as
well as the major leagues.
I feel like it helped me. The
more games you manage,
the more comfort you kind
of get.
Sandberg was one of
three managers in history
to suffer shutout defeats in
his rst two games, accord-
ing to the Elias Sports
Bureau. Mike Redmond
did it with Miami to start
2013 and it happened to
Jack Chapman in 1876,
when he managed the
Louisville Grays during the
rst season of the National
League.
The Phillies scored
their rst run Sunday
for Sandberg in his 22d
inning as manager. Darin
Ruf smashed a 2-2 Ricky
Nolasco change-up deep
into the left-eld stands
for a solo homer. It was
his eighth home run in 35
games.
Sandberg
From page 1B
The Times Leader staf
ALLENTOWN The
Lehigh Valley IronPigs
survived a sixth-inning
surge by the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre RailRiders
and went on to claim vic-
tory on Monday night,
8-3. The RailRiders cut
the decit
to one run
in the sixth,
but the
I r o n P i g s
added ve
runs late to
win com-
fortably.
T h e
Rail Riders
were held
w i t h o u t
an extra
base hit
as IronPig
p i t c h e r s
a l l o w e d
seven hits and eight strike-
outs. Ronnier Mustelier
recorded the only multi-
hit outing for Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre with two
hits.
Perci Garnier held
Scranton/Wi l kes- Barre
in check, allowing two
earned runs over 5 2/3
innings. Mike MacDougal
came in to get Garnier out
of a sixth inning jam, and
JC Ramirez earned a rare
two-inning save in a ve-
run win.
Chris Bootcheck was
touched up for ve earned
runs on 6 2/3 innings.
Bootcheck struck out four
and allowed nine hits.
The RailRiders scored
both of their runs with a
two-out rally in the sixth.
With runners at rst and
second, Ronnier Mustelier
singled to left eld. Melky
Mesa scored on the play.
The inning was capped
when Adonis Garcia
slapped a single through
the right side to drive
home Dan Johnson. The
rally cut the lead to 3-2,
but the RailRiders would
get no closer.
Pete Orr and Cesar
Hernandez scored three
runs for the IronPigs. Orr
led the way with three hits
including a double.
Lehigh Valley 8, RailRiders 2
RailRiders AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Corey Patterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
JR Murphy c 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Melky Mesa cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
DanJohnson 1b 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Ronnier Mustelier rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 0
Adonis Garcia dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Brent Lillibridge 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Alberto Gonzalez ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brendan Harris 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 7 0 0 0
0 2
Team RISP: 2-for-7; Team LOB: 6; SB: Lillibridge
(8, 2nd base of Garner/Rupp).
IronPigs AB R H BI 2B 3B HR
Pete Orr 2b 5 3 3 1 1 0 0
Freddy Galvis ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 0
Steve Susdorf rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 0
Josh Fields dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cody Overbeck 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Cesar Hernandez cf 2 3 2 0 0 1 0
Tyler Henson 3b 2 0 2 2 1 0 0
Cameron Rupp c 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Leandro Castro lf 4 0 2 2 1 0 0
Totals 32 8 13 8 3 1 0
SAC: Hernandez, Ce; Henson; SF: Susdorf;
Henson; Team RISP: 4-for-10; Team LOB: 7; CS:
Hernandez, Ce (7, 2nd base by Bootcheck/Mur-
phy, JR).
RailRiders 000 002 000 2
Lehigh Valley 100 112 03x 8
RailRiders IP H R ER BB SO
ChrisBootcheck(L,9-7) 6.2 9 5 5 2 4
Matt Daley 1.1 4 3 3 0 2
IronPigs IP H R ER BB SO
PerciGarner(W,1-0) 5.2 6 2 2 2 7
Mike MacDougal 1.1 0 0 0 0 1
JC Ramirez (S, 3) 2 1 0 0 0 0
HBP: Rupp (by Daley). Pitches-strikes:
Bootcheck 108-69, Daley 27-19, Garner 92-59,
MacDougal 23-15, Ramirez, J 21-14; Ground-
outs-fyouts: Bootcheck 9-5, Daley 0-1, Garner
5-1, MacDougal 1-1, Ramirez, J 5-1; Inherited
runners-scored: Daley 1-0, MacDougal 2-0; Um-
pires: HP: Ben May. 1B: Jef Gosney. 3B: Carlos
Torres; Weather: 77degrees, partly cloudy. Wind:
6 mph, Out to CF. T: 2:53. Att: 10,100.
IronPigs
hold of
RailRiders
for 8-2win
PAGE 8B Tuesday, August 20, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
Key events this week
will impact markets
With economic data thin on the
ground Monday, nancial markets have
started the week on a subdued note.
But as the focus of attention remains
on whether the U.S. Federal Reserve
will start to reduce its monetary stimu-
lus next month, investors will have a
raft of key events to digest toward the
second half of the week.
Recent economic data and public
statements by Fed policymakers have
led investors to conclude that the Fed
will begin winding down its $85 billion
a month in asset purchases as early as
September. The policy, which is intend-
ed to lower interest rates to shore up the
U.S. recovery, has also been credited for
boosting stocks over the past few years
as investors look for better returns than
have existed in bond markets.
Samsung has a
Mega smartphone
With a screen measuring 6.3 inches
diagonally, the Galaxy Mega is almost
as big as a 7-inch tablet computer. The
difference: It makes phone calls.
Samsung says the Mega is a hybrid
that combines the portability of a smart-
phone with the immersive experience
that a tablet offers for movies, books,
music and games. Phones of this size
are typically referred to as phablets.
Samsung Electronics Co. is known
for big phones. Its agship Galaxy S4 is
5 inches, while the Galaxy Note 2 is 5.5
inches. Apples iPhone 5 is 4 inches.
AT&T Inc. says it will start selling
the Mega on Friday for $150 with a
two-year service contract. The Mega
is also coming to Sprint and U.S.
Cellular. Dates and prices werent avail-
able for those carriers.
Amnesty program
coming to an end
The Department of Labor &
Industry reminds Pennsylvanians that
after the unemployment compensa-
tion amnesty program concludes in
two weeks, those who still owe over-
payments to the UC fund will lose
discounts on interest and penalties
accrued and face possible prosecution.
The program began June 1. Claimants
who have received more UC benets
than they were entitled to and employ-
ers who have not made mandatory tax
contributions to the UC Trust Fund have
until midnight Aug. 31 to make it right.
More than 130,000 individual claim-
ants and nearly 50,000 employers
received letters advising them of the
amnesty program, how much they
owe, and how to pay it back. Those
with outstanding UC payments are
encouraged to visit the UC Amnesty
Program website, makeitright.pa.gov.
IN BRIEF
$3.55 $3.63 $3.68
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
DAVID BAUDER
APTelevision Writer
NEW YORK In a warren of
ofces at a former bank building
near Madison Square Garden, dozens
of journalists are at work on gleam-
ing new electronic equipment, ready
to turn their test runs of Al-Jazeera
America into the real thing.
The Qatar-based news organization
will nally establish a rm foothold on
American television today after a decade
of trying. At 3 p.m., Al Gores former
Current TV will turn out the lights in
more than45millionTVhomes, replaced
by the new U.S. afliate of Al-Jazeera.
The network has hired many veter-
ans of U.S. television, including John
Seigenthaler, Joie Chen, Antonio Mora
and Sheila MacVicar, and is promising
a meaty diet of news that it believes
will contrast with the opinionated talk
that dominates American news net-
works.
Were breaking in with something
that we think is unique and are con-
dent, with our guts and some research,
that the American people are looking
for, said Kate OBrian, the former
ABC News executive who is now
Al-Jazeera Americas president.
The dozens of at-screen TVs and
occupied desks scattered around mar-
ble pillars in AJAs New York ofce
indicate this is no cheap startup. And
this is temporary; the network is look-
ing for a larger ofce in New York but
wanted to start quickly after buying
out Current in January.
Until Al-Jazeera America revealed a
prime-time schedule last week, there
were few indications of what the net-
work would look like. Scheduled shows
include a nightly newscast anchored by
Seigenthaler, a newsmagazine hosted
by Chen, a news talk show with Mora
and a business program starring Ali
Velshi.
Its still not clear what will be shown
in the mornings and whether much of
the broadcast day will be devoted to
documentary-style programming or
live news.
With its domestic bureaus, AJA will
seek out stories beyond the towers of
New York and government buildings in
Washington, said Ehab Al Shihabi, the
networks interim CEO. Besides those
two cities, bureaus are located in Los
Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, Detroit,
Chicago, Denver, Miami, Seattle,
Nashville, Tenn., and New Orleans.
Al-Jazeera is well-established over-
seas, and the American network will
take advantage of its 70 bureaus.
But executives have been careful to
stress that AJA will be geared toward
American tastes. They have a careful
line to walk: Al-Jazeera doesnt want
to remind Americans of when Bush
administration ofcials questioned its
independence in the months after the
terrorist attacks, and the years when
American cable operators wanted
nothing to do it.
Al-Jazeera America prepares for launch today
JUSTIN PRITCHARD
Associated Press
LONG BEACH, Calif. The latest
experiment in American journalism
is a throwback: a new daily newspa-
per to compete against an established
one in a big city.
With Mondays debut of the Long
Beach Register, the ambitious own-
ers of the Orange County Register are
expanding their bet that consumers
will reward an investment in news
inked on paper and delivered to their
doorsteps.
The competition is the Long Beach
Press-Telegram, which was founded
more than a century ago and main-
tains an average weekday circulation
of about 55,000.
As a result of the budding newspa-
per battle, this city of 468,000 is join-
ing the likes of Chicago, Philadelphia
and Boston as what has become a
rarity in 21st century America the
two newspaper town. Never mind
shrinking circulations and online
news migration.
We believe that a city with the size
and vibrancy of Long Beach should be
happy to support a great newspaper of
the variety we want to provide, said
Aaron Kushner, who since buying the
Orange County Register a year ago
with a partner has surprised indus-
try watchers by expanding reporting
staff and page counts. If it is, well
make healthy money. If its not, thatll
be unfortunate for everyone. But we
believe well be successful.
By launching the Long Beach
Register, Kushner, publisher of
the Register and CEO of Freedom
Communications, is taking his con-
trarian instincts outside of Orange
County.
Media business analyst Rick
Edmonds said the last time he can
recall a major U.S. city adding a new
daily paper was around World War
II, when Chicago got the Sun-Times
and New York got Newsday. There
have been scattered other instances
in smaller cities, including Wilkes-
Barre, but since newspapers entered
their recent troubles, the creation of
a new rivalry is itself news. A brew-
ing newspaper war in New Orleans
between that citys Times-Picayune
and a challenger based about 80 miles
away in Baton Rouge, La., is the clos-
est to whats unfolding in Long Beach.
How will it play out? asked
Edmonds, of the Poynter Institute,
a journalism foundation in St.
Petersburg, Fla. Dont really know
until it happens.
After a round of introductions,
editor Paul Eakins told his staff that
with at least 16 pages to ll each day,
the paper would both cover hyperlo-
cal news and welcome contributions
from readers. In all, the paper has
about 20 editorial employees.
Write about a boy becoming an
Eagle Scout? Yes. Opening of the new
dog park? You bet.
I dont think they quite knowwhats
coming, Eakins said of readers.
The plan Monday was to distribute
10,000 copies, publisher Ian Lamont
said. It will be wrapped around the
Orange County Register, so readers
will get coverage of Long Beachs
schools, sports, courts, happenings
and City Hall plus news from
around the region and world. There
will be no separate Long Beach paper
on weekends.
Several reporters at the Long Beach
Register are Press-Telegram alums,
and though Eakins downplayed any
rivalry, at the staff meeting there
were gentle jabs about besting an old
employer.
For their part, the Press-Telegrams
bosses are giving no ground.
Were not going to let a competi-
tor come into our city and take it,
said Michael A. Anastasi, vice presi-
dent of news and executive editor of
the Los Angeles News Group, which
owns the Press-Telegram and eight
other daily papers in the area.
The competitions certain winners,
Anastasi said, will be local residents.
Despite odds, Calif. city becomes 2 paper town
AP photo
Empty news stands are ready to hold copies of the Long Beach Register on Ocean
Boulevard in Long Beach, Calif.
DONNA GORDON BLANKINSHIP
Associated Press
SEATTLE Washington already
has the nations highest state minimum
wage at $9.19 an hour. Now, theres a
push in Seattle, at least, to make it $15.
That would mean fast food workers,
retail clerks, baristas and other mini-
mum wage workers would get what
protesters demanded when they shut
down a handful of city restaurants in
May and others called for when they
demonstrated nationwide in July.
So far, the City Council and mayoral
candidates have said theyd consider it
in the famously liberal city. One said,
however, that it may not be soon.
Venture capitalist Nick Hanauer
said theres no time to waste. What
the nation needs is money in the hands
of regular consumers. A higher mini-
mum wage is a very simple and elegant
solution to the death spiral of falling
demand that is the signature feature of
our economy, he said.
Some businesses advocates say a
higher minimum wage will make it
harder for companies in Seattle to sur-
vive. They cite Walmart, which has all
but refused to accept a Washington,
D.C., decision to raise the minimum
wage to $12.50 an hour in big box
stores.
A higher minimum wage eliminates
low wage jobs because thats how small
businesses cut costs and that ends up
hurting the people it was supposed to
benet, according to the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce.
More than 15 million workers earn
the national minimum wage, making
about $15,080 a year $50 below the
federal poverty line for a family of two.
San Francisco currently has the high-
est minimum wage for all workers at
$10.50 an hour.
Economist Chris Benner of the
University of California at Davis does
not agree that a higher minimum wage
would lead to job losses.
Benner also doubts a higher mini-
mum wage would affect prices enough
to scare away consumers. His research
has shown that even a large increase in
wages, like the proposal in Seattle, has
only a 4 to 5 percent effect on prices.
City Council member Nick Licata
doesnt expect the issue to get any of-
cial traction soon. One of the councils
most liberal members, he said there are
other issues the council should tackle
to help low-wage workers, including
wage theft and affordable housing.
Campaign seeks to push Seattle minimumwage to $15
IntPap 46.99 -.98 +17.9
JPMorgCh 51.83 -1.46 +18.7
JacobsEng 59.97 -1.45 +40.9
JohnJn 90.45 +1.08 +29.0
JohnsnCtl 40.16 -.38 +30.9
Kellogg 62.80 -.15 +12.4
Keycorp 11.99 -.17 +42.4
KimbClk 94.60 -.34 +12.0
KindME 81.42 -.69 +2.0
Kroger 37.94 -.31 +45.8
Kulicke 11.10 -.29 -7.4
L Brands 59.04 -.04 +25.5
LancastrC 79.65 -.33 +15.1
Lee Ent 2.45 -.05+114.9
LillyEli 52.79 -.07 +7.0
LincNat 42.75 -.80 +65.1
LockhdM 121.91 -.29 +32.1
Loews 45.67 -.74 +12.1
LaPac 15.10 -.66 -21.8
MarathnO 32.61 -1.46 +6.4
MarIntA 40.25 -.15 +8.0
Masco 18.61 -.41 +12.2
McDrmInt 7.20 +.02 -34.7
McGrwH 60.00 -.66 +9.7
McKesson 121.63 -.19 +25.4
Merck 47.58 -.12 +16.2
MetLife 47.61 -.67 +44.5
Microsoft 31.39 -.41 +17.5
MorgStan 25.81 -.66 +35.0
NCR Corp 36.65 -.75 +43.8
NatFuGas 65.27 -.16 +28.8
NatGrid 57.20 -.40 -.4
NY Times 11.50 +.09 +34.8
NewellRub 25.66 -.29 +15.2
NewmtM 32.08 -.30 -30.9
NextEraEn 81.54 -.61 +17.8
NiSource 29.51 -.30 +18.6
NikeB s 64.71 +1.06 +25.4
NorflkSo 72.95 -1.05 +18.0
NoestUt 41.22 -.08 +5.5
NorthropG 93.74 -.28 +38.7
Nucor 46.17 -.75 +7.0
NustarEn 41.57 -.26 -2.1
NvMAd 11.97 +.04 -21.3
OGE Egy s 35.51 -.54 +26.1
OcciPet 86.11 -.40 +12.4
OfficeMax 10.75 -.38 +24.7
Olin 23.14 -.14 +7.2
ONEOK 50.28 +.14 +17.6
PG&E Cp 42.41 -.23 +5.6
PPG 156.81 -1.78 +15.9
PPL Corp 30.55 ... +6.7
PVR Ptrs 22.65 -.34 -12.8
Pfizer 28.46 +.09 +13.5
PinWst 54.54 -.58 +7.0
PitnyBw 17.56 +.07 +65.0
Praxair 117.24 -.65 +7.1
PSEG 32.26 -.32 +5.4
PulteGrp 15.65 -.63 -13.8
Questar 22.77 -.20 +15.2
RadioShk 2.89 -.02 +36.3
RLauren 170.23 -1.85 +13.5
Raytheon 76.35 -.39 +32.6
ReynAmer 48.27 -.15 +16.5
RockwlAut 96.86 -.18 +15.3
Rowan 35.09 -.61 +12.2
RoyDShllB 66.35 -.37 -6.4
RoyDShllA 63.80 -.20 -7.5
Ryder 57.99 -.90 +16.1
Safeway 26.75 +.09 +47.9
Schlmbrg 80.41 -1.51 +16.0
Sherwin 167.52 -1.17 +8.9
SilvWhtn g 26.52 -.25 -26.5
SiriusXM 3.61 -.09 +24.9
SonyCp 19.92 -.06 +77.9
SouthnCo 42.05 -.34 -1.8
SwstAirl 13.11 -.23 +28.0
SpectraEn 33.49 -.05 +22.3
Sysco 32.50 +.05 +3.6
TECO 16.53 -.18 -1.4
Target 68.24 +.09 +15.3
TenetHlt rs 39.00 -.67 +20.1
Tenneco 46.79 -.94 +33.3
Tesoro 47.04 -1.76 +6.8
Textron 27.25 -.35 +9.9
3M Co 115.61 -.29 +24.5
TimeWarn 60.85 -.01 +27.2
Timken 57.96 -.98 +21.2
Titan Intl 16.09 -.35 -25.9
UnilevNV 39.33 -.27 +2.7
UnionPac 156.48 -1.45 +24.5
UPS B 86.08 +.03 +16.8
USSteel 17.99 -.83 -24.6
UtdTech 102.63 -.45 +25.1
VectorGp 16.05 ... +7.9
ViacomB 77.68 -.83 +47.3
WestarEn 31.49 -.33 +10.0
Weyerhsr 26.65 -.41 -4.2
Whrlpl 131.81 -1.85 +29.5
WmsCos 34.31 -.68 +4.8
Windstrm 7.99 -.14 -3.5
Wynn 139.18 +.61 +23.7
XcelEngy 27.70 -.25 +3.7
Xerox 10.14 -.16 +48.7
YumBrnds 72.08 -.08 +8.6
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.44 -.06 +17.6
GlblRskAllB m14.75 -.12 -3.9
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.51 -.16 +20.2
American Century
ValueInv 7.53 -.05 +19.0
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.19 -.10 +18.6
BalA m 22.30 -.10 +10.3
BondA m 12.33 -.03 -3.5
CapIncBuA m55.25 -.32 +6.6
CpWldGrIA m40.98 -.30 +11.8
EurPacGrA m44.23 -.37 +7.3
FnInvA m 46.55 -.25 +14.8
GrthAmA m 39.89 -.21 +16.1
HiIncA m 11.22 -.02 +2.7
IncAmerA m 19.28 -.10 +8.6
InvCoAmA m 34.81 -.20 +16.4
MutualA m 32.29 -.15 +15.1
NewPerspA m35.03 -.24 +12.1
NwWrldA m 55.18 -.71 +1.3
SmCpWldA m46.19 -.41 +15.7
WAMutInvA m36.19 -.19 +17.1
Baron
Asset b 58.25 -.25 +19.2
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.05 -.17 +11.7
GlobAlcA m 20.92 -.12 +6.7
GlobAlcC m 19.44 -.12 +6.1
GlobAlcI 21.02 -.12 +6.8
CGM
Focus 35.03 -.51 +19.6
Mutual 30.67 -.46 +7.9
Realty 28.32 -.55 -3.0
Columbia
AcornZ 34.69 -.24 +15.4
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 18.49 -.25 -8.7
EmMktValI 26.91 -.30 -9.0
USLgValI 27.77 -.36 +22.1
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.35 -.05 -7.2
HlthCareS d 33.13 -.03 +27.0
LAEqS d 27.86 -.38 -14.8
Davis
NYVentA m 38.35 -.24 +19.2
NYVentC m 36.80 -.23 +18.6
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.61 -.58 +16.0
Income 13.41 -.03 -1.8
IntlStk 38.86 -.54 +12.2
Stock 147.76 -1.27 +22.3
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 38.06 -.19 +10.4
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.54 ... +3.6
HiIncOppB m 4.54 -.01 +2.9
NatlMuniA m 8.89 -.03 -10.7
NatlMuniB m 8.89 -.03 -11.2
PAMuniA m 8.68 ... -3.3
FPA
Cres d 31.68 -.09 +13.0
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.22 -.04 +1.4
Bal 21.90 -.13 +9.3
BlChGrow 58.85 -.19 +20.0
Contra 89.21 -.27 +16.1
DivrIntl d 33.27 -.18 +11.1
ExpMulNat d 24.57 -.15 +12.2
Free2020 15.02 -.05 +5.6
Free2030 15.36 -.06 +8.2
GrowCo 111.40 -.52 +19.5
LatinAm d 37.32 -.57 -19.4
LowPriStk d 47.40 -.25 +20.0
Magellan 85.66 -.58 +17.5
Overseas d 36.63 -.06 +13.3
Puritan 21.00 -.11 +9.1
TotalBd 10.44 -.03 -3.0
Value 92.02 -.86 +20.5
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.20 -.24 +16.2
Fidelity Select
Gold d 24.09 -.34 -34.9
Pharm d 18.21 -.02 +23.1
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 58.50 -.34 +17.0
500IdxInstl 58.50 -.34 +17.0
500IdxInv 58.49 -.34 +16.9
TotMktIdAg d 48.34 -.32 +17.6
First Eagle
GlbA m 52.47 -.40 +8.0
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.89 -.01 -6.0
Income C m 2.33 -.01 +6.7
IncomeA m 2.30 -.02 +6.6
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 32.90 -.27 +14.9
Euro Z 24.35 -.09 +15.2
Shares Z 26.19 -.20 +16.5
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.78 -.07 -2.2
GlBondAdv 12.73 -.08 -2.1
GrowthA m 22.71 -.18 +16.9
GMO
IntItVlIV 23.03 -.26 +10.9
Harbor
CapApInst 49.19 -.01 +15.7
IntlInstl 67.28 -.58 +8.3
INVESCO
ConstellB m 24.65 -.08 +16.2
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.32-.10+17.0
PacGrowB m 20.76 -.18 +2.4
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 59.49 -.70 +12.0
AT&T Inc 33.79 -.39 +.2
AbtLab s 34.88 -.09 +11.3
AMD 3.60 -.06 +50.0
AlaskaAir 57.39 -1.10 +33.2
Alcoa 7.94 -.18 -8.5
Allstate 48.94 -.45 +21.8
Altria 33.93 -.36 +7.9
AEP 42.68 -.63 0.0
AmExp 74.34 -.83 +29.8
AmIntlGrp 46.32 -.78 +31.2
Amgen 104.47 -.44 +21.2
Anadarko 88.95 -2.57 +19.7
Annaly 10.66 -.61 -24.1
Apple Inc 507.74 +5.41 -4.6
AutoData 71.90 +.01 +26.3
AveryD 44.30 +.03 +26.9
Avnet 39.20 +.33 +28.1
Avon 20.36 -.27 +41.8
BP PLC 41.10 -.22 -1.3
BakrHu 46.44 -.42 +13.7
BallardPw 1.78 -.09+191.3
BarnesNob 16.67 -.87 +10.5
Baxter 71.38 +.26 +7.1
Beam Inc 61.67 -.53 +.9
BerkH B 114.30 -.94 +27.4
BigLots 33.30 -.47 +17.0
BlockHR 28.91 -.77 +55.7
Boeing 104.72 +1.25 +39.0
BrMySq 41.95 +.27 +30.1
Brunswick 36.08 -.30 +24.0
Buckeye 67.36 -.09 +48.3
CBS B 51.09 -.59 +34.3
CMS Eng 26.75 -.12 +9.7
CSX 24.89 -.27 +26.2
CampSp 46.04 +.04 +32.0
Carnival 35.89 -.63 -2.4
Caterpillar 84.20 -.96 -6.0
CenterPnt 22.93 -.25 +19.1
CntryLink 32.56 -.36 -16.8
Chevron 118.66 -1.22 +9.7
Cisco 24.27 ... +23.5
Citigroup 49.33 -1.02 +24.7
Clorox 83.97 -.12 +14.7
ColgPalm s 59.15 -.32 +13.2
ConAgra 34.91 +.13 +18.3
ConocoPhil 65.83 -1.55 +13.5
ConEd 56.10 -.54 +1.0
Corning 14.72 -.31 +16.6
CrownHold 44.30 +.15 +20.3
Cummins 123.83 -1.11 +14.3
DTE 67.16 -.43 +11.8
Deere 84.52 +.41 -2.2
Diebold 30.28 -.34 -1.1
Disney 61.83 -.34 +24.2
DomRescs 57.38 -.06 +10.8
Dover 86.65 -.50 +31.9
DowChm 36.63 -.26 +13.3
DryShips 1.92 -.12 +20.0
DuPont 57.53 -.75 +27.9
DukeEngy 66.33 -.72 +4.0
EMC Cp 25.73 -.15 +1.7
Eaton 64.83 -.61 +19.7
EdisonInt 46.59 -.39 +3.1
EmersonEl 61.12 -.15 +15.4
EnbrdgEPt 29.24 -.23 +4.8
Energen 65.34 -.99 +44.9
Entergy 63.54 -1.05 -.3
EntPrPt 58.52 -.77 +16.9
Ericsson 12.14 -.17 +20.2
Exelon 29.86 -.30 +.4
ExxonMbl 86.92 -.99 +.4
FMC Corp 64.99 -.45 +11.1
Fastenal 44.18 -.62 -5.3
FedExCp 108.67 -.01 +18.5
Fifth&Pac 24.49 +.02 +96.7
FirstEngy 36.39 -.42 -12.9
Fonar 5.53 -.02 +27.7
FootLockr 34.01 -.64 +5.9
FordM 16.12 -.18 +24.5
Gannett 24.06 -.40 +33.6
Gap 42.59 -.53 +37.2
GenDynam 84.15 +.40 +21.5
GenElec 23.85 -.10 +13.6
GenMills 49.50 +.12 +22.5
GileadSci s 57.34 +.43 +56.1
GlaxoSKln 51.31 -.32 +18.0
Hallibrtn 46.65 -.30 +34.5
HarleyD 58.05 -.39 +18.9
HarrisCorp 56.44 -.85 +15.3
HartfdFn 30.45 -.39 +35.7
HawaiiEl 25.38 -.27 +1.0
HeclaM 3.58 -.12 -38.6
Heico 58.74 -.18 +31.2
Hess 73.29 -1.78 +38.4
HewlettP 25.88 -.54 +81.6
HomeDp 75.21 -.17 +21.6
HonwllIntl 81.46 -.50 +28.3
Hormel 42.48 -.31 +36.1
Humana 91.71 +.18 +33.6
INTL FCSt 19.34 -.29 +11.1
ITT Corp 33.70 +.10 +43.6
ITW 72.16 -.27 +18.7
IngerRd 60.24 -.69 +25.6
IBM 184.23 -1.11 -3.8
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 101.52 +.63 +20.8
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 40.71 -.33 +9.6
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 42.49 +.20 +9.7
35.15 24.06 AquaAm WTR .76 30.73 -.45 +20.9
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.58 -.67 +33.6
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 420.40 +3.88 +18.6
15.03 7.83 BkofAm BAC .04 14.15 -.27 +21.9
32.36 22.11 BkNYMel BK .60 30.13 -.44 +17.2
22.68 6.58 BonTon BONT .20 14.26 -.48 +17.3
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 58.45 -.12 +20.9
79.33 43.90 Cigna CI .04 77.43 +.07 +44.8
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.78 -.27 +7.0
46.33 33.42 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.19 -.35 +12.9
34.70 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 33.76 -.18 +23.4
51.29 25.47 CmtyHlt CYH .25 40.45 -.10 +31.6
66.27 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 65.01 -.01 +37.3
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 61.12 -.15 +15.4
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 64.02 -1.45 +40.8
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.72 -.04 +24.9
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 11.96 -.07 -16.9
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.47 -.14 +4.4
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.53 +.17 +26.0
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.10 -.13 +54.2
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 94.58 -.59 +31.0
46.25 25.97 Lowes LOW .72 43.67 -.29 +22.9
119.54 85.09 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 116.06 -.71 +17.9
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 95.48 +.45 +8.2
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 30.66 -.30 +20.5
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 22.41 -.29 +10.6
39.75 7.93 NexstarB NXST .48 29.26 -.20 +176.3
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 73.93 -.98 +26.8
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.55 ... +6.7
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 17.73 -.61 +.5
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 80.88 +.70 +18.2
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 85.16 -.59 +1.8
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 79.59 -.31 +17.2
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 77.90 -1.71 +46.1
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.40 -.12 +150.0
26.17 15.33 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.50 -.32 +43.0
74.46 46.30 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 72.49 +.14 +36.8
54.29 40.08 TJX TJX .58 50.75 +.27 +19.6
43.24 30.04 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 39.62 -.51 +21.1
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 47.50 -.21 +9.8
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 73.58 -.53 +7.8
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 48.27 -.18 +23.2
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 42.49 -.26 +24.3
USD per British Pound 1.5655 +.0012 +.08% 1.5423 1.5691
Canadian Dollar 1.0346 +.0022 +.21% 1.0119 .9888
USD per Euro 1.3342 +.0004 +.03% 1.3389 1.2322
Japanese Yen 97.60 +.06 +.06% 93.44 79.55
Mexican Peso 13.0615 +.1499 +1.15% 12.6563 13.1325
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.34 3.36 -0.83 -8.45 -1.10
Gold 1366.20 1371.70 -0.40 -14.80 -15.67
Platinum 1509.00 1527.60 -1.22 -11.10 +0.72
Silver 23.16 23.32 -0.67 -21.26 -18.98
Palladium 752.00 762.15 -1.33 -1.54 +23.87
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.53 -.02 -3.0
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.45 -.07 +7.3
LifGr1 b 14.91 -.09 +10.7
RegBankA m 17.87 -.16 +25.8
SovInvA m 17.99 -.08 +12.9
TaxFBdA m 9.54 -.01 -6.7
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 17.80 -.35 -8.9
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.87 -.05 +1.1
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.55 ... +0.2
MFS
MAInvA m 25.08 -.12 +17.0
MAInvC m 24.17 -.11 +16.4
ValueI 30.35 -.17 +20.3
Merger
Merger b 16.00 -.02 +1.1
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.47 -.03 -1.9
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.61 -.10 +16.8
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 23.86 -.20 +24.1
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.07 -.15 +12.5
Intl I 25.26 -.14 +20.7
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 47.57 ... +12.4
DevMktA m 35.22 ... -0.2
DevMktY 34.88 ... 0.0
PIMCO
AllAssetI 11.99 -.08 -3.2
AllAuthIn 10.13 -.07 -7.1
ComRlRStI 5.75 ... -12.4
HiYldIs 9.44 -.02 +1.7
LowDrIs 10.22 -.01 -1.5
TotRetA m 10.62 -.04 -4.2
TotRetAdm b 10.62 -.04 -4.1
TotRetC m 10.62 -.04 -4.6
TotRetIs 10.62 -.04 -4.0
TotRetrnD b 10.62 -.04 -4.1
TotlRetnP 10.62 -.04 -4.0
Permanent
Portfolio 46.83 -.27 -3.7
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.96 ... +10.8
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 35.47 -.23 +13.6
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.06 -.16 +16.6
BlendA m 21.65 -.15 +17.4
EqOppA m 19.10 -.15 +20.4
HiYieldA m 5.61 -.01 +2.3
IntlEqtyA m 6.85 -.04 +9.1
IntlValA m 21.58 -.11 +8.3
JennGrA m 24.10 -.01 +15.4
NaturResA m 45.76 -.93 +1.5
SmallCoA m 26.38 -.22 +17.7
UtilityA m 13.12 -.10 +12.4
ValueA m 18.81 -.17 +20.5
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.59 ... +20.7
IncomeA m 7.03 -.01 -1.4
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.58 -.16 +5.3
OpportInv d 14.64 -.19 +22.5
ValPlSvc m 15.98 -.08 +15.5
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 25.94 -.15 +16.9
Scout
Interntl 34.99 -.23 +5.9
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 53.62 -.14 +17.5
CapApprec 25.21 -.06 +13.3
DivGrow 30.35 -.13 +16.0
DivrSmCap d 21.53 -.13 +23.5
EmMktStk d 30.30 -.56 -11.0
EqIndex d 44.46 -.26 +16.8
EqtyInc 30.64 -.29 +16.9
FinSer 18.16 -.25 +21.6
GrowStk 43.81 -.08 +16.0
HealthSci 53.48 -.13 +29.7
HiYield d 6.98 -.01 +4.0
IntlDisc d 51.71 -.17 +12.2
IntlStk d 15.05 -.16 +4.5
IntlStkAd m 14.98 -.15 +4.4
LatinAm d 30.65 -.54 -19.4
MediaTele 63.27 -.26 +18.7
MidCpGr 68.10 -.31 +20.6
NewAmGro 41.57 -.07 +15.7
NewAsia d 15.64 -.29 -7.0
NewEra 43.94 -.73 +4.8
NewHoriz 42.33 -.27 +27.6
NewIncome 9.30 -.03 -4.0
Rtmt2020 19.30 -.11 +7.9
Rtmt2030 20.89 -.14 +10.4
ShTmBond 4.78 -.01 -0.4
SmCpVal d 44.94 -.40 +14.7
TaxFHiYld d 10.83 -.02 -6.7
Value 31.90 -.29 +20.9
ValueAd b 31.54 -.29 +20.8
Thornburg
IntlValI d 29.83 -.05 +7.3
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.21 -.03 +12.8
Vanguard
500Adml 152.18 -.89 +17.0
500Inv 152.16 -.89 +16.9
CapOp 42.26 -.20 +25.7
CapVal 13.84 -.24 +24.8
Convrt 14.06 -.09 +12.2
DevMktIdx 10.77 -.07 +10.5
DivGr 19.41 -.05 +17.8
EnergyInv 63.19 -.95 +7.0
EurIdxAdm 65.81 -.52 +11.4
Explr 99.17 -.74 +24.8
GNMA 10.30 -.04 -4.2
GNMAAdml 10.30 -.04 -4.1
GlbEq 21.14 -.13 +13.2
GrowthEq 14.25 -.04 +16.0
HYCor 5.92 -.01 +0.5
HYCorAdml 5.92 -.01 +0.6
HltCrAdml 73.89 -.07 +25.3
HlthCare 175.10 -.17 +25.3
ITGradeAd 9.68 -.03 -3.5
InfPrtAdm 25.82 -.14 -9.0
InflaPro 13.15 -.07 -9.1
InstIdxI 151.17 -.89 +17.0
InstPlus 151.19 -.88 +17.0
InstTStPl 37.65 -.24 +17.7
IntlExpIn 17.03 -.01 +15.8
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.95 -.21 +5.2
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.77 -.87 +5.2
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Prmcp 84.00 -.31 +20.9
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REITIdx 21.10 -.26 -1.8
REITIdxAd 90.03 -1.13 -1.8
STCor 10.66 -.01 -0.3
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SelValu 26.10 -.19 +24.4
SmGthIdx 30.13 -.25 +20.4
SmGthIst 30.20 -.25 +20.5
StSmCpEq 26.66 -.27 +22.8
Star 22.29 -.13 +7.9
StratgcEq 26.05 -.28 +21.4
TgtRe2015 14.14 -.07 +5.7
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TgtRe2030 25.69 -.15 +9.9
TgtRe2035 15.66 -.10 +11.1
TgtRe2040 25.95 -.17 +11.9
TgtRe2045 16.29 -.11 +12.0
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TotBdAdml 10.52 -.03 -3.5
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TotIntl 15.51 -.13 +5.1
TotStIAdm 41.55 -.26 +17.6
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TxMIntlAdm 12.22 -.08 +10.7
TxMSCAdm 37.81 -.33 +21.4
USGro 24.65 -.08 +15.9
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WellsI 24.58 -.09 +3.5
WellsIAdm 59.56 -.22 +3.6
Welltn 36.95 -.18 +10.6
WelltnAdm 63.82 -.31 +10.6
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WndsrII 34.22 -.26 +17.7
Wells Fargo
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 1C
HEALTH
Should you puf at a higher premium?
Amajorityof Americans thinkits OKtocharge
higher health-insurancerates tosmokers but
not tooverweight people, accordingtoarecent
Galluppoll.
That mayhavesomethingtodowiththe
fact that amajorityof Americans areindeed
overweight, whileonly1 in5adults are
smokers. But theattitudehas implications
for health-planpolicydesigns goingforward,
especiallyintheAfordableCareAct era.
Thefederal health-careoverhaul gives states
theoptionof allowinginsurers that participate
intheonlinehealth-careexchanges tocharge
higher premiums tosmokers upto50
percent higher thanthestandardrate. At least
fvestates andWashington, D.C., havesaidthey
wont allowinsurers tochargehigher rates to
smokers. Pennsylvaniais not oneof them.
The eight insurers selling polices in
Pennsylvania come October Highmark,
Capital BlueCross, Independence Blue Cross,
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania,
UPMCHealth Plan, Geisinger Health System,
Aetna Inc. and HealthAmerica can charge
more to smokers, a move meant to account
for the increased risk and expense of covering
smokers health claims.
Its a move opposed by some odd bedfellows,
such as the countys top cigarette makers
as well as theAmerican Cancer Society.
Advocates for the poor and minorities
also say the smokers surcharge is unfair,
as it disproportionately will afect those
populations because they are more likely
to smoke and less likely to have employer-
provided health insurance.
And higher premiums could discourage
smokers frombuying insurance the
opposite of the intended efect of the
exchanges. (Pennsylvanias smoking rate is
slightly higher than the national average).
We dont want to create more barriers to
quitting,said Dianne Phillips, state policy
director for the cancer societys Cancer
Action Network.Making it more expensive
(might) put that insurance coverage out of
their reach.
Insurers say the extra charges make sense
froma risk-management standpoint.
Smokers will more or less be on the honor
systemwhen buying the insurance policies
theres no blood test to determine whether an
applicant is indeeda regular smoker. However,
if the insurance company later fnds out that
an applicant is a smoker but lied about it on
the application, it can retroactively apply
the extra premiumand continue to charge it
going forward.
It cant cancel the policy, though.
According to the Gallup poll, 58percent of
those surveyedwould be in favor of charging
higher insurance rates to smokers, but only
41 percent would agree the overweight should
be charged more.
TheAfordable CareAct does not allow
insurers to charge higher premiums to
overweight customers.
Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
MaryTherese BieBel
mbiebel@timesleader.com
Little Everett Andrew
Pisano arrived early, his
birth induced at 34 weeks
as part of a plan to return
his mother to good physi-
cal health.
But his parents, Tara
and Christopher Pisano
of Shavertown, say the
baby is improving their
emotional health as well.
Denitely busier, hap-
pier, Tara said, reecting
on how life has changed
since Everett Andrew was
born on July 19. He de-
nitely cheers me up. He
keeps my mind off whats
coming.
Taras coming ordeal is
a round of chemotherapy
to combat her recently
diagnosed acute myeloid
leukemia, which is a
blood cancer.
After that, the young
mother will receive a
stem-cell transplant
from her sister, Deanna
Hustey, to be followed by
more chemotherapy.
Theres a lot of encour-
aging news in this story,
including the fact that
Hustey, 26, is a 100 per-
cent match for her sister,
who just turned 28, and
that Dr. David Claxton,
a hematologist/oncolo-
gist at Hershey Medical
Center, has predicted a
90 percent chance Tara
will be alive ve years
from now.
But Tara, already a can-
cer survivor, had hoped
her rst bout with the
disease would be her last.
I had a hard time get-
ting my head to a good
place this time, said
Tara, who was treated
in 2011 for Ewings
Sarcoma, which usually
affects bones but was
found in her kidney. I
thought Id had my share
of trouble for a while.
Im torn between
never wanting (the new
treatments) to start, and
wanting to get them over
with so I can get back
to enjoying my life, she
said.
For Tara, a 2007 gradu-
ate of Kings College and
2012 MBA graduate of
Misericordia University,
her enjoyable life has
included working as a
senior accountant for
Luzerne Intermediate
Unit 18, cooking and
taking walks with her
husband of six years,
Christopher, whom she
met when they were both
students at Bishop Hoban
High School in Wilkes-
Barre.
Actually, we met
before that, when we
were babies, but we
didnt know it, Tara said
with a gentle laugh. His
cousins grandmother and
my grandmother were
best friends, so we ended
up at the same birthday
party. His mother was
showing me baby pic-
tures and there we were,
sitting in two high chairs
at a McDonalds. I told
her, That (other) baby is
me.
Tara and Christopher
got married in September
2007 and hoped to start
a family, but the Ewings
Sarcoma, discovered
early in 2011, interfered.
After surgery to
remove her kidney
and months of chemo-
therapy for the sarco-
Fighting to get her life back
Aimee Dilger Photos | The Times Leader
Tara and Christopher Pisano find changing diapers such a novelty, theyre both eager to do it.
Tara Pisano kisses her 3 week old son everett while her husband
Christopher looks on.
iF yOU GO
What: Rally at the River Grille, with music, food, baskets
When: 5 p.m. Thursday
Where: River Grille, 670 N. River St., Plains Township
Contributions may also be sent to Tara Pisano, c/o P.O.
Box 1591, Kingston, PA18704 or given online at www.
giveforward.com/fundraiser/nqk2/tara-pisanos-cancer-fund.
See PISAno | 5C
elizaBeTh De arMas
The Miami Herald
MIAMI Carole
Shearn isnt quite sure
when she will lose the
ability to speak, but she
is sure of one thing: Her
voice will still be heard,
even when the words can
no longer be spoken from
her lips.
The 70-year-old West
Palm Beach, Fla., resi-
dent learned she had
ALS, also known as
Lou Gehrigs disease,
in october. Her form of
ALS weakens the throat
muscles first.
The progressive dis-
ease has no cure, but
at the University of
Miami Miller School of
Medicines Department
of otolaryngology,
Shearn is the first patient
to take part in voice
banking a program
where patients who
eventually will lose their
voice due to diseases
such as Parkinsons, ALS
and cancer can record
key words, phrases and
personalized messages
to communicate when
speaking is no longer an
option.
Shearn uses Tobii
Assistive Technology, a
speech-generating device
that stores her record-
ings into categories. She
can then use a mouse,
touch the screen or even
use her eyes to retrieve
the sound files.
In case of an emergen-
cy, Shearn has even pro-
grammed a message say-
ing get help immediate-
ly and call 911. Tobii,
which is compatible with
Bluetooth technology,
will call for her.
Truthfully, I was so
amazed when I found
out about the Tobii,
she said. It makes me
feel good that I can per-
sonalize my messages to
whomever. It is my life-
line.
ALS is a neurode-
generative disease that
attacks the motor neu-
rons. As the disease pro-
gresses, these neurons
begin to degenerate and
stop sending messages
to muscles. Eventually,
individuals diagnosed
with the disease lose the
ability to move their legs,
arms and body.
According to the
national Institute of
neurological Disorders
and Stroke, 20,000 to
30,000 people are living
with ALS in the United
States. The average lifes-
pan for a person with
ALS is three to five years.
Because ALS patients
lose strength and move-
ment in their limbs, Tobii
has a built-in eye tracker.
Shearn can sit in front
of the device without
moving any part of her
body but her eyes and
still communicate effec-
tively.
Jocelyn odlum, a
speech pathologist at the
University of Miami, met
Shearn at an ALS sup-
port group in West Palm
Beach and then began
seeing her at the clinic.
After evaluating Shearn,
she got her started on
voice banking. Shearn
has been recording her
voice every day for the
past two months.
Carole is an inspira-
tion, odlum said. She
took this disease and is
doing everything she pos-
sibly can to be prepared.
odlum says that once
individuals learn they
have ALS, they should
see a speech pathologist
immediately so they can
be introduced to these
devices and helped.
Unfortunately by the
time people come to see
me they have no voice,
she said.
Shearn has record-
ed basic phrases such
as Hello. My name is
Carole, and How was
work? But, she also
has recorded some of
her other favorite phras-
Banking on your voice:
Machine stores speech
for patients future use
See voICE | 2C
MCT Photo
Carole shearn, 70, is losing the
ability to speak due to having
als. The retired teacher, who
lives in West Palm Beach, has a
way to preserve her voice via an
eye-gaze technology that per-
mits shearn to bank her voice
using spoken phrases, which
then transfer to a Tobii system.
What doyouget
nowthat weaccept GHP?
Achoice.
More patients chooseWilkes-Barre General than any other hospital
in Northeastern Pennsylvania. And if you have GHP, you nowhave
that choice, too. Learnmore at CommonwealthHealth.net.
Berwick Hospital Center First Hospital Mid-Valley Hospital Moses Taylor Hospital Regional Hospital of Scranton
Special Care Hospital Tyler Memorial Hospital Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
PAGE 2C Tuesday, August 20, 2013 HEALTH www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Newtool peeks into brain to measure consciousness
LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON
When people have a brain
injury so severe they
cant squeeze a loved
ones hand or otherwise
respond, there are few
good ways to tell if they
have any lingering aware-
ness or are in a vegeta-
tive state. Now research-
ers have created a tool to
peek inside the brain and
measure varying levels of
consciousness.
The work is highly
experimental, not ready
for bedside use yet and
if it pans out, a big ques-
tion is how to use it with-
out raising false hope.
No one knows what
level of consciousness at a
certain point after injury
really predicts recovery.
But it offers the hope
that one day doctors
might track conscious-
ness nearly as easily as
they check blood pres-
sure.
Consciousness can
grow and shrink, said
Dr. Marcello Massimini,
a neurophysiologist at
Italys University of Milan
who led the research to
quantify just how much
that is happening under
different circumstances.
It seems obvious
consciousness fades dur-
ing deep sleep, and doc-
tors can slip us under
with anesthesia. Yet
scientists dont have a
good way to measure
consciousness, especially
when the very ill appear
to be unconscious. Its
important to try to dis-
tinguish if patients are
at least minimally con-
scious, and not in a veg-
etative state, because the
sooner theres some sign
of awareness, the better
the chance of recovery.
Today, doctors check
if those patients can
do things like blink or
move a limb on com-
mand, or react to touch
or pain. If not, scans
of the brains electrical
activity may offer clues.
Scientists even have put
seemingly unconscious
patients inside MRI scan-
ners and told them to
imagine throwing a ball.
How the brain reacts can
indicate if theyre aware
and just cant show it,
whats called locked-in
syndrome.
But all these tests have
drawbacks.
The new work, report-
ed in the journal Science
Translational Medicine,
aims for an easier, more
objective measure. Its
based on the theory that
consciousness depends
on the complexity of
activity in the brain, how
well different regions con-
nect and process informa-
tion. For example, when
youre deeply asleep, the
neighbors car alarm may
not wake you but your
brain still processes that
you heard it. When youre
wide awake, it also pro-
cesses how annoying the
alarm is and how often it
goes off.
Massiminis team com-
bined two well-known
medical devices.
First, a coil delivers a
powerful pulse of magne-
tism that travels through
the skull to stimulate the
brain, essentially knock-
ing on it to say wake
up.
Then an EEG, which
measures brain waves
through electrodes
attached to the scalp,
records the patterns of
activity as neurons re in
response.
The nal trick: The
researchers created a for-
mula to compare the com-
plexity of those resulting
brain patterns by zip-
ping them, like digital
les are compressed so
they can be emailed.
They called the resulting
numerical measurement
the PCI, or pertubational
complexity index.
The team compared
tests from 32 healthy
people who were awake,
asleep, dreaming or anes-
thetized, and 20 people
with a variety of serious
brain injuries. The two
patients with locked-in
syndrome clearly were
aware, scoring nearly as
high as awake and healthy
people, they reported. The
patients in a diagnosed
vegetative state had scores
as low as people rendered
unconscious by the most
powerful anesthesia. The
minimally conscious were
somewhere in-between.
The strategy could
miss consciousness, so
it wouldnt give doc-
tors enough information
for end-of-life decisions,
researchers caution.
But its a pioneering
study that offers highly
promising leads, said Dr.
Nicholas Schiff, a profes-
sor of neurology and neu-
roscience at Weill Cornell
Medical College in New
York, who wasnt part of
the project.
If its ultimately prov-
en to work, the bigger
impact could be in help-
ing doctors study whether
patients improve when
given different treat-
ments, added Dr. Lori
Shutter, a brain inten-
sive-care specialist at the
University of Pittsburgh,
who also wasnt involved
with Wednesdays work.
But she cautioned that
just nding a glimmer of
consciousness could mis-
lead families hoping for a
miracle long after the pos-
sibility for improvement is
over.
This may provide a
lot of insight, Shutter
said. The downside is
once you prove theres any
consciousness, how will a
family react?
Whats up butter-
cup?, Whats new, super
glue?, and You snooze.
Voice
From page 1C
MCT Photo
Carole Shearn types in new phrases on her iPad before recording
them; the phrases will be transferred to a program that will play
them aloud in Shearns own voice. Shearn, 70, is losing the ability
to speak due to having ALS.
You lose.
When Shearn was ini-
tially diagnosed, she had
absolutely no idea what
ALS was.
She also didnt know
the disease does not have
a cure.
That was very hard
to hear, she said. I
had tears in my eyes, of
course, and I asked how
long I would have to live.
And my doctor said he
didnt know, three to five
years, so we left the office
on that.
Shearns daughter,
Jennifer Wagner, had been
suspicious of the early
symptoms she had been
noticing: slurred speech
and choking spells, even
when her mother wasnt
eating.
She researched her
mothers symptoms and
learned about ALS.
It was very daunting
and difficult to read,
she said. I had a pretty
good idea of what the
disease was and what it
was going to entail, and
I didnt want my mom to
go through that.
Although Shearn can
still drive and walk
without any assistance,
Wagner drives her moth-
er from West Palm Beach
to the university.
She also started an
open Facebook page
called Caroles Crusade,
where people can become
more aware about the dis-
ease and follow her moth-
ers progression.
I know that I can-
not cure the disease, so
my main goal is to bring
attention to it, she said.
For Shearn, keeping
a positive mindset has
helped her cope with the
disease, but she acknowl-
edges that she is not as
hopeful and optimistic
as she was eight months
ago because she notices
herself getting a little
worse.
I was certain I was
going to live past 90, she
said. I would still like
to.
But if she doesnt,
Shearn says, she believes
that she has done every-
thing she has wanted to
do: traveled to Rome,
Alaska, Paris, England,
Italy, Spain and the tip of
Africa, been surrounded
by good people and had a
successful 36-year teach-
ing career.
My life has always
been about people, so I
dont crave a lot of out-
side influence, she said.
Our family is small, but
we are tight. That has
always been everything to
me. I feel my life has been
blessed.
My life has always been about people,
so I dont crave a lot of outside influence.
Our family is small, but we are tight. That
has always been everything to me. I feel
my life has been blessed.
Carole Shearn,
West Palm Beach, Fla
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570.283.0528 | Kingston, PA | www.vomri.com
Perfect Images
JUNE PEARL SALE
228 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd. W-B PA 18702 826-1087
15% OFF
All Pearls
80018844
Roxy SayS Stop in foR ouR peRidot Sale
15% OFF
All Peridot Jewelry
in August
We will be closed 8/17-8/26. We will re-open on 8/27.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com COMMUNITY NEWS Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 3C
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY!
Photographs and information
must be received two full
weeks before your childs
birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-gener-
ated. Include your name and
your relationship to the child
(parent, grandparent or legal
guardians only, please), your
childs name, age and birthday,
parents, grandparents and
great-grandparents names
and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Dont forget to include a day-
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
Braden Zaremba
Braden Zaremba, son of Michael
and Megan Zaremba, Nanticoke,
is celebrating his ninth birthday
today, Aug. 20. Braden is a grand-
son of Chester and Henrietta
Zaremba, Nanticoke, and Richard
and Megan Tennesen, Sheatown.
He is a great-grandson of Dorothy
Coopey, Pembrooke Pines, Fla.
Braden has a brother, Tyler, 13.
time contact phone num-
ber. Without one, we may be
unable to publish a birthday
announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return
of birthday or occasions
photos and do not return
community-news or publicity
photos. Please do not submit
precious or original profes-
sional photographs that
require return because such
photos can become dam-
aged, or occasionally lost, in
the production process.
Email your birthday
announcement to people@
timesleader.comor send it
to: Times Leader Birthdays,
15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711-0250. You
also may use the formunder
the People tab on www.times-
leader.com.
NEWS FOR
SENIORS
EDWARDSVILLE:
Edwardsville Active Adult
Center, 57 Russell St., is
hosting a presentation
on transitional care by
a representative from
Riverview Ridge at 11
a.m. on Aug. 27.
A discussion on heat
stroke prevention and a
blood pressure screening
by Golden Living Center
will take place at 11 a.m.
on Aug. 28.
For more information,
call 570-287-3381.
EXETER: The
Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet at 1 p.m. today
in St. Anthonys Center.
Host and hostesses are
Aggie Abromavage,
Rose Gunsior, Johanna
Malinowski, Victor
Malinowski and Marge
Zinkavich.
The previous meeting
was attended by 59 mem-
bers and two guests. New
pastor, the Rev. Finn was
introduced to the club.
Birthday celebrants were
announced and Mary
Dirhan was highlighted
for her 98th birthday.
The 50-50 winners
were Sam Ferrara, Ron
McAdarra, Johanna
Malinowski and Frances
Poluske. Rosalie Ferrara
won the special game
prize and the guest of
Cheryl Piphers won the
bingo jackpot.
A casino trip is planned
for September to Mount
Airy with pick ups in Exeter
and Pittston. Membership is
not a requirement for trips.
Call Johanna at 655-2720
for details.
PLAINS TWP.: Plains
Senior Citizens Project
Head held a meeting
on Aug. 7 at SS. Peter
and Paul school caf-
eteria, Plains Township.
President Kevin OConnor
thanked members who
helped at the Plains Crime
Watch Night Out. The
Chinese auction was a
great success.
Michael Boncheck gave
a report on the trip in
September to Mount Airy
Casino. The date will be
announced at the next
meeting. The cost is $20.
Members and non-mem-
bers are invited to contact
Mike at 823-2871.
The next meeting will
be held on Wednesday.
There will be no host-
esses at this meeting since
there will be an ice cream
social.
SWOYERSVILLE:
The Swoyersville Senior
Citizens will meet
on Wednesday at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Hall. New members
are welcome. Winners
of the 50-50 fundraiser
were Helen Yurevich,
Sue Barger and Liz
Zdancewicz.
WYOMING: The
Wyoming, West Wyoming
Seniors will meet at
1:30 p.m. today at the
St. Monicas meeting
rooms with President
Frank Prenski presid-
ing. Servers are Armonde
Casagrande and Vicky
Mecklavage.
Refreshments will be
served after a brief busi-
ness meeting and bingo
will be played.
Fifty-fty winners from
the last meeting were
Helen Markert , Marion
Pocceschi, Olga Mizin
and Angie Mastruzzo.
Bingo jackpot winner was
Marion Poccschi.
Birthdays for August
are Olga Mizin, Joe
Kosloski, Genny Rooney
and Angie Zagursky.
Timber Ridge Health Care Center recently participated in the United Way Christmas in July food drive competition to benefit local fami-
lies. Some of the participants, fromleft, first row, are Daniel Kozar, Suzanne Modrovsky and Kaitlin Tanner. Second row: Bridget Flannery,
Virginia Hunisch, Mark Deibert, Ann Wambold, Debbie Storm and Bill Wolfe.
Timber Ridge Health Care participates in food drive
PETS OF THE WEEK
Name: Zippy D Do Da
Sex: male
Age: 5
Breed/type: Yorkshire
terrier
About this dog: neu-
tered, up to date on shots
Name: Olive Oil
Sex: female
Age: 6 months
Breed/type: domestic,
short-hair
About this cat: spayed,
up to date on shots
How to adopt: Call or visit the Hazleton Animal
Shelter, 101 N. Poplar St., Hazleton. Phone 454-0640.
Hours for adoptions are 1-4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday. Business hours are
8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 8 a.m.-1
p.m. Sunday. Wish list: donations of cat food, cleaning
supplies, paper products, and blankets are in need.
Members of the Edwardsville Active Adult Center recently observed Hawaiian Day. A special luncheon was served and various activities
were held throughout the day. A fun time was had by all. Participants, from left, first row, are Mary Ann Pointon. Second row: Joseph
Pikaitis; Betty Devans; Sherlene Long, director; Marsha Cragle; Mary Sisty; Myron Mahalak; Joan Shugar; Clara Norton; and Irene Smee.
Hawaiian Day observed at Edwardsville Active Adult Center
MEETINGS
Today
KINGSTON: West
Side Central Catholic
High School Class of
1964, 7 p.m., at St.
Ignatius Church, Conlon
Hall, North Maple Street.
Plans for the 50th anni-
versary reunion will be
discussed.
All classmates are
welcome and urged to
attend.
CALL 714-6460 TODAY!
www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
Most Insurances Accepted.
Most Insurances Do NOT Require A Referral
Pinnacle Rehabilitation Associates
Kevin M. Barno, MPT K. Bridget Barno, PT
Sharon Marranca, MPT Hal Glatz, MPT Maria Hall, PTA
K. Bridget Barno PT
Kevin M. Barno MPT
520 Third Avenue Kingston
DOYOU HAVE ARTHRITIS OF
THE SPINE OR HERNIATED DISCS?
WE DONT NEED MIRACLES!
All of our therapists have over
15 years experience treating your problems
Be able to sit, bend and walk pain free!
Our expert hands-on treatment will improve your
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2 Convenient Locations To Serve You!
201 South Main St. Pittston 602-1933
520 Tird Ave. Kingston 714-6460
www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
William Montross, MPT
K. Bridget Barno PT
Kevin M. Barno MPT
CALL 714-6460 TODAY!
www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
All of our therapists have over
15 years experience treating your problems
Be able to sit, bend and walk pain free!
www.iremclubhouse.com | 675-1134, ext. 102
Open to the Public!
Toast to clubhouse cuisine at the Irem
Clubhouse Restaurant & Pub. Delight in
American fare while enjoying the
beauty of the Back Mountain.
CLUBHOUSE
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
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S IDING ,W INDO W S
& C ARPENTRY
THE BES T RO O FING ,
Offering Physical, Occupational
and Speech Therapy
4 East Center Hill Road Dallas
570-675-8600
http://themeadowsnursingcenter.com/rehab/
Carpenter Dental
www.carpenterdental.com
Charles M. Carpenter D.M.D. Chas M. Carpenter D.M.D.
1086 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort
570-331-0909
Now Accepting New Patients!
Call for your
free implant,
denture,
extraction
consultation.
*Some restrictions may apply.
Your First
IMPLANT
$
895
Regular fee
$
1,890
00
August and September ONLY
80016652
Skilled Nursing
Personal Care
Rehabilitation
Services
61 Private Rooms
Memory Memor Memor Care
Caring and
Compassion
Spiritual Care
200 S. Meade St.
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702
823-6131
www.little www www owermanorwb.org
Open to the Public!
Immerse yourself in country club style:
daily lunch specials romantic dinners
patio dining business meetings parties
outdoor weddings elegant receptions
www.iremclubhouse.com | 675-1134
CLUBHOUSE
610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp.
Phone 570-825-9720 Fax 570-825-1939
www.lucasfarms.org
LUCAS FARMS
Hours Open 7 Days A Week
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES AT GREAT PRICES!
SHICKSHINNY LOCATION
NOW OPEN 7 DAYS PER WEEK
Sale starts Sat. 8/17 thru Fri. 8/23.
Hours: Open 7 Days AWeek
9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. (Hanover)
10:00A.M. to 7:00 P.M. (Shickshinny)
Phone 570-825-9720 Fax 570-825-1939
www.lucasfarms.org
GRABN- GO LUNCHMEAT,
SLICEDFRESHDAILY!
CONVENIENT, QUICK ANDEASY, NOLONGLINES!
COOKED HAM, HARD SALAMI, SMOKED TURKEY BREAST,
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Beautiful Smiles!
www.elizabethajosephdmd.com
337 Third Ave., Kingston 714-1800
Elizabeth A. Joseph, DMD, PC
Comprehensive, Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
Now Offering
Zoom
Whitening
Offering professional dental care to meet your individual
needs and goals. As a family-friendly practice, we strive to
create a pleasant ofce setting where patients of all ages
will feel comfortable throughout the treatment process.
You can be condent that the whole family, including the
kids, will receive modern dentistry with personalized and
compassionate care from our dental professionals.
We accept
most
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1 S. MAIN ST.
PLAINS
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SPECIAL PURCHASE
Blk/Wht
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(NEXT TO BABIES R US)
WILKES-BARRE
824-8880
Mens & Womens
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Roofng Siding
Interior Damage
Fire, Water and Storm
Restoraton
We Will Work With Your
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DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC
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and ftness while learning self defense.
Our mature program welcomes beginners
from 11 years of age to adult.
The Fall session will begin on
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For more information: 570-417-3185
PAGE 4C Tuesday, August 20, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
TUESDAY EVENING AUGUST 20, 2013
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MICHELLE R. SMITH
Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I.
If youve enjoyed the
works of Stephen King,
seen the lms Alien or
Prometheus, or heard
about the ctional Arkham
Asylum in Batman, thank
H.P. Lovecraft, the early
20th century horror writer
whose work has been an
inspiration to others for
nearly a century.
Themythos Lovecraft cre-
ated in stories such as The
Call of Cthulhu, The Case
of Charles Dexter Ward
and At the Mountains of
Madness, has reached its
tentacles deep into popu-
lar culture, so much that
his creations and the works
they inspired may be better
known than the Providence
writer himself.
Lovecrafts fans want to
give the writer his due,
and this month are holding
what they say is the larg-
est celebration ever of his
work and inuence.
Its billed the
NecronomiCon, named
after a Lovecraft creation:
a book that was so dark
and terrible that a person
could barely read a few
pages before going insane.
The Aug. 22-25 con-
vention is being held in
Providence, where he
lived and died poor and
obscure at age 46 in
1937.
HowardPhillips Lovecraft
was born in 1890.
His parents both died
in an insane asylum, his
father when Lovecraft was
just 8 years old, said S.T.
Joshi, who has written a
biography of Lovecraft and
edited several collections
of his work.
He attended just three
years of high school, leav-
ing because of a nervous
breakdown, Joshi said.
Besides a brief and
unhappy marriage that
took him to New York from
1924 to 1926, Lovecraft
lived his whole life on
Providences East Side,
close to Brown University.
He wrote his most sig-
nicant work after return-
ing to Providence, publish-
ing many of his stories in
the magazine Weird Tales.
He barely scraped
together a living, but devel-
oped a wide network with
fellow writers through
letters, and wrote an esti-
mated 80,000 of them in
his lifetime.
Lovecraft said several
times he could not live
anywhere but Providence,
a sentiment reected in
the gravestone his fans put
up decades after his death:
I AM PROVIDENCE, a
line they took from letters
he wrote.
The grave in a city cem-
etery is often visited today
by fans, who leave trinkets
or notes behind.
He was a fan of Edgar
Allan Poe, a master of
psychological horror, but
Lovecraft tackled different
themes.
He combined horror
with science ction and
developed what is com-
monly referred to as cos-
micism, the idea that man
is inconsequential in the
universe, that there are
forces that defy human
understanding in the cos-
mos, represented by gods
or creatures who are far
more powerful than us but
also indifferent to us.
To them, we are like ants
or specks of dust. When
we get in their way, we will
be destroyed.
A lot of these creatures
have bafing physical prop-
erties that dont t into our
perceptions of natural law.
For him the most terrify-
ing thing that could happen
is to defy our understand-
ing of the known laws of
physics, Joshi said.
His most famous crea-
ture is Cthulhu (commonly
pronounced kuh-THOO-
loo).
A pulpy, tentacled head
surmounted a grotesque
and scaly body with rudi-
mentary wings, Lovecraft
writes.
He likens it simultane-
ously to an octopus, drag-
on, and human caricature.
In The Shadow Over
Innsmouth, he writes of
a race of creatures that are
a cross between sh, frogs
and man. The story inspired
a Metallica song, The
Thing That Should Not Be.
Lovecrafts writing is
detailed and dense.
Youre not going to pick
up a Lovecraft novel and
just breeze through it,
acknowledges Lovecraft
fan Anthony Teth, who is
helping to organize the
conference.
He weaves in historical
and architectural refer-
ences throughout his sto-
ries, many of which are set
in his beloved hometown
or other spots he visited
in New England, such as
Salem, Mass., (Arkham)
and Newburyport, Mass.
(Innsmouth).
In Providence, most of
the buildings he wrote
about are still standing,
said Niels Hobbs, 43,
a marine biologist who
among those organizing
the conference.
When you walk the
streets of Providence,
especially College Hill, his
old neighborhood, you can
see Lovecrafts Providence.
Its simply everywhere, he
said.
Even so, many
Providence residents have
no idea of Lovecrafts con-
nection with the city and
his importance in litera-
ture.
There are no Lovecraft
museums or prominent
markers in the city.
His fans hope to change
that with this weeks
conference, which will
include walking tours of
Lovecrafts old haunts,
the unveiling of a new
Lovecraft bust at one of
his favorite old haunts, the
Providence Athenaeum,
and panel discussions on
Lovecrafts work, even the
NecronomiCon to celebrate horror writer Lovecraft
Howard Phillips Lovecraft
When you walk the streets of Providence,
especially College Hill, his old neighborhood,
you can see Lovecrafts Providence. Its
simply everywhere.
Niels Hobbs,
conference organizer
negative aspects.
He was steeped in the
past and suspicious of
change, and like some of
his contemporaries was
racist and anti-immigrant,
themes reected in his sto-
ries including The Shadow
Over Innsmouth.
In recent years, appre-
ciation for Lovecraft has
grown worldwide.
There have been lm
festivals on the West Coast
of Lovecraft-themed mov-
ies and conferences in
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com HEALTH Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 5C
I thought Id had my share of trouble for a while. Im torn between
never wanting (the new treatments) to start, and wanting to get
them over with so I can get back to enjoying my life.
Tara Hustey Pisano,
Shavertown
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Tara and Christopher Pisano talk about the challenges that lie ahead.
which usually affects ado-
lescents, she hoped she
was in remission for good.
She wanted to start a
family, but doctors told
her it might be impos-
sible for her to get preg-
nant, at least for a while,
because her body might
not bounce back. So she
and Christopher were sur-
prised, and pleased, when
they learned Everett was
on the way.
The pregnancy seemed
to be progressing well until
the 20th week, when Tara
began to feel anemic.
I knew what anemia felt
like, she said, because Id
had it before, during che-
motherapy.
During a checkup with
Kingston oncologist Dr.
David Greenwald, she said
she thought she might
have an iron deciency.
That turned out not to be
the case. It wasnt a de-
ciency of folate or vitamin
B12, either.
When they did the
bone marrow biopsy, I
was thinking nothing bad
would come back from
it, she said. I thought Id
done my time.
But the biopsy did indi-
cate myelodysplastic syn-
drome, which is character-
ized by an overabundance
of immature white blood
cells, also known as blasts,
in a persons bone marrow.
The condition soon pro-
gressed to acute myeloid
leukemia.
In her case, Tara said,
the leukemia is therapy-
induced, which means she
has it because of the che-
motherapy drugs she took
for the Ewings sarcoma.
They give you these
huge packets for each che-
motherapy drug you get,
and each one has pages
and pages of side effects,
she said. One of those side
effects was a 1 percent
chance of getting this kind
of cancer.
Tara was upset. She was
angry. She cried.
Then she became deter-
mined to ght.
I always visualize how
Ill feel when I get my life
put back to normal, she
said.
During these few weeks
of recovery from child-
birth, before the treat-
ments start, Christopher
and Tara are enjoying the
normalcy of everyday child
care. Were obsessed,
Tara said. We both want
to change the diapers.
She also expects to
enjoy serving as her sis-
ters matron of honor when
Deanna Hustey gets mar-
riedat the endof this month.
The sisters grew up in
South Wilkes-Barre, forg-
ing a close bond as they
played with Barbies, rode
bicycles together, and even
lmed home movies with
their dolls as the stars.
I always told her what
they would say, Tara said
with a big-sister smile. I
was the boss.
In a telephone inter-
view, Hustey said she is
happy to be able to donate
Pisano
From page 1C
stem cells, a process she
described as no more tax-
ing than donating blood,
but something she hopes
will give her sister many
healthy years to watch
Everett grow up.
When I rst saw him,
she said of her nephew, I
felt this incredible love. It
was just overwhelming.
The babys parents feel
that way, even more so,
and call Everett a miracle
because, if Tara hadnt
been pregnant and feel-
ing weak, they believe the
second cancer might have
progressed further before
it was discovered.
Its hard not to worry.
I dont think I spend ve
minutes without thinking
about it, Tara said.
But shes optimistic
about the coming stem-cell
transplant. Then I have to
wait for (my sisters) DNA
to take over and start pro-
ducing red blood cells and
platelets.
During and after the
transplant, Tara expects
to be hospitalized several
times, including a period
when shell have to spend a
month in Hershey.
Ive learned that all you
can do is just be there for a
person, Christopher said.
The couple will lease
a short-term apartment,
which is one of many
expenses not covered by
insurance.
You pay a few hundred
just to see a doctor, Tara
said. And I have lots of
doctors.
Christopher will be tak-
ing time off from his job as
a foreman at Wilkes-Barre
Clay Products, which takes
another bite from the fam-
ilys income.
Eager to help nancially,
friends and relatives have
planned a Rally at the
River Grille fund-raiser
for Thursday at the River
Grille restaurant in Plains
Township.
These next couple
months are going to be
very difcult for Tara
and her family, long-
time friend Alison Taroli
Gelsleichter said. We are
hoping to make it just a
little bit easier.
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PAGE 6C Tuesday, August 19, 2013 HEALTH www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
The lesser-known problemof male body image
LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
NEW YORK Body dysmorphia, anorexia and
bulimia have been studied in women for years, but
rare is an account from a man who battled the dan-
gerous, distorted reection in his mirror.
Out recently from Brian Cuban, the middle of
two younger brothers of Dallas Mavericks owner
Mark Cuban, is Shattered Image,
his self-published account of
cocaine, alcohol and steroid abuse,
a brush with suicide, visits to a psy-
chiatric hospital and three failed
marriages.
All, he said in a recent interview,
stemmed from the monster he
began seeing in his mirror as a
socially crippled teenager who was
overweight and bullied, both at school and by his
own mother, herself a victim of body-focused ver-
bal abuse from his grandmother.
Cuban, 52 and the executive director of the
Mark Cuban Foundation, said he managed to hide
his demons until loved ones helped him into recov-
ery about six years ago. Now, he elds emails from
young people facing the same troubles, mostly
girls trying to deal with shards of shattered self-
images in their own mirrors.
He wishes more boys were among them.
Even in 2013, the stigma is just huge for boys.
You dont want to out yourself,
said Cuban, who lives in Dallas.
Ive had men come to me and say
theyre hiding eating disorders from
their wives. Theyre afraid of losing
their jobs. Theyre afraid of being
thought of as gay. Not much has
changed for men.
AP: Youre just six years or so
into recovery. Why write this
book now?
Cuban: I just felt that there was a
lack of understanding of male self-
image and male eating disorders,
especially body dysmorphic disor-
der. It is overwhelmingly thought of
and portrayed in the media and
in research as a predominantly
female disorder. I wanted to be one
of the ones stepping forward to help
change that conversation. Nobody
else seems to be. The process of
writing was a big part of my recov-
ery. Not just the book but on my
blog. I came out as a bulimic on my
blog. That was the rst my family
even knew of it.
AP: In addition to the book, what steps will
you take to raise visibility on these and related
issues like bullying?
Cuban: My goal is to reach out to college stu-
dents to educate them about male
body image issues. And to reach out
to parents to hopefully start a new
conversation about how to talk to
your children and how fat-shaming
can affect your childs perspective
and get it out there that every child
is different. Every child is born
unique. When I talk to parents I
hear a lot of, Well, I was bullied
and I fought back so thats what Im
going to teach my kid. Thats great
and maybe that will work for your
son or your daughter, but your child
is not you. Your child may not be
mentally equipped to handle it the
way you did.
AP: Tell me about your mom
and your grandmother because
your relationships with them
caused you a lot of grief over the
years.
Cuban: I had a tough relation-
ship with my mom. And my mom
had a tough relationship with her
mother. My grandmother was from
the old country, a Russian Jewish immigrant who
came over. She was dirt poor, and she had her
issues. She fat-shamed my mom and my mom fat-
shamed me. It just runs downhill. Its nothing new.
What changes is how you deal with it. My father
was my security. Part of my recovery was dealing
with that, and my mom and I have a great relation-
ship now. You have to forgive. That doesnt mean
you necessarily forget, but it helps you move on by
releasing the emotion.
AP: Youve had several key low points,
including failed marriages, nearly losing your
leg to a staph infection due to steroid abuse,
suicidal thoughts involving a .45 automatic in
your mouth and trips to the psych ward. What
was the nal turn to a healthier life?
Cuban: The last time I was bulimic was, I want
to say, 2007. That corresponded with my nal
low point, when I had a two-day, drug and alco-
hol induced blackout in which I was unfaithful to
my girlfriend. That had never happened before. We
had just moved in together. She had gone out of
town, and when she got back theres alcohol and
drugs everywhere and theres a prophylactic on the
ground.
It was at that point that I go back to the hospital.
I thought she was gone, but she stuck with me and
weve been together almost eight years now. It was
that one moment where I said, You know what, if
this happens again Ill be dead.
I walked into 12-step. I put the eating behaviors
behind me. I put the drugs behind me, but the
thoughts are always there. With body dysmorphic
disorder, theres no cure for the thoughts. Its only
how you deal with those thoughts. Thank God for
family who loves me.
Cuban
Shattered Image: My Triumph
Over BodyDysmorphicDisorder,
by Brian Cuban. Cuban, brother
of Dallas Mavericks owner Mark
Cuban, wrote a self-published
account of cocaine, alcohol and
steroid abuse, a brush with sui-
cide, visits to a psychiatric hos-
pital and three failed marriages.
Many stroke, heart-attack survivors make no changes after event
TARA KULASH
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Theres no stronger
scare tactic into leading
a healthy lifestyle than
suffering a heart attack
or stroke, which is why
it may be surprising that
many survivors dont make
changes needed to improve
their health.
A study published in
April in the Journal of
the American Medical
Association shows one in
four men doesnt make
any lifestyle changes after
a heart attack, stroke or
other major cardiac event.
Women were more likely to
change unhealthy behav-
iors, and urban residents
were more likely to make
at least two lifestyle chang-
es than those who lived in
rural areas.
Three behaviors were
included for the study:
smoking cessation, healthy
eating and physical exer-
cise. Out of 7,519 patients
surveyed in 17 countries,
just 4.3 percent of partici-
pants improved their hab-
its in all three areas, more
than 30 percent made two
lifestyle changes and more
than 47 percent changed at
least one lifestyle behavior
to better their health.
Dr. Mark Friedman, a
cardiologist at the SSM
Heart Institute, said
changing ones lifestyle can
be very difcult.
Patients dont want
to be talked down to, he
said. They dont want to
be told theyre bad.
But much of the prob-
lem is lack of education.
While patients used to
stay in the hospital for up
to two weeks after a car-
diac event, they now are
discharged within a day or
two. This leaves little time
for the medical staff to edu-
cate patients on what hap-
pened to them and what it
could mean for their future.
Friedman attempts
to motivate patients by
starting small. While
the American Heart
Association recommends
walking for 30 minutes a
day ve times a week, the
SSM cardiologist encour-
ages his patients to begin
with walking three days a
week. He also recommends
frozen sh and fruit for
those on a low budget.
What really surprised
Friedman about the study
is that patients had the
most success with smok-
ing cessation more
than 52 percent. People
in wealthier countries had
more success than those in
poorer countries, the study
showed. Friedman said
higher income individu-
als are likely to have more
education and resources to
quit smoking.
The numbers pleased
him, though, as Friedman
said smoking cessation
is one of the best ways to
avoid heart disease. Still,
he said he believes it is one
of the hardest habits for his
patients to cut, and they
have to really want to stop
for it to work.
Other changes include
diet, with 39 percent report-
ing eating more healthful
food, and physical activity,
with 35 percent saying they
were more active.
Urban area residents
were 22 percent more likely
in the study than those
in rural areas to make at
least two lifestyle changes.
Friedman said this could
again be because of more
education and resources
in cities. More physical
activity was reported by
people at all income levels.
Women were more likely
than men to make lifestyle
changes after a major car-
diac event.
More than 7 percent of
women made all three rec-
ommended lifestyle chang-
es, compared to less than
2.5 percent of men. They
were also 66 percent more
likely than men to make at
least two lifestyle changes,
and more than 26 percent
of men changed nothing
compared to about 7 per-
cent of women.
Friedman and his team
do their best to educate
victims of major cardiac
events by bringing in dieti-
tians and models that show
whats happening in the
patients body. Then they
have a mandatory follow-up
visit.
Deb Garbo, a nurse
practitioner, sees patients
shortly after their release
from the hospital to pre-
scribe medications and
treatment. She said many
people dont absorb what
theyre taught in the hos-
pital because theyre more
focused on being released,
so its her duty to reteach
the patients everything.
Garbo assesses patients
readiness to make changes.
Sometimes they will tell
her that they arent con-
dent they can handle break-
ing a habit, so she doesnt
force it on them.
A scared straight method
that Garbo uses sometimes
is she will ask the patients
to hang a photo of their
heart stent in their homes
so they can look at it when
theyre tempted to smoke a
cigarette or eat unhealthily.
One way to succeed is to
participate in a cardiopul-
monary rehabilitation pro-
gram, she said.
At the heart institute,
patients are overseen by
a medical director for an
hour three times a week
for exercise and educa-
tion. Amy Puricelli, a nurse
at the St. Marys Health
Center cardio rehab, said
the patients she sees usu-
ally are genuinely trying to
make changes.
However, only 10 percent
to 20 percent of patients
eligible for cardiac rehab
actually sign up for the pro-
gram.
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The purpose of this clinical research study is to determine the safety and
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You may qualify if you:
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Tuesday, Augst 20, 2013 PAGE 7C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I re-
cently declined a
wedding invitation
because my spouse
and I will be out of
town on the date of
the wedding. A few
days after I sent the
RSVP, I got an email from the groom
saying he had suspicions that I
wasnt attending because I was bitter
about not being in the wedding party.
I was shocked by the email. Not
only do I not care about who is in the
wedding party, I dont think were
such close friends that we should
have been invited in the first place.
I emailed him back, explaining that
we will be out of town and how upset
and disappointed I am that he would
think something like that. Wasnt
what he did a breach of etiquette?
Appalled in New York
Dear Appalled: Yes, it was. Your in-
ability to attend the wedding appears
to have brought to the surface the
grooms insecurity about his social
relationships. I dont blame you for
being appalled. The mans behavior
was inappropriate.
Dear Abby: My sister is 63, divorced,
educated, intelligent, self-employed
and receives monthly support from
her ex-husband. The problem is she
takes no responsibility for her health.
Shes extremely overweight because
she overeats and doesnt exercise. She
complains every day she feels ter-
rible. (I call it self-pitying whining.)
Our other siblings think it is too
late to confront her. I want to address
the issue now, before she gains even
more, or has a stroke or heart attack
and, quite frankly, wont be able to
care for herself. I dont want to see
the responsibility fall on her three
kids or us siblings. Your thoughts?
Sibling Standing By
Dear Sibling: The problem with
confronting someone is that it usu-
ally makes the person being confront-
ed defensive. In a case like this I dont
recommend it. However, a family
INTERVENTION might work. If the
family members were to get together
and, as a group, talk to your sister
about your concern for her health, it
might be the wake-up call she needs.
No mention of whining should
be made, but suggest that she might
have a touch of depression that could
be helped if she brings it to the at-
tention of her doctor. Tell her you all
love her, that youre worried about
her, and are willing to help.
Dear Abby: When my wife and I
go to a busy restaurant or a concert
where we can pick up last-minute
tickets, I often ask her to hop out of
the car to find out if the wait times
are reasonable or tickets are available
while I wait in the car. I do this so I
wont have to find a parking space un-
til were sure we will be staying.
My wife says my doing this is tacky.
I believe it is efficient. What are your
thoughts, recognizing that I usually
come up with the short straw on mat-
ters of manners? Thanks!
John K. in Windsor, Conn.
Dear John K.: Your request makes
perfect sense to me. Parking spaces
are sometimes hard to find and valet
parking isnt cheap. However, because
your wife resents doing this, either
she should be the one to drive so you
can hop out, or tickets and reserva-
tions should be made in advance.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Thin-skinned groom-to-be berates wedding guest who sent his regrets
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). If youve
ever been the third wheel
navigating between a bicker-
ing couple, you understand how
important it is to present a uni-
fied front, even when you dont
feel so inclined.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Youve
been known to knock yourself
out to create something beauti-
ful for your loved ones. Just be
careful not to coddle them too
much, or they will turn soft.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You like
to know that your presence mat-
ters. However, if your energy
is too overwhelming, people
will feel intimidated, shut down
around you and be too uptight to
contribute their ideas.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). A burst
of health, strength and vitality
will have you feeling groovy.
Confident and happy in your
stride, heads will snap to check
you out when you walk by.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Love and
logic seldom go together. So
theres no sense in wondering
What was he thinking? or
Why did she do that? Instead,
wonder What was he feeling?
and Whats the best response?
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You
have the opportunity to ease
someones mind, salve their hurt
or soothe their pain. Seeing the
opportunity (others wont) and
acting on it is what makes you a
healer.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Its
always easier to flirt with danger
if you have no intention of actu-
ally starting a relationship with
it. Your heart is pure now, but
if you continue to flirt, danger
could eventually wear you down.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). When
life is not on track, dont wait for
the turning point. Grab the steer-
ing wheel and turn with all your
might. You might go into a spin,
but you wont be headed in the
same bad direction.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
If you keep answering emails,
phone calls and questions, they
will keep filling up your inbox,
voice box and mind space. At
some point youll say enough is
enough and change your focus.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
It would be easy to take the
socially acceptable route and do
what everyone else is doing. But
youll miss out if you play it too
safe. This afternoon, if youre not
risking, youre not being creative
enough.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
express yourself passionately
when appropriate, but what is
needed today is a more con-
trolled and to-the-point energy.
Practice your presentation with
this end in mind.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Anyone
can react to bad news. Youre
different. Youre empathic, and
you use your gift to prevent bad
news from happening in the first
place. You notice when there is a
need and serve it before things
get out of hand.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Aug. 20).
Your talent opens possibilities
for you that do not exist for oth-
ers. Youll use your privileged
position to promote good will
and create smart solutions to
common problems. Your com-
mute changes for the better in
September. Your lucky numbers
are: 5, 3, 33, 28 and 13.
F U N N I E S TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 1D
Special Notices
OCTAGON FAMILY RESTAURANT
375 W Main St. Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Weekend Special
$13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received at the Harveys Lake Borough, PO
Box 60; Rt. 415-Sunset, Harveys Lake, PA 18618 until 10 A.M.
local time on September 6, 2013 then publicly opened and read
aloud. Borough Council will act on the bids at their next meeting.
Bids are invited for the milling and paving of Woodlawn Dr., Rood
Street, South Street, Park Street, and Peach Street. The work in-
volves paving the entire width of the streets after milling, widen-
ing etc. This project must be completed prior to November 1,
2013.
Contract documents are at Penneastern Engineers, LLCs office
located at 165 North Wilkes-Barre Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre PA
18702, Phone (570) 823-4712. Copies of the contract docu-
ments may be obtained at a cost of Fifty Dollars ($50.00)/ set.
Prospective bidders are urged to familiarize themselves with the
site and review the scope of work and construction documents.
Any contractor who does not do so and submits a bid does so at
his own risk.
Bid proposals must be on the forms provided. Bid Security in an
amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total bid shall be sub-
mitted with each bid in accordance with the instructions to bid-
ders.
The Labor Standards, Wage Determination Decision and Anti-
Kickback regulations (29 CFR, Part 3) issued by the Secretary of
Labor are included in the contract documents of this project and
govern all work under the Contract.
Non-discrimination in Employment Bidders on this work will be
required to comply with the Presidents Executive Order #11246
and will be required to insure that employees and applicants for
employment are not discriminated against on the basis of their
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or familial
status in employment or the provision of services. In addition to
EEO Executive Order 11246, Contractors must also establish a
6.9% goal for female participation and a 0.6% goal for minority
participation in the aggregate on-site construction workforce for
contracts in excess of $10,000 as per the notice of requirement
for affirmative action as contained in the contract documents. At-
tention is called to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Develop-
ment Act of 1968, 12 USC 179 LU and the Section 3 clause and
regulations set forth in 24 CFR, Part 135.
Harveys Lake Borough reserves the right to reject any or all bids
and portions thereof or to waive informalities in the bidding. Har-
veys Lake Borough does not discriminate based on race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, or familial status in
the provision of services and is an Equal Employment Opportun-
ity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Bids may be held for a period not to exceed Ninety (90) days
from the date of opening for reviewing the bids prior to awarding
the contract. No bids may be withdrawn during this time.
BY: Borough Council & Mayor
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
INVITATION FOR BIDS
SEALED BIDS will be received at the NANTICOKE CITY MUNI-
CIPAL BUILDING, 15 EAST RIDGE STREET, NANTICOKE, PA
18634, until 10 A.M. Local Time, September 4, 2013, and then
publicly OPENED and READ ALOUD. The bids will be acted on
at the next meeting of the City.
The City of Nanticoke is requesting Building Demolition & Site
Clearance Bid Proposals for the property located at 45-47 East
Grand Street.
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS are on file at Penneastern Engin-
eers, 165 North Wilkes-Barre Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18702. COPIES of the Contract Documents may be obtained at
a cost of Seventy Five Dollars ($75.00) per set during normal
business hours.
BID PROPOSALS are unique and must be upon the forms
provided. Bids will be rejected from any bidder not registered
with the Engineer. BID SECURITY in an amount equal to ten
percent (10%) of the total bid shall be submitted with each bid, in
accordance with the Instructions to Bidders.
The Labor Standards, Wage Determination Decision, and Anti-
Kickback regulations (29 CFR, Part 3) issued by the Secretary of
Labor are included in the Contract Documents of this project and
govern all work under the contracts.
Non-discrimination in Employment Bidders on this work will be
required to comply with the Presidents Executive Order #11246
and will be required to insure that employees and applicants for
employment are not discriminated against on the basis of their
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or familial
status in employment or the provision of services. In addition to
EEO Executive Order 11246, Contractors must also establish a
6.9% goal for female participation and a 0.6% goal for minority
participation in the aggregate on-site construction workforce for
contracts in excess of $10,000 as per the notice of requirement
for affirmative action as contained in the contract documents. At-
tention is called to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Develop-
ment Act of 1968, 12 USC 179 LU and the Section 3 clause and
regulations set forth in 24 CFR, Part 135.
The City of Nanticoke reserves the right to reject any or all Bids
or to waive informalities in the bidding and is an EQUAL EM-
PLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
BIDS may be held by the City for a period not to exceed ninety
(90) days from the date of the Opening of the Bids for the pur-
pose of reviewing the bids, prior to awarding the Contract. In this
period of time, no Bidder may withdraw his Bid.
BY: Mayor Dougherty, and City Council
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The Back Mountain Regional Fire and EMS, 184 East Center Hill
Road, Dallas, PA 18612-1154, is soliciting bids for Additions and
Renovations to Back Mountain Regional Emergency Services
Facility, State Route 118, Lehman Township,
Pennsylvania 18612.
Bids will be received for the following prime contract(s):
Contract No. 1: General Construction
Contract No. 2: Plumbing Construction
Contract No. 3: HVAC (Mechanical) Construction
Contract No. 4: Electrical Construction
The Owner will receive bids until 10:00 a.m. on Friday, Septem-
ber 6, 2013, at the Lehman Township Municipal Building, loc-
ated at 1183 Old Route 115, Lehman, PA 18627, Attention: Mr.
Mark Vanetten.
Bids received after that time will not be accepted. All bids will be
opened publicly at that time.
All bids shall be enclosed in envelopes (inner and outer) both of
which shall be sealed and clearly labeled with the words
"SEALED BID FOR ADDITIONS AND RENOVATIONS TO
BACK MOUNTAIN REGIONAL EMERGENCY SERVICES FA-
CILITY, and the name and Prime Contract Number bid on,
name of bidder and date and time of bid opening, in order to
guard against premature opening of the bid. Facsimile bids will
not be accepted or considered.
Copies of the Bidding and Contract Documents on a compact
disk, in .pdf format, may be obtained by Prime Contractors at the
office of Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street,
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701; Telephone 570-829-4200,
Extension 275, Attention: Lynn Duszak. The disk may be ob-
tained for non-refundable sum of $100.00 each, plus cost of ship-
ping and handling, via pre-payment and providing Bidders Fed-
eral Express or UPS Account Numbers. Paper copies of the
drawings and specifications are available for a non-refundable
sum of $200.00, plus cost of shipping and handling. No partial
sets of documents will be obtainable.
All checks for Bidding and Contract Documents shall be made
payable to the Architect, Quad Three Group, Inc. Cut-off date for
issuing Bidding and Contract Documents shall be Friday, August
30, 2013 at 4:00 p.m.
All bids shall remain firm for sixty (60) days following opening of
bids.
Each contractor and each sub-contractor shall be licensed in the
community where the work will occur.
The Contract will be written to retain 10% for each request for
payment. When the Contract is 50% completed, no further retain-
age will be withheld, but no retainage previously withheld will be
returned to the Contractor. All retainage withheld during the first
50% of the work will be held until completion. However, the Ar-
chitect must approve the Application for Payment. The Contract-
or must be making satisfactory progress and there must be no
specific cause for greater withholding.
The Owner-Contractor Agreement will be the Standard Form of
Agreement Between Owner and Contractor, AIA Document
A101, 2007 edition.
The Owner requires that all Bids shall comply with the bidding re-
quirements specified in the Instructions To Bidders. The Owner
may, at its discretion waive informalities in Bids, but is not oblig-
ated to do so, nor does it represent that it will do so. The Owner
also reserves the right to reject any and all Bids. Under no cir-
cumstances will the Owner waive any informality which, by such
waiver, would give one Bidder a substantial advantage or benefit
not enjoyed by all other Bidders.
Bonding companies for Performance and Payment Bonds must
be listed in the U.S. Treasury Circular No. 570.
A Bid Bond made payable to the Back Mountain Regional Fire
and EMS in the amount of 5% of each Base Bid shall accom-
pany each bid, executed by the Contractor and a surety com-
pany licensed to do business in the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, as a guarantee that, if the bid is accepted, the bid-
der shall execute the proposed contract and shall furnish and
pay for a Performance and Payment Bond in the amount of
100% of the Contract Price as security for the performance of the
Contract and payment of all costs thereof, upon execution of
Contract. If, after fifteen (15) days the bidder shall fail to execute
said Contract and Bond, the Bid Bond shall be forfeited to the
Owner as liquidated damages. The Bid Bond of all bidders, ex-
cept the three low bidders, will be returned within ten (10) days
after the opening of the bids.
The Bid Bond of the three low bidders for each prime contract
will be returned within three days after the executed Contracts
and required bonds have been approved by the Owner.
All contracts exceeding $10,000 shall contain a provision requir-
ing compliance with Executive Order 11246, entitled, Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity, as amended and as supplemented in De-
partment of Labor regulations (41 CFR Part 60-1 subpart A).
The successful Bidder will be required to file a Stipulation
Against Mechanic's Liens prior to commencing work.
Bidders will be permitted to access the site by appointment only.
Contact the Owners Representative listed in the Project Manual.
The Bidding Documents and Forms of Proposal may be ex-
amined at the following site during regular business hours:
Quad Three Group, Inc., 37 North Washington Street, Wilkes-
Barre, Pennsylvania 18701, telephone 570-829-4200, facsimile
570-829-3732.
Dodge Editorial of NEPCA, 1075 Oak Street, Suite 3, Pittston,
PA 18640,
telephone 570-655-5905, facsimile 570-655-5960.
Pre-Bid Conference: A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will
be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday,
August 30, 2013, at the Project Site, located at State Route 118,
Lehman Township, PA 18627.
END OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
MEETING NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Harveys Lake Zoning Hearing
Board will hold a public meeting on September 3, 2013 at
7:00PM at the Harveys Lake Borough Building, for the following
two variance requests:
1. Harveys Lake Zoning Hearing Board will hear testimony on the
application of Steve & Heather Vieczorek, owners of property at
Pole 140, Lakeside Drive Harveys Lake, PA 18618. Applicant is
requesting a variance from Harveys Lake Zoning board, so that
they can expand a non-conforming dock in the S-1 Zoning Dis-
trict. There is a stop work order, and enforcement notice in effect,
as the structure has been expanded without permit approval. Ad-
ditionally, the appropriate DEP permits have not been secured
for work in the water.
2. The Harveys Lake Zoning Hearing Board will hear testimony
on the application of Scott & Susan Meuser, regarding a prop-
erty owned by Michael & Cindy Vough, for a property at 207
Lakeside Drive, Harveys Lake, PA. Applicant requests a vari-
ance needed to allow for private rowing/athletic club in the S-1
Zoning District. The current ordinance does not allow for a
private athletic/rowing club in this zoning district.
Copies of these applications can be reviewed at the Harveys
Lake Municipal Building during regular business hours.
Andy Luzetski Zoning Officer
Special Notices
Free Books:
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By Watchman Nee
Economy Of God.
By Witness Lee
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Newbooks
Christian Friends of
Brother Watchman Nee
Want to meet and share
thoughts with you.
Call 570-267-8250,
sdekw@yahoo.com.
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bridezella.net
Miscellaneous
PURSE (Kathy VanZeeland),black
& new w/ tags;$40. New black
Suede Tignanello purse;$30. Black
& gr ey Dooney & Bour k e
purse;$20.Like new camel color
Etienne Aigner purse;$20.Gun met-
al colored Tignanello purse;$10.
570-603-1195
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Let-
ters Testamentary have been
granted in the ESTATE OF
TERESA M. INTELICATO, late
of t he TOWNSHI P OF
WILKES-BARRE, (died July
27, 2013). Evelyn M. Snipas,
Executrix, c/o Robert A. Go-
nos, Esquire, 88 N. Franklin
Street, Second Floor, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18701.
All persons indebted to said
estate are required to make
payments and those having
cl ai ms or demands are to
present the same without delay
to Attorney Robert A. Gonos.
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters of Administration
have been granted in the Es-
tate of Anna C. Kotula, late of
Dupont, County of Luzerne,
C o m m o n w e a l t h o f
Pennsylvania, who died on Ju-
ly 5, 2013, to Valerie Kotula
n/ b/ m Val eri e Al ba, of 27
Llewellyn Lane, Royersford,
Pennsylvania 19468.
All persons indebted to said
estate are required to make
payment, and those having
claims or demands, to present
the same wi thout del ay to
Valerie Kotula n/b/m Valerie
Alba, Administrator of the Es-
tate of Anna C. Kotula, c/o
Dominick P. Pannunzio, Es-
qui r e, 294 Mai n St r eet ,
Dupont, Pennsylvania, 18641.
LAW OFFICES OF
DOMINICK P. PANNUNZIO
294 Main Street
Dupont, Pennsylvania 18641
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Wilkes-Barre City Council
will meet in Special Session on
Thursday, August 22, 2013 at
6:00 p.m., i n Ci ty Counci l
Chambers, Fourth Floor, City
Hall, 40 East Market Street for
the Second Reading of an Or-
di nance amendi ng part of
Chapter 7 of the City Code of
Ordi nances (Bui l di ngs and
Building Regulations) and also
for consideration of a grant ap-
plication under the Community
Development Block Grant
Disaster Recovery Program.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
If special accommodations are
required for persons with dis-
abilities, please notify Melissa
Schatzel at 570-208-4112 or
emai l mschat zel @wi l kes-
bar r e. pa. us
Jim Ryan
City Clerk
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is given that Letters of
Admi ni strati on C.T.A have
been issued in the Estate of In-
ez E. Thorne, a/k/a, Elizabeth
Thorne, deceased, l ate of
Swoyersville, Luzerne County,
PA., who died December 10,
2012. All persons indebted to
the estate are requested to
make payment and those hav-
ing claims to present the same
i mmedi at el y t o Shi rl ey E.
Rozelle, administratrix, 1241
Mai n St., Swoyersvi l l e, PA
18704 or the estates attorney,
Michael J. Anthony, Esq.
Michael J. Anthony, Esq.
120 S. Franklin St.
P.O. Box 95
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703-0095
Lost & Found
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
-CALL ANYTIME
-HONEST PRICES
-FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
Lost & Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
Vito &
Gino's
FREE
PICKUP
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
PAGE 2D Tuesday, August 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
General Auction
AUCTIONS BY MARVA
213 E. LUZERNE AVE., LARKSVILLE
WEDNESDAY - AUGUST 21 - 4:00 P.M. START
LIVINGROOM, BEDROOM & KITCHEN SETS,
BLOW MOLDS, JEWELRY, TOOLS, FISHING,
HOLIDAY ITEMS, TOO MUCH TO LIST!!!
AUCTIONEER: MARVA MYSLAK AU-3247L
FOR INFO: 570-822-8249
WE ACCEPT ALL CREDIT CARDS - 10% BUYERS PREMIUM
WWW.AUCTIONZIP.COM I.D. 3473
Medical/Health
LPN
Per Diem
CNA
FT, PT, Per Diem All Shifts
(PA Certification Req.)
*Competitive Pay Rates*
Jump Start Your Career Today!
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for information
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Or apply in person at:
Birchwood Nursing & Rehab Center
395 Middle Rd
Nanticoke, PA 18634
Medical/Health
RN SUPERVISOR
*$2,500- Sign On Bonus*
LPN-CNA
Full Time-Part Time Positions!
*Competitive Salary + Benefits*
To apply for our amazing career opportunities
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for info
Email resumes to: Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Subject Line: ATTN-Riverside
Or apply in person at:
Riverside Rehab & Nursing Ctr.
500 West Hospital Street Taylor, PA 18517
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
Production/Operations
PRODUCTION
AEP Industries, Inc.,
manufacturer of flexible packaging films in Mountaintop hiring
MACHINE OPERATORS FOR NIGHT SHIFT ONLY
Starting at $ 10.50/hr. PLUS .50 /hr. for night shift;
60-90 day evaluation provides increase $$ based on
YOUR performance, attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours shifts alternating / 3 & 4 day work weeks
(overtime pay every other)
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND A MUST
As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack
finish product to specifications with strong opportunity for
promotion. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, MUST
know how to use a tape measure and scale,
and be a TEAM PLAYER.
Previous mfg. experience preferred.
Benefit Pkg. includes:
Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday pay
Applications accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES, INC.
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
20 Elmwood Avenue
Crestwood Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA 18707
Email: grullony@aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free workplace
Production/Operations
SHEETFED/WEB
SUPERVISOR
Local printer is looking for an experienced press production
shift supervisor. Candidate will supervise the shift activities of
our Sheetfed Dept. and is responsible for department's safety,
quality and productivity. Weekend and holiday work may be
required as needed. Union shop supervisory experience is
desirable. Salary pending experience.
Minimum qualifications:
High school diploma or GED
Vocational/technical degree or equivalent experience
Front-line supervision experience plus technical and
interpersonal skills
Problem solving experience with four color lithograph and
paper problems
Good mechanical trouble shooting skills
Proactive thinker and good team builder.
Please send resume to:
The Times Leader
Box 4490
15 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
E/O/E
Child / Elderly Care
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
MOTOWN THE MUSICAL
Wed., Oct. 16th
$149. (Mezz Seats)
WICKED
Wed., Oct. 16th
$169 (Orchestra seats)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
Monday, December 2
$99.
orchestra seats
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
Frank LLoyd Wright's
Fallingwater/Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains, Lyndhurst
Castle Tarrytown
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
1,000 Islands
Sept 16-19
Meals, Cruises,
Wine Tasting
Yankees/Orioles 9/1
White Sox 9/2 & 9/4
Giants Broncos 9/15
Eagles 10/6
Sight & Sound
"Noah" 9/7
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
1-800-432-8069
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Accounting /Financial
ACCOUNTANTS
We are a diversified NEPA
CPA firm with an immediate
need to hire a Supervisor and
Manager for our staff. CPA &
minimum 4 years public acctg.
experience including tax
preparation required. Clients
consist of financial institutions,
manufacturing, medical and
other service industries, non-
profits, and governmental. We
offer a very competitive salary
as well as a full benefits
package.
Send resume to:
The Times Leader
Box 4485
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Administrative / Professional
Legal Secretary/
Receptionist
Full time. Legal experience
preferred but will train the
right candidate. Excellent
phone etiquette is necessary.
Must be able to work inde-
pendently, computer know-
ledge is a must. Duties will in-
clude answering telephones,
typing, billing, general office
functions. Send resume and
cover letter to:
The Times Leader
Box 4490
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre,PA 18711
Automotive
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
Busy service center needs
motivated, experienced Auto
Mechanic. Drivers license &
inspection license required.
Excellent starting salary &
benefits. Call: 570-237-6671
Banking / Real Estate / Mortgage
Account Services
Associate:
Responsible for all aspects
of Automated Clearing
House (ACH), ATM
balancing and Electronic
Funds Transfer (EFT)
including processing and
notifying members of Return
Deposit Items in a timely
manner that provides mem-
bers with quality service.
Reconcile accounts in
accordance with credit uni-
on policies and procedures.
Experience/Education
substitution permissible,
Salary commensurate
with Experience/Education.
Please forward Resume and
Salary Requirements to:
Community Regional
Credit Union
584 Wyoming Avenue
Kingston PA 18704
Clerical
EXPERIENCED
OFFICE HELP
Must have previous
experience with general
office duties including
knowledge of word & excel.
Good customer service skills
a must. Full benefits after 90
days. Send resume to:
Box 4425 15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Transportation Coordinator
Full/Part time.
Saturday thru Monday
3pm-11pm. Plus 2 day shifts.
$9/hour.
Call 570-288-5466
Customer Support / Client Care
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
PROFESSIONAL
Growing manufacturer has a
position open for a Customer
Service Professional in a fast-
paced environment. The ideal
candidate must possess
excellent communication skills,
along with computer experi-
ence. Must be a team player
with a can-do attitude and
have excellent follow-up skills.
Must have MS Excel, Word
knowledge. Comprehensive
benefit package, including
vacation, medical, dental, and
401K.
Send resume to:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVER
Experienced Roll Off,
Class A or B CDL Driver. Full
Time, Over Time available.
Benefits include, paid
healthcare, vacation, 401K.
Apply in person
7:30am-3:30pm
Louis Cohen & Son, Inc
9 Fellows Ave
Hanover Twp, 18706
Education
THE WYOMING VALLEY
WEST SCHOOL DISTRICT
is accepting applications for
the following positions:
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
The Wyoming Valley West
School District is seeking a
full-time, Occupational
Therapist for the 2013-2014
school year. The position is
within the collective bargain-
ing unit and the selected can-
didate will work directly with
students and/or in collabora-
tion with staff. Responsibilit-
ies include screenings, evalu-
ations, team collaboration,
IEP development and other
duties. Must possess current
PA state occupational therap-
ist license, current clear-
ances, valid drivers license
and personal vehicle. Send
letter of interest, resume, ap-
plication, three current profes-
sional references, copy of
current PA state occupational
therapist license and
clearances
(Act 34 Criminal Record
Clearance, Act 151 Child
Abuse Clearance, Act 114
FBI Fingerprinting).
Send applications to:
The Personnel Office
Wyoming Valley West
School District
450 N. Maple Avenue
Kingston, PA 18704
Application deadline is Friday,
August 23, 2013.
Food Services
Is now hiring for the
following part time positions:
Security Officers
and
Produce Clerks
Previous experience
preferred.
Apply at:
400 South Main St.,
Wilkes Barre
E.O.E
Help Wanted General
LOT ATTENDANT
Part Time. Valid PA
Drivers License.
Call 570-824-0903
after 3pm
ANGELO'S PIZZA
is currently looking for a Part
Time CASHIER. Please call
Bill at 570-855-8732
DRAFTSPERSON
Entry level position with
knowledge of CAD required.
Home design, material take
offs and truss review.
*Health and Dental Insurance
*Vacation and Personal Days
*401K Retirement Plan
Send resumes to:
Fine Line Homes
596 Susquehanna Blvd.
Hazle Township, PA 18202
LANDSCAPE HYDROSEED
PERSONNEL
Hydroseed and soil erosion
control experience helpful.
Valid drivers license a must.
Top wages paid. Unlimited
overtime. Apply in person
9am-3pm, Monday through
Friday and bring ID:
1204 Main Street
Swoyersville
Varsity Inc.
No Calls Please
E.O.E
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
FORKLIFT
MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc., located in
Pittston, PA, is the exclusive
dealership for Crown and
TCM forklifts for NEPA. We
are seeking a full time forklift
mechanic to troubleshoot, re-
pair and diagnose Crown and
other makes of lift trucks.
Good written and verbal com-
munication skills, as well as
customer care skills are
necessary. A valid drivers li-
cense and the ability to safely
operate lift trucks are re-
quired. Previous forklift mech-
anical experience or technic-
al school graduate will be
considered. We offer an
excellent wage and benefits
package, as well as 401K
Retirement Savings Plan,
paid holidays, paid vacation
and much more.
E-mail your resume to
mermar@actionliftinc.com
or fax to 570-603-2880
Maintenance / Supervisory
CARPET + TILE
CLEANERS
Stanley Steamer is hiring.
Drivers license required; must
work Saturdays, 7 am - done;
100% commissions paid. Call
Ted at 570-332-8168 to
inquire about employment
opportunities.
EOE.
Marketing/Product
SOCIAL
MEDIA
TEAM LEADER
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA. Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a background
in social media. Candidate
shoul d have experi ence
posting to Facebook, Twit-
ter, Google+, YouTube and
Pinterest. Creative writing
skills required and Blog-
ging Experience is a defin-
ite plus! The ability to work
under tight deadlines is re-
quired. If you love the world
of Social Media, Dont let
this career opportunity pass
you by. Come and join our
marketing team! Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
Medical/Health
RESIDENTIAL
WORKER
Full and per-diem work at a
personal care home, located
in Drums, giving assistance
to residents with all aspects
of their care. HS diploma or
equivalent needed along with
a valid PA driver's license.
Hours vary. Benefit package
offered to full time. Please
send resume to: Northeast
Counseling Services, HR
Dept. 130 W Washington
Street, Nanticoke, PA 18634
or via email to:
ncsjobs@ptd.net EOE
www.northeastcounseling.org
Restaurants
COOK & SERVER
Looking for a part time Cook
and a part time Server, for a
restaurant in White Haven.
Experience and references
required. Please call
570-443-8359 between
12noon-5pm.
COOK &
DISHWASHER
Experienced line cook and
flexible dishwashers for
Agolino's Restaurant.
Call to schedule an appoint-
ment, or apply in person after
2:00pm, 570-655-3030.
MANAGEMENT
TRAINEE
This person must be custom-
er oriented, motivated, and
energetic with good com-
puter skills. Flexible shifts.
Weekends a must.
Apply in person with resume:
AUNTIE ANNE'S
LAUREL MALL HAZLETON
PIZZA BAKER &
KITCHEN HELP
At least one yr experience for
Pizza Baker.
Full Time & Part Time
available for both positions.
Apply at: Dave Colarusso's
105 West End Road, Hanover
570-822-0181
ask for Dave or Grace
Sales / Business Development
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
EXPERIENCED
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a Background
in sales. Candidate will have
outside B2B sales experi-
ence. Must be willing to cold
Call, develop new business
as Well as service existing
clients as needed. Your abil-
i t y t o achi eve mont hl y
budgets and assist Manage-
ment in developing budgets
will guarantee Your success!
The ability to work under
tight deadlines is a must.
This is a Full Time position.
Base mont hl y sal ary Of
$1,500, plus 5-20% commis-
sion on sales. Health Insur-
ance after 90 days. Come
and j oi n our outstandi ng
team! Send resume
and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
TELEMARKETER
ENTHUSIASTIC
TELEMARKETER
NEEDED
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a Background
in inside sales. Candidate
will call businesses off of
our extensi ve Database
and set appointments for
our outside Sales execut-
ives. No travel is required.
The ability to work under
tight deadlines is a must.
This is a Part Time position.
Qualified candidates will
Earn $15-25 per hour de-
pending on performance.
Come and j oi n our out-
standing team! Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
JOIN OUR TEAM!!
We are looking for energetic
SALESPEOPLE with little or
no experience, who are look-
ing for an excellent working
environment with great
earnings!
WE WILL TRAIN
YOU!!
SUBARU/KIA
560 PIERCE ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON
Commercial
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
HUNLOCK CREEK
Turn Key and come to this
beautiful quiet area with a
stream that runs between the
properties. Great yard for sit-
ting on the deck & watching
nature all for a great price.
This place has been remodel
and updated. A great place to
live. Do not let this house
pass you by. This is by ap-
pointment only. 24 Hour no-
tice.
MLS# 13 2668
$85,000
Please call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
Commercial
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
NANTICOKE
212 E. Main Street
Building on Main St. near Anto-
nio's. Former business & res-
idential combination with 4
floors containing 3000+ sq. ft.
Walk-in street level entry both
front and back. Small off street
parking area in rear. Great op-
portunity with new Main St.
projects and foot traffic nearby.
$ 40,000. 570-760-7888 or
570-735-6879.
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
TANNING SALON
Established West Side tanning
sal on. Turn key busi ness.
Send letter of interest to P.O.
Box 1652, Ki ngst on, PA
18704.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 3D
Houses For Sale
(570) 885-2474
3 Bedrooms, 2 tile baths, hardwood oors, granite counter tops
Conveniently located just o Route 315
Minutes to Route 81, the Cross Valley Expressway or Wilkes-Barre
$199,900
NOW AVAILABLE!
Residential Lots Also Available
80020231
Automotive
339 Highway 315 Pittston
New and used car dealership is now looking for an experienced
Auto body Technician for a growing dealership.
The technician should be able to perform all aspects of damaged vehicles to pre accident
condition.
- Must have minimum of 5 years experience in the industry
- Must have current drivers license
- Must have own tools
- Excellent working conditions
- Salary based on experience
- Must be dependable
- Full time position 40 plus hours per week
- Excellent benefts, medical, dental, 401K
- Immediate openings available
Apply in person or email resume mwynn@kpautogroup.com
Commercial
SCRANTON
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
FOR SALE
$65,000 - $110,000
Five (5) investment buildings
for sale throughout Scranton,
each less than 5 minutes to the
downtown area. Each build-
ing is priced at a reasonable
rate, but can be negotiable.
Please call 570-346-3328 or
570-336-8192 for more details
and for an appointment to see
the buildings.
SUB SHOP &
RESTAURANT
Established Luzerne County
sub shop & restaurant. Great
business. newly remodeled. All
new equipment. Complete in-
vent ory. Pri ce i ncl udes 4
months rent $16,500. Will ac-
cept 60% down. 570-417-9200
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a 2 car garage,
all rented. Off street parking for 8
cars. Great investment.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
For Sale By Owner
BACK MOUNTIAN
AREA
MOBILE HOME
with addition on 4+ acres. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, nice deck,
enclosed heated sun porch. All
appliances and washer & dry-
er included. Private peaceful
set t i ng. Locat ed hal f way
between Dal l as & Harveys
Lake. $75,000. Must sell look-
ing for offers. 570-499-4150
DALLAS
For Sale By Owner
41 Pine Crest
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath ranch,
Large living and family
rooms, 2 car garage. Large
lot on quiet street. $139,900.
Call 570-675-0937
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 story, 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool. $250,000.
570-235-1624
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
WILKES-BARRE
8 Mill St. (Parsons)
3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large yard with 2 tier deck.
Spacious driveway, garage,
and storage shed. Conveni-
ent location for shopping,
casino, hospital, school bus
stops. Asking $94,000
(NEG.) Call: 570-824-8665
for appointment
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
NEW PRICE $105,000
This large Chalet has a full kit-
chen on the ground floor with
full bath. Great for two families
to share, or in-laws quarters.
In Big Bass Lake Community
with indoor & outdoor pools,
club house, gym & lakefront
beaches. Conveniently loc-
ated near Rts. 380, 435 & 307.
Call Tom cell 516-507-9403
ONE SOURCE REALTY
570-842-3200
Houses For Sale
BEAR CREEK
2,000 sq. ft. Cedar 3 BR home
nestled on 3.5 acres. Hard-
wood floors in DR & LR, stun-
ning great room with tile floor,
cathedral ceiling & gas fire-
place. Modern kitchen with
stainless steel appliances &
granite counter tops, detached
2 car garage 24x48 w/kitchen
& 3/4 bath, covered pati o.
Large rec room in lower level.
C/A & gas heat.
One Year Home Warranty .
MLS #13-1702
$384,900
Call Matt Hodorowski
714-9229
BENTON
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
665 CREST AVE.
Make your full or part-time
home at beaut i f ul LAKE
GANOGA on top of Red Rock
Mtn. Truly a gem! 112 of lake
frontage with dock. 2700+ sq.
ft. of energy efficient living
space with open floor plan,
vaulted ceilings and great nat-
ural lighting. Expansive deck
provides fabulous views of
the l ake. Four bedrooms,
three plus baths, fireplace
and more. Community beach,
tennis courts, helipad and
2000 acres are all available to
association member for hunt-
ing and fishing or just plain
walking. Come see it!
#13-1857
$599,000
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
283-9100
MOUNTAIN TOP
Brick ranch with natural wood-
work, stone fireplace with gas
logs, newer carpet over HW
floors, gas heat, central aid.
Modern kitchen w/Corian coun-
tertops. Beautiful sun room
opens to large, level, private
yard. Updates include newer
roof, panel box, water heater &
more!
MLS 13 3416
$173,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
715-7733
474-6307
DALLAS
Beautiful, well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 sq. ft. 5
bedrooms, 3.5 baths, hard-
wood & tile floors, gorgeous
ent ry f oyer, bui l t -i n pool ,
fenced yard, 3 car garage.
MLS# 13-1932
$459,000
ONE YEAR HOME
WARRANTY INCLUDED
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
PRICE CUT
9 Westminster Drive
4 bedroom brick ranch. 2,800
sq. ft. Totally renovated. 2 1/2
car garage. Low taxes, corner
lot. Walking distance to Dallas
school & medi cal cent er .
$251,000. See ZILLOW for de-
tails. Call 570-878-3150
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied. MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
DALLAS
Newberry Estate Exceptional
4 bedroom, 3 bath townhouse.
Hardwood floors. Bright & airy
kitchen. Finished lower level
with walk-out to patio. Enjoy
carefree living with swimming,
golf & tennis amenities.
MLS#13-2185. $199,000
Call Geri 570-862-7432
DALLAS
WOODLAWN AVE
Fully renovated inside and out!
Home has many features in-
cluding: 3 or 4 bedrooms with
a fully finished attic, 2 full and
1 half bath, Laundry room on
the first floor.
MLS#13-2316
$220,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
DALLAS
19 Glen Riddle Lane
Peacef ul surroundi ngs over-
whelm the senses when you step
foot on this lovely property. Tudor
style 2 story with 4 bedrooms and
2.5 baths, family room with fire-
place. Accessible outdoor deck
from kitchen, family room Base-
ment area can be finished off for
additional living space.
MLS 13-1818
$284,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$89,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DUPONT
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 1-3
Remodel ed cont empor ar y
home wi t h new ki t chen &
baths. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
great outdoor living space with
fenced yard, above ground
pool & detached garage.
MLS#PM-2459
Call George Zygmunt
646-706-2934
570-629-6100
DUPONT
250 Main Street
$79,900
Affordable brick ranch home
with 3 bedrooms, deck over-
looking fenced in yard. de-
tached two car garage. a low
mai ntenance home i n very
convenient location with new
propane furnace.
MLS #13-3009
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Colleen Turant
570-239-4293
FORTY FORT
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $145,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
40 Lincoln Street
$119,900
Remodeled home has some
great sur- prises! Two mod-
ern baths, first floor laundry,
three nice size bedrooms,
large new kitchen with gran-
ite counters and tile floor,
corner l ot wi th ni ce yard.
Everything is new, so you
don't have anything to do but
move in!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS #13-3008
Call Colleen
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$119,900.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
GLEN LYON
194-196 E. Main St.
Large home with mother in law
suite that can either be open to the
rest of the house or closed off with
its own entrance and used as an
apartment. This home has vinyl sid-
ing, newer electrical, replacement
windows, large yard and 2 car gar-
age. Home offer a 1st floor master
and bath, 3 fireplaces and tons of
room. Come check out all the pos-
sibilities for yourself.
MLS 13-2419
$84,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TWP.
7 ALLENBERRY DR.
Ready to move in this 3 bed-
room town house in Allen-
berry is also the most afford-
able unit currently for sale.
New hardwood floors & in-
cluded LG washer & dryer.
Over sized lot with patio &
private wooded surroundings.
Convenient location. One of
the first units in Allenberry.
Easy in & out.
MLS#13 403
$98,900
Call Paul at 760-8143
or Gail at 760-8145
to schedule your
appointment.
696-2600
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
Affordable 2 story home fea-
turing nice size living room,
dining room, eat-in kitchen,
1/2 bath on 1st floor, 3 rooms
on 2nd floor with full tile bath.
Updated gas heating system.
Off street parking for 2 cars.
Little grass to cut! Mortgage
payment will be less than
most rents.
MLS #13 2100
$44,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
209 Constitution Avenue
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
HANOVER TWP
Lovely home in the Korn Krest
section of Hanover Twp. Open
downstairs floor plan. 3 bed-
rooms, l arge deck, above
ground pool . Out of fl ood
zone. Beautiful views. Very
low heating costs.
MLS #13-1358
$94,900
David Krolikowski
885-6731
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
288-0770
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Find Your
Next Vehicle
Online.
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PAGE 4D Tuesday, August 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Part-Time/Temporaries
THE TIMES LEADER
DATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21
TIME: 11 AM - 2 PM
The Times Leader Distribution Center
90 East Market Street
Wilkes-Barre
INSERTER/PACKAGERS
- PART TIME -
Day and night shift positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is preferred, but we
will Train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include but not limited to:
Opening of insert skids
Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
Stackdown of ROP
Clean up Packaging Department at the end of the assigned shift
Must be able to work flexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs and have reliable transportation. pre-
employment drug screening & background check required.
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY AUG. 25
12:00 to 2:00
Nice bungalow ranch style
home containing (6) rooms, 3
bedrooms. Rooms in lower
level. New bath, upgraded ap-
pliances, new parquet & car-
peted floors, new windows.
Close to grade school & high
school. Property is close to all
amenities. Nice view from up-
per deck. Home is next to 501
High St. which can be pur-
chased as a package deal.
DIR: From W-B to San Souci
Parkway, left on Willow, right
on High.
#13-697
$67,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100 x. 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
501 High Street
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY AUG. 25
12:00 to 2:00
Looking for an affordable home
in excellent condition, close to
grade school and high school,
this is the home for you! Re-
modeled throughout, private
driveway, fenced-in yard, new
ki t chen, f r eshl y pai nt ed
throughout, new windows, new
parquet floors and carpeting.
Property at 503 High St. also
for sal e. Sel l er wi l l accept
package deal. DIR: From WB
to San Souci Parkway, left on
Willow, right on High.
#13-691
$74,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100, x 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
Maintenance free townhome
in Ledgewood Estates. 2
story great room, hardwood
floors, maple glazed kitchen
wi th grani te counters and
stainless steel appliances.
gas fireplace. 3 BRs on 2nd
floor with 2 full tiled baths.
Master boasts a separate
shower & Jacuzzi tub. Laun-
dry on 2nd floor. Full base-
ment, gas heat & central air.
nice deck, 2 car garage. Loc-
ation near all interstates & the
Hanover Industrial Park.
MLS 13 1960
$245,000
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HARVEYS LAKE
184 State Route 29
Nice charming home in Har-
veys Lake. Open eat in kit-
chen, 2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath
and a nice large private lot.
Home also offers a 2 car de-
tached garage. Home is just
waiting for your personal
touch. $142,900
MLS#13-1787
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or Tony Wasco
855-2424
Weichert Realtors,
Trade Mark
570-901-1020
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
Commercial - Residential -
Land
All for One Price
$259,900
40' x 60' clear span pole barn
with concrete floor, 19.5 acres,
two story, 12 year new resid-
ential home featuring 1st floor
master bedroom & bath, Jac-
uzzi tub & separate shower in
master bath. Great room with
floor to ceiling stone fireplace.
Large eat-in kitchen, 2 BRs
and Jack & Jill Bath on 2nd fl.
finished lower level - walk out!
Half bath in lower level & 1st
floor. Large rear deck. Work,
live & enjoy your land without
leaving home!
MLS# 13 1591 & 13 1607
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HUNTINGTON MILLS
2 story home in Huntington
Mills offers quiet country liv-
i ng. Features l i vi ng room,
den, dining room, eat in kit-
chen. 3 bedrooms, bonus
room, full bath. 2 car garage.
All situated on 1.12 acres.
MLS #13-2799
$105,900
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a
desirable neighborhood. Mod-
ern kitchen with cherry cabin-
ets, stainless steel appliances,
island with Jenn air & tile floor.
Separate glass surrounded
breakfast room. Family room
with gas fireplace & hardwood
floors. Formal dining room with
bay wi ndow. French doors
throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-in
closet & separate sitting room.
Lower level rec-room and of-
fice. Two car garage. Pittston
Area School District.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$285,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
UNDER CONTRACT
This 3 bedroom, 4 bath brick
town home offers a spacious
floor plan, high ceilings, re-
cessed lighting & rich hard-
wood floors. Cherry cabinets,
a large island, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel appli-
ances & over sized sink high-
l i ght the ki tchen. Cori an
counters & European style tile
& vanities accent the baths.
Finished lower level (above
ground). 2nd floor has new
hardwood Brazilian cherry
f l oors. New l andscaped
pat i o, al l f enced i n.
Owner Will Consider Rent
with "Option"
$279,900.
Call Ruth K Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo lovely large
rear yard garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, f ormal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
19 Church Street
Lovely Kingston home that
will ''capture'' you upon entry!
From it's inviting 10 x 6 foyer
with hardwood floors to the
modern kitchen with pristine
white cabinetry, this house is
an absolute ''doll house!''
Master Suite on 2nd floor with
two additional bedrooms and
another room on the 3rd floor
+ 3 season porch, off-street
parking with 2 car garage and
so much more! Call today!
MLS# 13-2893. $144,900
Don Crossin 570-498-3287
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$273,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
NANTICOKE
For Sale by Owner
1/2 double, 3 bedrooms, large
living room, dining room, kit-
chen, laundry, laminate floors
on 1st floor, new hot water bol-
ier, fenced yard. $13,000.
570-735-1058
or 570-704-8099
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
REDUCED $219,900
7 Concord Drive
Beautifully maintained 2 story
in Oakwood Park. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 2 car garage
and private rear yard. Mature
landscaping, gas/electric heat
with central air.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2215
Call Charlie
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
Houses For Sale
LAKE SILKWORTH
(LEHMAN TWP.)
Exceptionally well maintained
ranch home with spacious
landscaped yard. Three bed-
rooms, amazing spa room
with hot tub. Large eat-in kit-
chen, finished basement with
bar and fireplace. Oversized
t wo-car at t ached garage,
deck, patio and screened in
porch. Short walking distance
to the lake with deeded lake
access.
MLS#13-2053
PRICE REDUCED TO
$149,000
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
283-9100
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
timesleader.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 5D
Want To Buy
80026129
Houses For Sale
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$59,000
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$194,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
Locat ed on Madi son St .
between Li nden & Mapl e.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
$89,900. MLS# 13-2431
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
MOOSIC
REDUCED
$87,500
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home with endless
possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1
bath, central air, plenty of stor-
age. Enclosed porch, garage
with carport. Situated on 3 lots.
Di recti ons: 1-81, Exi t 180
Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto
8th St., up hill, turn left, house
3rd on right.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Immaculate 3/4 bedroom bi-
level on half acre lot offers
privacy & outdoor beauty.
Convenient U shaped kit-
chen opens to dining area.
Hardwood floors in much of
house. Family room in lower
level has tile floor & brick
mantle ready for wood burn-
er. Office can be 4th bed-
room. Perennials comprise
extensive outdoor landscap-
ing, along with a 10x17 deck,
15x 16 pat i o & 20x 12
Studi o/offi ce. Home War-
ranty.
MLS#13 2914
$189,000
Call Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
MOUNTAIN TOP
ALBERDEEN ACRES
Beautifully appointed and up-
dated home. Large lot with
mature l andscapi ng. Huge
amount of storage with abund-
ant shel vi ng & cl oset s.
Screened i n deck & pati o.
Amazing finished lower room
with walk-out patio doors & a
fireplace. Generous room sizes
throughout. Remodeled kit-
chen with granite appliances
included. Move in condition
with little wear and tear.
#13-2917
$420,000
Gail Pukatch 760-8145
Paul Pukatch 760-8143
696-2600
MOUNTAINTOP
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Aug. 18th , 1 -3 PM.
Beautifully maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 bathroom stream from
home on cul-de-sac end of
Oak Drive, oak kitchen cabin-
ets with tile counter-tops. Four
zone heating and central AC,
l arge formal sunken l i vi ng
room with step up to dining
room, oak hardwood floors
throughout, tile in bathrooms
wi th sun-room overl ooki ng
stream. Enormous backyard
framed by babbling brook .
Suspension bridge overlooks
stream with access to natur-
ally wooded playground.
42oakdrive.2seeit.com
570 510-5452
SWOYERSVILLE
$118,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in this roomy
Cape Cod in a desirable neighbor-
hood. Large eat in kitchen with
new flooring. Finished basement
with theater/rec room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
cently painted & move-in
ready. This 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
level lot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
tos online, go to.
www.
prudentialrealestate.com &
enter PRU7R4L5 in the
Home Search.
MLS 13 3363
$142,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
101 Honey Pot St.
$72,000
Well cared for and desirable
corner lot with replacement
windows, private driveway in-
cluding a carport, and recent
updates to the kitchen and
bath. MLS #13-3243
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WEST PITTSTON
All brick ranch home, im-
maculate condition, 2 mas-
ter bedrooms, marble & tile
throughout. custom kitchen.
Professionally landscaped.
Move in condition.
$299,900.
570-417-9200
SWEET VALLEY
NORTH LAKE
Picture perfect lake front, 2
story, 3 bedrooms. 1 3/4
baths, furnished. Truly a
Must See! $249,000.
845-778-7605
Houses For Sale
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
Large 2 story, 4 bedrooms, 1
bath, new wi ndows, l arge
porch, updated i nteri or.
MLS #11-4369
$59,900
Call Joe
613-9080
PITTSTON
$64,900
62 Pine St.
Enjoy the warm weather in this
3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home
with great curb appeal, sun
room and patio. New roof and
newer windows.(Traveling N.
on Main St. Pittston turn R.
onto Pine St., home is on left).
MLS 13-1897
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
PENDING
PRICE REDUCTION
$169,900
69 Curtis St.
Spacious 3 bedrooms home, re-
built in 1980 with 2 full baths and a
3/4 master bath. Private pool area
with brand new liner, 2 car garage
with 1/2 bath and full 2nd story for
hobby room, etc. Located at the
end of dead end street, affords lots
of privacy.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2079
Call Charlie
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED $109,000
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
90 River Street
$57,900
This traditional 2-story prop-
erty features a large fenced in
yard, private driveway, re-
placement windows, large
laundry room and an eat-in
kitchen. MLS#13-3269
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
FIXER UPPER
HEAVY LIFTING DONE
3 BR, 1 bath 2 story, eat in
kitchen, concrete basement
floor.
MLS#13-2642
$25,000
Call Mike Griffith
570-954-8434
mikegriffith@comcast.net
RUBBICO REAL ESTATE
570-826-1600
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
433 FAIRVIEW ST.
Your COOL oasis awaits, both
inside and out. When its hot
outsi de, rel ax i n ai r condi -
tioned comfort. Or venture out-
doors to sit under the shade
trees or catch a breeze from
the front porch. This home is
high above the valley, well out
of the flood zone. Updated 2-
story with modern kitchen with
vaulted ceiling, modern bath,
LR, DR and 2 generous bed-
rooms. Updates include new
roof, windows, front door, light-
i n g , w- t o - w c a r p e t i n g,
interior/exterior painting & se-
curity system. OSP & large
level yard.Details at:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
SEARCH: PRU5B4G9.
#13-2080
$79,000
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor. MLS 13 2814
$48,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
NEW LISTING!
22 BLAIR ST.
An i mpeccabl y mai ntai ned
town home inside & out. Three
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, living,
dining & family rooms, galley
kitchen. 3-season sun room
over l ooks a l evel yar d
bordered by flowering bushes.
Many upgrades include ceram-
ic flooring, new kitchen coun-
ters & several new appliances.
Private off-street parking. This
home is move-in ready & you
can probably own it for less
than your current rent. Now is
a good ti me to make your
dream of home ownership a
reality! For more details and to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU2A8T2 i n the
Home Search. Call today to
schedule a private showing.
#13-3274
$94,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
HARFORD AVE.
Beautifully kept home with 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Thi s
home features a gas fireplace,
finished basement, hardwood
fl oors and a 4-season sun
room. There is a first floor
laundry and the modern eat-in
kitchen come with all the appli-
ances included.
MLS#13-2372
$229,000
Everett Davis
570-417-8733
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
PAGE 6D Tuesday, August 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Rentals
Heather Highlands
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
109 Main Street, Inkerman
Jenkins Twp., Pa 18640
Rental Office: 570-655-9643
Sales Office: 570-655-4301
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazi ng, wel l mai ntai ned.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049
Vieve 570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x 188
lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
TRUCKSVILLE
Elegance & comfort combine
to give you all you dream of.
1st floor mater,guest suite
with full bath,fabulous break-
fast room overlooking private
wooded yard. Plenty of built
ins and plantation shutters
gi ve thi s home wonderful
character.
MLS#13-2678
$459,000
Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story. Very
nice neutral decor, new floor-
ing & roof, all appliances are
included, private driveway.
Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$74,000
Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
$87,500
Carl Georinger
696-5429
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
It's all about location. 2 story
home featuring living & family
rooms, eat-in kitchen, laun-
dry on 1st floor & updated 3/4
bath. 2nd floor has 3 bed-
rooms, full bath. gas hot air
heat & central air on the 1st
floor. Fenced rear yard.
MLS# 13 2586
$59,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Aug. 18, 12-2
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer ap-
pliances and gas heat. Nice
level backyard and off-street
parking. Motivated seller!
#13-2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$232,00
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent to Buy
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
55 Nicholson Street
Enclosed rear porch 22x10,
and side enclosed porch
5x11. A very nice large yard.
Large walk-in hall closet.
Nice clean home.
MLS 12-3899 $40,000
Castrignano Real Estate
570-824-9991
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street.
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING
(FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP)
1705 W. 8TH STREET
There is plenty of summer left
to enjoy the 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. Then watch the
leaves change color around
your large country lot. A well-
maintained 2-story with 3 BRs
and 1.5 modern baths is wait-
ing for its new owners. This
charming home has a modern
kitchen with breakfast nook,
formal dining room, large liv-
ing room and an added family
room with vaulted ceiling and
fireplace. 2-car detached gar-
a g e . Ch e c k i t o u t a t :
www.prudentialrealestate.com.
SEARCH: PRU7W7A3
Listed at $228,900
MLS#13-2539
Call to schedule a private
showing.
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman Outl et
Road. 470 front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded. $125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Build your dream home on this at-
tractive 1.2 acre level lot with lake
privileges. Priced to sell. HOA FEE
IS $140 YEARLY.
MLS#13-40
$50,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
ACREAGE FOR SALE
No Closing Costs
No Time Frame to Build
Dallas School District
10% Down Financing
Lots of Elbow Room for Privacy
3ac 425 ft. rd. Frontage $49,900
7ac 700 ft. rd. Frontage $89,900
Call 570-245-6288
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. Water & sew-
er included. 1st, last & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 9/1/13.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
AVOCA
3 room, 1st floor, wall to wall
c a r p e t , a p p l i a n c e s ,
washer/dryer hookup. Off
street parking. INCLUDES
ALL UTILITIES. Security. No
pets. $650 month. Call
570-655-1606
Back Mountain
2 bedroom, large modern eat in kit-
chen, bath, carpeting, large deck,
ample parking, No Pets. $595.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
2,300 sq. ft. apartment with 2
full baths, huge kitchen living
room, full laundry room, rear
deck. Ideal location for Miseri-
cordia or Penn State, Lehman
campus, students. No pets.
Security & references required.
570-406-5128
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$650/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly & mo-
bility impaired; all utilities in-
cluded. Federally subsidized
program. Extremely low in-
come persons encouraged to
appl y. I ncome l ess t han
$12, 450. 570- 675- 6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Townhouse
3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths in a
quiet country setting. Central
air and vacuum, 2 car garage.
Includes range, water, trash &
al l ext er i or mai nt enance.
Ameni t i es i ncl ude gol f i ng,
s w i m m i n g & t e n n i s .
$1, 475/ mont h + ut i l i t i es.
Call Bernie
655-4815
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
888-244-2714
EDWARDSVILLE
Spacious, clean, 2 brdm, 1st
f l oor apt . New car pet i ng
throughout. No pets. Electric
heat. $525 monthly. Sewer &
water included in rent. Back-
ground check required.
570-899-9140
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
2 APTS AVAILABLE
1693 Wyoming Ave
1st floor, spacious 3 bedroom
apt. Oak hardwood fl oors,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, living room with fire-
p l a c e , t i l e b a t h r o o m.
Washer/dryer hookup in base-
ment, 1 stall garage, big back
yard. No pets. No smoking.
$900 mo. plus electric.
570-239-1010
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
1 Studio Apt, 2 Bed,
and 3 Bed $475, $550,
$650 and $900.
Call 570-901-1020
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
Apartments /Townhouses
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Cozy 1st fl oor, 1 bedroom
apartment. New carpet, lamin-
ate & tile flooring. Washer/dry-
er hook up. Nice neighbor-
hood. Section 8 Welcome. No
pets. $595 + security, with all
utilities included. 570-606-9917
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities,
garbage & sewer included. 1st,
last & security. Available Now!
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEY LAKE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Located off the lake.
Stackable washer & dryer, all
utilities included. $735/mo.
Lease, Deposit and last
months rent. 570-639-2331
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
KINGSTON
1 bedroom, bright, living room,
dining room, new windows,
porch, yard, 2nd floor, gas
heat, PRIME, QUIET.
NO PETS, NO SMOKING.
Available late August.
$575+utilities.
Discount Available. 574-9827
KINGSTON
Bennett Street
1 bedroom, living room, eat in
kitchen, full bath. Convenient
l ocati on. Tenant pays gas,
el ect r i c, t r ash. No pet s.
$400/month. Application, se-
curity deposit & first months
rent at signing. 1st & 2nd floor
available. 570-675-4938
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom,
2nd floor, 1.5 baths & office. All
appliances, washer/dryer in unit.
Wall-to-wall, C/A, garage, attic, no
pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Large 2 bedroom, remodeled,
stove, refrigerator, dish wash-
er. $675/month, heat included.
Call 570-814-0843
KINGSTON
Market Street, 2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, cozy wi t h spaci ous
rooms. Hardwood floors & sun
porch. $475/month + utilities &
security. No pets.
570-542-7740
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. Two
modern modern 5 room 2 bed-
room apartments available 9/1.
Both have dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back
porches and yard. Washer/dryer
hookup. $575 includes fridge,
stove water & sewer. Non smoker
preferred. 570-545-6057
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 1st floor, 1 bed-
room, 2 covered porches, kit-
chen, bath, living room and
basement. Appliances, range
with self-cleaning oven, mi-
crowave, refrigerator, dish-
washer. Off street parking, No
Smoking and No Pets. Secur-
ity, References and Lease.
$535+utilities. 570-477-5959
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 7D
Autos For Sale
COCCIAS
NEW 2013 FORD F-150 TRUCK CLEARANCE
OVER 60 TO CHOOSE FROM
Tax and tag extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. "Lease payments based on 24 months lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 bank fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery.
See salesperson for details. All payments subjected to credit approval by the primary lending source." Photos of vehicles are illustration
purposes only. Coccio Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors.
No security deposit necessary. See dealer for details. Sale Ends 9/3/13.
*Tax and tags extra. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate.
Sale ends 9/3/13.
NEW 2013 FORD F-150
REGULAR CAB 4X4
$
25,499
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
PLUS
APR
0
60
$
1500
%
M
O
S.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
24
Mos.
Was .............................................................................. $42,200
Ford Rebate .................................................................. $1,500
Ford Bonus Rebate ...................................................... $2,000
Ford Credit Rebate ...................................................... $1,000
Off Lease Rebate .......................................................... $1,000
Trade-in Rebate ............................................................ $1,500
Ford Regional Discount off MSRP ............................ $1,750
Coccia Discount off MSRP ......................................... $1,951
NEW2013 FORDF-150
SUPER CAB XLT 4X4
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
NEW 2013 FORD F-150
SUPER CREW XLT 4X4
24
Mos.
Was .............................................................................. $44,465
Ford Rebate .................................................................. $1,500
Ford Bonus Rebate ...................................................... $2,000
Ford Credit Rebate ...................................................... $1,000
Off Lease Rebate ............................................................. $500
Trade-in Rebate ............................................................ $1,500
Ford Regional Discount off MSRP ............................ $1,750
Coccia Discount off MSRP ......................................... $2,716
Was .............................................................................. .$36,060
Ford Rebate ................................................................... $1,500
Ford Bonus Rebate ................................................... $2,500
Ford Credit Rebate ................................................... $1,000
Off Lease Rebate.............................................................. $500
Ford Regional Discount off MSRP ......................... $1,250
Coccia Discount Off MSRP..........................................$1,311
$
27,999
$
31,499
$
33,499
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate.
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645
Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
NEW2013 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB STX 4X4
24
Mos.
$
269
$
329
$
349
23
MPG
Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Cruise
Control, Decor Group, Sync, 40/20/40 Cloth Seats
Was ............................................................................... $32,000
Ford Rebate ................................................................... $1,000
Ford Credit Rebate....................................................... $1,000
Ford Bonus Rebate....................................................... $1,000
Trade-In Rebate............................................................. $1,500
Off Lease Rebate.............................................................. $500
Ford Regional Discount ................................................. $750
Coccia Discount Off MSRP. ........................................... $751
PLUS
APR
0
60
$
1500
%
M
O
S.
5.0L, V8, Auto, CD, 18Chrome Wheels, Cloth Seat, Air,
Decor Pkg, Cruise, ABS, Pwr Equipment Group, PDS,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Reverse Sensing System,
Power Sliding Rear Window, XLT Chrome Pkg, Rear
Camera, Chrome Running Boards
5.0L, V8, Auto, CD, 18Chrome Wheels, Cloth Seat, Air,
Decor Pkg, Cruise, ABS, Pwr Equipment Group, PDS, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Reverse Sensing System, Power Sliding
Rear Window, XLT Chrome Pkg, Rear Camera, Chrome
Running Boards
PLUS
APR
0
60
$
1500
APR %
M
O
S.
APR
0
60
%
M
O
S.
STX, 5.0L, V6, Auto., CD, 17 Alum.
Wheels, Cloth Seat, Split Seat, Air,
Decor Pkg., Cruise, ABS,
Pwr. Equipment
Our NAME
Means A
Great Deal!
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $585 + utilit-
ies, security & references.
No pets, no smoking.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON
WYOMING AVE.
2nd floor, 1 bedroom, appli-
a n c e s , l a u n d r y r o o m.
$375/month + electric. Secur-
ity & references. No pets.
570-696-1600
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor.
Archi tectual l y desi gned.
Central air. Off street park-
ing. Quiet residential neigh-
borhoods, utilities & heat by
t enant , no pet s , no
smoking. 1 month security,
1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LUZERNE
2nd floor, modern 4 rooms &
bath. carpeting, stove & fridge,
garage, washer/dryer hook up.
No pets. $500/month + utilities
& security. 570-406-2789 or
570-675-3867
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MINERS MILLS
1 & 1/2 bedrooms, completely
redone, washer/dryer hook up,
heat & water included. Quiet
neighborhood with yard and
screened in back porch. No
pets. $575/month + security. 1
year lease. 570-430-0175
MOUNTAIN TOP
3200 sq. ft. turn of the cen-
tury two story home. Beauti-
ful pine floors, working stone
fireplace, large eat-in kitchen
with cherry cabinets, butlers
pantry, formal dining room, 2
sl eepi ng porches, 4 bed-
rooms, 3 1/2 baths. Great
floor plan for entertaining.
Private community amenities
include a lake, tennis courts
and trails for hiking & biking.
O n e y e a r l e a s e .
$ 1 , 3 0 0 / m o n t h .
Call Maribeth Jones
510-2384
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 BR IMMEDIATELY
1 & 2 BEDROOMS.
No pets. Rents based on in-
come start at $405 & $440.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
570-474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor 1 bedroom, new car-
pet & tile floors, washer/dryer
hook up. $425/month + utilities.
No pets. 570-881-2285
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom, 1 bath, living room
& kitchen. Refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer $520/month,
includes heat & water.
735-4074, leave message.
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
NANTICOKE
Very clean, modern 2 bed-
room. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. Large rooms, closets,
attic. All appliances including
washer/dryer. 2 air condition-
ers. Off street parking. No
pets/No smoking. $695 + se-
curity. Call 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 2nd floor, private
entrance, bath, bedroom and
living room. Wall to wall carpet,
large kitchen with range and
fridge. Large attic storage. Sun
por ch, No pet s and no
smoking. Security, reference
and lease. $460 + utilities.
570-477-5959
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove
included, $300/month + utilit-
ies. 2 bedroom. $400 + utilities.
3 bedroom 1/2 double. $500 +
uti l i ti es.Off street parki ng,
lease, 1 month security depos-
it, no pets. 570-654-8318
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 4 rooms & bath.
Washer/dryer hook up. Heat &
hot water furni shed. Fresh
paint. No pets. Security & ref-
erences. $650. 570-654-1193
or 570-332-7951.
PITTSTON
3 bdrm. Eat in kitchen. Wash-
er/dryer hook up. Storage
area. Small yard & rear deck.
$850/month + security. Heat &
sewer included. Call 650-7265
PITTSTON
Furnished studio includes, sky-
light, decks, French doors, ap-
pliances, kitchen set, living &
bedroom furniture. Mirrored
closet doors. Heat, hot water,
trash & sewer included. $480 +
security. 570-883-7458 or
202-986-4430
PLAINS TWP.
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, heat,
water & hot water included.
Off street parking, pets al-
lowed. $700/month one year
lease & references.
570-406-8218
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
Apartments /Townhouses
PLAINS/HUDSON
Clean and efficient first floor.
One bedroom, off street park-
ing. Incl. stove, fridge, sewer
and garbage. Laundry facilit-
ies. Security and references no
pets. $575/month plus utilities.
570-466-4176 or
570-388-6468
PLYMOUTH
1 bedroom. No Smoking, heat
and water included. Security
and references. $450.
570-379-2336
*Corrected Number*
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2
floors, central air, 1 baths,
new kitchen, dishwasher,
stove, refrigerator, washer-
dryer, off street parking, No
smoking/No pets. $550
month plus utilities.
570 814-6620
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable..
dishwasher/off street parking
and sewer included.. no
smoking indoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570 855 3329.
PLYMOUTH
Newly remodeled, parlor, 1
bedroom, kitchen & bath. Heat,
hot water, garbage, sewage,
electricity, stove refrigerator in-
cluded. Close to bus stop &
stores. $560/ month, $560/ se-
curity. 1 year lease. No Pets.
570-779-4537
SHAVERTOWN
1 bedroom, 2nd floor private
setting with a pond.
Completely renovated, with
plenty of closet space and
storage, hardwood floors
throughout. A new deck and
private driveway. $750/month.
570-760-2362
SHAVERTOWN
Back Mountain
36 Roushey St
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, recently
remodeled, all appliances, off
street parking, ample storage.
$595 + security & utilities.
WILKES-BARRE
135 Westminster St.
1st floor, 3 bedroom. $595+
utilities. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 570-780-0000
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility impaired;
all utilities included. Federally
subsidized program. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, hard-
wood f l oors, l i vi ng/ di ni ng
combo, refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hookup, off-street
parking, no pets. Front & back
por ches, f ul l basement .
$650/month + utilities & secur-
ity deposit.
Call 570-655-8928
WEST PITTSTON
$635 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WHITE HAVEN
Route 940. Large 2 bedroom
near I-80 & PA Tpke. Fresh
paint, w/w carpet, stove & refri-
ger at or . Wat er , sewer &
garbage included. No pets.
$550 + electricity & security
deposit. 570-443-9639
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
30 Susquehanna
First floor, five room, 2
bedroom apt.. with deck
& porch. Stove & refri-
gerator provided. Ten-
ant s pay wat er, gas
heat, electric & garbage.
$525/month.
MLS #13-860
Call Louise Mary Gresh
570-455-8521
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
1st floor, 2 bedroom, living
room, HEAT/WATER in-
cluded. Convenient heights
location, washer/dryer
hook-up, yard, lease,
$599/month, no pets, 1st,
last security. AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY back-
ground /references
checked. 570-822-4302 or
570-954-8329
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment near
General Hospital. No Pets. $495 +
utilities, first, last + security deposit.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, off street parking,
washer & dryer hook up.
freshly painted No pets. $575
+ utilities & security.
570-822-7657
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
at el y , was her / dr y er on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
i ty camera presence & al l
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom -
$550. Water & sewer paid
1 month security deposit.
Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/ month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
142 S. FRANKLIN STREET
BEAUTIFUL BROWNSTONE
APT IS A MUST SEE!! 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms, office, 2 off
street parking spots, 14' ceil-
ings, hardwood & tile floors.
Stove, refrigerator, dishwash-
er, microwave, garbage dis-
posal, washer & dryer. 24 hour
maintenance. $1,100 month +
securi ty, + uti l i ti es, 1 year
l ease. Cal l Jani ce at
570-706-6010
WILKES-BARRE
CENTER CITY
200 BLOCK OF
S. FRANKLIN ST.
Luxury apartment in historic-
al building. Newly renovated,
1500 sq. ft., 2 bedrooms, 2
baths, granite kitchen, dining
room, living room, laundry
room. Off street parking. No
pets. $850 month + utilities.
570-905-7234 after 5 pm
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
LODGE
Formerly The Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting at:
Daily $49.99 + tax
Weekly $199.99 + tax
Microwave, Refrigerator
w/charge WiFi, HBO.
570-823-8881
www.WilkesBarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE
Near General hospital 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. $575 + utilities.
1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $675/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
WILKES-BARRE
Near Wilkes University
1 & 3 bedroom apartments.
$400 & $625/month + utilit-
ies, 1st & last month's rent &
1 month security. Section 8
OK. No pets. 570-606-9432
WYOMING
2nd floor, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Very clean. Must See.
Applianaces, air & washer/dry-
er. Off street parking. No pets.
$650/month + utilities & secur-
ity. 570-693-3473
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
Small room with bath at 281 S.
Franklin St.; 2nd floor; heat &
water included in $295 month
rent. Call 570-333-5471 with
references.
WILKES-BARRE
Studio near Wilkes
Wood floors, parking, no pets,
short term OK. $425, all utilit-
ies included. 570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Available 9/1
Cozy one bedroom, modern
kitchen & bath, wall to wall car-
pet. Tenant pays electric heat.
$475/month. 570-236-3786
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St. Fully furnished,
Delightful 2nd floor, excellent
condition, brand new queen bed,
Secure, private off street park-
ing. Historic building is non-
smoking/no pets. Base rent
$700/month. Security,
references required. View at
houpthouse.com
570-762-1453
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 8
0
0
2
1
5
8
1
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WYOMING
1st floor, 1 bedroom, appli-
ances, laundry, utilities by ten-
ant. No Pets. Smoke Free.
$525/month. Security, lease &
references. 570-839-3252
Commercial
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EXETER
A & A Self Storage
1,050 sq. ft. office space for
lease. 3 offices + reception
& restroom, gated access,
ample parking, convenient
location. Perfect for con-
tractor's office. $900/month
utilities. 570-287-5343
www.joeamato
properties.com
Storage units also available
in sizes from
5 x 10 to 10 x 30
WEST PITTSTON
GARAGE
1 car, secure parking, 9 x 12.
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
612-616 Main St.
Bring back clam night. Unlim-
ited potential in the once icon-
ic location. Space can be used
as restaurant, (coolers &
equipment on site) bar & grill.
Includes office and living space
the possibilities are endless!
Call agent to make an appoint-
ment and a deal.
MLS 13-2445
$79,500
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE/KINGSTON
5 Unit, 2 completed and ren-
ted, 2 started, new plumbing,
sheet rock and electrical. Call
for more information. $86,900.
570-550-1222.
KINGSTON
GARAGE, 2 bay wi t h l i f t .
$750/month. 570-814-8876
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PA CLUB
LIQUOR LICENSE
For sale.
Call 570-574-1002
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
3,000 square feet. Suitable for
many businesses. Plenty of
parking. $600/month + secur-
ity. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
PAGE 8D Tuesday, August 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Commercial
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Mfg/Warehouse Space
Gas heat, sprinkler.
21' ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$1, 100/ mont h 7605095
BENTON
Minutes from Shickshinny. 4
bedrooms, 1 bath. Country set-
ting, partially furnished. Wash-
er . Hunt i ng pr i v i l eges .
$750/month + security. & refer-
ences. 570-854-0984
DALLAS TWP.
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath home
with 1 car garage. Close to
309. Large yard. Cats allowed.
$950/month + security deposit.
Call Barbara Mark @
570-696-5414
Smith Hourigan Group
570-686-1195
HARDING
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. College stu-
dents welcome after August 20th
Wi-fi, Direct TV, lake rights, wash-
er/dryer. $1,200/month + utilities.
570-639-5041
KINGSTON
Spacious half double. 3 br, liv-
ing room, dining room, fenced
yard, no pets, $775/month.
Credit background check, se-
curity deposit. 570-235-0377
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$760/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
LUZERNE/Kingston
3 bedroom, gas heat, stove
and washer included. New
rugs, yard, no pets. $750 plus
utilities and security
570-430-7901
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors throughout, living room
with fireplace, eat in kitchen, 4
season sun porch, pri vate
wooded setting. Crestwood
Sch. Dist. Attached garage.
Pet friendly. Large fenced
property, ideal for children &
pets. $1,050/month.
570-472-3277
NANTICOKE
Hanover Section, Espy Street.
Single family home, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths. All appli-
ances included, off street park-
ing. No smoking. $650/month
+ utilities & security. 570-574-
4692 between 11am & 8 pm
PITTSTON
Lovely 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
house. Pri vate parki ng,
yard, washer/dryer hookup,
cable & satellite ready, en-
closed back porch. $650 +
utilities, security & refer-
ences. No pets or smoking.
570-239-4293
PITTSTON
Available Sept. 1
80 River Street
Newly remodeled two story,
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove & dryer,
washer hookup, two car
driveway, fenced yard, no
pets. $800/month + utilities.
1st, last & security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarredjs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath newly re-
modeled single home. $660 +
utilities. 1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath newly re-
modeled single home. $660 +
utilities. 1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
WILES-BARRE
MINERS MILLS
5 room, 2 bedroom home. The
l ast qui et nei ghborhood i n
Wi l kes-Barre. Refri gerator,
stove, washer/dryer included.
Sewerage & recycling fees
paid, other utilities by tenant.
Of f st r eet par ki ng, non-
smokers. References & em-
ployment verified. $650/month
& security. 570-824-7392
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled 3 bedroom home,
featuring fresh paint, dish-
washer, washer/dryer hook-up,
deck and yard. No Pets. No
Smoking. $685+utilities. Call
570-466-6334
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story
home. Large rooms, off-street
parking. Nice neighborhood,
near school . 1 year l ease.
$ 7 5 0 / m o n t h + s e c u r i t y .
Washer/Dryer hook-up, dish-
washer and range included.
570-362-1820
Land (Acreage)
LUZERNE
699 Miller St
Land for sale
50 x 150. $38,000
Quiet neighborhood, Ready
to build on. Call
570-693-3427.
SWEET VALLEY
GRASSY POND ROAD
6.69 wooded acres. Great
building site and/or ideal hunt-
ing property. No utilities.
REDUCED $65,000.
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901 696-2468
Storage
PLAINS TWP.
2 GARAGE/STORAGE UNITS
14 x 24
Automatic overhead door.
Heat & electric included.
$205/month each.
Available separate or together.
Call 570-823-1466
Want To Rent
GARAGE WANTED
in Miners Mills / Hudson area.
570-824-5033
Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
3 bedrooms, washer/dryer
hook-up, new floors, Fenced
yard, gas heat, No Pets.
$600/month + utilities & 1st
and Last months rent.
Call 570-313-5414
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $525 month +
security. 570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
Large 1/2 double, 3 bedrooms,
n e w a p p l i a n c e s , n e w
washer/dryer. Freshly painted,
new carpeting. $600/month +
utilities. Call 570-881-0320
HANOVER TWP.
1/2 double 3 bedrooms, vinyl
siding, steel insulated entry
doors with deadbolts. Gas
heat. Located on small, quiet
lane. Close to bus stop &
shopping. Available 9/1/13.
Now showing. Lease, refer-
ences checked. $525 monthly
+ utilities. 570-650-3803
KINGSTON AREA
3 Bedroom, 2 full baths, stove,
refrigerator. Washer/dryer, wa-
ter/sewer included. Quiet, dead
end street. $800/month. 1st
month+security. Section 8
welcome. 570-313-6066
KINGSTON
HALF-DOUBLE
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerator
and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
off-street parking. No Smoking,
No Pets. $650+ utilities
& security. 570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled
older charm, stained glass
windows, front & rear
porches, Living room/din-
ing room combo, eat-in kit-
chen with laundry alcove, 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by
t enant , no pet s , no
smoking. 1 month security,
1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, walk-up
attic, basement, fenced back
yard, Large Deck. $595/
month+utilities. NO Pets.
570-902-1031
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
NANTICOKE
5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, w/w car-
peting. washer/dryer hookup,
yard. $475 + security deposit.
All utilities by tenant. Call
570-472-2392
PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 1.5 baths, eat in
kitchen with appliances, living
room, office/den, laundry. Off
street parking. $500 + security
& references, water, sewer in-
cluded. 570-702-3538
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living &
dining rooms, large eat in kit-
chen i n a ni ce, tree l i ned
neighborhood. Washer/dryer,
refrigerator, double sink, stove,
water, sewer, recycl i ng i n-
c l u d e d . Ni c e g a r d e n .
$800/month, 1 year lease, rent
& deposit. 570-820-7049
Half Doubles
WILKES-BARRE/EAST END
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, wall to
wall carpet. Stove, dishwash-
er, washer/ dryer hook up.
Heat. garbage & sewer in-
cluded. Many Extras!. No
pets. $975 + security & refer-
ences. 570-824-4288
Lots
SLEEPY HOLLOW
KINGSTON TWP
Limited Time Only!
priced Reduced!
Starting at $69,900
All Public Utilities
Dallas School District
Great neighborhood.
Summit Pointe Builders
Call 570-675-7900
Sales
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no
work. remodeled throughout.
Minutes from I- 81 & PA Turn-
pike. $550/month.
570-471-7175 or 610-767-
9456
Pets
4 KITTENS! 1 black & white
stripe short hair male, 2 tor-
toise hair females, and 1 black
& white stripe male. Approx. 8
weeks old. FREE.
570-283-1675
KITTENS! Five left to go to a
good home. There are 2 who
are 14 weeks old & 3 who are
8 weeks old. FREE.
570-575-9984
KITTY CLOSE OUT
4 Adorable Kittens, free to "lov-
ing home". 3 black, 1 gold &
white all 10 weeks old. Litter
box trained and eating on their
own. Just want to be loved.
Seriously inquiries only. Please
contact Donna, Edwardsville,
at 570-814-2175.
MALTESE PUPPIES
7 Weeks Old. White and
Cream. Fathers 4 pounds,
Mothers 10 pounds. 1st Shots.
$800. 570-239-1846
St. Bernards, Poms, Yorkies,
Chihuahuas Labs & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
YORKIE PUPPY
Female, AKC. champion
bloodlines. Dew claws done,
wormed, 1st shots. $950.
570-332-4739
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
02' Four wheel drive. 116,000
miles. Asking $4,700 OBO.
Very good condition.
570-388-6001
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,495
Call for details 570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2007 Harley 883 5363............................................ $6,989
2003 BMWZ4 3.0i Convertible 53232..................... $17,989
2002 CORVETTE Z06 13295.................................... $28,879
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840...................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167.......................................... $26,986
2006 COBALT LS Coupe 68286.................................. $5,900
2008 SILVERADO CREWLT2 74414.......................... $18,999
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014............................... $17,999
2004 F150 XCAB FX4 100506.................................. $13,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500.................... $18,999
2006 F150 XCAB 4X4 62084....................................$16,999
2006 F350 SUPER DUTY W/PLOW29662...................$16,495
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569............................ $17,495
2008 F150 CREWKING RANCH 50457...................... $28,896
2008 MUSTANG GT Coupe 2665.............................. $24,999
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332.................... $17,999
2009 Honda CR-V EX SUV 42978............................. $17,990
2009 Honda CIVIC Si 45585.................................. $17,495
2006 Hummer H3 SUV 50591................................. $19,999
2011 SONATA SE Sedan 51600................................ $15,999
2007 Mini COOPER S 46153................................... $13,999
2006 350Z Convertible 22128............................... $19,990
2007 GRAND PRIX GXP 82306............................... $11,495
2004 Subaru WRX STi 60721.................................. $18,898
2010 Subaru Outbac Wagon 25683........................ $19,890
2012 Subaru Sedan 33059....................................$17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SX-4 30482................................ $12,999
2005 TACOMA CREW Truck 87132........................... $19,898
2006 RAV-4 Limited AWD 123109.......................... $10,990
2010 RAV-4 I4 AWD 34739..................................... $17,499
2010 Volkswagen TIGUAN 22065........................... $17,499
2012 Volkswagen JETTA SE Sedan 32392.................$14,999
2012 Volkswagen BEATLE 2.5L Hatchback 30751..... $14,999
FORD '04 TAURUS SES
Power windows, power locks,
seat, air, One Owner, 42k.
Must See! $6,850.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
NISSAN '03 ALTIMA SL
Power windows, power locks,
seat, air, 77k. One Owner.
Gorgeous! $7,825.
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
CHEVY '02 PRIZM
Power windows, locks, air,
72K. Economical!
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 Convertible, Sprint
blue, black / brown leather
interior, navigation, 7 spd auto
turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue,
auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 AUDI A8L grey, black leather,
navigation, AWD
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
05 INFINIT GX35 AWD grey, black
leather, sunroof
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO green, grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6, AWD
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 KIA SORRENTO LX silver,
V6 AWD
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold,
7 passenger mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
00 FORD F150 SUPER cAB
blue, 4X4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BMW '07 X5 4.8 Liter
71,000 miles, showroom condi-
tion, sport package, every op-
tion that BMW offers. Silver/
grey. $29,500. 570-417-9200
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 IMPALA LT
V6, Auto, all power, cruise,
CD. Very clean. Balance of
GMs Warranty.
SPECIAL $11,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Mercury Grand
Marquis GS 2005
Two tone white, leather interi-
or,one owner, garage kept,
139K highway miles,CD and
security system. New tires
and current inspections.
$8000 570-239-8110
Autos For Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort
288-8995
00 Toyota Corolla
4 door, 4 cylinder, auto.
Runs great. $2,995
Grand Cherokee V8. Runs
great. Power windows &
doors.
$2,495
96 F150 Pickup. auto, runs
good.
$1,995
96 Pontiac Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows & brakes,
4 door, runs good, 106K.
$2,395
01 Ford Taurus SES
4 door, air, power
doors & windows.
$2,995
99 Chevy S10 Blazer 4
door, power windows,
doors & seats. 126,000
miles.
$2,995
03 Ford Wind-star 4 door,
all power options. 96,000
miles $3,400
04 Nissan Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd. Excellent con-
dition. $10,900
09 Mercedes GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many options
to list. 30K miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff. $42,500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Buying Junk
Cars
Used Cars &
Trucks
Highest Prices
Paid
288-8995
Boats & Marinas
DURATECH 12' ALUMINUM
BOAT Semi "V" bow 54" W at
widest point of boat. Comes
with set of oars, 2 anchors, 3
flotation boat seat cushions.
Mercury Outboard 9.8 hp
Model Merc 110 2 cylinder, 2
cycle engine, remote 5 gallon
gas tank. Excellent running
condition. Ready for the water.
Selling price for boat & engine
$1,000. 570-654-3805
Miscellaneous
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires &
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave. Forty Fort
288-8995
Motorcycles
FORD "11 ESCAPE XLT
Aut omat i c, 4 wheel dri ve,
moon roof, sync, grey, excel-
lent cond, 4 cylinder, 30,500mi,
$18,000. 654-3326/479-3646.
HARLEY '09 DAVIDSON,
Sportster 883
Mint Showroom Condition!
Only 340 original miles,
inspected, extras. Purchased
at Noto's. Only $5,000, OBO.
570-285-3469
HONDA '88 GL1500
Motorbi ke FREE to a re-
sponsible person due to my
son's sudden death. If inter-
ested contact:
tomdaniel125@hotmail.com
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
CHEVY VAN, High Top
With Wheel Chair Lift-350.
Automatic, Air, Cruise, Tilt,
Steering, Low Miles. $3,500.
OBO. 570-760-0243
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4995. 570-696-4377
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '08 ESCAPE
4x4 sunroof, One Owner.
Like new! $7,995
570-696-4377
FORD '03 F150 XLT
Auto, air, power windows,
power locks, bedliner. 80k.
Excellent! $6,825.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '04 EXPLORER
4X4. V6. Sunroof.
Bargain Price! $4,995
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
timesleaderautos.com
Find
Your
Next
Vehicle
Online.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Tuesday, August 20, 2013 PAGE 9D
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
MICROWAVE : over the stove
mount. Whirlpool, white, & in
good condition. $50.00.
570-406-5661
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
FIND OUT HOW
TO BECOME A
MEMBER
OR CALL FOR
A QUALIFIED
CONTRACTOR
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
For All of Your Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Roofing,
Siding, Decks, Windows, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
Shedlarski
Construction
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA registered.
Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding &
railings,replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys.
All types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Gift Certificates Available
570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-793-4773
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
L & A
CONCRETE
WORKS
Why Live With
Ugly Concrete?
Try Concrete
Resurfacing,
Stamped or Stenciled
Overlays
Licensed & Insured
PA088910
570-840-0803
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
SS PAINTING INC.
Drywall, Spackling, Painting,
*Aluminum Siding*
Get Your Whole House Painted
for under $1,200.
570-956-3560
www.iwantpainting.com
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
GTL
ELECTRIC
Service/Upgrades
570-542-4455
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
Handyman
ALL PHASE
HANDYMAN SERVICE
You Name It,
We Can Do It!
Over 30 Years Experience
in General Construction
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
570-497-1821
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SUMMER CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
DEMOLITION
ESTATE CLEANOUT
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
Cheaper Than a Dumpster!!
Same Day Service
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 704-8846
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Hauling & Trucking
HAULING &
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Interior Decorating
SLIPCOVERS by SANDRA
Draperies + Shades
Boat Covers + Upholstery
COSTUMING Theater, Opera
Residential & Commercial &
Institutional Sewing for any
reason since 1977
Call 570 519 0214
Landscaping
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING RAKED?
Specializing In Trimming &
Shaping of Bushes,
Shrubs, Trees.
Bed Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch & Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465
Meticulous and Affordable.
Free Estimates
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups
Landscaping, mowing,
mulching, trimming, planting.
Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Painting & Wallpaper
H & D PAINTING
Wall papering, drywall, all
types of carpentry, handyman
work. Free Estimates. Insured
570-831-5013
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
DAVE WITKOSKY
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Free Est.
30 years experience
826-1719 675-1719
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
Tree Removal, Pruning,
Stump Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
TOM'S AFFORDABLE
Tree & Shrub Trimming
& Removal. Chipper service.
Gutter Cleaning
References available.
Free estimates. 570-814-9132
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $11,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
OLDS '01 BRAVADA
AWD, 4 door, 6 cyl., auto,
leather, sunroof, CD. Fully
equipped. Red.
Very good condition.
$1,850
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
OLDS '99
BRAVADA
New parts.
Needs some body work.
$3,400.
(570)760-2791
Auto Parts
Vito &
Ginos
LIKE NEW
USED
TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & uP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Antiques & Collectibles
$ Antiques
Buying $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
German stamps for sale or
trade for US stamps. Call
Terry at 570-338-2041
Antiques & Collectibles
REFRIGERATOR MONITOR
(general electric) cooling unit
on top outside. Type- D.R.-2-
T16, SOR # 42- 953- 799,
CI RCA 1942. $475. 00.
570-779-4228
or
570-262-1032
VINTAGE "KOKEN" BARBER
CHAIR. St. Louis model, ori-
ginal black leather, & in very
good condi ti on. Hydraul i cs
work. B-3688 original headrest,
l eat her st r ap, & br ush.
$750. 00.
570-779-4228
Appliances
STEEL WINDOW FAN, ex-
pendable sides - $25.00. Kirby
classic vacuum with rug renov-
ator - $50.00.
570-693-1918
VI TA- MI X COMMERCI AL
BLENDER. The quiet one, on
counter. Model 36019.
570-562-1801
Building Materials
BARN WOOD PLANKS (de-
constructed) that are 2" thick, 7
1/2" to 12" wide, & 5'-6" to 6'-0"
long. Approx. 55 planks. Short-
er 2" planks and also many full
2"x 4" boards. $510.00.
570-779-4228
DOOR One 36"x80" sol i d
wood, 6 panels ext or int door,
neutral oak finish with hinges
$100. MAILBOX, handmade,
solid wrought iron. $100.
570-735-8730
DOORS. 24 - Used Solid Core
Doors 32" x 79"-----$25 each.
Mahogany Stained. Call:
570-287-1161
Clothing
JACKETS - 2 men' s sport
jackets, 1 is light blue and the
other is navy. Both size 46 &
like new. Asking $20.00 each.
570-313-5214
SCRUBS, assorted colors &
sizes, approximately 50. Excel-
lent condition. $1.00 each.
570-823-4941
SWEATSHIRTS, never worn;
Eleven for $25.
570-313-5214
Exercise Equipment
IMPEX TECH ROD TR-2 GYM
similar to Bo Flex gym. Excel-
lent condition. Used approxim-
ately 10 times. $129.00 or best
offer.
570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
COAL STOVE. Old fashioned
white Dickson with warming
closet & six lids. Great for
heating & cooking! $500.00.
570-735-2081
COFFEE TABLE oak, glass in-
serts $60. Accent table match-
ing mirror $40. Computer desk
wi t h swi vel chai r $50. 3
shelves 1 (5) shelf $35. Black
$50. TV Colby sm. flat screen
$50. Portable stepper $50.
570-829-2599
Furnances & Heaters
HIGH EFFICIENCY
OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE from Central
Boiler burns less wood. 25
year warranty.
B & C Outdoor Wood
Furnaces LLC
570-477-5692
Furniture & Accessories
RECLINERS 2 blue cloth, ex-
cellent condition & very com-
fortable; $100.0each or both
for $175. Cash only.
570-825-5080
CHAIRS (2) padded with arm
rests, etc. $5. each.
570-540-0175
QUEEN WING CHAIRS (2)
(Ann Hallagan). In excellent
condition. $149.00 each.
570-540-0175
BEDROOM SET : Full sized
headboard, dresser with mir-
ror, and chest of drawers. Real
wood. $150.00.
570-603-1195
CHERRY TABLE w/ painted black
legs & 4 arrow black chairs. Very
good condition; $350.00. Corner
curio cupboard w/ mirrored back;
$50.00. Hunt board w/ painted 3
shelf hutch; $300.00. Leather otto-
man i n excel l ent condi t i on;
$200. 00.
570-406-4092
COFFEE TABLE that is glass
& brass w/ two end tables. All
in perfect condition. $25.00 for
each.
570-288-0060
END TABLES (2). One has a
pull out drawer. FREE. 570-
540-0175
FISH TANK 12"x48"x21" $75.
Kitchen table, 4 chairs, glass
3' d $100. 570-735-8730 or
332-8080
MEDICAL CHAIR for shower
or bath. Used twice. $20.00.
570-696-9005
KITCHEN TABLE Retro -
$50. Wooden double bed head
board & wooden foot board,
with no sides - $25.
570-693-1918
SOFA & love seat with floral
pattern & pillow back. In good
condition. $100.00.
570-674-9716
COFFEE TABLE (solid cherry)
& two solid cherry end tables
w/ dr awer s, 3 pi ece set ;
$250. 00.
570-779-4228 or 570-855-
2506
BUNK BEDS wood, excellent
condition. Twin over twin. Me-
dium stain wood. Can be sep-
arated into two twin beds. In-
cludes ladder, rails, 2 match-
ing comforters, mattress cover,
& more. 570-696-6986
Landscaping & Gardening
TI LLER POULAN MI NI
TILLER 9" tilling width. Runs
great. $40. 570-654-3805
Medical Equipment
CHAIRLIFT/RECLINER with
remote control, green cloth, ex-
c el l ent c ondi t i on 30" w
x40"hx30:deep $200. Cash
only. 570-825-5080
Miscellaneous
MOTOR '55 Evinrude 3HP out-
board, very good condition. All
in working order & does run
ni ce. Out board has a f ew
scratches but other then that is
ready for water or man cave.
$250. OBO. 570-394-7159
570-301-3602
CALL US! TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
BEST PRICES IN
THE AREA
Ca$h on the $pot
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
AIR COMPRESSOR for car.
12 volt, new & in box. $10.00.
570-655-2154
AIR PURIFIER, Aerus Guardi-
an. In great condition. Origin-
ally paid over $1,000 & selling
for $399.00.
570-822-6258
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
ANTIFREEZE & COOLANT
(2) - $5.00 Each.
570-655-2154
ARTI FI CI AL FI REPLACE.
Home made. White and golden
stone l ook. 50" l ong x 15"
wide. Rack & logs included.
$100.00.
570-735-2081
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CANES AND WALKI NG
STICKS. 25 available. Made
from sl i ppery mapl e trees.
Many different shapes & sizes.
$5 to $6 dollars each.
570-735-2081
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x30 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
MOWER CUB CADET 2185
TRACTOR wi th 46" mower
deck, 3 bag grass catcher, 40"
snow thrower, & dump cart - all
for $1,000. 570-675-3503
LADDER STAND for deer
hunti ng (12 ft.) - $50.00.
Neoprene chest waders (L) -
$20. 00. Neopr ene chest
waders (M) - $20.00. Fi ve
office waiting room chairs -
$100.00.
570-693-6267
BOOKS diabetic books, hard
covers, (8) - $2. each. Air
compressor to pump up car
tires $5. 570-654-8902
FABRIC 16 cuts of fabric, as-
sorted lengths. $1.50 per yard.
570-696-9086
Miscellaneous
DI RT BI KE, Schwi nn 26"
Formans 26 speeds w/ front
suspension. Paid $390.00 &
selling for $99.00.
570-655-2154
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
EVENFLO BOOSTER child re-
straint system that meets all
requirements for motor vehicle
saf et y. Gr eat condi t i on.
$20. 00.
570-288-0060
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GIRLS CLOTHING, size 5, ap-
prox. 50 items, price varies
with quantity bought. Excellent
condition. 570-239-1638
CYLINDER PILSNERS (glass)
for flowers, beautiful & elegant
for a wedding. $15.00 each, if
buy all 30 then $300.00 cash.
570-779-4325
GPS ( TomTom model #
4ET03) with 4 & 1/2" screen.
Needs power cord;$39.00.
Jeep (grey) - Li berty/Ni tro
Fl oor Mates. New & never
used;$70.00.
570-654-1969
INSULATION, 6x23, 4 rolls;$25 a
roll. Curio cabinet; $75. Plastic
chair mat; $30. Sofa, chair, and ot-
toman; $75. BF Goodri ch ti re,
215/75/R14; $20. Stone laundry
t ub; $45. Met al t ool - box f or
truck;$45. Oak coffee table; $75.
Single bed complete; $20.00.
570-868-4444
LADDER for in ground pool;
$75.00 or best offer.
570-822-6258
LAMP SHADES (2) that are
12" high, white, & bell shaped.
Perfect condition. $3.00 each
or 2 for $5.00.
570-288-0060
LIGHTING SYSTEM for outdoors
that is Malibu low voltage. New.
Was $248.00 & asking $35.00.
VCR movi e tapes, 50 movi es;
$15.00. Walker for handicap w/
wheels & in new condition; $6.00.
Umbrella stroller; $4.00. Material,
large box of remnants; $5.00. 570-
799-9791
RECLI NER/ Swi vel r ocker
( bei ge) - $90. 00.
570-696-4020
Miscellaneous
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MI CROWAVE - Emer son
900W, nearl y new; $2500.
PUR water filtration system
that includes faucet mount & 3
faucet refills; $25.00, OBO.
570-696-1030
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
PATIENT HYDRAULIC LIFT.
New. Polyester mesh sling &
commode opening to help with
transfers. $300.00.
570-474-6549
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
RE F RI GE RAT OR, d o r m s i z e
Emerson;$25. Kling 5 drawer chest,solid
wood & 40"Wx35" Hx19"D; $50. Casio
keyboard (76 full size keys) w/ stand,
tone response,power adapter cover,&
books in box;$75. Antique child's small
roll top solid oak desk;$99. Electronic in-
sect bug zapper,one acre coverage,still in
box;$10.
570-675-4617
REGULATION POOL TABLE.
4 1/2 x 9. Three piece 1 inch
slate. Three sets of balls 4
cues. Must be disassembled.
$400.00.
570-288-9003
RUG DOCTOR CLEANING
MACHINE that was used 3
times; $250.00. Leaf Vacuum
wood chipper, made by mtd &
like new; $150.00.
570-829-2035
SHEET MUSIC - About 30
pieces for piano, guitar, & har-
monica. Religious music in-
cluded; $15.00.
570-655-1808
STOVE i n excel l ent condi ti on.
Bisque or off white. Frigidaire Gal-
lery Series. Electric ceramic cook
top. Self cleaning, speed bake
oven; $225.00. Dishwasher in great
condition. Bisque or white whirl-
pool quiet wash plus; $125.00.
570-926-1726
STROLLER (Uppababy Vista)
that is 2 years old, silver, & in-
cludes bassinet attachment
and cup. Excellent condition.
Pai d $615. 00 & aski ng
$450. 00.
570-817-3186
Miscellaneous
TEETER TOTTER/SEESAW
iron frame - $25.00. Concrete
birdbath base - $25.00.
570-693-1918
WEST BEND ELECTRONIC
SOUND MIXER, new in box;
$25.00. Black leather Tyler
Rodan purse;$10.00. Multi-
col ored Dol ce & Gabbana
purse;$10.00.
570-603-1195
Musical Instruments
O R G A N & b e n c h ,
Wur l i t z er , wor k s . FREE.
570-540-0175
Sporting Goods
BIKE 24" Mongoose Mountain
bike $50. 570-793-5416
Televisions /Accessories
65" OLIVIA TV LCD that is 5
years old; $500.00.
570-256-3983
Tickets
PENN STATE
TICKETS
Set of 4 seats,
6 season games,
Section EGU, on 20 yard line.
570-954-5237
Tools
PLANET JR. ATTACHMENT, in-
c l u d i n g p l o w s ,
cultivators,sweeps,harrows,etc.40
pieces; $200. Log rolling tool; $40.
Pressure treated wood pieces,2 x 8
x 6 average; 25 pieces for $20. Old
potato shovel; $25. Wheelbarrow
with steel front wheel; $25.
570-693-1918
YARD VACUUM (craftsman
power propel l ed) 6.5 hp -
$300.00. Craftsman 10" radial
arm saw, master mechanic tool
- $50.00. Three drawer chests
w/ bottom storage - $30.00
each.
570-675-3503
Toys & Games
MILLENNIUM BARBIE in ori-
gi nal package. Thi s i s the
"Special 2000 Edition Celebra-
tion Barbie." All indications
show that it never was open.
$20.00 OBO.
570-394-7159
V-SMILE V-Tech electronic TV
game used once & in box w/ 3
games;$20. Wood castle w/ wood
f i g u r i n e s b y A n a t e x
Castlemania;$20. Sit & spin with
musi c; $5. Pogo st i ck grow t o
pro,used once;$10. Five Thomas
the Tank VHS tapes;$5. Barbie
plastic kitchen;$5. 570-603-1195
Stereo /TV /Electronics
SONY TV : 22 i nch Wega
Trinitron flat screen in excel-
lent condition. Was $625.00 &
selling for $75.00.
570-819-4951
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
PAGE 10D Tuesday, August 20, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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