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SCHOOL OF

CeSL0-<5/

CIVIL

ENGINEERING
JOINT HIGHWAY

RESEARCH PROJECT
JHRP-78-6

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE

COMPUTERIZED GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK FOR THE STATE OF NDIANA RECEIVED


Gary D. Goldberg

APR 2

5 1979

PURDUE UHIVERSW

3^ In

UNIVERSITY

HIGHWAY COMMISSION

TECHNICAL REPORT STANDARD TITLE P* r.r


1 .

Report No.

?.

Government

Accemon

No.

3.

u.

tnt

Cotoiog Ho

JHRP-78-6
4.

Tillo and Subtitle

S.

Report Dote

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERIZED GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK FOR THE STATE OF INDIANA
7.

June
6.

1978

Performing O'goniiotion Cod*

Authord)

8.

Performing Orgon.iotion Report No

Gary
9.

Goldberg
Nome
ond Addreii
10.

JHRP-78-6
Wort Un.l No.

Performing Organization

Joint Highway Research Project Civil Engineering Building Purdue University A 79 West Lafayette, Indiana 7
12.

II,

Contmrt

or

Grant Ne
I

HPR-PL-1 (15) Part

1.1.

Type of Report ond Period Co*

Sponjoring Agoncy

Nome ond Addrel-

Indiana State Highway Commission State Office Building 100 North Senate Avenue k620h Indianapolis, Indiana
15.

Interim Report
14.

Sponioring Agency Code

Supplementary Note*

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department or Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. From the study, "A Computer ized Information Storaqe and Retrieval System for Soils of Indiana."

16.

Abstroct

informa tion storage and retrlev al computerized, u s e r -o r en ted pedological and geot echnical engineering insystem for geological The computer ized data system is flex formation has been developed. ible so that changes can be made easily as the requirements of user nstructional User's Manu A complete become more clearly defined. has been prepared compatible with the prese nt requirements and need of the Indiana State Highway Commission and the Joint Highway R e The c omputerized data bank search Project at Purdue University. should facilitate efficient and economical handling of geotechnical information from the State of Indiana.
A
i , , i

The application of statistical methods to the geotechnical data The grouping of soils by stored to January, 1978 is promising. material areas is justified for the parent and regions physiographic t soil parameters from soil te rm n e f f cu to-de of some d prediction The groups of soils and determine. easier to properties which are must be examcorrelations provide acceptable which soil parameters ined on a case by case basis.
i
i

17.

Koy Wordi

18.

Distribution Statement

soils data, computer, data storage, data retrieval,

statistics
C'omf.
i

restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Va. 22161
No
of Kit

17.

Security

(of 'hit report)


i

20.

Security Cluitlf.

poue)

21.

No. of Pagei

22.

Price

Unc

a s s

ed

Unclassified

163

Fofm

DOT

F 1700.7 io-si

Interim Report
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERIZED GEOTECHNICAL

DATA BANK FOR THE STATE OF INDIANA

TO:

J. F. McLaughlin, Director Joint Highway Research Project

June 1, 1978
Project:

C-36-51T

FROM:

Michael, Associate Director Joint Highway Research Project


H. L.

File:

1-5-20

Attached is an Interim Report on the HPR, Part I Study entitled "A Computerized Information Storage and Retrieval System for the Soils of It has been authored by Mr. Gary D. Goldberg, Graduate Instructor Indiana". in Research on our staff, under the direction of C. W. Lovell and R. D. Miles of our staff.
The report presents the results from the development of the geotechnical A complete instructional User's Manual data bank for the State of Indiana. The application of is included which describes the details of the system. statistical methods to the geotechnical data stored to January, 1978, is The promising. The collection of additional soils data is in progress. application of advanced statistical methods of new input data is expected.
The report is submitted as partial fulfillment of the objectives of the Study. Copies of the report will also be submitted to ISHC and FHWA for their review, comment and similar acceptance.

Respectfully submitted,

/(M^
Harold L. Michael Associate Director
HLM:ms
cc:

Altschaeffl 0. M. Bevilacqua W. L. Dolch R. L. Eskew G. D. Gibson W. H. Goetz M. J. Gutzwiller


A.
G.

G.
D.
K. R. R.

P. G.

Hallock E. Hancher R. Hoover F. Marsh D. Miles L. Owens T. Satterly


K.

C.

M.
K.

C.
L.
E.

S.

Scholer B. Scott C. Sinha A. Venable E. Wood J. Yoder R. Yoder


F.

Interim Report
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERIZED GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK FOR THE STATE OF INDIANA

by

Goldberg Gary D Graduate Instructor in Research


.

Joint Highway Research Project

Project No.
File No.

C- 361

-5-20

Prepared as Part of an

Investigation

Conducted by
Joint Highway Research Project Engineering Experiment Station Purdue University
in

cooperation with the

Indiana State Highway Commission and the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration

The contents of this report reflect the views of the author who is responsible for the facts and the The conaccuracy of the data presented herein. tents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the Federal Highway Administration. This report does not constitute a standard, specifi cation, or regulation.

Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana June 1 1978


,

Digitized by the Internet Archive


in

2011 with funding from


Indiana Department of Transportation

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation;

http://www.archive.org/details/developmentofcomOOgold

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The author wishes to express his sincere appreciation

to

Professors C.W. Lovell and R.D. Miles for their assistance


and guidance throughout
the course of
to

this

study.

The author

is

grateful

the Joint Highway Research

Project of Purdue University, The

Indiana State Highway

Commission, and the Federal Highway Administration for their


financial
support of this study.

Thanks are due to Professor J.E. Yahner for his assistance on the pedologic aspects of this study and Professor
G.P.

McCabe for his review of the statistical methods of this


.

research

Special

thanks are due to Mr. Mark Nye, Mr.


Lisa Reid, Mr.

Ronald

Farmer, Ms.

Gary Re

and especially Mr.


in

Robert Ringholz, for their assistance


the proj ec t data

the collection of

Iv

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE
List of Tables
vi

List of Figures

viii

Nomenclature
Highlight Summary
xI
'

Introduction
Purpose
Scope
The Concept of
a

Geotechnical

Data Bank.

Benefits of

Geotechnical

Data Bank

....
.

Direct Use of Raw Data

Statistical

Methods of Data Reduction

DEVELOPMENT OF THE GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK


Information Collected
Data Collection

....

20

Process
2&
2 7

Data Management and Manipulation


Data Preparation Data Processing

2 8

ANALYSIS OF DATA
Distributional
General

Characterization of Data.

33

Method of Analysis
Results
47

Statistical

PAGE

DISCUSSION OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS


Soi
1

55
59

Variabi

ty

Predictions and Correlations

60 60

Consolidation Test Results


Unconfined Compressive Strength Test Results
Compaction and California Bearing Ratio Test Results
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

63

6*

68
72
1k

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

BIBLIOGRAPHY
APPENDICES
APPENDIX
A
-

8l

Distributional Characterization Propert es of So


i

81

USER'S MANUAL

101 101

Introduction

APPENDIX APPENDIX APPENDIX

Description of Data
Coding System

Items

103

125

Formats, Card and Column Locat ions

1^3

APPENDIX
APPENDIX

Computer Programs
Example Problems

1^8
162

LIST OF TABLES

TABLE
1
.

PAGE

Summary of Published Regression Equations Index, C c for Prediction of Compression from (Adapted and Compression Ratio, C p ) Azzouz et a
, 1

Counties with Modern Soil pleted Since 1958

Surveys Com-

Summary of Statistical Parameters for Different Soil Properties of All Samples Stored as of January 1978
k.

Comparison of the Coefficient of Variation of Soil Properties Among Soil Groupings.


.

5-

Values for All Samples for Compression Index (C ) and Compression Ratio (C r
2
)

(N = 96)

5-A

Values for C and C f of Soils from the Crawford Upland Physiographic Region
2
r

(N-28)
5-B

Values for C c and C r of Soils from the Wabash Lowland Physiographic Region
2
r

(N-28)
5-C
r

Values for C c and C r of Soils Derived from Outwash and Alluvial Deposits (N=63)2

H ?

6.

Values for All Samples for Unconfined ComN=3 56 pressive Strength (q y


2
r
) (

6-A

Values for q u of Soils Derived from Lacustrine Deposits (N = 8)


2
r
i

6-B

Values for q of Soils from the Calumet Lacustrine Plain (N=40)


2
r

50

7-

Values of All Samples for Maximum Dry ), Maximum Wet Density (y Density (y. d a* max _ (N-167).!> z and Optimum Moisture Content (w Qpt
2
r
)

TABLE
7-A.
2
r

PAGE

max max Morainal Valparaiso the from Soils


(N = 26)
2

Values for Y d

and w

Qpt

of

Section
'Z

7-B

of and W Ym Qpt max max Soils Derived from Limestone Bedrock (N-22)
r

Values for y

Values of All Samples for Soaked CBR at 100 (CBRS01) and 95 (CBRS02) Percent of Standard Proctor Maximum Dry Density
2
r

(N=l 38)

sk

Summary of Regression Equations for Prediction of Compression Index (C c and Compression Ratio (C r
)

10

Summary of Regression Equations for Prediction of Unconfined Compressive Strength (q u


)

Summary of Regression Equations for Prediction of Standard Proctor Maximum Dry Densities and and Wet (Y (v J m d max max Optimum Moisture Content (w q
)

VIII

LIST OF FIGURES

F.GURE
I.

PAGE

County Data Sources Sample Distribution Curve for Houdek Series, C Horizon (Adapted from Crawford
et

al.

(8))

3.

California Bearing Ratio-Liquid Limit Curve (Adapted from Crawford et al. 18)).
Data
Input

Form (DIF)
3^

5.

Physiographic Units Based on Present TopModified from Malott (35) ography.

6.

Soil

Regions of Indiana Reference (36))

(Adapted from

Classification of Soil Samples in Accordance with Unified Soil Classification System

8.

Classification of Soil Samples in Accordance with AASHTO Soil Classification System


Plasticity Charts for Consolidation Test
-

9.

Data
10.

..01

Plasticity Charts for Unconfined Compressive Strength Test Data Plasticity Charts for Compaction Test
Data

II.

APPENDIX FIGURE
A-l

Distributional Characterization of Percent Passing No. 10 Sieve


Distributional Characterization of Percent Passing No. ^0 Sieve
'

A-2

APPENDIX FIGURE

A-3

Distributional Characterization of Percent Passing No. 200 Sieve


Distributional Characterization of Percent Passing No. 270 Sieve

A-*|

A-5

Distributional
Sand

Characterization of Percent

^
'

A-6

Distributional Characterization of Percent


Silt

A-7

Distributional
Clay

Characterization of Percent
Characterization of Percent

A-8

Distributional Colloids
Limit

A-9

Distributional Characterization of Liquid


Distributional Limit

A-10

Characterization of Plastic

A-

Distributional Characterization of Plasticity ndex


I

A-12

Distributional Characterization or Shrinkage Limit Distributional Characterization of Natural Moisture Content


Distributional
Dry

A-13

A-14

Characterization of Natural

Dens

ty

A-15

Distributional Characterization of Compaction Test Data

A-16

Distributional Characterization of Soaked California Bearing Ratio

A-17 A-18

Distributional Characterization of Unconfined Compressive Strength


Distributional Characterization of Consolidation Test Data

NOMENCLATURE

AASHTO
CBR
CBRSOl

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials


California bearing ratio
soaked California bearing ratio at 100 percent of standard Proctor maximum dry density soaked California bearing ratio at 95 percent of standard Proctor maximum dry density

CBRS02

Cc
C

coefficient of concavity compression index


Control
Data Corporation

CDC
C
r

compression ratio
coefficient of uniformity
Data
Input Form
vo id

Cu

DIF

initial

ratio

skewness
kur tos
P
i

plasticity
ISHC
L
.

ndex

Indiana State Highway Commission

liquidity index
numbe r of samples
c

preconso

da

ion

pressure

po

overburden pressure
Purdue University Computing Center

PUCC

unconf ined compressive strength

coefficient of determination

coefficient of multiple determination


adjusted coefficient of multiple determination
standard dev at on
i i

var ance
i

SPSS
SPT

Statistical

Package for the Social

Sciences

Standard Penetration Test


Unified Soil

uses

Classification System

USDA
V

United States Department of Agriculture

coefficient of variation
liquid

w.

limit

w w

natural moisture content


opt

optimum moisture content


plastic limit
shr nkage
i

w w

limit

mean natural
dry dens ty
i

standard Proctor maximum dry density


max
Ym

standard Proctor maximum wet density


max

xl

HIGHLIGHT SUMMARY

computerized information storage and retrieval


to

system

has been developed

include geological,

pedological and
Indi-

geotechnical engineering information from the State of


ana.
A

User's Manual
in

describes the details of the system and


Data are being collected for

instructs

its

use.

inclusion

into the system from private consulting

firms and private soil

testing firms, as well as from tests conducted by the Division of Materials and Tests of the

Indiana State Highway

Comm ission
Such

(ISHC).

information

is

transmitted to the ISHC

in

sub-

surface investigation reports, containing data from both

laboratory tests and field surveys.


a

As

of January,

1978,

total
It

of
is

508 data sets have been stored within

the sys-

tem.

anticipated that an additional 6000 data sets


1978, when the
ISHC will

will

be

stored by December,

assume full

responsibility for maintenance and operation of


data bank.

the geotechnical

Various statistical methods have been applied to the


data.

Results
a

indicate that the range


given soil

in

values to be

expected for
physical
has

parameter depends on the particular

property and on the population from which the soil


Some soil

been sampled.

properties appear to be

xll

inherently more variable than others.


by

The grouping of soils

physiographic regions and/or the origin of their parent


suggests that the
p

material
can be
soil

red

cab

ty of

some parameters

improved for certain combinations of parameters and

groups, but not others.

Specifically, prediction equations have been generated


for compression

index

(C

and compression
for:

ratio
(a)

(C
r

from simple-to-determine soil measures

all

test

data,

(b)

for the soils


(c)

from the Wabash Lowland physiographic

unit and

for

Crawford Upland physiographic unit scils.

Additionally, soils derived from outwash and alluvial deposits produced acceptable regression models for
C

Valid regression equations have also been developed


for the unconfined compressive strength
(q
)

for soils

from

the Calumet Lacustrine Plain and soils derived from

lacus-

trine deposits.
test values,

It

is

also possible to predict

compaction

standard Proctor maximum dry and wet densities


(a)

and optimum moisture content for

soils from the Valpar-

aiso Morainal
1
i

area and

(b)

soils derived from residuum of

mes tone bed rock

INTRODUCTION

The need for geo og ca


1 i

pedo og ca
1
i

and geotechnical

engineering information for use

in

site selection, planning,

design, construction, and maintenance of transportation facilities and of most engineering structures
ized.
is

widely real-

Much of the
is

information

initially required by the

engineer

used

in

preliminary construction planning, site


in

selection and for guidance

further soil

investigations.

Unfortunately, most of these data are necessarily limited


in

quantity due to economic and time constraints.


The engineer
is

therefore faced with the problem of

determining the location, sequence, thickness, and areal extent of each soil

stratum,

including

description and

classification of the soils and their structure, by extrapolating the data from
a

few selected sites to an area many times

greater than that which has been sampled.

Even though

large amounts of detailed soils data are available from

work performed during planning and construction of adjacent


and nearby projects,

these data are usually not readily


is

accessible for use, or their existence


The accumulation of

unknown.

laboratory and field testing data


Indiana

for characterizing the engineering properties of

soils

is

extensive.

An

enormous amount of data, collected

and

stored from highway projects within the State of


in

Indiana

over the last 20 years, has been retained

the form of

subsurface investigation reports.

These reports have been

prepared by private consulting firms and governmental agencies from routine soil

investigations.

In

their bulky,

voluminous form, the majority of these data are not very


useful
.

The need therefore exists to make this

information more
in

accessible both for the engineer interested


formation of
soil
a

detailed
in

in-

site and the engineer


a

interested
A

general

characteristics over

large area.

computerized geo-

technical data bank was judged to be the most efficient, ex-

pedient, and economical way to reduce the accumulated data


to
a

form which could readily be made available to interested

individuals, such as highway engineers, geotechnical engineers,

contractors,

land use planners,

the Soil

Conservation

Service, and universities throughout the State.


Pu rpos e
It
is

the purpose of this study to develop

user-

oriented, dynamic information storage and retrieval


system for geotechnical data.
People without
a

computer

computer

programming background should be able to use the system with


a

minimum amount of instruction.

In

addition to being user-

oriented, the system should also be flexible so that changes


can be made easily as the requirements of users become more

clearly defined.

3H

The collection of large amounts of soils test data and the


fact that most natural soil deposits are highly variable in both

horizontal and vertical directions, Justifies the use of a statistical approach (31, 32, 33)
.

This study also attempts to

evaluate, in a preliminary way, some of the methods by which the

engineering properties of the soils of Indiana may be characterized


and predicted.

Scope

Data are being collected for inclusion into the geotechnical

bank from private consulting firms, private soil testing firms,


as well as

from tests conducted by the Division of Materials and

Tests of the Indiana State Highway Commission (ISHC).


is reported to the ISHC in subsurface

Information
,

investigation reports

con-

taining data from both laboratory tests and field surveys.


logic soils information is also being collected.

Pedo-

Since no standard procedure was required for reporting the


results from subsurface investigations before the mid 1960's, the

manner of presentation and the information which was reported,


are dependent upon the source of such information.
A User's Manual

has been prepared describing the details of the system and instruc-

tions on the use of the computerized geotechnical data bank.

Numerals in parentheses refer to entries in the Bibliography

Over twenty-five hundred sets of data have been collected as of this date
(

Ja

ua

78

These data sets have

subsequently been stored within the data bank and subjected


to various methods

of statistical

analyses.

These analyses

of have included soil characterizations and formulations

correlation and prediction equations.

Figure

shows the

representative counties with the State from which the data


have been collected and the soil
tions and predictions, generated.
The Concept of
a

characterizations, correla-

Geotechnical

Data Bank

Large amounts of geotechnical

information for transpor-

tation projects are accumulated each year by highway depart-

ments throughout the United States and abroad.

Geotechnical

investigations are conducted to provide surface and subsurface

information relative to soil, rock, and water.


is

This

information

used
in

In

selecting the proper locations for


(17,

the project and

making design decisions

6M.

Sub-

sequent use of this information after the design and con-

struction of

project from which soil

samples were taken


limited
(22,

and geotechnical data generated, has been

63).

The State of South Dakota realized the value of extensive soils data which had been accumulated
in

that state

over many years

(8).

It

was recognized that expensive soil

testing programs were being conducted on new routes which

closely paralleled old routes on which extensive soil


ing

test-

had been prev ous

under taken

study was consequently

Elkhart

i
\T-\
D.la-,2 war* ,

SCALE- MILES

FIGURE

COUNTY DATA SOURCES

inaugerated
using the

in

1965 with

the main

goal

of

finding

way of

large amount of past soil

testing experience on

new highway locations.


In

cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service


the South

in

South Dakota,
a

Dakota Department of Highways began


soil

program to determine the pedological

series name
This effort may
(2)

represented by each highway soil

profile.
in

have been suggested by previous work

Indiana

and

Michigan (38).

Engineering data and the project and location


The pro-

information for each sample site were determined.


ject number,
limit,

stationing, offset, depth, gradation,

liquid

plasticity index, maximum density, optimum moisture


sample were then placed on sample was then classified

content, and color of each soil

computer punch cards.

Each soil

according to several methods of soil

classification, viz.,

Transportation the American Association of State Highway and


Officials
(AASHTO)
and
a

system, the Unified Soil


textural

Classification

System (USCS)

classification system.

The data were then sorted and subjected to various

methods of statistical
vast amount of data to

analyses.
a

One method of reducing the


yet

concentrated

meaningful

form
ser-

was to develop sample distribution curves for each soil


ies

based upon any one of the many engineering characterisOne such curve has been reproduced and shown
in

tics.
ure 2.

Fig-

Figure

has also been

reproduced from the South


to

Dakota report
test data
to

(8)

to demonstrate an attempt

use the soil

determine the California bearing ratio (CBR)

o o

c o

o 0)

O N K O I
(0 UJ

* > Q. 0> E Q

? 5
.o

'
T3

-s

CE UJ

o C
o

en

V)

UJ

eg (0

-2

a D

81
UJ

T
?
CQC"(DO w

>a a: o O u.

%
zo
Od)

o
j

gI cr D CD a: o cr H u_

o
ro

O
CM

s3|<juios

jdqainN

UJ AC

u.

O
ce

Q H
LlI

< Q <

>
cc

a
2

a
o
cc

> 3

at

is <
.

UJ"5
CD _
0)

|8 (TO

OGl

-S _1<
<cc
ro UJ

cc

from the

results of

much easier and more economical

liquid

limit determination.
In

1976,the Kentucky Department of Transportation puba

lished

report that discussed the development of


(56).

computerThe pur-

ized soils data system for highway projects

pose of this system was to facilitate the collection, cen-

tralized storage, and retrieval of soils data from highway


and other engineering projects within Kentucky.

The soils data system

in

Kentucky

is

divided

into collec-

tion,
ing

storage, and retrieval

subsystems.

The type of data be


(1)

collected can be grouped into four categories:


(2)

raw

data, data.

basic data,

(3)

derived data, and

(k)

descriptive
(56):

brief description of this

information follows

"Raw data are measurements such as wet weight, dry weight, temperature, and hydrometer reading that must be recorded to find the basic soil characteristics...

"Basic data are the soil characteristics and properties, such as density, moisture content, specific gravity, and percent of material passing a certain sieve, found by mathematically manipulating the Some independently meaningful data, such raw data. as amount of swell of a sample, are measured directly and could be called either raw or basic data...

"Derived data are deduced from known mathematical and empirical relationships, using the raw and (or) Examples of derived data include maximum basic data. density, optimum moisture, textural classification, Derived liquid limit, and California Bearing Ratio. it (sic) since data summary called be also could data properties... and characteristics soil summarizes

"Descriptive data are not found by laboratory or They are field tests as are other types of data. or indirectly they since however, very important, They soils. the locate or directly indicate, affect, and bedrock, color, depth, include geographic location, soil series name."

LOP

Some of the data which were collected were not suitable for
direct computer storage.
An extensive codification system wa3 con-

sequently devised by the Kentucky Department of Transportation.


Due to the completeness of the coding system and its applicability
to soils information in general, some of the details of the coding

system were adopted in this research (see Appendix C).


Wlaschin (69) reports that the West Virginia Department of
Highways has adopted a computerized system whereby boring log in-

formation is directly placed onto computer cards in the field.

Laboratory data are added to the storage system when the cards are
returned to the engineer's office.

A complete description of the

operation of the system is not available as of this date, and only


a rough draft of the preliminary user's manual was reviewed.

Sweden has also developed a system of computer banks for geotechnical data (3*0.
report:
As stated in the English summary of the final

"Data deriving from soil surveys is a type of information which never becomes obsolete or out-of-date. Nevertheless, each year vast amounts of the source data disappear through mismanagement of records. This mismanagement takes the form of scattering data throughout the files of Government offices, local authorities, consultants, contractors, and many others to remain in obscurity and often inaccessible."
In Finland and Denmark, computer techniques are to a certain

extent used for plotting soil sounding data

(3*+).

Spradling (56)

states that in France, the Lille Regional Laboratory has prepared


a card index system for retrieving boring and soils test data (30).

And in Southern Rhodesia (20)

and Algeria

h 7

large scale mapping programs are under way.

The Department of Natural


has developed
a

Resources,

Province of Quebec,
inall

system for storing and retrieving field


is

formation.

Canada

also building

national

index

for

geological data, while making major


ing ma ter
i

inventories of exist-

(29

3*0

South Africa has also done extensive work


The objective of their work
is

in

this area.

to

develop

data bank for


is

constructional materials
way and
a

(6k).

The project

still

under

final

report

is

not yet available

(58).

Benefits of

Geotechnical

Data Bank

The benefits which can be obtained


of
a

from the development

computerized geotechnical data storage and retrieval


(a)

system can be divided into two major categories:


direct use of raw data; and
to
(b)

the

the use of statistical

methods

reduce the data to

usable form via distribution characOther uses

terizations, correlations, and predictions.

of the computerized data system can be realized and are

mentioned briefly with citations of reference literature.


Direct Use of Raw Data
A

computerized geotechnical data bank provides the

capability of retrieving an extensive listing of available


soil

and

rock information both quickly and economically.


the

For

instance,

location of

selected soil

type from

specific geographic location may be used to develop preliminary sources of

information for initial

site investigations

(56)

12

Rapid
for

inventories and summary tables of soil


in

characteristics
use planning
a

use

town,

building, and

long

range

land

are also possible

(3M-

With the production of


the

summary

of available soils data, of granular and

location of possible sources

select borrow materials could be facili-

right-of-way tated, along with route selection studies and


appraisals.
In

addition, the compilation of large scale

engineering engineering soil maps and profiles based on

characteristics
As

is

possible (8).

South previously mentioned, the objectives of the

about African work include the collection of information

constructional materials for inclusion

in

data bank.

Specifically, this will help to locate constructional


ials more readily,
to

mater-

inform of expected subgrade conditions,


and
to

to warn of construction hazards

aid
6).

in

route location,

assisted by soil engineering maps


Deen
(10),
(52),

(5,

as

referenced by Spradling
(68), and

(56),

and

Sisiliano

Witczak

Roberts

(50),

studied the

regional or physiographic approach to soil


w ith

characterizations
to

the objectives of demonstrating

the ability

recog-

regard to nize certain areas potentially troublesome with

engineering performance of soils.

Sisiliano concluded:

"The Physiographic Subdivision Approach outlined and worthwhile in this study can lead to meaningful implications and conclusions for use in the prel imlnary modern stages of planning, route location and design of highway facilities in the State of Indiana."

However,

ano

fu

the

concluded that landform or parent

generalizations material areas would provide the best basis for


of soil

behavior

in

Indiana.

McKittrick (37)
costs were related
(26)

showed that subsurface investigation

to

physiographic units

in

Indiana.

approach described the applicability of the correlation


in

to work

Alaska on the Trans-Alaska pipeline.


(3*,000

tremendous

amount of data

samples from 3,500 soil borings)


in
a

were collected and subsequently stored


data bank.
and offset),

computer-based
centerline

Specifically, boring location

(by

sample depths and type of sample, water table


laboratory test results

depth, permafrost encountered, and


for each

sample (Unified classification, moisture content,

dry density,

specific gravity, thaw settlement test results,


in

etc.) were stored

the

Alyeska

data bank

(27).

The

land-

form type was also


of the soils

included with the sample data.


Kreig
(26)

Summaries
writes:

information were prepared.

"Summaries could be prepared for a quantitative picture of the natural variation in critical soil characteristics for each landform.
"Such data bank summaries were useful for many purposes including the comparison of conditions in^ different landforms and the allocation of exploration For example, the number of boreholes expenditures. to made during field programs was usually limited due drilling The problems. access high costs and difficult program was more efficiently planned using the known variability of different landforms so that few holes holes were drilled in the uniform landforms and more Had landforms. were programmed for highly variable spacing uniform on the drilling program been predicted without regard to landform, exploration expenditures Once the propwould have been used inefficiently. erties of a landform were fairly well known, prelimwere inary soil studies in new areas such as reroutes exof done from airphotos and quantitative estimates depected soil conditions were made from previously veloped data bank summaries."

Statistical

Methods of Data Reduction

Statistical methods are used to study the variability


of

the engineering

index properties,
to group

to

compare one soil


types with sim-

type to another,
ilar engineering

and

together soil

index properties
and Hampton,

(30(19)

Hampton
the variation

(18)
in

Yoder, and Burr

studied

the engineering properties of soils derived and and

from the same parent material


of climate, vegetation, age,

under similar conditions

topography.

Soil

samples

were selected from horizons of the Crosby and Brookston


soil

series within the State of

Indiana.

Atterberg limit

tests, standard AASHTO compaction tests, Hveem stabilometer


and swelling pressure tests,

California bearing ratio tests,

grain size distribution tests, and unconfined compression


tests were performed on selected samples and the results

were statistically analyzed.

It

was concluded that soil

variability

is

function of the property being measured.


Illinois have
soil

Numerous studies at the University of

attempted to show the relationship between pedological


types,
62).
soil

parent materials, and engineering properties

(60,

61,

Significant correlations are shown between pedologic


types and the engineering and physical

properties of

the soil

profiles.

Of course,

some soil

types are more


a

variable than others and the degree of variation within


given soil
physical

type appears to be different for the different


In

properties being measured.


from which
a

addition, the parent

material

soil

type has been derived has been

found to be useful for predicting the differences in the engineering

properties of the soil.


Various correlations among selected soil properties can be useful to the engineer when the need for extensive laboratory testing
is

being considered

(1*9,

67).

As reported by Ring, Sallberg, and

Collins (U8), Woods and Litehiser (TO) showed the general interrela-

tion of plastic limit, plasticity index, liquid limit, optimum moisture

content, and maximum dry density for a large number of soils from
Ohio.

They reported that increases in the plastic properties of the

soils were accompanied by increases in optimum moisture content and

decreases in maximum dry density.

Rowan and Graham (51) report that

the optimum moisture content from the standard Proctor test can be

predicted from the shrinkage limit (SL), percentage passing the No.
sieve (A), and the percentage passing the No. Uo sieve (B) by the

following formula:

Calculated ontimum moisture content (percent),

opt

= SL (f) A

Rowan and Graham suggested that the calculated optimum moisture contest be reduced by three percent, after they compared the predicted

values with the results of tests on 10 soils

Davidson and Gardiner (9) modified the Rowan-Graham formula

after comparing the calculated and the laboratory values of optimum

::-.

moisture content of 210 soils from different areas in the United


States.

They reported the greatest deviations between calculated


.

and laboratory values occurred with the more plastic soils

modified optimum moisture content relation is obtained by adding


the correction factor,

PI

- h, to the Rowan-Graham formula, where

PT is the plasticity index.

Thus:

optimum moisture content (percent)

Jumikis {2k), Ring el al.

(1+8)

and James (23) studied the rela-

tionships between liquid limit, plastic limit, plasticity index,

gradation, optimum moisture content, and maximum dry density.


Jumikis examined various glacial soils of New Jersey.

Ring et al

used simple and multiple regression analyses to predict optimum

moisture content and maximum dry density from simpler classification


tests.

And finally, James developed families of liquid limit curves

to predict the standard Proctor maximum dry density from the plas-

ticity index, and presented relationships between plastic limit and

optimum moisture content.


Black (3) and Crawford et al. (8), presented methods of deter-

mining the California bearing ratio from the results of index property
and moisture content tests.
C

Black used the consistency index,

5=

where w is the moisture content, LL is the liquid limit,

and PI is the plasticity

17

index,

to

predict CBR values.

Crawford et al. defined

CBR values relationship between liquid limit values and


for

use

in

highway design

in

South Dakota

(see

Figure 3).

Relationships have been

investigated between unconfined


index, and natural

compressive strength,
content.
m oisture

liquidity

moisture

Peck

(*5)

examined the relation between natural

content and the logarithm of unconfined compresHe

sive strength for Chicago clays.

concluded that the revalue due


to
a

lationship was not of much practical


amount of scatter.
A

large

better correlation existed between

compressive liquidity index and the logarithm of unconfined


strength at various levels of natural

moisture content.
for
(\k)

Similar studies have been reported by Sisiliano (52)

selected soil
for

types of

Indiana, and by Fredlund and Dahlman


in

proglacial

Lake Edmonton sediments

Canada.

Additional

relationships between the values of the standard penetration


test
in

(SPT)

and

the unconfined compressive strength are

found

the

literature.

Since samples for unconfined compressive

the strength tests are usually taken by methods other than

split spoon

(by

the

ISHC),

very few samples for which

values. unconfined strengths tests have been run contain SPT

Therefore,

this

relationship has not been investigated here.

Numerous researchers have attempted to predict the com-

pression index

(C

and compression

ratio

(C
p

from easierlimit
(w
L
)

to-determine soil
natural

properties,
(w
)

for example,

liquid
1

moisture content

and

the

initia
a

void

ratio

(e)

Azzouz, Krizek, and Corotis

(1)

present

summary of different

published equations for prediction of both

and

C
r

in-

cluding the data base used to establish the relationships.


This

information has been reproduced as Table


in

1.

Additional
(25,

regression relationships reported


52,
66)

the
in

literature
Table
I.

23,

are similar to those presented

Differ-

of Table ences which exist between these equations and those


1

are directly attributed

to

the data base from which

the

equations have been derived.

19

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20

DEVELOPMENT OF THE GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK

Most of

the

information being gathered

is

taken from

subsurface

investigation reports from highway projects


Pedological
soils

within the state.

information
The

is

addit-

ionally being collected and stored.


is

latter

information
(5*0

taken from recent agricultural


Soil

Soil

Survey Manuals
individual

and General

Maps

(16)

prepared on an

county

basis.

Approximately one-third of the counties within the


surveys
(Table 2).

state have completed modern soil

many surveys developed prior to 1958 are obsolete, since


soil

have series names have been changed and new methods


in-

been adopted for collecting and reporting pedological


formal ion.

Information Collected

Information gathered during


tion
is

roadway soil

investiga-

generally limited.
is

Usually, only simple laboratory


few selected soil

testing
m ore

performed on

samples, with

advanced testing reserved for samples taken from sites

where special
soil

structures are to be constructed or non-typical


Consequently, very small

conditions are encountered.

quantities of tests are available for the majority of soil


borings from subsurface investigation reports.

21

Table

Counties with Modern Soil


Compl
e

Surveys

ted

nee

1958

1.

Allen

(1969)

16. 17. 18. 19.

Jennings
Lake

(1976)

2.
3.

Bartholomew (1976)
Boone
(1975) (1958)

(1972) (1967)

Madison
Owen

A.
5.

Carroll

(196*0 (1967)

Clark

(197*0
(1975)

20.

Parke Perry

6. 7.

Crawford
Daviess

21.
22.
23-

(1969)
(1968)

(197*0
(1972) (197*0 (I960)

Pulaski
Scott

8.
9.

Delaware
Elkhart

(1962)
(197**)

Ik. 25. 26. 27.


28.

Shelby

10. 11.
12.

Fayette
Floyd

Spencer
Sul
1 i

(1973)

(197**)

van

(1970

Fountain

(1966)
(1975) (197*0

Tippecanoe (1959)
Union
(I960) (1976)

13.
lit.

Harrison

Hendricks
Howard

29.

Vanderburgh
Vigo
(197*+)

15.

(1971)

30.

22

The minimum

information to be stored for


B

particular

boring

(see Appendix
1.

for details)

is

as

follows:

gradational characteristics based on standard sieve sizes and hydrometer analysis

Atterberg
visual

."

textural

classifications

k.

color based on moist condition


to

computer program utilizing the above information

clas-

sify the samples by the AASHTO


and

(including the group index)


is

USCS systems has been developed and


3,

presented as
test data,

Program

Appendix
if

E.

The following additional

are stored,
1.

available:

organic content
pe rcen
t

(loss on

ignition)

as

2.
3.
k
.

in in

situ moisture content situ dry and wet densities,


i

pcf

spec

rav ty
i

5.
6.

compaction test results California bearing ratio (CBR)


unconfined compressive strength failure strain (percent)
strength data from triaxial tests
(tsf)

7.

and

8.

and direct shear

9. In

consolidation test results


information

addition to laboratory testing data,


to

will

be stored
1.

include:

project
a.
b.

identification
n

project

umber

contract number

23

road

umbe

d.

data collection agency

sample location
a
.

coun ty

b c
d

district
townsh
range
i

e
f
.

section
line number

g h

stationing

in

feet

offset in feet and the left or right direction from the centerline

3.

sample identification
a. b. c.

boring number

laboratory number
sampling procedure

h.

date the sample was taken from the hole

5.
6.

physiographic region
parent material de r ved
i

from which the soil


feet

has

been

7.

ground surface elevation

in

8.

depth from which the sample has been removed n feet


i

9.

depth to bedrock

in

feet
in

10. 11. 12.

depth to groundwater

feet

standard penetration resistance (SPT)

pedological
a.

soils

information

soil

association name

2kh

b.
c.

soil series name

horizon
slope (topographic) class

d.

e.
f.
g.

erosion class

natural soil drainage class

permeability
flooding potential
frost heave susceptibility

h.
i.
j.

shrink-swell potential
pH

k.

Data Collection Process

The various

consulting organizations contracted by the ISHC

for subsurface investigation prior to the mid 1960's had unique

methods of presenting their results.

The information reported by

one agency was not necessarily reported by another (for example,

some consultants reported the complete range of gradational char-

acteristics

while other consultants reported only a limited range

of sieve sizes)
At present, the geotechnical data needs to be transferred to the

Data Input Form (DIF) shown in Figure h.

25

O L_ H
Q.

UJ tr

26

Information recorded on the DIF can then be directly punched


on
is

cards and transferred to magnetic tape for storage.

This

Program

1,

Appendix

E.

Details of the data


are described
in

items
B.

to be

stored

in

the
is

computer
not

Appendix

Some

information

suit-

able for direct

input, and an extensive codification system


is

has been developed and

presented

in

Appendix
in

C.

Since

large amounts of data are collected,


and punching the data are
has been written to

errors
An

recording

inevitable.

"audit" program

identify those errors which can be de-

tected with the computer and,

thereby, allow mistakes to be


E,

corrected.
p

Program 2, Appendix

gives

listing of this

rog ram

Data Management and Manipulation

The Statistical

Package for the Social

Sciences

(SPSS)

was selected to provide systematic and effective accessibility

for

identifying, organizing, storing,

retrieving, and

cataloging all data.


(PUCC)

The Purdue University Computing Center


Data Corporation
in

operates the Control

(CDC)
E

6500 have

computer.

The SPSS programs presented

Appendix

been designed for use on this computer system. The SPSS system
is
a

documented,
in

integrated system of
The system

computer programs written


provides
a

Fortran language.

unified and comprehensive package designed for


The

data transformation, analysis, and file manipulation.


SPSS text
(42)
is
a

complete instructional manuscript for the

SPSS programs and data management operation.

27

For
E

the most run on

part,
IBM

the

programs presented

in

Appendix
to

can

be

the

360 computer system available

the

ISHC by merely

replacing the system control


local

cards.

Differ-

ences

in

operating systems,

procedures, and other

factors complicate the problem of describing job deck setups.

However, the SPSS text


detail
A
.

(42)

describes these differences

in

duplicate magnetic tape containing

listing of the

information presently stored within the CDC 6500 geotechnical


data bank (2508 soil
for use on

samples)

has

been provided to the


use and

ISHC

the

IBM 360.

Accordingly, full

operation
at

of the geotechnical

data bank by the

ISHC can begin

any-

time.
To access

the data stored on magnetic tape,


a

the SPSS

system

is

activated by means of
IBM-card format).

sequence of control

cards

(80-column

The control
in

cards cause the


in

specified operations to be performed


the control

the order

which
The

cards are arranged

in
in

the program deck.


a

control

cards must be prepared

manner consistent with


cards
the

the SPSS operation.

Over 75 different types of control


to the operation of

are available and those most useful

geotechnical

data bank will

be discussed.

Data Preparation

Data are card punched onto

series of six cards for

each sample.

Decimal
is

points are not to be included.


left blank.

Missing

information

to be

The order of the data

23

cards

is

fixed.

number,

from one to six,


to
is

is

sequentially

assigned to each card


within each data set.
(sample number)
as
is

(card number)

identify the care


also assigned
a

Each sample

number

each hole

(hole number).

These numbers
Each county
the hole

are assigned sequentially within each county.

name

is

coded.

The card number,

the

county code,

assigning number and the sample number have the purpose of


a

unique
l.D.

identification number (l.D. number)


number
is

to

each data card

The

used

for

internal

bookkeeping.

Details of the formats, card locations, and column


locations are presented
in

Appendix

D.

Da ta

Proces sing
the SPSS system
in

Data are processed


file utilized teen control
in in

in

files.

Each

the data manipulation

process contains six-

cards.

The details of the system are contained


E.

Program
fo
1
1

3,

Appendix
:

The control

card

identifications

are as

ows

FILE NAME
RUN NAME
run
at
-

2.

identifies the current computer


is

(the title on the run name card

printed

the top of each page of output generated

on
3.

that run)

VARIABLE LIST
INPUT MEDIUM
-

k.

identifies the source of the

data file.
5.

INPUT FORMAT

29

6.

VAR LABELS

assigns

name to each variable

included on the VARIABLE LIST card.


7.

VALUE LABELS

assigns

name to each coded

value of each variable defined on the VARIABLE


LIST card.
8.

MISSING VALUES
statistical

excludes missing values from


Normally, missing
in

processing.

values are treated as zeros

the data manip-

ulation and processed accordingly.


g.
|F
-

creates variable transformations needed


the USCS, AASHTO,
and group

to generate

index

codes
10.

ASSIGN MISSING

assigns

code

(-8)

to

those

variables calculated
program.
This

internally with the SPSS

includes the codes assigned to


the

the USCS and AASHTO classifications and

group index.
is
1

The purpose of this control


the MISSING VALUES card.

card

the same as
-

RECODE
to

causes values of existing variables


tered
.

be

12

OF CASES

defines the number of samples

(cases)

contained on the magnetic tape at

the time of processing.


13.

PRINT FORMATS

defines the formats for data

from computer output.


\k. 15.

READ

INPUT DATA

SAVE FILE

30

16.

FINISH
sys tem
.

terminates processing of the SPSS

The control

cards

identified above, along with the data


into
a

contained on the magnetic tape, have been combined


general
and
is

SPSS system file.

This

is

Program
All

k,

Appendix

E,

stored on

magnetic tape.

data processing and

manipulations will access this magnetic tape with the control

card GET FILE

(Appendix F).

The following control

cards

include those which are an-

ticipated to be of most use to the operation of the geotechnical


(A2)

data bank.
for
a

The reader

is

referred to the SPSS text


a

complete description of their application plus


included below (the

description of those control cards not


name of the control
card
is

punched
in

in

columns

1-15;

the

instructions are punched starting


1.

column 16):
IF

COMPUTE

similar to the
to

control

card.

For example,

generate the new variable,


the procedure
I

liquidity index (Ll),


COMPUTE
LI
LI

is:

(NATMC-PL)/P

ASSIGN MISSING
2.

(-8)

SELECT

IF

allows the selection of data from


For example,
to

specific cases.

select all
(code

samples derived from lacustrine deposits


1)

with plasticity
the procedure
IF

indices greater than


is:
1

30,

SELECT

(PARENT EQ

AND

PI

GT 30)

31

SORT CASES

permits

reordering of cases
a

according to any one or


variables.

specified set of
to
in

For example,

sort

all

the data

by counties and

townships,

ascending order,

the procedu re

is:

SORT CASES

COUNTY, TOWN

(A)

The SORT CASES procedure begins by sorting


the file first by county.

The file

is

next

sorted by township within each county.

TASK NAME
ific or
run
.

enables the user to identify speca

separate tasks within

given computer

LIST CASES

enables the user to list the cona

tents of all or
the file.

designated set of cases


card must be used

in in

This control

conjunction with the SPSS statistical


ing

process(see

procedures, such as CON DESCR PT


I

V E

description of sample procedural cards below).


Suppose
a

user would

like

listing of the

depths to bedrock which have been encountered

within Floyd County (code 22).


control
cards would be used

The following

(assuming 100 sam-

ples from Floyd County are contained within


the data bank):

SELECT

(COUNTY EQ 22)
CASES =
1

LIST CASES

00/VAR AB L ES
I

BEDRKB

32

6.

CONDESCRI PT VE
I

computes descriptive statisstandard deviation,

tics

such as mean, mode,

kurtosis, etc.
7.

FREQUENCIES

computes and presents one-way

frequency distribution tables and histograms.


8.

CROSSTABS
n-way
c

computes and displays two-way to


ab
u
1

ros

s - t

on

tables
to

for

any discrete

variables.

For example,

determine the

joint frequency distribution of physiographic


regions and parent material
card wou
1

areas the control

be

CROSSTABS
9.

TABLES
a

PHYSIO BY PARENT
plot.

SCATTERGRAM- prints
REGRESSION
-

two-dimensional

10.
In

performs regression analyses.


procedural
cards

addition to the few statistical


(
I

listed above
tics

CONDES CR PT VE to REGRESSION), numerous statisI

(such as mean, mode,


a

standard deviation, etc.)


a

can be

selected with

STATISTICS card, and

variety of options

are available for data processing and presentation of results

with an OPTIONS card.

Examples of the use of the SPSS


included
in

system with the geotechnical data bank have been

Appendix

33

ANALYSIS OF DATA

total

of 2508 data sets

(cases)

were collected and

subjected to various methods of statistical


cluding characterizations of the total

analyses,

in-

data and character-

izations on the basis of physiographic units and parent

material areas.

Figure

shows the physiographic regions


6

of the State, and Figure

shows the distribution of parent

material
and
8

areas.

To further

identify the data,

Figures

give frequencies within the USCS and AASHTO clas-

sification systems,

respectively.

It

should be remembered

that the data have been collected throughout the entire

state, but no attempt was made to collect equal

numbers of
1.

samples from all


fore,

parts of the state.

See Figure

There-

the correlation and

prediction equations presented

have are applicable for only those areas from which data
been collected.

Distributional
Table
3

Characterization of Data

presents the results of the statistical analysis


parameters for all
the samples
1978.

of the different soil


ted and

collecand

stored
(31)

in

the computer as of January


a

Liu

Thornburn

present

good discussion of the value of

many of these statistics and their applicability to the study


of natural

soil

deposits.

3*

VJ

FIGURE 5 PHYSIOGRAPHIC UNITS BASED ON PRESENT TOPOGRAPHY. MODIFIED FROM MAL0TT(35)

35

Soil PeRions, Their Parent Llaterlals and Representative Soil

knu

1.

3.

A.
5.

6.
7.

8.

10.

11.

12.

13.

Sandy and loamy lacustrine deposits and eollan sand (Maumee, Rensselaer, Plainfield) Silty and clayey lacustrine deposits (McGary, Patton, Hoytville, Dubois) Alluvial and outuash deposits (Fox, Genessee, Warsaw, Wheeling) Eollan sand deposits (Plainfield, Oshtemo, Bloomfield) Thick loess deposits (Alford, Hosmer, Iva) Loamy glacial till (Riddles, Miami, Crosier, Brookston) Clayey glacial till (Blount, Rewamo, Morley) Thin loess over loamy glacial till (Brookston, Crosby, Miami Parr) Moderately thick loess over loamy glacial till (Fincastle, Russell, Miami, Brookston) Moderately thick loess over weathered loamy glacial till (Cincinnati, Avonburg, Vigo, Ava) Discontinuous loess over weathered sandstone and shale (Zanesville, Berks, Well ston, Muskingrum) Discontinuous loess over weathered limestone (Crider, Frederick, Corydon) Discontinuous loess over weathered limestone and shale (Eden, Switzerland, Pate)

FIGURE 6 SOIL REGIONS OF INDIANA (ADAPTED FROM

REFERENCE

(36))

36

N=2469
Note=

39 samples not
due

classified

to insufficient data

Unified Soil Group Classification

FIGURE 7

CLASSIFICATION OF SOIL SAMPLES IN ACCORDANCE WITH UNIFIED SOIL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

37

1200

1000

N=2506

a.

915

800

Note: 2 samples not classified due to insufficient data

o w 600

636
"

OU

O
i

E 3

400
200
14
I

140
51
.

22
_l
1

c b

27

88
3
10
i
i

03
i

<

<

"cm

<<VJ

*3
Soil

CO

<

<

<

<i

<

AASHTO

Group Classification

FIGURE 8

CLASSIFICATION OF SOIL SAMPLES

IN

ACCORDANCE WITH AASHTO SOIL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

3^

No.

of Samples, N

Cn CO CTv Cn CMtMCvJ-3en cn cn

CO

f>

r<

-T

cm cm cm

cn cn cn

e'-

r*.

en

vO on

CO on en

o vO

CSJ

on
r-

-3"

CM

on

on

Maximum Value

oo oo ooo o oo oo
o oo o CC

o oo o o envo O (TiCOOO o ooo o oo o


-3-

CM

on

O
CM

cn en

rn
CM

O cn

Min imum
Val ue
in
<U

o o
CM
t

CM

o o

o
M3

cn

O rn
cn
CM

MM
4-1

10)

a.
1_

Kurtosis, g 2

on on .
-3-

-3-

CO vo
I

fNI

vO

en

en

m
on

vO vO on on

on

oo

o oo
i

sO

O-

_ .
O
oo
4-)

Skewness, g.

Ji

c oo
<u r~-

N0O r-oo o cn cm o o
i i
i

r^ co

cn on CM
csi

CO
-3-

cc cn
-3"

oo

ooo
cm

CM

CO
-3"

on

t_
OJ

cn
>.
i_

U_ u_
>

o
1_

to

3 c
TO

Coefficient of Variation, V

-3"

vO vo vo r^ cn

co

v>

cn cn cn

O o oo

enco
-3"

-3-

-3"

cn
oo

CM CM

O CM
vO

vO

on
CM

co
-3-

oo on r^
r-~

o o
CM

CM

on

u- -3
in <4L.
4-1

O
in TO

1)

E
Q_
i

Standard Deviation,

cn r-^-3- -3cn cm cn
s

cn-3- cn
r
-3-

\o cn cn co vo cn

oo
-3"

CM

cn

cn on
j-

on

O
voO

onvO
CM CM

vO

o
cn

u <U Q u o
03

to

-a

4-1

oo
Ul
a)

Variance,

on vo on r~ oo cn on
s
cm

co cn cn cn cn j- vO on

vo vo cn
CM

o
-3"

on

on vO
CM

CM

o
CO

O
4-1

-3- cm \40 -3-

cn cn

vO

r*-M3 cn

oo

cm so so

co cn MM
3-

o CM

in

4->

CL

TO

to

00
-3>

4J
/>

Mean, x

on

oO
envo

cn on vo co co cn r^ o cn cn cm

on vO cn

o
CM

CO

vO on
CM

PM

u_

<

-3-1

cnoovovo

cn

^
!_
TO

3
oo

Units

<3*>

e-e *<?

a*

<j*

<**?

<?

<>*?

a*

<>*?

a*?

<3~e

<*<?

<U

<u
0)

0)
vi)

tu

> > >


ai

Soil

> u
/>

4-1
-.

._

<u

..

oo oo oo

in

Property

F
_i

F
I
.

4-1

>> > o u
TO L.
in

>4-1

EL
*

W)

4-

c
in in TO

o o o O o CN
Os)

"O
T3

V
cn
TO

1
*
J-

O
zz.

C
TO

CO

Q_
<h>

z:

o z z

oo
avp

O > O oo O o
*>
TO
<j4? <j-p

T>

O w
ro

O
4->
ifl

o
-c

X c

.* .

^ ^
TO L.

TO

1_

c
0)
4-1

4-1

3
cr _i

a*

*_ Cu

TO

C F .^
1-

_l

c 3 o u

3
4-1

4)

-=

D-

oo

TO

TO

V:

No. of

CO

CO
r*.

oo
-3"

oo
-3"

\0

o
OA

Samples,

o
Maximum Value
CM
CT,

rA

o PA

CM

-J

la pa

CT\
'

OO

m
CA
CM

c
CO M3

vO

Minimum Value
<U

r-~

-3"

CO

co

o
PA
r-.

MO

O O

o o

Kurtosis,
a.

g.

ct\ -a-

PA
CM

o
-3-

-T

CM

LA

cn

cn
CM

o
Q-

mO

CO OO
4J <T\

"

Skewness, g.

-a-

cn

-3"

o
PA

O
CM

MO

PA

MO LA

C
<U

o
Coefficient of Variation, V

o
i

(TJ

3 C

CO
-3"

CM

-3-

CO
-3"

mO

\0 cn
-3"

(0

CM

CO LA

o
CO LA

-3"

LA

</>

ui (D

L. 0)

4J TJ
OJ
0)

Standard Deviation,

CM

-3"

CM

cn cn

LA

OO

LA

E
(TJ

O
4-

i_
(TJ

to

CL

o a. e 4J
<1)

Variance,

o o

O cn
CM

-3"

mD
CM

MO mO

cn
r-

CO cn

CM

(TJ

o o
CO

PA

(TJ

UI

CO

ro
4->

<

Mean, x

O -3-

O CM
CO
CM

MO

o
r-~

cn CO

LA

CO

LA

cn

-3"

CA

CM

O
>i_ (D

3
CO

Units

d*

3
CT

4-1

tj
(JJ

X E Soil

X
ro

X
0) l_ ro

X
(TJ

ui 0) l_

<_>

4J

E
fZS

3
4J
t/1

e
TJ Jd-e

CL .C

c
<4-

CL

E
tj >-

o
PA

c o

>
i_

>-

2
4-J

o
<_)

cn

o
TJ

4->

c
0) L.
4-1

Property

>
i/l

CO

<

E 3 ui E c <D X Q
(TJ

4-1

E E C

X
CO

Q)

c a; B 4-1 3 E c o
4-1

o o

o >
0)

4-i

ro

&e LA cn
4-1
(TJ

TJ
4)

C
J}

TJ
*~"

C
u-

CO
0)

4-)
(TJ

3:

O. o

tc CO

tC
CO
<_>

> C o u c

l/l

o QC
CO

"
.

4-J

4-1

(TJ

o o UI <*- c n- o 4) L-> o
(J

bOS

The value of maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation are


of obvious interest.

The coefficient of variation, V, is useful for

comparing the degree of variation within a population or among populations with respect to a given soil property.
k

Accordingly, Table

has been prepared containing the coeffients of variation of each

parameter for all the physiographic regions and parent material areas
under investigation.
Figures Al through Al8, presented in Appendix A, graphically

illustrate the range, 95% confidence interval and the mean of the
parameters, based upon the soil groupings.

These values would help


,

the practicing engineer not familiar with Indiana soils


an idea of the expected values of the soil parameters.

to obtain

Full illustration

of the usefulness of such statictics is deferred to a later report,


where the data base has been enlarged.
It is important to note that the statistical results presented

within this report are valid only for plastic soils.

Some investigators

have assigned a zero to the index properties for non-plastic soils,

while others have arbitrarily assigned values to the soils based upon
the index properties of other soils contained within the populations

under study.

No method was judged acceptable, and therefore non-plastic

soils were excluded from all analyses

General Method of Analysis

State-wide prediction models for each dependent variable are potentially of value.
The dependent variables of major interest are:
)

l)

coefficient of consolidation (C
C /1+e

and compression ratio (C


,

which equals

CO

where e

is the initial void ratio)

2)

unconfined compressive strength

41

cn
la

vo
r-.

-a-

cn

...
ex
r-~

l*
i
i i

"^

r-~

CA

la
_3-

cm
.3-

vO

l---

oo cA LA LA

f> LA LA

c">

'

'-n

w
LA

CM
-S
-

\>

vO
<~A

OO
-3"

r-~

CM

CM

CA

CO

vO

r-.

CM

r-.

in
CNJ

CM

cn

ca
CM

CM
r-.

CM

o
CNI

CM

vjO^O cnr~CM
(VI

CM
-3"

r
1-1

o
-3"

ca

vO

^o

O
CA
r-

c-

(Ti -3"

O0
\40

LA OO

vO
CM

LA LA LA
CM

M3
f
CM
~

LA
-3"

LA vO
CM

oo

ca

o O
CM

O .
-3"
,

CO
CM

vO
<"A

O
cn CA
r-

CM

OOrA-3-CO
CM

-3"

CM

OO

-3"

CA
cm
-3"

LA

r~
-3"

c
4-1

w.
in

-3"

CM cm
r--3-

vor-.ee CA CA CA

cm

CA
o

o CA
i i

o
cn

TO l_

TO

c
o

cn

a 3

cn la

cn co vo

la ca
r-

Colloids

oo
r-

la
r--

vo

i
i

o o
co
ms

C3
4-

O
*->

o
l/)

cm

cn

CM
-3r--

Clay
%

r-

LA
-3-

r~-.oocMr--.aooo CO CArA-3-LA-3-

o
-3"

la ca LA

OO
CM

0)

o c o <4g <j- <


0)

cn

OLALAO-3o CA
,

vO
i

O
r

Silt
%

oo

vO CA
r

cn
-3"

-3-3"

cn CA oo
-3"

la

-3"

Cn-3-

o o
<D

4-1

-3-

ca
P-.

vc

(-

laco
-3-

ID

Sand
No.
S

oo

o
cn cn

LA
r-.

CM

-C
4-1

L. (U

Q.
>4-

o c o

O
i_

270

Q_

ieve

CM

...... COCALAOO
o
ca
CM cm

co

CO cn

cn ca CA

cn
ca

O cn
ca

OO
r-.

O^O
cn

la ca

CA

CO

OO cnrA
cn

in 1_


LO

CM

No.

ra

200 Sieve

oo

LALACnrACM CA CA
o
cn
-3-

la

vO

co

-3-

oo
PMD

cn

r00 CA
-3"

CA
CM

vO
r-

CL<4f=

o
<->

No. 40

vo

cm
0-t

r-

o
CM
CM

la
CM
'

co CA

Sieve
No.
10

oo

_
CM


vO OO

O _CM
LA
-3"

rACM
CM

vO

-T CA

vO

M0

VO

^O
CA

Sieve
..

LA

LA

_
TJ

<U

c o
cn

c
TO

c
c
T3

0)

C -
TO

TO

c
* L.
4-1

c
--

T3

I_

CC

_l

2 o
cn
i_

C
TO

XI

4-1

l_

o
in 4>

C
TO

_
TO

jz
D.
(0 l_

i a.

a.

a. 3
-o
i_

c
TO

in

*
-J

3
J3

2 o

3 u
TO

o
31

3
U
0) tu

in

^
c o
4-t

TO

TO

o
i/l

_l

_J
4-1

~
h-

*
<\>

cn

c
CO

Q.

W o U

F
cn

cn

4-> 4->

Q.

o
in

CO C3

3 O
-

to

. .

<

SL a.

>

/)

C TO E i_ o

JZ

o M3

-C
Ul TO

(U

TO
.

TO i_
TO

F 3
^-

TO 0)

.*

4-1

.
3:

TO l_

J3

0-

O- 1_ i

<

^ C
TO
-*:

TO

o
0)

C O
4->

CO

TO

TO
(_>

>

TO

a.

hi

LA
r^

CM

\D pa PA CO
-3"

LA
CM
i

CM

CA CA

QO
-3"

OO

o
LTV

CA

co

CM
CM

OO
CM

LA
CM
CM
-3"

LA
OO

CA rA

LA

w
OO
CM

O CM
r~.

CA
CM

PA
CM
-3r--

-3"

CM

CM CM

PA
CM

PA
-3"

r-Lf\

\D
-3-

O
-3-

LA
V40

LA

LA MD

PA LA CO
CM

LA

LA

O o rA
1-^.

PA
CM

PA
CM
-3-

O
CM

PA OO

\0

PA P~

en

PA

PA
CA
M0

w.

4-1

u->

PA

OO PA

PA PA

LA
-ar

CA PA

MD
CM

LA PA

vO PA

Ol

10

c
CL

1_
ft)

D
1_

O > o o
4-1

Col loi ds
%

OO LA \0

PA OO
PA PA \0
-3"

PA LA

OO oo

CM

NO
P^
CM
-3-

vO PA
CO

CA LA -T oo
-3"

-3"

\o vO

Clay
%

LA

vO PA

OO PA

C oo
0)

en u C O U

vO

vO PA PA

CA

00

14-

1
in 0)

Silt

LA
CO

O LA
LA VO

CA PA

-3" -3"

CA

-3"

CO
CM
LTV

o
0)

4J
!_

Sand

O O

O
en pa LA

CA

PA CO
vjO

r^ CA vO

CO oo
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<3

(q

),

3)

standard Proctor maximum dry

(Y
rf

nd

wet
*

max
opt
),

^m

max;

densities and optimum moisture content


California bearing ratios
(CBRS02)
(CBR)
at

(w

and

soaked

100

(CBRS01)

and 95

percent of standard Proctor maximum dry densities.

The

independent variables
),

included:

1)

initial

void

ratio

(e

natural moisture content


,

(wj, natural dry


(w
p

density (yJ
ticity
index

liquid
(I

limit

(w
L

>

plastic limit

),

plas(p Q ),

),

percent clay, overburden pressure


(p
)

and preconsol idation pressure

for

the consolidation
(L.)

test

data;

2)

w
L>

Yd

a nd

liquidity index
3)

for
l

the
,

unconfined compressive strength data; and


and w
If

w
p

for
a

the compaction and

CBR test data.

particular dependent variable resisted state-wide


if

regression modelling, or
ant quantities

data were contained

in

significthat
is,

to justify modelling on

smaller units,
areas, and
in

physiographic regions, parent material


cases on soil
types,

some
to

the data were grouped accordingly

determine
i

if

the prediction models

could be significantly

mp roved

The following general

approach was applied

in

the devel-

opment of the regression models for each dependent variable.


The method of least squares was used
to to

find "good" estim-

ates of the regression parameters and


of the

isolate the effects

independent variables on the chosen dependent varDraper and Smith


is

iables.

(11)

discuss this method

in

more

detail, and the reader

referred to this text for further

kk

explanation of the theory of regression analysis.


Each
of the

regression model

formulated had random levels


The methods of formulation

independent variables.

appropriate for fixed employed were the regression methods


levels of the

independent variables.
level

The two conditions

that justify fixed


1)

methods for random level

data are:

The conditional

distribution of each dependent variable


is

(given the

independent variables)

normal with the mean

given by the model


also,

(dependent on independent variables),


be

must the measurements of the dependent variable


2)

mutually independent.

The levels of the

independent variinde-

mutually ables for the different data points must be

variables pendent, and the distribution of the independent


must be

independent of the model

parameters.

Both of the

data modelled, above assumptions are reasonable for each set of


and

they have been assumed to be valid.


The regression models developed are linear
in

the

paramis

eters

(because no parameter appears as an exponent or

multiplied or divided by another parameter).


terms
in

The potential

each model

are

linear

independent variables, squared

independent variables, reciprocal


pendent variables, and linear

transformations of indeindependent

interactions of

variables.

Logarithmic transformations of dependent and


it

independent variables were attempted when


that the model
ma t on
i

was suspected

was

intrinsically linear by suitable transfor-

Each dependent variable was

first plotted against each

U5I-

independent variable in order to investigate the nature of the dependence.

These plots indicate whether linear terms, quadratic terms,

or transformations of the variables are appropriate.


the coefficient of determination, r
2
,

Additionally,

was examined to determine the

degree of relation between the dependent variable and the single

independent variable in each case.


GRAM was applied.

The SPSS routine called SCATTER-

Next, the independent variables and/or transformations suggested

by the scatterplots to have some relationship to the dependent variables were selected for an examination of all possible regressions.

The Purdue computer program DRRSQU was selected to identify the "best"
set of independent variables.

Different criteria for selecting the


The C
p

fitted models may be used to determine the "best" equation.

criterion (Ul), concerned with the total square error (consisting of


a random error and bias component) of the n fitted observations, was

selected to identify the set of independent variables that leads to


the smallest C

value with a low bias component.

The "best" set of

independent variables for each dependent variable provided a model for

additional examination.
To further select the terms appropriate for each model, stepwise

regressions were performed, modelling each dependent variable using


the terms indicated by DRRSQU.

The REGRESSION routine of the SPSS

system was used.

The stepwise regression results (see Reference Ul

for a discussion of this method) give adjusted coefficients of multi-

pie determination (R
the model.

2 as each variable is added to or deleted from ) a

Usually, only the coefficient of multiple determination,

kCh

denoted by

2 R
,

is used as a measure of the proportionate reduction

of the total variation in the dependent variable associated with the


use of a set of independent variables.

However, since in the step-

wise regression procedure used, R

can be made large by increasing


2

the independent variables in the model, R

was used as a criterion

for selecting a good model.

2
Q.

explicitly recognizes the number of

independent variables in the model, as shown below (71),


2 _ a

n - 1 ^ sum of squares due to error (or deviation) sum of squares of total n - p

or R

due to error mean square 2 , 1 = 1 ...., mean square of total a

where

p = number of independent variables considered n = number of data sets

The value may actually become smaller when another independent vari-

able is introduced into the model (^l).


and 1.
The larger R
2
,

takes on values between

the better the fitted equation explains the

variation in the data.


The regression equations with high R
EL

values (greater than O.65)

were checked to determine if the relationships were statistically


useful.

The criteria included:

1)

small confidence intervals (at the

93% confidence level) and 2) confidence intervals that did not cross
zero.

Those equations considered valid, satisfied these two criteria. After obtaining good prediction models
,

it is important to exam-

ine these models to determine if they are appropriate for the particular

UC-n.

data being examined.

Certain assumptions are inherent in formulation

of the regression models; an examination of the residuals (differences


between the observed and corresponding predicted values) will suggest
if any of the usual assumptions are invalid.

The usual assumptions

are that the errors are independent, have zero mean,

A7

constant variance, and follow


An examination of

normal

distribution.

the

residuals of the final models


defic-

were made
iencies.

in

model each case to investigate possible

The residuals of each model


in

were plotted against


in

each

independent variable

the model,

addition to the
The

dependent variable and its predicted value.

residuals

Computer Program were tested for normality by the Purdue displaying The models with residual plots not called NORP. but tendsystematic tendencies to be positive or negative,
ing
to

fall

within horizontal

bands centered around 0, and


at

additionally satisfying the normality criterion

the 90

percent confidence level, were selected as the final models.

Statistical
The
in

Resul

t s

independent variables selected as possible terms


the associated
in

the

regression equations and


2
r
,

coefficients
for
C

of determination,
C
.

are presented
2
r

Table

and
c

Attempting to obtain higher

values, the physiographic

regions and parent material


20 data

areas which contained at least


for further

sets were selected

investigation.

These

Lowland, included the soils of the Crawford Upland, Wabash


and soils derived

from outwash and alluvial

deposits.

AM

three groups reduced the total

variation

in

the dependent

selected variables associated with the use of some of the

independent variables.

The

2
r

values have been tabulated

in

Tables 5-A, 5"B, and 5-C for each of the three groups.
Table
6

shows that no adequate

values were obtained

48

TABLE

5.

Values of All Samples for Compression Index (C ) and Compression Ratio


r

(C
r

(N=96)

Independent Variables

w
0.795
0.771

V.

w,

w
p

Clay

0.639

0.330

0.268

0.243

0.107

0.029

0.013

0.685

0.674

0.551

0.304

0.206

0.245

0.111

0.030

0.003

TABLE 5-A.

Values for

and

C
r

of Soils

from the Crawford Upland Physiographic Region (N=28)

Independent Variables

Y.

w,

w
p

Clay

0.796

0.786

0.700

0.399

0.368

0.220

0.177

0.056

0.029

0.705

0.704

0.647

0.417

0.317

O.256

0.215

0.057

0.025

49

TABLE 5-B

Values for

and

of Soils
(N=29)

from the Wabash Lowland Physiographic Region

Independent Variables
e

Y,

w,

w
0.364

Clay

0.844

0.818

0.628

0.243

0.123

0.030

0.026

0.003

0.758

0.757

0.567

0.203

0.281

0.112

0.024

0.032

0.000

TABLE 5-C.

Values for

and

of Soils Derived from

Outwash and Alluvial

Deposits

(N=63)

Independent Variables

w
0.844 0.815

Y,

w,

w
p

Clay

0.716

0.362

0.305

0.297

0.168

0.015

0.006

0.742

0.722

0.637

0.326

0.234

0.286

0.165

0.015

0.000

v<

TABLE

6.

2
r

Values of All Samples for Unconfined Compressive Strength (q ) (N-356)

Independent Variables
w

w.

0.003
u

0.008
0.170

0.020
0.060

0.105 0.179

0.173

0.13*
0.191

log q u

0.001

0.250

TABLE 6-A.

Values for

q
u

of Soils Derived from

Lacustrine Deposits (N=43)

Independent Variables

w.

T,

0.209
u

0.170
0.171

0.219
0.181

0.607 0.668

0.701

0.309
0.321

log q

0.185
u

0.692

TABLE 6-B,

Values for q

of Soils from the


u

Calumet Lacustrine Plain (N=40)

Independent Variables

w
L
P

w
P

y,
d

L
.

0.100
u

0.098

0.09* 0.0*0

0.560 O.698

0.737

0.356
0.331

log q u

0.059

0.088

0.7*5

51

when an attempt was made to find


and
log
q u

relationship between
in

q u

and
low

the
2
r

independent variables shown


values were obtained for
q y

the

Table.

Similarly,
Tipton Till

data of the

Plain,

Scottsburg Lowland, Mitchell

Plain,

Wabash Lowland, and the Crawford Upland.


soils derived from residuum of siltstone,
stone;

Additionally,
shale, and sandloess over

residuum of limestone bedrock;


till;

thin

loamy

Wisconsin age glacial


its,

and outwash and alluvial


in
in
r
.

depos-

did not show any

improveme nt

For

soils deri ved

from lacustrine deposits as shown

Table 6-A, an

improve-

ment

in

2
r

was achieved,

but

significant improvement was

moisobserved only for the independent variables of natural


ture content, w r
,

and natural
2
r

dry density, Y d

As

seen

in

Table 6-B, similarly high


found
in

values were observed for soils


This
is

the Calumet

Lacustrine Plain.

expected

since most of the soils found within this physiographic

region have been derived from lacustrine deposits.

Relatively low

2
r

were obtained for the dependent var-

iables of standard Proctor maximum dry and wet densities,

optimum moisture content and their logarithmic transformations,


for all the compaction

test data

(Table 7).

Soils

of the Tipton Till

Plain and soils derived from outwash and

alluvial deposits;

residuum of siltstone, shale, and sand-

stone; and thin loess deposits over loamy Wisconsin age

glacial

till,

also had

low

2
r

values.
in

Additionally, those
A-6,
and

soils classified as CL and CH

the USCS and A-^,


to

A-7-6

in

the AASHTO System, were also selected

determine

52

TABLE

7.

Values of All Sampl es for Maximum Dry Density ), and Optimum Moisture ), Maximum Wet Density (y (y. max max Content (w J (N=l67) opt
r

Independent Variables

W
L

w
P

w
P
s

Yd

max log y d

0.566

0.489
0.496 0.436
.

0.440

0.091

max

0.589 0.456

0.463 0.340 0.349


0.563

0.086

0.106
0.103

max log 3 y m w
t opt

0.466

0.439
0.503

max
0.681

0.056 0.065

log 3 w

opt

0.613

0.485

0.493

TABLE 7-A

Values for y

y
max

and w

max

of Soils from the Valparaiso Morainal

Section (N=26)

Independent Variables
1

w
L P

n P

w
s

^d

max log Y

0.823
d

0.724

0.597
0.591

0.237
0.241

0.835
max
0.788

0.750
0.683
0.701

Y m

max log 3 Y
opt

0.580 0.574 0.547


0.512

0.199
0.203

max

0.794 0.755

0.664 0.559

0.256 0.238

log 3 w

opt

0.670

53

if

any

improvements could be made


in

in

No

significant
Coefficfor

increases

any of the

2
r

values were observed.

ients of determination greater

than 0.65 were obtained


in

compaction data of soils found

the Valparaiso Morainal

Section and soils derived from residuum of limestone bedrock.


The

independent variables, along with the improved


included
r

2
r

values, are

in

Tables

7,

7~A and 7~B.

Very low

were observed for CBR test data.

Table

contains the results for the entire set of data.


ships for the soil
sets,

Relation-

groups which contained 20 or more data


selected for the compaction
2
r

that

is,

those groupings

data,

produced similarly poor

values.

Following the application of all

possible regressions

and stepwise regression modelling for those sets of vari-

ables and transformations selected from above,

the

final
9

acceptable regression models are presented


11.
i

in
s

Tables
ou
t
1

through
the

These equations satisfy the requ remen t

ned in

General

Method of Analysis, with adjusted coefficients of

multiple determination greater than 0.65-

5*

TABLE 7-B

Values for Y.
d

max

and w

max

opi

of Soils

De rived from Limestone Bedrock

(N=22)

Independent Variables

W
L

w
p p
s

Yd

max log Y d

0.802
max

0.618 0.625

0.715

0.035

0.815 0.656

0.727
0.586

0.039
0.016
0.017
0.101

Ym

0.500
0.500
0.675

max
m

log Y

0.663

0.595
0.719

max
0.823

opt

log a w

opt

0.81

i*

0.655

0.717

0.075

TABLE 8

Values of All Samples for Soaked CBR at 100 (CBRSOl)and 95 (CBRS02) Percent of Standard Proctor Maximum Dry Density (N=l 38)
r

ndependent Variables
1

w
L P

p r

Y^ d

max

Ym m

w max

* opt

CBRS01

.192
.221

.082

.187
.233

.272
-228

.237 .180
.271

.258
.2hh .353

CBRS02
log CBRS01 log CBRS02

.068
.143

321

.310
.332

.328 .273

.328

.120

-214

.309

55

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59

DISCUSSION OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Soi

Var iabi

ty

The statistical

results presented

in

the preceding

engineer to make cerChapter will enable the geotechnical The resulting data also tain es t ma tes of soil properties. may be expected for indicate that the range of values which particular parameter appears to vary with the a given soil
i

physical

property which

is

being measured and the population

from which the soil


soil

has been sampled.

Nevertheless, some

than others. properties are inherently more variable

regions and the The grouping of soils by physiographic

suggests that the origin of their parent materials further improved for predicability of some soil properties can be and certain combinations of some independent variables
groups of soils, but not others.
those combinations of soil
A

specific listing of

parameters and soil groups proin

viding the best reduction

the degree of variability, would

Exthemselves. show combinations as variable as the data by case basis and pected values must be determined on a case

Figures

Al

through Al8 of Appendix


The range,
95

have been prepared for

this purpose.

percent confidence interval,


is

and mean of each soil


i

parameter under discussion

shown

these

Fi

gures

Predictions and Correlat ions

Consolidation Test Results


The plasticity chart shown
the consolidation
test
in

Figure

indicates that

results are for soils which are

plasticity (59 mostly inorganic clays of low to medium (25 samples). samples) and silts of medium compressibility high adjusted coFrom Table 9 it can be seen that a very
was found to efficient of multiple determination of 0.856

exist between

and

w
p

and

for all
p

the

test data
is

Since the prediction equation contains


not of much practical
use.

c>

this

equation

The R* values for the remaining


the equation
C
p

three equations for


that the variation

and
c
C

for

C
r

all

indicate

in

and

can be explained with the

use of simple and easily determined soil

properties.

Figure

the indicates that the soils collected from

all of which are Wabash Lowland are inorganic clays almost

of

low to medium plasticity and an equal

number of silts of

medium compressibility.

The R* values are slightly greater

tota values o f the equations derived from the than the R, a


da ta
.

Soils

investigated

in

the Crawford

Upland are also

me dium plastic

inorganic clays and medium compressible

silts

(Figure 9).

Prediction equations similar to those of


Soils derived from

the Wabash Lowland have been generated.

largest group outwash and alluvial deposits constitute the


of samples collected for the prediction of
C

and
c

C
f

but

61

ALL SAMPLES

N=96

x UJ a

80

--

o
en CL

HO

--

HO

80

LIQUID LIMIT

WABASH LOWLAND CN=29)

X LU Q
i

80

>1
i

CJ
1

HO-

f/
I 1

CD a: _j Q_

QLrML^
J
1

HO
l:[QUID

80

120

LIMIT

FIGURE

9 PLASTICITY CHARTS FOR

CONSOLIDATION

TEST DATA

62

CRAHFQRD UPLAND

N=28

X LU o
~z.

80

>1
1

HO

s&/ >^s
+ yS
(mh)-(oh)

hCO cr

Q_
'

++^
:
-i

icc-ml
r-

^^ p*^
HO

--

i
1

80

120

LIQUID LIMIT

GUTWASH AND ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS CN=63)

LU

a
>I

80

--

u
CO (X

HO

--

HO

80

LIQUID LIMIT

FIGURE

CONTINUED

63

no adequate models

for

C p

were found.
model

Among the models de-

veloped,

the most
in
C

useful

explains 84 percent of the


initial
is

variation

and

involves only the


for

void

ratio.
in

The plasticity chart ure


9

these soils

also shown

Fig-

The majority of the soils

investigated above

(96

sam(63

ples) were derived from outwash and alluvial

deposits

samples).

It

will

be

left as an exercise
if

for

further re-

searchers to determine

good prediction models can be deIn-

veloped within the other physiographic regions within


diana and
if

the grouping of soils


in

by

parent material

areas

would also result

regression equations as good as those

developed for outwash and alluvial deposits.

Unconfined and Compressive Strength Test Results


The results from 356 unconfined compressive strength

tests were collected and predictions were attempted.


initial
all

An

attempt was made to develop regression equations for


and

the soils

selected soil groupings.


a

Later, an attempt

was made to develop

series of regression equations for the

logarithm of unconfined compressive strength and liquidity


index at various
No

levels of natural moisture content

(**5)q

adequate relationships were developed for the total


or

data

for

^u

data of soils taken from most of the physio-

graphic regions or parent material areas.

Acceptable regression equations were generated for


soils derived from lacustrine deposits using the

logarithm

Sk

of unconfined

of the compressive strength and the square

natural

dry density

(Table 10).

Two prediction equations

values of 0-756 and 0.750 were also developed with R* limited to the Calumet when the lacustrine deposits were
Lacus trine Plain.
B oth

models also contained only the


a

square of the natural dry density;

higher

value was
a

obtained when

was applied directly without

the

logarithmic

transformation.
Plain and derived

The soils taken from the Calumet


from lacustrine deposits are
in

Lacustrine
in

identified

the plasticity charts shown

Figure 10.

Test Results Compaction and California Bearing Ratio


A

total

of

138 sets of data were collected

from stanthe

tests. dard Proctor compaction tests and CBR

For
for

total

generated data, no reliable equations co uld be


densities, dent variables of maximum dry or wet
ture content or the CBR value at
imum dry density and more simp le
100 or

the depen
i

optimum mo

95

percent of max-

independent variables
found between opti(R
g

very high correlation, as expected, was

density mum moisture content and maximum dry


For the physiographic

0.89*0.
areas

regions and parent material

compaction test results, which contained at least 20 sets of those soils deonly the Valparaiso Morainal Section and
rived from residuum of

limestone bedrock, displayed any

densities, optimum relationship between maximum dry and wet


m oisture

content (and their logarithmic transformations) Reasonably high R a values and simpler independent variables.

65

CALUMET LACUSTRINE PLAIN

N=40

X a
-z.
1

80

>hi

+
-H-

<?/

is

i
1

40

CD CE _J a_ +Q

y
HO

s^

(mh)-(oh)

1__

80

120

LIQUID LIMIT

LACUSTRINE DEPOSITS (N=H8]

X LU a

80

@
-

>i

>^
yS
(MH)-(oh)
1

HO

V
CO CE

Q_

'

:jc-c/@ 1
it

4?
40

80

120

L [QUID LIMIT

FIGURE

10 PLASTICITY

CHARTS FOR UNCONFINED COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH DATA

66

prediction models. were obtained for the acceptable


remarkably high
2 R a

value of 0.972 was

found

for

the

correla-

content and tion between optimum moisture

the

independent

densities for soils of variables of maximum dry and wet The plasticity charts for the Valparaiso Morainal Section.
been soils from which these models have

formulated, are

shown

in

Figure 11.

No

relationships were found to exist with

values

and the independent greater than O.k for the CBR test data The collection of additional variables presented in Table 8. throughout the entire test data representative of soils

state will determine

if

prediction equations can be form-

utilized and preulated for CBR test data using the methods

sented within this report.

This will

also be left as an

exercise for future researchers.

67

VALPARAISO MORAINAL AREA (N=26)

X LU a
i

80

>j

40
-

J^
y/4(mhHoh)
1

CO cc _J Q_

MS
J
1

40

80

120

LIQUID LIMIT

RESIDUUM-LIMESTONE BEDROCK (N=22)

X LU Q
>I
i

80

40
CO

<x
a_

:ci3^'
40
80
120

LIQUID LIMIT
PLASTICITY CHARTS FOR COMPACTION

FIGURE

II

TEST DATA

(A

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

The

research results may be summarized as follows:


1.

computerized, user-oriented,

information

storage and retrieval system for geological,


pedological and geotechnical engineering
inis

formation has been developed.

The system

flexible, so that changes can be made easily


as
ly
2.

the

requirements of users become more clear-

defined.

complete instructional User's Manual

has

been

prepared, compatible with the present requirements and needs of the


Indiana State Highway

Commission and the Joint Highway Research


Project at Purdue University.
3.

Suggestions for standardizing the reporting


and

collection of new data have been made. facilitate efficient


information from

The computerized data bank should and economical


the State of

handling of geotechnical
Soils

Indiana.
a

information which was essen-

tially "lost" after

project was completed, can now be

utilized for future highway projects and


data bank should be maintained by the

improvements.
for all

The

ISHC

potential

users

69

The application of statistical

methods to the geois

technical data stored to January 1978

promising.

However, no soil

group studied can be said to produce

overall, better correlation equations than others,


and parent matergrouping of soils by physiographic regions justified for some depenial areas certainly appears to be
of soils. dent variables and for certain groups

From the

preliminary constatistical analysis to date, the following


clusions are
1. d

rawn

The prediction of compression

index

(C

and

compression ratio
measures
Soils
is

(C

from more simple soil


a

reasonable on

state-wide basis.

investigated within the Wabash Lowland and


regions also
C

the Crawford Upland physiographic

produce regression equations for

and

C
r

with relatively high correlation coefficients.


Further, equations generated for soils derived
from outwash and alluvial

deposits also are

statistically significant for the prediction


of
2.
C

but not

for the prediction of

Prediction of the unconfined compressive


strength analysis
in
(q is
)
,

by

the method of regression

not

possible for soils found withPlain,

the Tipton Till

Scottsburg Lowland,
Crawford Up-

Mitchell

Plain, Wabash

Lowland,

land, and soils derived

from residuum of silt-

stone, shale, and sandstone;

residuum of

70

limestone bedrock;
consin age glacial
ial

thin

loess over

loamy Wis-

till;

and outwash and alluv-

deposits.
q

Acceptable regression models


from the Calumet Lacustrine

for

of soils

dePlain and soils derived from lacustrine

posits have been developed.


of maximum dry density The prediction K

maximum wet density (y


ure content
(w

max moistand optimum


a

(y d

opt

is
s

max not possible on


i

stateinde-

wide basis from the

mp er- to-de t e rm ne

statistical pendent variables studied and the

methods used.
the soils

Adequate prediction equations for

investigated from the Valparaiso Mor

ainal

the logArea have been found to exist for


,

arithms of y d

max max transformations), and w Qpt

Ym

(and
.

their

logarithmic
_

Soils der.ved from

produced aderesiduum of limestone bedrock also


for the quate regression equations, but only and w Qpt and the simpler-tologarithms of y d max Mo acceptable determine independent variables.

Tipton Till models were found for soils of the


of siltPlain and soils derived from residuum loess deposits stone, shale, and sandstone; thin till; and soils over loamy Wisconsin age glacial

classified as CL and CH

in

the Unified Soil


in

Classification System and A-4, A-6, and A-7


the AASHTO system.

71

k.

The prediction of

the

soaked CBR

is

not

pos-

within this sible with the methods and data used


study.
ilar
to

The grouping

of

soils

into

units

sim-

those of the compaction

test

data does
in-

not offer any

improvement with the set of


investigated.
in

dependent variables
As

sufficient data

is

collected

the future from all


the need
to study

the physiographic and parent material

areas,

will groups of soils which are more closely related

be de-

termined.

These areas should


soil

include pedologic soil

assoc-

iation areas,
t

series, soil

horizons, and combinations,

hereof

72

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

This study has briefly

ve

s t

ga ted

he me

hod of

regression analysis to develop meaningful

correlations and
parameters from

predictions of difficult to determine soil


more readily attainable soil

measures.

The following are

suggested for future research.


1.

Statistical

techniques other than regression

analysis may prove to be more appropriate to


study soil

variability, and may lead to betmodels.

ter statistical
cal

Bayesian statisti-

decision theory has recently been under

development and provides mathematical models


for making engineering decisions
in

the face

of uncertainty.
2.

The analysis of variance

(ANOVA)

technique

should be investigated.

The independent

variables

in

ANOVA models may be qualitative

(physiographic region, parent material, sampling procedure,

etc.)

and may provide


in

insight

into factors often overlooked tical


3.

the statis-

study of soils.

The collection of new soils data should con-

tinue from private and public sources.

For

73

those soil

properties for which no acceptable

models are generated, the need to study groups


of soils other
than

those

investigated within
The ped-

this

research should be determined.

ological
p

grouping of soils data appears most

rom

ng
the

k.

The feasibility of contractors using

geo-

technical data bank should be studied.


5.

The feasibility of incorporating

into the data

bank the

location of bore holes by state

plane coordinates should be investigated.


This would enable
a

user of the system to pre-

cisely locate the position from which each


sample has been taken.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

7^

BIBLIOGRAPHY

976) Azzouz, A.S., Krizek, R.J. and Corotis, R.B. Compressibility, Soil of "Regression Analysis Soils and Foundations, Vol. 16, No. 2, June,
(

pp.

19-29.

\l

"The Belcher, D.J., Gregg, L.E. and Woods, K.B. (19*3) CharacFormation, Distribution and Engineering Project teristics of Soils," Joint Highway Rese arch The the State Highway Commission of India na Bul"Engineering Experiment Station - Engin eering letin No. 87, Purdue University, January, 389 PPthe Calif' Black, W.P.M. (1962) "A Method of Estimating Soils 'ornia Bearing Ratio of Cohesive DecernVol. 12, No ticity Data," Geotechn que
i

3-

ber,
A.

pp.

27\-2W.
1
i

C ass Burmister, D.M. (19*0) "Practical Methods for the Con ication of Soils," Proceedings of th e Purdue ference on Soil Mechanics and Its App lications, Purdue University, September, pp. 129-139-

f-

5.

Clauss,

Bank.ng K.A. (1975) "Material or Terrain Data Sym3rd Roads," at the National Data Bank for Storage, Data posium on Terrain Evaluation and Johannesburg, South Africa, February, 9 PP-

6.

to Clauss, K.A. and Vail, J.W. (1975) "A New Approach Materials Data Banking for Road Construction, Proceedings of the 6th Regional Conferen ce for Africa, Durban, South Africa, Vol. 1, September,

pp.
7.

11-19.

Cozzolino, V.M. (1961) "Statistical Forecasting of Compression Index," Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and F oundation Vol. 1, pp. 51-53Par s Eng neer ng
i

8.

Crawford, R.A., Thomas, J.B. and Stout, M.Jr. (1972) "Computerized Soil Test Data for Highway Design, Physical Research Section, South Dakota Department of Highways, Pierre, South Dakota, 2k pp.

751

9.

Davidson, D. T. and Gardiner, W. P. (19*49) "Calculation of Standard Proctor Density and Optimum Moisture Content from Mechanical Analysis, Shrinkage Factors, and Plasticity Index," HRB Proceedings Vol. 29, pp. b^^-he>l.
,

10.

Deen, R. C. (1967) "Highway Construction in Windblown Silts in Western Kentucky," Division of Research, Kentucky Department of Highways, January.
,

11. Draper, N. and Smith, H. (1966) Applied Regression Analysis John Wiley and Sons, Inc., kOl pp.
12.

Elnaggar, H. A. and Krizek, R. J. (1970) "Statistical Approximation for Consolidation Settlement," Highway Research Board, No. 323 , pp. 87-96.

(13.)

Franzmeir, D. P., Sanders, F. W. and Zachary, A. L. (1975) Key to Soils in Indiana , Department of Agronomy, Purdue University and USDA Soil Conservation Service, February, 26 pp.
(1971) "Statistical Geotechnical Properties of Glacial Lake Edmonton Sediments," Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability to Soil and Structural Engineering , Peter Lumb , Editor, Hong Kong University Press, September, pp. 203-228.

Ik. Fredlund, D. G. and Dahlman, A. E.

19. Galloway, H. M. , Yahner, J. E., Srinivasan, G. and Franzmeir, D. P. (1975) User's Guide to the General Soil Maps and Inter-

pretative Data for Counties of Indiana , 27 pp.


16.

General Soils Maps and Interpretation Tables for the Counties of Indiana (1971), Agricultural Experiment Station/Cooperative Extension Service, Purdue University and Soil Conservation Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, November.
(1973) "Retrieval and Use of Geotechnical Information," Ohio River Valley Soil Seminar, Geotechnics in Transportation Engineering October,
,

17. Hagerty, D. J., Schmitt, N. G. and Pfalzer, W. J.

PP. 1-9.

18. Hampton, D.

(1961) "Statistical Analysis of Soil Variability," Joint Highway Research Project Report No. 12 , Purdue University, May, 115 pp.

19. Hampton, D.

Yoder, E. J. and Burr, I. W. (1962) "Variability of , Engineering Properties of Brookston and Crosby Soils," HR3 Proceedings , Vol. Ul, pp. 621-6^9.

76

20

21

22

23

James

"Atterberg Limit Tests for Quantitative Earthwork Control," Civil Eng neer ng a fied No. 7*+6, September, Publ ic Works Review, Vol. 63 pp. 1005-1006.
P.M.

(1968)

2k.

Jumikis, A.R.
(N.J.)

(1958) "Geology and Soils of the Newark Metropolitan Area," Jou rna of the So Foundations Division, ASCE, Vol. and r-ounaatii Mechanics ana k\ pp. \bHb, May, 41 Paper 1646, Proc. 8*4, No. SM2, 84,
1
i

25.

Kog ure, K. and Ohira, Y. (1977) "Statistical Forecasting of Compressibility of Peaty Ground," Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Vol. \k, No. k, November, pp. 562-570.

26

Kreig,

R.A. (1977) "Terrain Analysis for the TransAlaska Pipeline," Civil Engineering, Vol. ^7, No. 7, July, pp. 61-65-

27
28

Kre
Kr
i

R.A

(1977)

Personal
R.B. K.ts.

Communication, October.

Corotis, zek., R.J., K.J., torotis,

H.H. (1977) ana El-Moursi, and ti-noursi, n.n. Measured and Predicted f "Probabilistic Analysis of Settlements," Canadian Geotechnical Journ al Vol. \k, No. 1, February, pp. 3 3
, 1 ,

29

Legget, R.F. (1973) Cities and Geol ogy 505" 506 Book Co., Inc.^ pp
.

McGraw-Hill

30

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Liu, T.K.
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i4-1 11
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35.

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i i

36.

37

McKittrick, D.P. (1965) "Subsurface Investigation for Indiana High ways," Joint Highway Research Project Report No. 20, Purdue University, September,

T/T
38.

pp

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Moran,

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APPEND CES
I

81

APPENDIX A

Dis trihutional

Characterization of Soil

Properties

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>-z UJO

z o J <

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z=8.

XO

tnH-<

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x>-i 1-OJ

ui^r <
ctenf

en

o o
q:

u.

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OH *Z UJ
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ft Ui
03

o o

oj

o o
CC

o
i-

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3 t
</j

a
o u
a>

o CM
T

oO 5
x

m
tr
(f)

_
7
'

O ~
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en

a
2

^
1

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ro

<
y^z <m2 *I3 1zoo <I<UJ
x _Jcn

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<5

<<
MITCHELL
CRAWF0RC

LOWLAND

CALUMET

O* OO

OO. Z=>

cc_i

UPLAND

WABASH

PLAIN

CL<< _)CCUJ < oir

oz
t-0.

q: z>

>2

NOI93y OIHdVHSOISAHd

95

NUMBER OF SAMPLES124
ALL SAMPLES

RANGE
MITCHELL
PLAIN

95 7.

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL
116

^CRAWFORD
Ul UPLAND

MtAN
118

LOWLAND

5 WABASH

O g
2

IT

CALUMET
PLAIN
TIPTON TILL PLAIN

40

JlacuCLSTRINfc

93

30

40

30

60

70

80

90

100

110

120

130

NATURAL DRY DENSITY,

PCF

NUMBER OF SAMPLES-7
ALL SAMPLES

524
RANGE

LACUSTRINE

^DEPOSITS

< K UJ
<0UTWASH SAND
ALLUVIAL

95 7.

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL
1

A
r
MEAN

232

^DEPOSITS
Ul

5 THIN LOESS 2 OVER LOAMY


WISCONSN
TILL

49

RESIDUUMLIMESTONE BEDROCK
30

88

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

no

120

130

NATURAL DRY DENSITY, PCF

FIGURE AI4 DISTRIBUTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURAL DRY DENSITY

96

ALL SAMPLES

178

WABASH LOWLAND

26

VALPARAISO MORAINAL

AREA

26

TIPTON TILL PLAIN

62

O UJ
cr

80

90

100

110

120

130

140
-

o
X Ol < cr o > i Q.
ALL SAMPLES

MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY, PCF MAXIMUM WET DENSITY, PCF

o
NUMBER OF SAMPLES178

RANGE

WABASH LOWLAND

VALPARAISO

MORAINAL

AREA

TIPTON TILL PLAIN


5
10
15

20

25

30

35

OPTIMUM

MOISTURE

CONTENT, PERCENT

FIGURE AI5 DISTRIBUTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COMPACTION TEST DATA

97

?!
-2

o
CM

o o
lit

a.

t<n

o
2

s p 0. o

z
uj

>-z

to

I u QW jQ
<o>Qr co

luj

I- uKn

lis J^
-?

fj

z
totn

<i to

<0

o
1VIH31VW

!N3HVd

7
a. a.

w
.o 2

<fi

LlI

uj uj

oo

o
S

aS

22 ss xx << 22

O o <
cr

uj

X
l/>

<(-

-Jul
uj

HI
o
tn _j
__ t/icr
I-

z> CD

l-O
Si

-JO.

<

lSgg -JO _l*t=

25

I|| ^
uj

5 S "J -

-iviusiwi iN3avd

Y
RANGE

ALL SAMPLES
-

148-

o o
Ixl

NUMBER OF SAMPLES^

/-MEAN
WA8ASH LOWLAND
23

cc

I a. <
CO >-

95%
TIPTON TILL PLAIN

A
9

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL

60

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

33

36

39

42

45

SOAKED CBR 100% MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY

SOAKED

CBR

95

MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY

ALL SAMPLES

M
OUTWASH 8 ALLUVIAL
DEPOSITS

-' 48

<
CC
Ixl

---

,25

< THIN 2 OVER


KTILL
UJ

LOESS LOAMY

1
1


36

WISCONSIN

z e <

.+_

RESDUUMSILTSTONE, SHALE,

SANDSTONE

,25

RESIDUUMLIMESTONE

BEDROCK
24
12
15

18

24

27

30

33

SOAKED CBR -100% SOAKED CBR- 95%

MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY

36

39

42

45

FIGURE AI6 DISTRIBUTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOAKED CALIFORNIA BEARING RATIO

93

NUMBER OF
ALL SAMPLES

SAMPLES

RANGE
MITCHELL
PLAIN

95%
CRAWFORD UPLANO

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL
79

K
I

MEAN M
WABASH LOWLAND
i

85

56

CALUMET
LACUSTRINE
PLAIN

TIPTON TILL PLAIN


10
2.0
3.0

63

5.0

UNCONFINED

COMPRESSIVE

70 60 STRENGTH. TSF

60

90

381

ALL

SAMPLES
55
,

LACUSTRINE

< DEPOSITS s
Id

5 OUT WASH
8 ALLUVIAL

165

H Z
!r

DEPOSITS
THIN LOESS

<OVER
LOAMY
WISCONSN
TILL

-<30

RESIDUUM

LIMESTONE BEDROCK
LO

58

ZO

10

40

SO

60

70

80

9-0

UNCONFINED COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH, TSF

FIGURE AI7 DISTRIBUTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF

UNCONFINED COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

MEAN
ALL SAMPLES

NUMBER OF SAMPLES

116

Z o o
LU
E

RANGE

O X a. < tr o o
Jn j 0.

CRAWFORD UPLAND

95 7.

CONFIDENCE INTERVAL
42

WABASH LOWLAND

0.4

0.8

1-2

'

20
e

2 4

2 8

3 2

INITIAL VOID RATIO,

MEAN tMn

NUMBER i'ui"">-"

OF

SAMPLES

ALL
SAMPLES

-. 103

RANGE

g o UJ
E

CRAWFORD UPLANO
95

28

X Q. < K O 2 >

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL

WABASH LOWLAND

29

0.1

0.2
.

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

Q7

COMPRESSION

INDEX, C c

FIGURE AI8 DISTRIBUTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF

CONSOLIDATION

TEST DATA

USER'S MANUAL

101

USER'S MANUAL

roduc t on
i

The User's Manual and


F

is

presented as Appendices

B,

C,

D,

E,

and

is

to be

used

in

conjuction with the computerized


Appendix
in
B

storage and retrieval system.

includes

des-

cription of the variables included

the data bank.


item are used
is

The

variable names associated with each data


throughout the manual whenever this
enced.

information

refer-

Appendix

includes

listing of the codes assigned


from

be recorded to those variables which cannot directly

subsurface investigation reports.

Appendix

contains the

for each data formats, card locations, and column locations

item.

Appendix

contains the listing of the programs used


data to the data bank;
is

to add additional

to check data

input

errors where this

possible; and to use the Statistical

Package for the Social

Sciences

(SPSS)
F

program for data mancontains examples of

ipulation and management.


the use of the geotechnical
If

Appendix

data bank.

the data are available for

inclusion into the data


Input Form

system,
(|)IF),

this

information
k.

is

recorded on the Data

Figure

Some information will


be

not be available
for soil

and these spaces will

left blank.

For example,

102

modern agricultural samples taken from counties for which no


soil

survey reports are available,

the

soil

series name,
(from

bedrock horizon, slope class, erosion class, depth to


the soil

survey), depth to seasonal

high water table, drain-

age class, permeability,

flood potential,

frost-heave sus-

ceptibility, shrink-swell
not be filled.
All

potential, and pH data spaces will

numeric data will


is It

be

gh t-

us

ed

The F-type

format for numeric data


are not to be

fixed,
is

therefore decimal

points

included.

suggested that leading zeros


(for example,

also be included to minimize punching errors

beginning

string of numbers

in

the wrong column).

Alphaand

numeric information, such as boring number,


laboratory number, may be recorded
it
is

line number,

in

any columns.

However,

suggested that such alpha-numeric information be left-

justified.

APPENDIX

USER'S MANUAL:

PART

Description of Data Items


Part
the
I

of the User's Manual


is

contains

description of
in

Information which

presently being stored


and each card
If
is

the data

bank.

Six cards are used,

consecutively
is

numbered from one to six.


for the
a

no
is

information

available

particular card

(which

usually the case for card 6),


be

identification number will


be maintained
in

recorded,

and

this card

will

its

proper sequence.
see Figure h,
re-

Referring to the Data Input Form (DIF),


the variable SEQNUM

(located

in

the upper left corner)

assigned by the fers to the sequence number automatically


computer to
the total
It is
a

soil

sample.

This number ranges

from

to

number of samples contained within the data bank.


a

recorded on the DIF after


a re
i

listing of the newly


This

entered data
tion number

rece ved for verification.

identifica-

is

automatically present whenever the data are

processed, may be accessed by referring to SEQNUM, and may


be used as any other variable
in

the processing of data.

104

VARIABLE NAME
CARD1

DESCR PTI ON
I

The first column of each card

within

data set,

containing

sixcards per data set, contains the card number.


The

number

(1)

is

always

recorded

for this variable.

COUNTY

The county from which the soil

sample has been taken


corded here.
coded and
ly
in

is

re-

County names are

listed alphabeticalII.
is

Part

HOLENO

unique number

assigned

sequentially to each hole withi

each county

SAMPNO

Numbers are assigned sequentially to each sample retrieved


f

rom each hole.

The variables COUNTY, HOLENO


and SAMPNO,

from the
(l.D.

identifiNo.)

cation number
is

which

recorded

in

columns 2-10 of
Use

the

remaining five cards.


l.D.

of the

No.,

along with
a

the card number, assigns

unique ten digit number to

105

each data card.

This

is

con-

venient for internal


ing.

bookkeep-

DISTRI

The State of

Indiana

is

divided

into six highway districts,

which have been coded.


DATEYR
The year
in is

which the sample


recorded here.
show the
last
For
is

was taken

The two columns

two -digits of the year.

example, the year 1965


resen ted as
(

rep-

65

DATEMO

The month was taken

in

which the sample

is

recorded here

in

code

DATEDA

The day of the month on which


the sample was taken
is

re01

corded here,

reported as

through 31TOWN
The township of the public land

survey within the state


co rded here

is

re-

TOWND

The north-south direction of

the

townsh
RANGE
The

is

coded
is

range within the State

reco rded here

106

RANG

The east-west direction of the

range

is

coded.
is

SECTIO

The section number

recorded

here

For example,

if

soil

sample has
3

been

taken from township


range
R2W,
2

North,
2k

West,
Sec.

section
,

(T3N,

Ik)

(03)
(1)

will
will Part

be entered be entered
II

for TOWN,

for TOWNDI

(see

for codes
(02)

assigned to
will
(2)

directions),

be enbe

tered for RANGE,

will

entered for RANGDI, and


will
be entered

(2k)

for SECTIO.

PROJPR PR0JN0 PROJPA PROJMI

These four variables make up


the project number,

consisting
parenthe-

of
sis

prefix, number,
and mileage.

CONTPR C0NTN0

These two variables make up


the contract number,
ing of
a

consista

prefix and

number.
a

ROADPR R0ADN0 ROADSU


BORING

The road number contains


fix,
a

pre-

number and

suffix.

A unique alpha-numeric

boring

number

is

assigned to each bor-

ing within each project.

107

ASSOC

The soil

association name, repa


a

resenting
scape with

natural

soil

land-

characteristic

topography and repeating pattern of soil

types,
1

is
8

coded assoc

here.

There are

soil

Jation types
the State of

identified within
Indiana.

The soil

association
Soil

is

taken

from the General

Maps,

contained

in

Reference (16),

prepared for each county.


A

user's guide

is

also avail(15).

able;

see Reference
is

REPEAT

This column

used to

indicate
index

the source of the soil

properties

(liquid

limit,

plastic limit and plasticity


index)

reported.

(1)

in

Column 80
inal

indicates that orig-

data are reported for the


A
(2)

index properties.

indi-

cates that

special

test

(compaction, strength, or consolidation) was performed on


soil
a

sample but the index

108

properties were not determined.


However,
the

index properties
a

were reported for


of by

soil

sample

the same
a

type

(as

indicated
a

laboratory number) at

different depth within the same


hole.
If
a

the

index properties

from

soil

sample of the same


from
a

type taken

different
a

hole have been


is

reported,

(3)

reco rded

This flag

is

for statistical

analyses purposes,

i.e.,
A

fre-

quency distributions.

biased

estimate of the frequency of


the

index properties would reif

sult

the

results of

single

test were used more than once.

Therefore when

(2)

or

(3)

was

recorded the data were not used


in
a

frequency distribution.
(2)
is

CARD2

The number
ed

always record-

for this variable.


(see
re-

D2

The identification number

description on Card
co rded
.

1)

is

"l

STATNO

The station number on the cen-

terline or baseline,

used

to

reference the location of the


sample hole,
to
is

recorded here
foot.

the nearest

EXAMPLE:

Station 195^
P_

2h

1 1 I

ft

OFFSET

The distance from the centerline or baseline to the sample

hole

is

recorded here
If

to

the

nearest foot.
has been

the sample

removed from the centhe offset


is

terline,
as

reported

(0000).
is

OFFDI

The direction of the offset

coded
LINE1 LINE2

The alpha-numeric

ine number

description

is

recorded here.
is

The description
fied.

left justi-

The line number has been

broken up into two variables


since the maximum field length

allowable

is

eight, and an

appropriate description could


contain up to ten characters.
SOURCE
The source of the
Is

information

coded.

The names of the

10

consulting firms and of the


Division of Materials and Tests,
ISHC performing
the

labora-

tory tests and/or roadway borings

are recorded.

SAMPTY

The method of removing the

sample from the hole


LABNO
The
to
j

is

coded.

laboratory number assigned


the
i

soil
i

sample

is

left

ust

ed

GRDSUR

The ground surface elevation of


the top of the boring
is

re-

corded to the nearest tenth of


a

foot.

DEPTHT

The depth to the top of the

sample
es
t

is

entered to the neara

tenth of

foot

DEPTHB

The depth to the bottom of the

sample

is

entered to the neara

est tenth of

foot

SPT

The value of the Standard Pene-

tration Test for the depth from

which the sample has been removed


PHYSIO
is

recorded here.
Indiana
is

The State of

divided

into eleven physiographic units,

each being assigned

code.

The

Northern Moraine and Lake Region


is

further subdivided
.

into five

areas

See Figure

SERIES

Soils which have been derived from similar parent materials


and have horizons of similar

origin, character, and arrangement


in
i

the soil
a

profile,
series.

char-

acter ze

soil

The location of each sample

hole
tural

is

found on an agricul-

soil

survey map

(5Mis

The soil

series name

sub-

sequently identified and the


code
is

recorded

The identification of the soil

series from

soil

survey map

requires the determination of


the exact position from which

the sample has been taken.

This

is

very difficult since


in

slight error

scaling can
in

cause an error

the

identifi-

cation of the correct series.

Since the parent material

(see

PARENT below)

is

determined

12

once the soil


the error
is

series

is

found,
if

compounded
is

carelessness
CARD3
The number

not
is

eliminated.

(3)

always re-

corded for this variable.


ID3

The

identification number
.

is

recorded

PARENT

Twelve parent material


have been diana.

areas
In-

identified within

The parent material

types can be
the soil

identified once
is

series

found by re-

ferring to the booklet, "Key


to

So

of

nd iana"

(13).

The soil

series

formed within
is

each parent material

listed

within this booklet for easy


identification.
material
soil
in

The parent
coded.
If

name

is

the

series has been developed

more than one parent materarea,


the parent material

ial

judged to be most characteristic


of the area
in

question

is

re-

ported

HORIZO

simple profile will display

each of three horizons,

13

designated as A,
The typical

B,
in

and

C.

range

depth of

each horizon, along with the

USDA textural classification,


is

given within the specific


soil

agricultural
for

survey report
The depth from

the county.

which the sample was removed


and
the textural
in

description
profile

provided

the soil

borings, will
the horizon

help determine
the sample.
If

for
is

the sample

taken

from

depth

intermediate between two

horizons, the horizon judged


to be most

representative

is

reported.
coded
SLOPE
.

The horizon name

is

The slope

(topographic) class
ser-

characteristic of the soil


ies
is

identified from the soil


in

mapping unit
soil

an agricultural

survey report.

The class

intervals have been coded.


EROS 10

The erosion phase of the soil

series

is

identified from the


a

mapping unit located on


s u

soil

rvey map.

11*1

Codes have been assigned to

each erosion phase.

BEDRKS

If

the depth

to

bedrock

is

less

than

fifteen feet from the


the value will

ground surface,
be
If

reported
a

in

the soil
is
is

survey.

range of values
the average depth

report-

ed, ed

recorda

to the
.

nearest tenth of

foot

BEDRKB

If

bedrock was encountered dur-

ing

drilling or sampling and


in

is

noted

the soil
log,

profile of
informa-

the boring

this

tion
est

is

recorded to the neara

tenth of

foot.

WATERS

The depth to the seasonal

high
the
is

water table
soil

is

reported

in

survey if this depth

within six feet from the


ground surface.
A

range of

values

is

normally reported
is

and the average value

re-

corded to the nearest tenth of


a

foot

WATERC WATERF

The depth to water reported


the drill

in

logs at the completion

15

of drilling

is

recorded for
The
final

the variable WATERC.

or 2k hour
is

reading, whichever
in

reported

the

logs,

is

recorded for WATERF.

Both

depths are rounded to the tenth


of
a

foot
soil

DRAIN

Natural

drainage classes
Once the soil have

have been coded.

series and parent material


been

identified, the drainage


type

characteristic of the soil


can be determined
to Soils

from the "Key


(13)-

of

Indiana"

PERMEA

Numerical

ranges have been

assigned to rate soil


ity and

permeabil-

these have been coded.


in

The range
the soil
soil

permeability for
if

series

found

in

the

survey for the county be-

ing considered.

FLOOD

Those soils subject to flooding


or which have
a

ponded or

perched water condition are in-

dicated

in

the soil
soil

survey.
is

The typical

condition

coded

16

FROST

Three classes of frost potential

have been defined,


high.

i.e.,

low, medium and

These

are based on United States

Department of Agriculture soil


texture classes or the classes
in

the Unified

soil

classifica-

tion system.
ions have been

Further subdivisrequired and

have subsequently been coded.

SHRINK

Qualitative definitions of
shrink-swell
ported
in

behavior are resurveys and

the soil

these have been assigned ranges

which have subsequently been


coded
PH
.

The pH reaction range typical


for the soi
i

series
survey.

given

the so

Each
a

range has been assigned


If
a

code.

wide range of pH values

have been reported, overlapping


the coded

ranges, no
be

informa.

tion will

recorded

GRAD

The percent soil

by weight

passing the following sieve


sizes
is

reported to the nearest

17

ten th of

percent:

GRAD01 GRAD02 GRAD03 GRADOA GRAD05


CARD** Dk
I

1/2 inch inch Ilk inch 1/2 inch 3/8 inch


1

Between GRAD05 and GRAD06,

the

number
CARD*4

{k)

is

reported for

and

the
I

identification

numbe r for

DA

GRAD06 GRAD0 7 GRAD08 GRAD09 GRAD10


SAND SILT CLAY COLLOI DS

No. No. No. No. No.

10

kO

200 270

The percent sand,


and colloids

silt,

clay
re-

by weight are

corded to the nearest tenth of


a

percent.

Percent sand has

presented some problems due to

inconsistencies
by the numerous

in

reporting

consulting
a

firms.

Accordingly,

sub-

program was written to calculate the percent sand based upon

percent passing No.

10

sieve
200

minus percent passing No.


sieve
LL PL
PI

(SAND

GRAD07

GRAD09).

Liquid limits and plastic


limits are reported
to
in

addition

the plasticity

index.

18

Non-plastic soils have been


assigned
a

code

(-010).

The

percentages are rounded to the


nearest tenth.
SL

The shrinkage
to

limit

is

recorded
a

the nearest
If
a

tenth of

per-

cent.

special
a

test has
soil

been performed on

and

sieve analysis and/or index

property test has not been run,


the results

from the sieve


index property
sam-

analysis and/or

determination of the soil


ple with
the

same laboratory
be

number will
this sample.

reported for
See discussion

under REPEAT.
LOSS IG

The percent weight

loss

for the

determination of organic content

(loss on

ignition test)

is

reported to the nearest tenth


of
a

pe rcen

CARD5

The number
te red

(5)

is

always en-

ID5

The identification number

is

recorded
NATMC

The natural

moisture content

is

15

rounded to the nearest tenth


of
a

pe rcen

NATWD NATDD

The natural wet density and


natural
dry density are
re-

corded to the nearest tenth.


The units are pounds per cubic
foot
.

SPECGR

If

the results from

triaxial
re-

or consolidation test are

ported for

soil

sample,
is

the

specific gravity
given. This
is

usually

rounded to the

thousand place.

TEXTUR

The textural

classification as
the soil

reported

in

profile

survey has been coded.


ORGANI

The relative amount of organic

matter (as determined from


loss on

ignition test or visual


is

identification)
COLOR

coded.

The color of the soil

sample
is

based on the moist condition

coded

TESTEF

The type of compaction test and

compactive effort applied to the


sample are recorded
If
in

code.
is

the compactive effort

20

not

typical,

the value

is

re-

corded under the comments


section of the data
Figure
k
.

input

form,

MAXDD MAXWD

Both the maximum dry density


(MAXDD)
and
the maximum wet

density (MAXWD) are recorded


to the nearest

tenth of

pound per cubic foot.

OPTIMC

The optimum moisture content the nearest tenth of


is
a

to

percent

recorded

CBRUN1 CBRUN2 CBRS01 CBRS02

The value of the CBR number

is

recorded to the nearest tenth


of
a

percent.

CBRUNl

and

CBRUN2 represent the unsoaked

values at 100 percent and 95

percent maximum dry density,

respectively.

CBRS01

and

CBRS02 represent the soaked

values at 100 percent and 95 percent maximum dry density,

respectively.
QUSTR
The unconfined compressive

strength to the nearest hundredth of


is
a

ton

per square foot

entered here.

AASHT01
UNIF1
Gl

program to calculate both the

AASHTO (including group index,


Gl)

and Unified classifications

has
in

been written and


Part
IV

included

of the User's Manu-

al.

The names have been coded.

The variable names are AASHTO,


Gl

and

UNIF.

If

one of the variables used to

classify the soil


reported (i.e.,

type was not

liquid limit,

plastic limit, percent passing


No.
k,

No.

10,
it

No.
is

40,

or No.

200 sieve),
to classify

not

possible
with the
sam-

the But

soil
if

computer.

the soil

ple had been visually classified


in

the

laboratory and reprofile

ported within the soil

survey,

provision has been

incorporated to include this

information

in

the data system.

The two variables, AASHT01

and

UNIF1, have been created


this purpose,
and

for

the appro(see

priate code

is

entered

22

Part
not

for

codes)

possible for the computer


the
soil

to generate

classifiinformain

cation name and this


tion has not
the

been reported

laboratory,
be

these two
a

items
(-8)

will will

left blank and

automatically be assigned
to

to these variables

indicate

that

they are unknown.


(6)
is

CARD6
I

The number
The

entered.
is

D6

identification number
.

recorded

QUSTA

The failure strain


to
a

reported

the nearest

hundredth of
if

percent

is

entered

an

unconfined compressive strength


test has been
run.

TYPE

Codes have been assigned to


the various

types of strength

tests

STRENGTH

The failure strength


to

reported
a

the nearest hundredth of

ton

per square foot

is

entered.

STRAIN

The failure strain reported to


the nearest hundredth of
a

percent

is

recorded.

123

CONFPRES

The confining pressure

is

en-

tered to the nearest hundredth


of
a

pound per square

inch.
is

COHES ION ANGLE

If

Mohr failure envelope


in

included
results,

the strength

test

the

intercept to the
a

nearest hundredth of

ton

per

square foot, and the strength


angle to the nearest tenth of
a

degree,

is

recorded.

Strength parameters from totalstress circles will


be

reported

POREPRES

When

saturated strength test

with pore pressure measurements


is

presented

in

subsurface

investigation report, the pore

pressure at failure will

be

recorded to the nearest hun-

dredth of
inch.

pound per square

MAJOR

The major principal

stress at

failure will

be

recorded to
a

the nearest hundredth of


per square foot
EO EF

ton

The

initial

(EO)
is

and

final

(EF)

void ratio

reported to the

nearest thousandth.

124

SO SF

The

initial

(SO)

and

final
is

(SF)

degree of saturation
to

entered
a

the nearest

tenth of

per-

cent.
PO PC

The overburden pressure


and preconsol
(PC)
is
i

(PO)

dat ion pressure

entered to the nearest


a

tenth of
Total
CC CR

ton per square


be

foot.

stresses will

reported
(CC)
is

The compression

index

and

recompression index (CR)

rounded to the nearest thousandth.


CV

The coefficient of consolidation


is

in

square feet per month

rounded to the nearest


t

hund red

125

APPENDIX

USER

MANUAL:

PART

Cod

ng

System

Information which cannot be directly recorded has been


codified to make the system compatible with computerized
storage and retrieval.
code will
and
be used.

Whenever the data are accessed, the


contain the code

The printed output will

the description
in

(value label).

Such

labels are partic-

ularly helpful
included
As
in

documenting output and have therefore been


listed
in

the

SPSS programs

Part

IV.

additional

codes are required

(in

particular, for

SOURCE and SAMPTY), they can be added to the system.

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

COUNTY

DESCRIPTION
Adams
Al len
r t ho omew Benton B ackford Boone

CODE
17. 18. 19. 20.
21
.

DESCRIPTION
Dekalb
awa re Dubois El khart
De
1

2. 3. k. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Ba

10.
1

12. 13.

rown Carrol Cass CI ark Clay CI n ton


B
1 i

Crawford
Da v ess Dea rbo rn
i

U.
15. 16.

22. 232k. 25. 26. 27. 28. 2930.


31

Fayette Floyd
Foun tain
F

ran

in

Decatur

32.

Fulton Gibson Grant Greene ton Ham Hancock Harrison Hendri cks
i 1

126

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
3334. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40.
41
.

COUNTY
I

(Continued)
CODE
6364. 6566. 67. 68. 69. 70.
71

DESCR PT ION
Hen ry Howa rd Hunt ngton
i

DESCRIPTION
Pi ke

Jackson Jasper
Jay

42. 4344. 45. 46. 4748. 4950.


51

Jefferson Jennings Johnson Knox Kosc usko Lagrange


i

Lake

LaPorte Lawrence
Mad son Mar on Marshal Mart n
i
i

52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 5960.


61
.

am Mon roe
M
i
i

Montgomery Morgan Newton Noble


Oh io

Orange Owen
Pa rke

62.

Perry

72. 73. 74. 7576. 7778. 7980. 81. 82. 8384. 85. 86. 87. 88. 8990. 91. 92. 93.

Porter Posey Pulaski Putnam Rando ph Ripley Rush Joseph St Scott


1

Shel by

Spencer Starke Steuben


Su
1
1
i

van

Switzerland Ti ppecanoe
T

pton Union
i

Vanderburgh
Ve rm V go
i

on

Wabas h Warren
Wa
r r
i

ck

Washington Wayne
Wei s Wh te Whi 1 ey State of
1
i

Kentucky

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

D1STRI

DESCRIPTION
Crawf ordsv Fort Wayne Greenf e LaPorte Seymou r V ncennes
1 1

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

127

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

DATEMO
DESCRI PT ION

2. 3k. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

January February March


April May June July Augus

10.
1
1 .

12.

Septembe r October November December


TOWNDI
DESCRI PTION

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

2.

North South
RANGDI

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

DESCRI PTION
East West

2.

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
99

SECTIO

DESCRIPTION
Special Land Grant refer to map of area

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

ASSOC
DESCRI PTION

2.
3. k.
.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10.

Eel-Martinsvi le-Genesee Genesee- Ross-Shoal s Wakeland-Stendal-Haymond Genesee-Shoal s-Eel Haymond-Nol in-Petrol ia Genesee-Eel-Stendal-Pope Huntington-Wheel ing-Markham Huntington-Lindside Haymond-Wakel and Al ida-Delrey-Whi taker
1

23

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
1

ASSOC

(cont nued
i

DESCRI PTI ON

12. 13. \k. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19-

Bono- Ma umee -Warners Chelsea-Hi lsdale-Oshtemo


1

Conrad-Wooten-Weiss Door-Tracy-Quinn
Door- Lyd ck E s ton-Wea Dubois -Otwe
i

20.
21
.

22. 23. 2k. 26. 27. 28. 30. 31. 32. 33. 3*. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. ko.
h\
.

Fox-Martinsvi le-Aluvi Fox-Nineveh-Ockley Fox- Rodman Fu ton- Rimer-Mil ford- Ren sselaer Homer-Sebewa-Gi ford Maumee-Gi ford-Rensselaer Maumee- Newton Martinsvil le-Belmore-Fox Martinsvi le-Whi taker Mahalasvi le-Whi taker Mi ford-Montgomery-Rensselaer McGary Neg ey- Parke Osh temo-B ronson Oakvil le-Plainfield-Tawas Osh temo- Fox Ockl ey-Wes 1 and Ockl ey-Wea
1

1 1

Ock ey- Fox


1

kl. kl. kk. hS.


1*6.

kl. k8. kS. 50.


51
.

53. 5k. 55. 56. 5758. 59. 61. 62. 63.

Plainfield-Brems-Morrocco Plainfield-Tyner-Oshtemo PI ai nf ield-Watseka Plainfield-Chelsea Pat ton-Henshaw Pat ton-Lyles -Hens haw Peoga-Bartle-Hosmer Parke-Miami-Negley Rensselaer-Montgomery Rensselaer-Darroch Rensselaer-Whi taker Vincennes-Zipp-Ross Vol inia-Dickinson Wea-C rane Warsaw-El ston-Fox
Westl and-S eeth
1

Weinbach-Sciotovi le Weinbach-Wheel ing Crosier-Brookston -Corwin B rooks ton-Ode Blount-Morley-Pewamo Blount- Pewamo Riddles-Miami-Crosby
1 1

129

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
64. 6566. 67. 6970. 71. 72. 73. 74. 76. 7778. 7980.
81
.

ASSOC (Continued)
DESCRI PTI ON

Crosby-Brookston El ot t-Markham-Pewamo F ncas t e-Ragsda Hoytsvi le-Nappanee Parr-Miami Pa r r-Corw n


1
i i 1 1 i

sdal Randol ph-H Reesvi le-Ragsdal


i

e
e

Raub-Ragsdale Ragsda e-S de -Hennep Rus se


1 i 1

-Zen a Russe Miami-Metea-Cel ina


1
1
i

82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 8990.


91

Miami-Ososso-Riddles Miami-Crosby-Metea Miami-Russel 1-Fincastle Miami- Fox-M ton Miami- Crosby Miami-Hennepin Miami-Fox-Martinsville
i

Mor ey1 1

oun

Muskingum-Shadeland-Highgap
-Cha Imers Ode Sidel 1-Parr Hennep n- Rodman
i

92. 93. 95. 96. 98. 99. 100.


101
.

Avonburg-Clermont C nc nnat -H ckory Cincinnati-Rossmoyne-Hickory


i

nc nna
i

-Ava

Cincinnati-Ava-Al ford Crider-Hagerstown-Frederick Crider-Frederick Corydon-Weikert-Berks Fai rmount-Swi tzerland


G

102. 103. 04 105. 106. 107. 108. 109.


1 . 1

ray ford
1
i

Lawrence-Bedford-Crider Ti s t- Johnsburg Wellston-Zanesville-Berks Berks-Gi Ipin-Weikert


Zanesvi le-Wel lston Mucks-Peats Alford Bloomfield-Princeton-Ayrshi re Hosme r va-Ava Iva Hosmer-Cinci nnat Lyl es-Ayrsh re-Princeton Princeton-Ayrshire-Bloomfield Princeton- Fox
1
I

10.

111. 112. 113114. 115.


1

16.

HO
VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

REPEAT
DESCRI PTI ON

2. 3.

Original Index Properties Index Properties Repeated from Same Hole Index Properties Repeated from Different Hole

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

OFFDIR
DESCRI PTI ON
Left Right Cen ter

2. 3-

ne

VARIABLE NAME
NOTE:

SOURCE
OEA
is

an open
is
a

CONSULTANT
CODE
1

end agreement: consultants report

DESCRIPTION
Indiana State Highway Commission American Testing and Engineering Company (OEA) American Testing and Engineering Company (Consu tant The H. C. Nutting Company (OEA) The H. C. Nutting Company (Consultant) Pittsburg Testing Laboratory (OEA) Pittsburg Testing Laboratory (Consultant) Westenhoff and Novick, Inc. (OEA) Westenhoff and Novick, Inc. (Consultant) Stokely and Associates (OEA) Stokley and Associates (Consultant) Soil Testing Services, Inc. (OEA) Soil Testing Services, Inc. (Consultant)
1

2. 3-

A.
5.

6.
7. 8.

9-

10.
1 1
.

12. 13. \k. 1516. 17. 18. 19-

Geo-Surveys (OEA) Geo-Surveys (Consultant) Testing Service Corporation (OEA) Testing Service Corporation (Consultant) (OEA) Hurst-Rosche Engineers of Indiana, Inc Inc. Indiana, of Engineers Hurst-Rosche
(Con
s u
1

tan t

20.
21
.

Homer Homer

22. 232k. 25.

Chastain and Associates (OEA) Chastain and Associates (Consultant) L. E. Gregg and Associates (OEA) L. E. Gregg and Associates (Consultant) Harold S. Shaffer (OEA) Harold S. Shaffer (Consultant)
L. L.

131

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

SAMPTY
DESCRI PT ION

2. 3A. 5. 6. 78. 9. 10.


1
1 .

Shelby Tube Split S poon Den son Sampler Continuous Flight Auger Hand Auge r Jar Bag Rock Core Piston Samp e r ow Stem Auger Ho Power Auger
i 1

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

PHYSIO
DESCRI PTION

2. 3. k. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10.
1

12. 13.

Plain Upland Dearborn Muscatatuck Regional Slope Scottsburg Lowland Norman Upland Mitchell Plain Crawford Upland Wabash Lowl and Calumet Lacustrine Section Valparaiso Moraine Kankakee Lacustrine Section Maumee Lacustrine Section Steuben Morainal Section
Ti pton

Till

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
10.

SERIES
DESCRIPTI ON
Ade
Ad
r
i

CODE
150. 160. 170. 180. 190. 200. 210.

DESCRI PTI ON

Bedford
Bell mo re

20. 30. ko. 50. 60. 70. 80. 90. 100.


1

an

Alford Algiers
Al ida

Berks
Bi rds

Alii son Arm es bu rg


i

Aubbeenaubbee
Ava

Avonbu rg
Ayr Ay rsh re Bart e
i

10.

120. 130.

HO.

Baxter

220. 230. 2A0. 250. 260. 270. 280.

oomf e ount Bonn e Bono Boones bo ro Boye r Brady


B
1

Bl

rems

Bronson B rooks ton

132

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
290. 300. 310. 320. 330. 340. 350. 360. 370. 380. 390. 400. 410. 420. 430. 440. 450. 460. 470. 480. 490. 500. 510. 520. 530. 540. 550. 560. 570. 580. 590. 600. 610. 620. 630. 640. 650. 660. 670. 680. 690. 700. 710. 720. 730. 740. 741, 742. 750.

SERIES

(Continued)
CODE
760. 770.
771
.

DESCRI PTION Burg n Burns de Camden Carl isle


i i

DESCRIPTION
Fu
1

ton
1

Cas co Cat in
1

GeneseeLoam S t Genes seeUrban Land


i

Ce

na

Cha me rs Chel sea


1

Cincinnati CI a rence
CI e

rmon

Colyer Conover Conrad Corw n


i

Cory

Corydon Coupee Crane


Cr der
i

Crosby Cros e
i

Cuba Dana Da r roch Del Rey D ck nson Door Dowag ac Dubo s


i
i
i

Dunning Eden
Eden ton Edwa rds
Eel
E
1

k
1

nsonv

El El

iott ston Evansv Fab us Fa rmoun t F ncas 1 Flanagan Fo resman Loam t Fox-S
i 1 1
i i

780. 790. 800. 810. 820. 830. 840. 850. 860. 870. 880. 890. 900. 910. 920. 930. 940. 950. 960. 970. 980. 990. 1000. 1010. 1020. 1030. 1040. 1050. 1060. 1070. 1080. 1090. 100. 1110. 120. 130. 1 140. 1150. 160. 170.
1 1 1 1 1

Gi
G
i

ford
t
1
1

Gilpin
na

enha Granby Gray fo rd Guthrie Hage r s town Hanna


Gl

Has

n s

Haubstadt Haymond Hennepin Hen s haw


cko ry High Gap Hill sdal e Home r Hoopes ton Hosme r Houg h ton Hoy tv
H
i i

Huntington
Hun ts v ona
I I I

pa va va

Jasper Jennings Johnsburg Jules Ka amazoo


1

Ke rs ton

Kings Kokomo Landes

Lawrence Lenawee
L
L
i

nd

de
1
1
i

1 1

80.

nkv Long o
i
i 1 1

Fox-Loam Fox-Urban Land Frede rick

190. 1200. 1210.

Lorenzo Lowe Lucas


1

1
I

">

J J

'

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1220. 1230. 1240. 1250. 1260. 1270. 1280. 1290. 1300. 1310. 1320. 1330. 1340. 1350. 1360. 1370. 1380. 1381 1390. 1400. 1410. 1420. 1430. 1440. 1450. 1460. 1470. 1480. 1490. 1500. 1510. 1520. 1530. 1540. 1550. 1560. 1570. 1580. 1590. 1600. 1610. 1620. 1630. 1640. 1650. 1660. 1670. 1680. 1690.
.

SERIES

(Continued)
CODE
1700 1710 1720 1730 1740 1750 1760 1770 1780 1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 i860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 I960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030

DESCRI PTION
Lyd
Ly
1
i

DESCRI PTI ON
Petrol
i

ck
1 i

es
1
1

Pewamo
Pike P nhook
i

Maha as v Ma rkham
Ma rk and Ma rt nsv
1
i i

11

Mart sco Mas s e Ma ther ton


i

Plainf iel d Piano Pope Princeton Proctor


Q_u
i

Maumee McGary Medway


Mel lott

nn
1

Merm Me tamora
i 1

Me tea
t Mi ami -S M am -U r ban Mi ford sdale Mi Mi ton
i 1 i
1

Ragsda Rahm Rando ph Ra rden Raub Rawson


1

Loam Land

Rees v

Rensselaer Riddles
me r Rob n son
R
i

Mon tor Mon tgome ry Mon tmo renc Mor 1 ey


i

Rockcas Rodman

Ross Ros smoyne

Morocco
Mu ren Mus k ngum Mus sey
i

Runnymede
Rush Russel Clair St Sa ranac
1
.

Nappanee
Neg ey Newa rk
1

Newton
N
i

Saugatuck Sc otov Sebewa


i i

chol son

neveh
1 i

No

n
1

Oakvi le Ockl ey

Octagon
Odel Osh temo Otwel Owos so Pa ms
1 1

2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100


21 10

Sewa rd Shadel and


Sh
i

ps he
1

Shoa Sidel S eeth Sloan Sparta


1

S t a r

ks
1

Parke Parr Patton


Pek
i

Peoga

2120 2130 2140 2150 2160 2170 2180

Steff enda S ck S tone Stoy


1
i

St rol e Sunbu ry

Switzerland

13*

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
2190. 2200. 2210. 2220. 2230. 2240. 2250. 2260. 2270. 2280. 2290. 2300. 2310. 2320. 2330. 2340. 2350. 2360. 2370. 2380.
2390".

SERIES

(continued)
CODE
2440. 2450. 2460. 2470. 2480. 2490. 2500. 2510. 2520. 2530. 2540. 2550. 2560. 2570. 2580. 2590. 2600, 2700 2800 2900 3000 3100 3200 3300 3400

DESCRI PT ION
Swy ge r Sy van
1

DESCR PT ON
I
I

Wea
We ke r We nbach We s ton Wes 1 and
i
i

Tagga Tama

Ted row

Tilsit T ppecanoe
i

To edo
1

ng Whee Wh taker Wh t son


1
i i

Toronto Tracy Trapp s t


i

Troxel Tyne r Un on town


i

Wi bur ette Wi Wi nga t Woodme re


1 1 1

Woo pe r Wynn
1

V V

go

Xen

a
i

ncennes
1
i

Zanes v
Zi pp

Vo

n
1

a
1

Wake and Wallkil Warners


Wa r saw

Bo

row
i

2400. 2410. 2420. 2430.

Wasep Washtenaw
i

Urban Land Land Al uv a Gravel P Gullied Land Strip Mine


1
1
i

Wat seka

Wauseon
PARENT
DESCRI PTI0N
So
i

Cut and Fill Made Land

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

2. 34. 5.

Soils f Soils formed Soils formed Soils f rmed


ti
1 1

rmed rmed

in in in in
i

lacustrine deposits outwash and alluvial deposits eolian sand deposits thick loess deposits oamy Wi scons n age g ac a
i i 1

6.
7.

Soils formed
till

in

clayey Wisconsin age glacial

8. 9-

10.

11.
12.

Soils formed in thin loess deposits over loamy Wi scons n age glacial till s fo rmed in moderately thick loess deposSo oamy Wisconsin age glacial till over t s Soils formed in moderately thick loess deposllinoian till or clayey paleosols t s over formed in residuum from siltstone, shale s So and sandst one bedrock Soils formed in residuum from limestone bedrock Soils formed in residuum from soft calcareous mes tone shale and
i
i

135

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
I

HORI ZO

DESCRI PT ION
A
B

2. 3k.

ROCK
SLOPE
DESCRI PTION
Level or nearly level 0-2 percent slopes 2-6 percent slopes 6-12 percent slopes 12-18 percent slopes 18-25 percent slopes

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

2. 3k. 5. 6. 78.

25-35 percent slopes Greater than 35 percent slopes

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

EROSIO
DESCRI PTI ON

2. 3.

None-s light Eroded (Moderate) Seve re

VARIABLE NAME
-010

WATERC, WATERF
Dry

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

DRAIN
DESCRI PTION

2. 3. A.

Well, Somewhat Excessive, Moderately Wei Somewhat Poorly Poorly and Very Poorly
1

Excessive

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

PERMEA

DESCRIPTION
Ve ry si ow
S
1

NUMERICAL RANGE (inches per hour)


(less than
.

06)

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ow
1

Moderate Moderate Moderate!


Rap
i

y y
d

ow
i

Rap

d
i

Very Rap

(0.06-0.2) (0.2-0.63) (0.63-2.0) (2.0-6.0) (6.0-20.0) (More than 20.0)

136

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

FLOOD
DESCRI PT ION

2.

None Perched,

Ponded,

Hazard, or Common

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

FROST OR SHRINK
DESCRI PTION

2.
34. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9-

Very Low Very Low-Low Low Low-Mode rate Moderate (subject to) Moderate-H gh (severe) H gh High-Very High Very High
i
i

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

PH

DESCRIPTION
Ext reme y acid Very s t rong y acid St rong y acid Med urn acid SI ightly acid Neutral Mildly al ka ne Moderately alkaline S t rong y alkaline Very s t rong y
1

pH

range)

2.

3If.

5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

10.

(Below 4.5) (4-5-5.0) (5-1-5.5) (5.6-6.0) (6.1-6.5) (6.6-7-3) (7.4-7.8) (7.9-8.4) (8.5-9-0) (Above 9-0)

ka

ne
PI

VARIABLE NAME
CODE

LL,

PL AND

DESCRI PTION

-010

Non-pl as
SL

soils

VARIABLE NAM E
CODE
10

DESCRI PTION Non- plastic soils

137

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1

TEXTUR
DESCRI PTI ON
Sand

2. 34. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Sand-Trace Gravel Sand-Little Gravel Sand-Some Gravel


Sand and Gravel Sandy Loam Sandy Loam-Trace Gravel Sandy Loam-Little Gravel Sandy Loam-Some Gravel Sandy Loam and Gravel Loam Loam-Trace Gravel Loam-Little Gravel Loam-Some Gravel Loam and Gravel Si ty Loam Silty Loam-Trace Gravel Si ty Loam-Little Gravel Si ty Loam-Some Gravel Si ty Loam and Gravel Silt Silt-Trace Gravel Silt-Little Gravel S t-Some G rave Silt and Gravel Sandy Clay Loam Sandy Clay Loam-Trace Gravel Sandy Clay Loam-Little Gravel Sandy Clay Loam-Some Gravel Sandy Clay Loam and Gravel Clay Loam Clay Loam-Trace Gravel Clay Loam-Little Gravel Clay Loam-Some Gravel Clay Loam and Gravel Ity ay Loam lty ay Loam-Trace Gravel lty ay Loam- Little Gravel lty ay Loam-Some Gravel lty ay Loam and Gravel Sandy ay Sandy ay-Trace Gravel Sandy ay- Little Gravel Sandy ay-Some Gravel Sandy ay and G rave
1 1 1 1 i

10.
1 1

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19-

20.
21
.

22. 232k. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. ^3. 44. 45. 46. 47, 48. 49.

Si 1 ty Si ty Si lty Si lty
1

ay

ay-Trace Gravel ay-L 1 1 e Grave ay-Some Gravel


i 1

138

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
50.
51

TEXTUR (Continued)
DESCRI PTION
S
i

ty

Clay and Grave

Clay

52. 53. Sk. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 636k. 6566. 6768. 69. 70.
71

Clay-Trace Gravel Clay-L t tl e Gravel Clay-Some Gravel Clay and Gravel Grave Sandy Gravel
i

Gravel y Sand Sand and Gravel Coprogenous Earth tomaceous Earth D Fibr ic Materia Fragmental Material Hemi c Mater ia Ice or Frozen So Marl Muck Mucky Peat
1

Oxide-Protected Weathered Bedrock Partially Decomposed Organic Matter


Peat Sapric Material Undecomposed Organic Matter Unweathered Bedrock Weathered Bedrock, Saprolite, or Grus Comp ex
1
I

72. 737*.

75. 76. 77.

nappl

cab

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1

ORGANI

DESCRIPTI ON
No Organic Material Trace (1-10$ Organic Matter) Little (1.1-20$ Organic Matter) Some (21-35$ Organic Matter) And (36-50$ Organic Matter)

2. 3k. 5.

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1 .

COLOR
DESCRIPTI ON

2. 3. k. 5. 6.

Bluish Gray Bl ack


B B

rown rown s h Yell ow Dark Brown Da rk Bluish Gray


i

139

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
7. 8. 9.

COLOR (Cont nued)


i

DESCRI PTI ON

10.
1 1

12. 13. 14. 1516. 17. 18. 19-

20.
21
.

22. 2324. 25. 26. 27. 28. 2930. 31. 32. 33. 3^. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. ^7. 48. 4950.
51
.

Dark Gray Dark Grayish Brown Dark Green sh Gray Da r k Olive Dark 01 ve Gray Dark Red Dark Reddish Brown Dark Reddish Gray Dusky Red Dark Yellowish Brown G ray s h B rown Green sh Gray Grayish Green G reen Gray Light Bluish Gray Light B rown Light Brown sh Gray Light Greenish Gray Light Gray Light Olive B rown Light 01 ve Gray Light Red Light Reddish Brown Light Yel owi sh Brown 01 ve B rown
i i i i i

01 ive 01 ve 01 ve
i

Gray
Yel
1

ow

Pale B rown Pale G reen Pale 01 ive Pale Red Pale Yel low Pinkish Gray Pink Pinkish White Redd sh Black Reddish B rown
i

Red
.

Reddish Gray
Redd
i

sh

Yel low

52. 5354. 55.

Strong Brown Very Dark Brown Very Dark Gray Very Dark Grayish Brown Very Dark Red Very Pale Brown Very Dusky Red

UO

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
56. 57. 58. 5960.

COLOR (Continued)

DESCRIPTION
Weak Red
Whi Yel Yel Yel
te lowi sh lowi sh low

Brown
Red

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

TESTEF
DESCRI PTION

2.
3.

Standard Procto Standard Procto


Ene rgy

12400 ft-lb/cu.ft. See DIF for Compactive

Standard Procto
G
i

Compactive Energy Not


12^00 ft-lb/cu.ft. 56000 ft-lb/cu.ft. 56300 ft-lb/cu.ft. See DIF for Compactive

ven
i

k. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9.

10.
1
1 .

12.

Modified Procto Mod f ed Procto Mod f ed Procto Modified Procto Energy Mod f ed Procto G ven 15-Blow Compact ion: 15-Blow Compact ion: - B ow Compact ion: Energy 5- B ow Compact ion:
i i
i

Compactive Energy Not


7^00 ft-lb/cu.ft. 7800 ft-lb/cu.ft. See DIF for Compactive

Compactive Energy Not

ven
i

13lit.

15.
16. 17. 18. 19.

20.
21
.

22.

See DIF For Mechanical Knea ding Compactor: Compact ve En ergy Compactive Knea ding Compactor: Mechan ca Energy Not G ven See DIF For Ha rva rd M n a tu re Apparatus: Compactive En ergy Compactive Harvard Mi n a t u re Apparatus: Energy Not Gi ven See DIF for Compactive Energy Hveem Method Compactive Energy Not Given Hveem Method See DIF for Compactive Tab bratory V Energy Compactive Energy Not Given Vibratory Table See DIF for Compactive Compres s on Mac hine: Energy Compactive Energy Not Comp ress on Mac hine: Given
i

HI
AASHTO (AASHT01)
DESCRI PTION

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1

2. 3k. 5. 6. 78. 9.

A-l-A A-1-B A-2-4 A-2-5 A-2-6 A-2-7


A-3 A-A A-5 A-6 A-7-5

10.
11
.

12. 13.

A-7-6
A-8
.

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1

UNI

(UNIF1

DESCRIPTION
CL CH

2. 34. 5. 6.
7-

CL-CH
ML OL

8. 910.
1 1 .

ML-OL ML-CL CL-OL ML-OL OR CL


MH OH

12. 1314. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

20
21
.

MH-OH MH-CH CH-OH MH-OH OR CH ML-MH OL-OH MH-OH OR ML-OL Any combi ination of fine -g ra ned soil CL-ML
i

22. 232k. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

GM GC

GM-GC
SM

SC

SM-SC
GW OR GP' t=G SW OR SP" L*=S

G*-GM G*-GC

\U1

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
31. 32. 33Zh. 35.

UNIF (UNIF1)
DESCRI PTION

(Continued)

G*-GM OR G* S*-SM s*-sc S*-SM OR S* sc


PT

*GW and GP, and SW and SP have been combined and coded as This has been necessary since grain respectively. G and S, size curves are rarely presented within subsurface investigation reports and the gradational characteristics cannot be determined, that is, the uniformity coefficient, Cu, and the coefficients of curvature, Cc.

VARIABLE NAME
CODE
1
.

TYPE
DESCRI PTION

2.
3.

Unconsolidated Undrained Triaxial Test Consolidated Undrained Triaxial Test - Not Saturated Consolidated Undrained Triaxial Test - Sat urated
D
i

k. 5.

rect Shea

Consolidated Drained Triaxial Test

1*3

APPENDIX

USER'

MANUAL:

PART

Formats, Card and Column Locations FORMAT


Fl .0

VARIABLE NAME
CARD1

CARD LOCATION

COLUMN LOCATION
1

COUNTY

F2.0

2-3

HOLENO
SAMPNO
DISTRI

F5.0 F2.0
Fl .0

4-8

9-10
12

DATEYR
DATEMO

F2.0

U-15
17-18
20-21

F2.0 F2.0 F2.0


Fl .0

DATEDA
TOWN

23-24
26

TOWNDI
RANGE
RANGDI

F2.0
Fl .0

28-29
31

SECTIO PROJPR
PROJNO

F2.0
A3

33-3^

36-38 39-43

F5.0
A3

PROJPA
PROJMI

44-46 47-49
51-53

F3.0
A3

CONTPR

}kk

VARIABLE NAME
CONTNO

FORMAT
F5.0
A2
F3 .0
Al

CARD LOCATION

COLUMN LOCATION

5A-53
60-6!

ROADPR ROADNO
ROADSU

62-64
65

BORING

A8

67-74 76-78
80
2
1

ASSOC
REPEAT
CARD2
ID2

F3.0
Fl .0
Fl .0

F9-0 F7-0 FA.O


Fl .0

2
2 2 2

2-10
12-18

STATNO

OFFSET
OFFDI
LINE1
LI
R

20-23
25
27-3*4

A8
A2
F2 .0 F2 .0

2 2
2 2

NE2

35-36 38-39 41-42


44-51

SOURCE

SAMPTY
LABNO

A8
F5.1 F4.1
F4.1
F2 .0

2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3
3

GRDSUR
DEPTHT
DEPTHB
SPT
PHYS 10
SERI ES

53-57
59-62

64-67 69-70
72-73 75-78
1

F2.0
F^.O
Fl .0

CARD3
ID3

F9.0
F2 .0

2-10
12-13

PARENT

1*5

VARIABLE NAME
HORIZO
SLOPE

FORMAT
F1 .0
Fl .0

CARD LOCATION
3

COLUMN LOCATION
15 17

EROSIO
BEDRKS

19
Fl .0
3

21

-23

F3.1

25-28
BEDRKB
F4.1
F2.
1

WATERS

30-31
3

WATERC

Fk.1
F4.
1

33-36
3

WATERF
DRAIN

38-41
3

A3
Fl .0
Fl .0
3

PERMEA
FLOOD FROST

45
3

Fl .0 Fl .0

47
3

49
3

SHRINK
PH

Fl .0

51
3

F2.0
F4.
1

53-54
3

GRADOl

56-59
3

GRAD02 GRAD03

61-64
F4.1
3

F4.1
F4.1 F4.1
Fl .0

66-69
3

GRADOl GRAD05
CARD4
ID4

71-74
3

76-79
3
1

F9-0
F4.
1

2-1
l

GRAD06

12-15
1

GRAD07 GRAD08
GRAD09 GRADIO

F4.1

7-20

Fk.)
Fk.
1

22-25
4

27-30
4 4

F4.1

32-35

\Uf,

VARIABLE NAME
SAND
S
1

FORMAT
Fk.\
Fk.
I

CARD LOCATION
k k k k

COLUMN LOCATION
37-^0 k2-hS

LT

CLAY

F4.1
F4.1
Fk.
1

COLL
LL
PL
PI

52-55

57-60 62-65 67-70


72-7^

Fif.l

h
k k

Fk.

SL

F3.1

LOSSIG
CARD5
ID5

F3.1
Fl .0

h 5
5 5 5 5

76-78
1

F9.0
FA.l
FA.
1

2- 10

NATMC

12-15
1

NATWD NATDD

7-20

F4.1
FA.

22-25

SPECGR

5
5
5

27-30
32-33
35

TEXTUR
ORGANI

F2.0
Fl .0

COLOR

F2.0
F2.0
F4.1 F4.1 F3.1

37-38
ko-k]

TESTEF
MAXDD

5
5
5

hl-hS
48-51

MAXWD OPTIMC
CBRUN1

5 5 5 5 5

53-55 57-59
61-63

F3-1
F3.
1

CBRUN2
CBRSOl

F3.

65-67
69-71

CBRS02

F3.1

I*7

VARIABLE NAME
QUSTR
AASHT01
UNIF1

FORMAT
F3.
1

CARD LOCATION
5

COLUMN LOCATION
73-76 77-78 79-80
1

F2.0

5
5

F2.0
Fl .0

CARD6
1

06

F9-0
FA. 2
Fl .0

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
6

2-10
12-15
17

QUSTA
TYPE

STRENGTH
STRAIN

FA.
FA. 2
FA.

18-21

22-25

CONFPRES
COHES ION

26-29
30-32
33-35

F3.2
F3.1
FA. FA. 2 FA.
FA.
3

ANGLE
POREPRES

36-39
A0-A3

MAJOR
EO EF

A5-A8
A9-52

6 6
6

SO SF
PO
PC

FA.l
FA.l
FA.
2

53-56
57-60

6 6 6
6 6

61-6A

FA. 2

65-68
69-72
73-76

CC

FA.
.

CR
CV

FA. FA.

77-80

T.8

APPENDIX

USER'S MANUAL:

PART

IV

Computer Programs
The computer programs are used for data management and

manipulation.

All

programs are written for use on the CDC

6500 system at Purdue University.

H9

PROGRAM NUMBER

THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM WILL ADD MEW DATA TO THE EXISTING DATA FILE.

12345. ABC, CM15000, L1OO00. T25. P20, TU8000, TC200, TP1 PASS= REQUEST (SO I LDAT. 1414, UP=. WRITE) REWIND (SOILDAT) SKIPF, SOILDAT, 1. BKSPR, SOILDAT, 1. COPYBF,, SOILDAT. 7/8/9

DATA CARDS

6/7/8/9

150

PROGRAM NUMBER 2

INPUT DATA FOR CARD PUNCHINC THE PURPOSE OF THIS PROGRAM IS TO CHECK NEW WITH THE FOLLOWING -AUDIT* DETECTED ONLY THOSE ERRORS WHICH CAN BE ERRORS PROGRAM WILL BE REPORTED. _

12345, ABC, CM77000,L10000.T25,P20,TU4000.

PASS* -SOIL DATA FOR DAYBAN. (SPSS) COMMON SPSS. 7/8/8


RUN NAME UARIABLE LIST

THE

STATE OF

INDIANA*

INPUT FORMAT

COMMENT
N OF CASES IF
IF IF

IF

**** SOIL DATA CHECK DATEDA. TOWN, , DATEYR, DATEMO. DISTRI SAMPNO, HOLENO. COUNTY, CARD1, PROJMI CONTPR. PROJPA. PROJNO, TOWNDI . RANGE, RANGDI SECTIO, PROJPR, CARD2, ID2, REPEAT, ASSOC, BORING, ROADSU, CONTNO, ROADPR, ROADNO, LABNO, GRDSUR, SAMPTY, SOURCE, LINE2, , LINE1 OFFDIR, OFFSET, STATNO, DEPTHT, DEPTHB. SPT, PHYSIO, SERIES, CARD3, ID3, PARENT, HORIZO. SLOPE, EROSIO, BEDRKS, FROST, SHRINK, PH, BEDRKB, WATERS, WATERC, WATERF, DRAIN, PERMEA, FLOOD, SILT. CLAY, SAND, GRAD01 TO GRAD05,CARD4,ID4,GRAD0S TO GRAD10, SPECGR, NATDD, NATWD, NATMC. COLL, LL, PL, PI , SL, LOSSIG, CARDS, ID5, CBRUN2, CBRUN1 OPTIMC, MAXWD, MAXDD, TESTEF, TEXTUR, ORGANI, COLOR, IDE, CARDS. , UNIF1 AASHTOl QUSTR, CBRS02, CBRSOl , QUSTA, TYPE. STRENGTH, STRAIN, CONFPRES, COHESION, ANGLE, POREFRES, MAJOR, EO, EF, SO, SF, PO, PC, CC, CR, CU (F1.0.F2.0,F5.0,F2=0,1X,F1.0.1X.F2.0,1X.F2.0.1X,F2.0.1X,F2.0, 1X,F1.0.1X,F2.0. 1X.F1.0,1X,F2.0,1X,A3,F5.0,A3,F3.0.1X.A3. .0, 1FS.0. IX, F5.0. 1XA2,F3.0,A1, 1X.A8. 1X.F3.0, 1X.F1.0/F1 IX. A8, 1X.F2.0, 1X.F2.0. 1X,F1.0,1X.AS,A2. F7.0, 1X.F4.0. ,1,1X,F4.1,1X.F4.1.1X.F2.0.1X.F2.0.1X,F4.0/F1.0.F3.0,1X, F5. IX. 1X.F2.1, F2.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F3.1, 1X.F4.1. 1X.F1.0. 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F2.0.1X,F4.1,1X,F4.1,1X,F4.1.1X,F4.1.1X.F4.1/F1.0.F9.0.1X, 1X.F4.1, F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F3.1/ 1X.F3.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X,F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, F1.0,FS.O,1X,F4.1,1X,F4.1,1X,F4.1,1X,F4.3,1X.F2.0.1X,F1.0,1X, F2.0,1X,F2.0,1X,F4.1.1X,F4.1,1X,F3.1,1X,F3.1,1X,F3.1.1X,F3.1. 1X.F3.1. 1X,F4.2,F2.0,F2.0/F1.0.F9.0,1X. F4.2, 1X,F1.0,3F4.2,F3.2,F3.1.2F4.2,1X, 2F4.3,2F4.1,2F4.2,2F4.3,F4.2) THE NUMBER OF CASES (N OF CASES) WILL COINCIDE WITH RUN THE NUMBER OF SAMPLES BEING UERIFIED IN A PARTICULAR 70 (CARD1 NE 1 OR CARD2 NE 2 OR CARD3 NE 3 OR CARD4 NE 4 OR CARD5 NE 5 OR CARDS NE S) REPORT. =1 REPORT. =2 (ID2 NE ID3 OR ID3 NE ID4 OR ID4 NE ID5 OR IDS NE IDS) GT 12 DATEMO OR LT SO) OR (DISTRI GT 6 OR (DATEYR GT 78 GT 15 OR DATEDA GT 31 OR TOWN GT 38 OR TOWNDI GT 2 OR RANGE OR RANGDI GT 2 OR ASSOC GT 11G OR REPEAT GT 3) REPORT. =10 (OFFDIR GT 3 OR SOURCE GT 25 OR SAMPTY GT 11 OR PHYSIO GT 13
. ,
,

151

IF IF IF IF IF IF

IF

IF IF

IF
IF
IF IF

IF

IF IF IF

OR SERIES GT 3400) REPORT. =20 (OFFDIR EQ 3 AND OFFSET ME 0) REPORT. =21 AMD LE 10 AMD ORGAMI ME 2) REPORT. =22 (LOSSIG GT (LOSSIG GT 10 AMD LE 20 AMD ORGAMI ME 3) REPORT. =23 (LOSSIG GT 20 AMD LT 35 AMD ORGAMI ME 4) REPORT. =24 (LOSSIG GT 35 AMD ORGANI ME 5) REPORT. =25 (PARENT GT 12 OR HORIZO GT 3 OR SLOPE GT 8 OR EROS 10 GT 3 OR DRAIN GT 4 OR PERMEA GT 7 OR FLOOD GT 2 OR FROST GT 9 OR SHRINK GT 5 OR PH GT 10) REPORT. =30 (GRADOl GT 100 OR GRAD02 GT 100 OR GRAD03 GT 100 OR GRAD04 GT 100 OR GRAD05 GT 100 OR GRADOG GT 100 OR GRAD07 GT 100 OR GRAD08 GT 100 OR GRAD09 GT 100 OR GRAD10 GT 100 OR SAND GT 100 OR SILT GT 100 OR CLAY GT 100 OR COLL GT 100) REPORT. =35 (LL GT 130 OR PL GT 100 OR PI GT 85 OR SL GT 55 OR LOSSIC GT GO) REPORT. =40 (NATMC GT 125 OR NATUD GT 140 OR NATDD GT 135 OR SPECGR GT 2.79 OR TEXTUR GT 77 OR ORGANI GT 5 OR COLOR GT GO OR TESTEF GT 22 OR MAXDD GT 135 OR MAXUD GT 150 OR OPTIMC GT 40 OR CBRUN1 GT 25 OR CBRUN2 GT 25 OR CBRSOl GT 45 OR CBRS02 GT 25 OR OUSTR GT 4.5 OR AASHTOl GT 13 OR UNIF1 GT 35) REPORT. =50 (QUSTA GT 20 OR TYPE GT 4 OR STRENGTH GT 11 OR STRAIN GT 20 OR COHESION GT 1.5 OR ANGLE GT 40) REPORT. =55 (EO GT 1.5 OR EF GT 1.0 OR SO GT 100 OR SF GT 110 OR PO GT 2 OR PC GT 7.0 OR CC GT .El OR CR GT .5) REPORT. =G0 (DEPTHT GT DEPTHB) REPORT. =70 (GRADOl LT GRAD02 OR GRAD02 LT GRAD03 OR GRAD03 LT GRPD04 OR GRAD04 LT GRAD05 OR GRAD05 LT GRADOG OR GRADOG LT GRAD07 OR GRAD07 LT GRAD08 OR GRAD08 LT GRAD09 OR GRAD09 LT GRAD10) REPORT. =80 (LL NE -1 AND PL ME -1 AND PI NE -1 AND ((PI ME (LL-PD) OR (PL GT LL))) REPORT. =90 (NAXDD GT MAXUD) REPORT. =100 (CBRUN1 LT CBRUN2 OR CBRSOl LT CBRS02) REPORT. =200 (EO LT EF OR SO GT SF OR PO GT PC OR CC LT CR) REPGRT.=300

READ INPUT DATA

DATA CARDS

FINISH G'7/8/9

152

PROGRAM NUMBER 3

IN CONJUNCTION THE FOLLOUING IS A LISTING OF THE SPSS PROGRAM BEING USED OF RAU LISTING A MANIPULATIONS-INCLUDING DATA FOR SYSTEM SPSS THE UITH PROCEDURES. SPSS THE OF ANY DATA AND THE PROCESSING OF DATA WITH

FILE NAME RUN NAME UARIABLE LIST

PROG

INPUT MEDIUM INPUT FORMAT

UAR LABELS

'*** SOIL DATA FOR THE STATE OF INDIANA COUNTY, HOLENO, SAMPNO, DISTRI DATEYR, DATEMO, DATEDA, TOWN. TOWNDI RANGE, RANGDI. SECT 10. PROJPR, PROJNO. PROJPA. PROJMI CONTPR. CONTNO. ROADPR. ROADNO, ROADSU. BORING. ASSOC, REPEAT, STATNO. OFFSET, OFFDIR, LINE1 , LINE2. SOURCE. SAMPTY, LABNO, GRDSUR, DEPTHT, DEPTHB, SPT. PHYSIO, SERIES, PARENT, HORIZO, SLOPE, EROSIO. BEDRKS. BEDRKB, WATERS, WATERC. WATERF. DRAIN. PERMEA. FLOOD. FROST. SHRINK. PH. GRAD01 TO GRAD10. SAND. SILT, CLAY, COLL, LL, PL, PI. SL.LOSSIG. NATMC. NATWD. NATDD, SPECGR, TEXTUR, ORGANI COLOR, TESTEF, MAXDD. MAXWD, OPTIMC, CBRUN1 CBRUN2, CBRS01 , CBRS02, QUSTR, AASHT01 . UNIF1, QUSTA, TYPE, STRENGTH, STRAIN, CONFPRES, COHESION, ANGLE, POREPRES, MAJOR, EO, EF, SO. SF, PO. PC. CC, CR, CU S0IL1 (1X,F2.0,F5.0,F2.0,1X.F1.0,1X,F2.0,1X,F2.0, 1X,F2.0, 1X.F2.0. 1X.F1.0, 1X.F2.0. 1X,F1.0,1X.F2.0. IX, A3,F5.0, A3.F3.0. IX, A3, F5.0, 1X,A2,F3.0,A1, IX. A8. 1X.F3.0, 1X.F1.0/ 11X.F7.0, 1X.F4.0, 1X.F1.0, IX, A8.A2, 1X,F2.0, 1X.F2.0, IX, A8, 1X.F4.1, 1X,F4.1. 1X.F2.0, 1X.F2.0, 1X.F4.0/ 1X.F5.1, 11X,F2.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0. 1X.F1.0, 1X.F3.1. 1X.F4.1. 1X.F2.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0. 1X.F1.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F2.0. 1X,F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1/ UX, F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X,F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1. 1X.F4.1. 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1. 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F3.1. 1X.F3.1/ 11X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1, 1X.F4.1. 1X.F4.3, 1X.F2.0, 1X.F1.0, 1X.F2.0. 1X.F2.0. 1X.F4.1. 1X.F4.1. 1X.F3.1. 1X.F3.1, 1X.F3.1, 1X.F3.1. 1X.F3.1. 1X.F4.2,F2.0.F2.0/ 11X F4.2, IX. Fl.O, 3F4.2.F3.2. F3.1.2F4.2, 1X.2F4.3,2F4.1,2F4.2,2F4.3,F4.2) COUNTY COUNTY/HOLENO HOLE NUMBER/SAMPNO SAMPLE NUMBER/DATEYR YEAR TAKEN FROM HOLE/DATEMO MONTH TAKEN FROM HOLE/DATEDA DAY TAKEN FR OM HOLE/TOWN TOWNSHIP/TOWNDI TOWNSHIP-DIRECTION/RANGE RANGE/ RANGDI RANGE-DIRECTION/SECTIO SECTION/ PROJPR PROJECT NUMBER-PREFIX/PROJNO PROJECT NUMBER/ PROJPA PROJECT NUMBER-PARENTHESIS/PROJMI PROJECT NUMBER-MILE/ CONTPR CONTRACT NUMBER-PREFIX/ CONTNO CONTRACT NUMBER/ DISTRI DISTRICT/ ROADPR ROAD NUMBER-PREFIX/ROADNO ROAD NUMBER/ ROADSU ROAD NUMBER-SUFFIX/BORING BORING NUMBER/ASSOC SOIL ASSOCIA T I ON/REPEAT DATA REPEAT/ STATNO STATION NUMBER/OFFSET OFFSET/OFFDIR OFFSET-DIRECTION/ LINE1 TO LINE2=LINE NUMBER/SOURCE SOURCE OF INFORMATION/ SAMPTY SAMPLE TYPE/LABNO LAB NUMBER/ GRDSUR GROUND SURFACE ELEUATION/DEPTHT DEPTH TO TOP OF SAMPLE/ DEPTHB DEPTH TO BOTTOM OF SAMPLE/PHYSIO PHYSIOGRAPHIC UNIT/ SPT N UALUE OF SPT/ PARENT PARENT MATERIAL/ SERIES SOIL SERIES NAME/
. , . ,

153

RECODE UALUE LABELS

EROSIO EROSION CLASS/ SLOPE SLOPE CLASS/ HORIZQ HORIZON/ BEDPKB DEPTH TO BEDROCK-BO SURUEY/ BEDROCK-SOIL BEDRKS DEPTH TO RING LOG/WATERS DEPTH-SEASONAL HIGH UATER TABLE-SOIL SURUEY/ WATERC WATER DEPTH AT COMPLETION/WATERF WATER DEPTH FINAL OR 24 H OURS/DRAIN NATURAL SOIL DRAINAGE/PERMEA PERMEABILITY/ FLOOD FLOODING POTENTIAL/ FROST POTENTIAL FROST ACTION/ SHRINK SHRINK-SWELL POTENTIAL/ PH REACTION-PH/ GRAD01 PERCENT PASSING 1 1-2** SIEUE/ GRAD02 PERCENT PASSING 1** SIEUE/ GRAD03 PERCENT PASSING 3-4** SIEUE/ GRAD04 PERCENT PASSING 1-2** SIEUE/ GRAD05 PERCENT PASSING 3-8** SIEUE/ GRADOS PERCENT PASSING NO. 4 SIEUE/ GRAD07 PERCENT PASSING NO. 10 SIEUE/ GRAD08 PERCENT PASSING NO. 40 SIEUE/ GRAD09 PERCENT PASSING NO. 200 SIEUE/ GRAD10 PERCENT PASSING NO. 270 SIEUE/ SAND PERCENT SAND/ SILT PERCENT SILT/CLAY PERCENT CLAY/COLL PERCENT COLLOIDS/ PI PLASTICITY INDEX/ PL PLASTIC LIMIT/ LL LIQUID LINIT/ LOSSIG LOSS ON IGNITION/ SL SHRINKAGE LIMIT/ NATWD NATURAL WET DENSITY/ NATMC NATURAL MOISTURE CONTENT/ SPECGR SPECIFIC GRAUITY/ NATDD NATURAL DRY DENSITY/ ORGAN I ORGANIC CONTENT/ TEXTUR TEXTURAL CLASSIFICATION/ COLOR COLOR/ MAXDD MAXIMUM DRY DENSITY/ TESTEF TEST-EFFORT IDENTIFIER/ OPTIMC OPTIMUM MOISTURE CONTENT/ MAXWD MAXIMUM WET DENSITY/ CBRUN1 UNSOAKETJ CBR-100 MAXDD/ CBRUN2 UNSOAKED CBR-95 MAXDD/ CBRSOl SOAKED CBR-100 MAXDD/CBRS02 SOAKED CBR-35 MAXDD/ QUSTR UNCONFINED COMPRESSIUE STRENGTH-TSF/ QUSTA FAILURE STRAIN-PERCENT/ TYPE TYPE OF STRENGTH TEST/STRENGTH FAILURE STRENGTH/ STRAIN FAILURE STRAIN/CONFPRES CONFINING PRESSURE/ ANGLE FAILURE ANGLE/POREPRES PORE PRESSURE AT FAILURE/MAJOR MAJOR PRINCIPAL STRESS/EO INITIAL UOID RATIO/EF FINAL UOID RATIO/SO IN ITIAL DEGREE OF SATURATION/SF FINAL DEGREE OF SATURATION/PO OUERB URDEN STRESS/PC PRECONSOLIDATION PRESSURE/CC COMPRESSION INDEX/ CR RECOMPRESSION INDEX/CU COEFFICIENT OF CONSOLIDATION AASHT01.UNIF1 (BLANK=S33S)/ SAND (BLANK=933) COUNTY (-0) UNKNOWN (Ol)ADAMS (02) ALLEN (03) BARTHOLOMEW (4) BENTON (OS)BLACKFORD (OG)BOONE (07)BROWN (08)CARROLL (03)CASS (lO)CLARK (ll)CLAY (12)CLINT0N (13)CRAWF0RD (14)DAUIESS (15)DEARB0RN (lG)DECATUR (17)DEKALB (18)DELAWARE (13)DUB0IS (20)ELKHART (2DFAYETTE (22)FL0YD (23)F0UNTAIN (24)FRANKLIN (25)FULT0N (2E) GIBSON (27) GRANT (28) GREENE (23) HAMILTON (30) HANCOCK (3DHARRIS0N (32)HENDRICKS (33)HENRY (34)H0WARD (35) HUNTINGTON (3G) JACKSON (37) JASPER (38) JAY (33) JEFFERSON (40) JENNINGS (4DJ0HNS0N (42)KN0X (43)K0SCIUSK0 (44)LAGRANGE (45)LAKE (4S)LAP0RTE (47)LAWRENCE (48)MADIS0N (43)MARI0N (50)MARSHALL (5DMARTIN (52)MIAMI (53)M0NR0E (54) MONTGOMERY (55)M0RGAN (5S)NEWT0N (57)N0BLE (58)0HI0 (53)0RANGE (GO)OWEN (GDPARKE (G2)PERRY (G3)PIKE (G4)P0RTER (G5)P0SEY (G6)PULASKI (G7)PUTNAM (G8)RAND0LPH (G3)RIPLEY (70)RUSH (7DST. JOSEPH (72)SC0TT (73)SHELBY (74)SPENCER (75)STARKE (7G)STEUBEN (77)SULLIUAN (78) SWITZERLAND (73) TIPPECANOE (80)TIPTON (8DUNI0N (82)UANDERBURGH (83)UERMILLI0N (84)UIGO (85)WABASH (8G)WARREN (87)WARRICK (88)WASHINGT0N (83)WAYNE (90)WELLS (3DWHITE (32)WHITLEY (93)STATE OF KENTUCKY/

15*

DISTRI (-O)UNKNOWN ( 1 )CRAWFORDSUILLE (2)F0RT WAYNE (3)GREENFIELD (4)LAP0RTE (5)SEVnOUR (S)UINCENNES/ DATEMO (-O)UNKNOWN (Ol)JANUARY (02)FEBRUARY (03)MARCH (04)APRIL (05)MAY (OG)JUNE (07)JULY (08)AUGUST (09)SEPTEMBER (lO)OCTOBER (ll)NOUEMBER (12) DECEMBER/ TOWNDI (-0) UNKNOWN (l)NORTH (2)S0UTH/ RANGDI (-O)UNKNOWN (l)EAST (2)WEST/ ASSOC (-0) UNKNOWN (1) EEL-MARTINSU-GENESSE (2) GENESEE-ROSS-SHOALS (3) WAKELAN-STEN DA-HAYMO (4) GENESEE-SHOALS-EEL (5) HAYMON-NOLIN-PETROLI (6) GENESE-EEL-STEND-POPE (7) HUNTING-WHEELI-MARKH (8) HUNTINGTON-LINDSIDE (9) HAYMOND-WAKELAND (10) ALIDA-DELREY-WHITAKE (11) BONO-MAUMEE -WARNERS (12) CHELS-HILLSDAL-OSHTE (13) CONRAD-UOOTEN-WEISS (14) DOOR-TRACY-QUINN (15) DOOR-LYDICK (IS) ELSTON-WEA (17) DUBOIS-OTU ELL (18) FOX-MART I NSU I LL-ALUU (13) FOX-NINEUEH-OCKLEY (20) FOX-RO DMAN (21) FULT-RIM-MILF-RENSSEL (22) HOMER-SEBEWA-GILFORD (23) MA UME-GILFOR-RENSSEL (24) MAUMEE-NEWTON (2S) MARTINSUIL-BELMO-FOX (27) MARTINSUILLE-WHITAKE (28) MAHALASUILL-WHITAKER (30)MILF-MONT GOM-RENSSEL (31) MCGARY (32) NEGLEY-PARKE (33) OSHTEMO-BRONSON (34) OAKUIL-PLAINFIE-TAWA (35) OSHTEMO-FOX (35) OCKLEY-WESTLAND (39) PAILNFIE-BREM-MORROC (40) P (37) OCKLEY-WEA (38) OCKLEY-FOX LAINFIE-TYNER-OSHTE (41) PLAINFIELD-WATSEKA (42) PLAINFIELD-CHELS EA (43) PATTON-HENSHAW (44) PATTON-LYLES-HENSHAW (45) PEOGA-BARTL E-HOSMER (4B) PARKE-MIAMI-NEGLEY (47) RENSSELAER-MONTGOMER (48) RENSSELAER-DARROCH (4S) RENSSELAER-WHITAKER (50) UINCENNE5-ZIPP-R OSS (51) UOLINIA-DICKINSON (53) WEA-CRANE (54) WARSAW-ELSTON-fOX (55) WESTLAND-SLEETH (56) WEINBACH-SCIOTOUILLE (57) UEINBACH-WHEE LING (58) CROSIER-BROOKSTON (59) BROOKSTO-ODELL-CORWI (SI) BLOUNT -MORLEY-PEWAMO (B2) BLOUNT-PEWAMO (63) RIDDLES-MIAMI-CROSBY (64) CROSBY-BROOKSTON (65) ELLIOT-MARKHAM-PEWAM (66) FINCASTLE-RAGSDAL E (67) HOYTSUILLE-NAPPANEE (69) PARR-MIAMI (70) PARR-CORWIN (71) RANDOLPH-HILLSDALE (72) REESUILLE-RAGSDALE (73) RAUB-RAGSDALE (74) RAGSDALE-SIDELL (76) RUSSELL-HENNEPIN (.77) RUSSELL-XENIA (80) MIAMI-C (79) MIAMI-OSOSSO-RIDDLES (78) MIAMI-METEA-CELINA ROSBY-METEA (81) MIA-RUSSEL-FINCASTLE (82) MIAMI-FOX-MILTON (83) MIAMI-COSBY (84) MI AM I -HENNEPIN (85) MIAMI-FOX-MARTINSUIL (86) MO RLEY-BLOUNT (87) MUSKIN-SHADELA-HIGHG (88) ODELL-CHALMERS (89) SI DELL-PARR (90) HENNEPIN-RODMAN (91) AUONBURG-CLERMONT (92) CINCIN NATI-HICKORY (93) CINCINNA-ROSSMO-HICK (95) CINCINNATI-AUA (96) C INCINNAT-AUA-ALFORD (98) CRID-HAGERSTO-FREDER (99) CRIDER-FREDERI CK (100) CORYDON-WEIKERT-BERK (101) FAIRMOUNT-SWITZERLAN (102) GR AYFORD (103) LAWRENC-BEDFORD-CRID (104) TILSIT- JOHNSBURG (105) WE LLST-ZANESUIL-BERK (106) BERKS-GILPIN-UEIKERT (107) ZANESUILLE-WE LLSTON (108) MUCKS-PEATS (109) ALFORD (110) BLOOMFI-PRINCE-AYRSH (111) HOSMER (112) IUA-AUA (113) HOSMER-CINCINNAT-IUA (114) LYLE -AYRSHIR-PRINCET (115) PRINCET-AYRSH-BLOOMF (116) PRINCETON-FOX/ REPEAT (DORIGINAL DATA (2)DATA FROM SAME HOLE (3)DATA-DIFFERENT HOLE/ OFFDIR (-O)UNKNOWN (l)LEFT (2)RIGHT (3)CENTERLINE/ SOURCE (-O)UNKNOWN (ODSTATE (02)ATEC-0EA (03)ATEC-CONSULTANT (04)NUTTING-OEA (05)NUTTING-CCNSULTANT (06)PITTSBURG TEST-OEA (07)PITTSBURG TEST-CONS (08)WESTENHOFF-NOU-OEA (09)WESTENHOFF-MOU-CONS (lO)STOKLEY-OEA (ll)STOKLEY-CONSULTANT (12)STS-0EA ( 13)STS-C0NSULTANT (14)GE0 SURUEYS-OEA (15)GE0 SURUEYS-CONSULT. (lS)TESTING SERUICEOEA (17)TESTING SERU ICE-CONSULT. (18)HURST-R0SHE-0EA (19)HURST-R0 SHE-CONSULT. (20)CHASTAIN-OEA (2DCHASTAIN-C0NSULTANT

155

(22)GREGG-0EA (23) GREGG-CONSULTANT (24)SHAFER-0EA ( 25 SHAFER-CONS ULTANT/ SAMPTY (-O)UNKNOWN (Ol)SHELBY TUBE (02)SPLIT SPOOM (03)DENISON SAMPLER (04)COMT. FLIGHT AUGER (05)HAND AUGER (OG)JAR (07)BAG (08)ROCK CORE (09)PISTON SAMPLER (lO)HOLLOU STEM AUGER (ll)POWER AUGER-MACHINE' PHYSIO (-O)UNKNOWN (l)TIPTON TILL PLAIN (2)DEARB0RN UPLAND (3)MUSCATATUCK REGIONAL SLOPE (4)SC0TTSBURG LOULAND (5)N0RMAN UPLAND (G)MITCHELL PLAIN (7)CRAWF0RD UPLAND (8)WABASH LOWLAND (9)CALUMET LACUSTRINE ( 10 VALPARAISO MORAINE (ll)KANKAKEE LACUSTRINE (12)MAUMEE LACUSTRINE (13)STEUBEN MORAINA L/ SERIES (-O)UNKNOWN (10)ADE (20)ADRIAN (3OALF0RD (40)ALGIERS (80)AUBBEENAUBBEE (GO)ALLISON (70)ARMIESBURG (50)ALIDA (130)BARTLE ( 120)AYRSHIRE (lOO)AUONBURG (HO)AYR O0)AUA (170)BERKS (150)BEDF0RD U40)BAXTER ( 1SO)BELLMORE (210)B0NNIE (190)BLO0MFIELD (20O)BLOUNT (180)BIRDS (250)BRADY (230)BOONESBORO (240)BOYER (220)BONO (290)BURCIN (270)BRONSON (280)BROOKSTON (260)BREMS (330)CASCO (320)CARLISLE (300)BURNSIDE (310)CAMDEN (370)CHELSEA (340)CATLIN (350)CELINA (3G0)CHALMERS (410)C0LYER (390)CLARENCE (380 CINCINNATI C 400) CLERMONT (4G0)CORYD (440)CORUIIN (450) CORY (420)CONOUER (430) CONRAD (500)CROSBY (4S0)CRIDER (470)COUPEE (480)CRANE ON (540)DARROCH (550)DEL RAY (510)CROSIER (520)CUBA (530)DANA (GOO)D (580)DOWAGIAC (590)DUBOIS (5G0)DICKINSON (570)DOOR (G40)EEL (GIO)EDEN (G20)EDENTON (G30) EDWARDS UNNING (680)EUANSUILLE (G70)ELSTON (G50)ELKINSONUILLE (GGO)ELLIOTT (710)FINCASTLE (720)FLANAGAN (G90)FABIUS (700)FAIRMOUNT (730)FORESMAN (740)FOX-SILT LOAM (741 )FOX-LOAM (742) FOX-URBAN LAN D (750 FREDERICK (7G0)FULTON (770)GENESEE-SILT LOAM (77DGENESEEURBAN LAND (780)GILFORD (790)GILPIN (800)GINAT (810)GLENHALL (840)GUTHRIE (850) HAGERSTOWN (820)GRANBY (830)GRAYFORD (880)HAUBSTADT (890)HAYMOND (900) (8G0)HANNA (870)HASKINS (930)HIGH GAP (940)HIL HENNEPIN (910)HENSHAW (920)HICKORY (970)HOSMER (980)HOUGHTO (950) HOMER (9G0)HOOPESTON LSDALE (1020) (990)HOYTUILLE (lOlO)HUNTSUILLE N (1000) HUNTINGTON (1050)JASPER ( 10G0) JENNINGS IONA (1030)IPAUA (1040)IUA (1090)KALAMAZOO (HOO)KERSTON (1070)JOHNSBURG (1080)JULES (lllO)KINGS (1120)K0K0MO (1130)LANDES (1140)LAWRENCE (1150)LENAWEE (1170)LINKUILLE (1180)LONGLOIS (HGO)LINDSIDE (1190)LORENZO (1200)L0WELL ( 1220)LYDICK (1230) (1210)LUCAS LYLES (1240)MAHALASUILLE ( 12GOMARKLAND ( 1250)MARKHAM (1300)MATHER (1270)MARTINSUILLE (1280)MARTISCO (1290)MASSIE TON (1310)MAUMEE ( 1340)MELLOTT (1320)MCGARY (1330)MEDWAY (1350)MERMILL (13G0)METAM0RA (1370)METEA ( 1380)MIAMI-SILT L OAM (138DMIAMI-URBAN LAND (1390)MILF0RD (1410)MILTON (1400)MILLSDALE ( 1420)MONITOR (1430) MONTGOMERY (1440)MONTMORENCI (1450)MORLEY (14G0)MOROC CO (1470)MUREN (1480)MUSKINGUM (1490)MUSSEY ( 1500)NAPPANE E (1510)NEGLEY (1520)NEWARK (1530)NEWTON (1540)NICHOLSON (1550)NINEUEH (15G0)NOLIN (1570)OAKUILLE (1580)0CKLEY (1590)OCTAGON (lGOO)ODELL ( 1G10)OSHTEMO (1G20)OTWELL (1G30)OWOSSO (1G40)PALMS (lGGO)PARR (1G70)PATT (1G50)PARKE (1G80)PEKIN ON (1G90)PEOGA (1700)PETROLIA (1710)PEWAMO (1720)PIKE (1730)PINHOOK (1?40)PLAINFIELD (1750)PLANO (17G0)POPE (1770)PRINCET0N (1780)PROCTOR (1790)QUINN (1800)RAGSDALE (1810)RAHM (1820) RANDOLPH (1830)RARDEN
)

156

1870 )RENSSEl_AER ( 1860)REESUILLE (1850)RAWSON (1840)RAUB ( 1910 JROCKCASTLE ( 1900)ROBINSON (1890)RIMER (1880)RIDDLES 1950)RUNNYMEDE 1940)ROSSMOYNE ( (1930)ROSS (1920)R0DMAN 1990)SARANAC (1980)ST. CLAIR (1970)RUSSELL (19GO)RUSH (2030 )SEUAPD (2020)SEBEWA (2010)SCIOTOUILLE (2000)SAUGATUCK (2070)SIDELL (20S0)SHOALS (2050)SHIPSHE (2040)SHADELAND (2110)STARKS (2100)SPARTA (2090)SL0AN (2080)SLEETH (2150)STOY (2140)ST0NELICK (2130)STENDAL (2120)STEFF (2180)SWITZERLAND (2190)SWYGERT (2170)SUMBURY (21G0)STR0LE (2240) (2230)TEDR0W (2220) TAMA (2210)TAGGART (2200)SYLUAN (2280) (2270)TOROMTO (2260) TOLEDO (2250) TIPPECANOE TILSIT (2320)UNION (2310)TYNER (2300)TROXEL (2290)TRAPPIST TRACY (2360)WAKEL (235OU0LINIA (2340)UINCENNES (2330)UIGO TOWN (2400)UASEP (2390)WARSAW (2380)WARNERS (2370)WALLKILL AMD (2440)UEA (2430)WAUSEON (2420)WATSEKA (2410) WASHTENAW I (2480)UESTLAND (2470)WELLSTON (24G0)WEINBACH (2450)WEIKERT (2520)WILBUR (2510)WHITSON (2500)WHITAKER (2490) WHEELING (25G0)WOOLPER (2550)WOODriERE (2540)WINGATE (2530)WILLETTE (2G00)ZIPP (2590)2ANESUILLE (2580)XENIA (2570)WYNN (2900)ALLUUIAL LAND (2700)BORROW PIT (2800)URBAN LAND (3100)GULLIED LAND(3200)5TRIP MINE (3000)GRAUEL PIT (3300)CUT AND FILL (3400)NADE LAND/ PARENT (-O)UNKNOWN (l)LACUSTRINE DEPOSITS (2)0UTWASH AND ALLUUIAL DEPOSITS (3)E0LIAN SAND DEPOSITS (4)THICK LOESS DEPOSITS (5)L0AMY WISCONSIN TILL (G)CLAYEY WIS. TILL (7)THIN LOESS-LOAMY WIS TILL (8)THICK LOESS-LOAM WIS TILL (9)THICK LOESS-ILL TILL (10) RESIDUUM-SI. ST SH SS (ll)RESIDUUM-LS BEDROCK LS/ ( 12) RES CALCAREOUS SH H0RI20 (-O)UNKNOWN (1)A HORIZON (2)B HORIZON (3)C HORIZON (4)D HORIZON/ SLOPE (-0) UNKNOWN (l)LEUEL-NEARLY LEUEL (2)0-2 (3)2-G (4)6-12 (5)12-18 (G) 18-25 (7)25-35 (8)35+/ EROSIO (-O)UNKNOWN (DNONE-SLIGHT (2)M0DERATE-ER0DED (3)SEUERE/ WATERC (-0) UNKNOWN (-l)DRY/ WATERF (-0) UNKNOWN (-l)DRY/ DRAIN (-O)UNKNOWN ( DWELL-EXCESSIUE (2)M0DERATELY WELL (3)S0MEWHAT POORLY (4)POORLY-UERY POORLY/ PERMEA (-O)UNKNOWN (l)LESS THAN .06 (2).0G-.2 (3). 2-. 63 (4). 63-2. (5)2.0-6.0 (6)6.0-20 (7)GREATER THAN 20/ FLOOD (-O)UNKNOWN (l)NONE (2)PERCHED-P0NDED-HAZARD/ FROST (-O)UNKNOWN (DUERY LOW (2)UERY LOW-LOW (3)L0W (4)L0W-M0DE RATE (5)M0DERATE (6)M0DERATE-HIGH (7)HIGH (8)HIGH-UERY HIGH (9)UERY HIGH/ SHRINK (-O)UNKNOWN (DUERY LOW (2)UERY LOW-LOW (3)L0W (4)L0W-MODE RATE (5)M0DERATE (6) MODERATE-HIGH (7)HIGH (8)HIGH-UERY HIGH (9)UERY HIGH/ (-O)UNKNOWN (Ol)BELOW 4.5 (02)4.5-5.0 (03)5.1-5.5 (04)5.6-6. PH (05)6.1-6.5 (06)6.6-7.3 (07)7.4-7.8 (08)7.9-8.4 (09)8.5-9.0 (lO)ABOUE 9.0/ LL.PL.PI.SL (-O)UNKNOWN (-l)NOT PLASTIC/ TEXTUR (-0) UNKNOWN (l)SAND (2)SAND-TRACE GRAUEL (3)SAND-LITTLE GR AUEL (4)SAND-S0ME GRAUEL (5)SAND AND GRAUEL (6) SANDY LOAM (7)SANDY LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL (8)SANDY LOAM-LITTLE GRAUEL (9)SANDY LOAM-SOME GRAUEL (10) SANDY LOAM AND GRAUEL (ll)LOAM (12) LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL ( 13)L0AM-LITTLE GRAUEL (14)L0AM-S0ME GRAUEL (15)L0AM AMD GRAUEL (16)SILTY LOAM (17)SILTY LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL (18)SILTY LOAM-LITTLE GRAUEL (19)SILTY LOAM-SOME GRAUEL (20)SILTY LOAM AND GRAUEL
( ( (

157

(2DSILT (22)SILT-TRACE GRAUEL (23)SILT-LITTLE GRAUEL


(24)SILT-S0ME GRAUEL (25)SILT AMD GRAUEL (2GJSANDY CLAY LOAM (27) SANDY CLAY LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL (28) SANDY CLAY LOAM-LITTLE GRAUE L (29)SANDY CLAY LOAM-SOME GRAUEL (30)SANDY CLAY LOAM AMD GRAUEL (3DCLAY LOAM (32)CLAY LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL (33)CLAY LOAM-LITTLE CRA UEL (34) CLAY LOAM-SOME GRAUEL (35) CLAY LOAM AMD GRAUEL (3G)SILTY CLAY LOAM (37)SILTY CLAY LOAM-TRACE GRAUEL (38)SILTY CLAY LOAM-LITTLE GRAUEL (33)SILTY CLAY LOAM-SOME GRAUEL (40)SILTY CLAY LOAM AMD GRAUEL (4DSAMDY CLAY (42)SANDY CLAY-TRACE GRAUEL (43)SAMDY CLAY-LITTLE GRAUEL (44) SANDY CLAY-SOME GRAUEL (45) SANDY CLAY AND GRAUEL (4G)SILTY CLAY (47)SILTY CLAY-TRACE GRAUEL (48)SILTY CLAY-LITTLE GRAUEL (49)SILTY CLAY-SOME GRAUEL (50)SILTY CLAY AND GRAUEL (5DCLAY (52) CLAY-TRACE GRAUEL (53) CLAY-LITTLE GRAUEL (54) CLAY-SOME GRAUEL (55) CLAY AND GRAUEL (5G) GRAUEL (57) SANDY GRAUEL (58)GRAUELLY SAND (59) SAND AND GRAUEL (GO)COPROGENOUS EARTH (Gl)DIATOMACEOUS EARTH (G2)FIBRIC MATERIAL (G3) FRAGMENT AL MATERIAL (G4)HEMIC MATERIAL (65) ICE OR FROZEN SOIL (GG)MARL (67) MUCK (68) MUCKY PEAT (69) OX I DE-PROTECT. WX BR (7DPEAT (72)SAPRIC MATERIAL (70)PART. DECOM ORG MATL (73)UNDEC0M ORG MATL (74)UNWEATHERED BEDROCK (75)WX BR.SAPROLITE.GRUS (76)C0MPLEX (77) INAPPLICABLE/ ORGANI (-O)UNKNOUN (l)NO ORGANIC MATL (2)TRACE (3)LITTLE (4)S0ME (5) AND/ COLOR (-O)UNKNOWN (Ol)BLUISH GRAY (02)BLACK (03)BROWN (04)BROWNISH YELLOW (05)DARK BROWN (06)DARK BLUISH GRAY (07)DARK GRAY (08)DARK GRAYISH BROWN (09)DARK GREENISH GRAY (10)DARK OLIUE (ll)DARK OLIUE GRAY (12)DARK RED (13)DARK REDDISH BROWN (14)DARK REDDISH GRAY (15)DUSKY RED (1G)DARK YELLOWISH BROWN (17)GRAYISH BROWN (18)GREENISH GRAY (19)GRAYISH GREEN (20)GREEN (2DGRAY (22)LIGHT BLUISH GRAY (23)LIGHT BROWN (24)LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY (25)LIGHT GREENISH GRAY (2G)LIGHT GRAY (27)LIGHT OLIUE BROWN (28)LIGHT OLIUE GRAY (29)LIGHT RED (30)LIGHT REDDISH BROWN (3DLIGHT YELLOWISH BR. (32)0LIUE BROWN (33)0LIUE (34)0LIUE GRAY (35)0LIUE YELLOW (36)PALE BROWN (37)PALE GREEN (38)PALE OLIUE (3S)PALE RED (40)PALE YELLOW (4DPINKISH GRAY (42)PINK (43)PINKISH WHITE (44)REDDISH BLACK (45)REDDISH BROWN (4G)RED (47)REDDISH GRAY (48)REDDISH YELLOW (49)STR0NG BROWN (50)UERY DARK BROWN (5DUERY DARK GRAY (52)U. DK. GRAYISH BROWN (53)UERY DARK RED (54)UERY PALE BROWN (55)UERY DUSKY RED (5G)WEAK RED (57) WHITE (58)YELL0WISH BROWN (59)YELL0WISH RED (60) YELLOW/ TESTEF (-O)UNKNOWN (01 )STANDARD-12400 (02) STANDARD-SEE DIF (03)STANDARD-NOT GIUEN (04)MODIFIED-12400 (05)MODIFIED-56000 (0G)MODIFIED-56300 (07)MODIFIED-SEE DIF (08)MODIFIED-NOT GIUEN (09)15 BLOW-7400 (10)15 BLOW-7800 (11)15 BLOW-SEE DIF (12)15 BLOW-NOT GIUEN ( 13)KNEADING-SEE DIF (14)KNEADING-N0T GIUEN (15)HARUARD MIN-SEE DIF (16)HARUARD MIN-NOT GIUEN ( 17)HUEEM-SEE DIF ( 18)HUEEM-N0T GIUEN (19)UIBRAT0RY-SEE DIF (20)UIBRATORY-NOT GIUEN (2DC0MPRESSI0N-SEE DIF (22) COMPRESS I ON-NOT GIUEN/ TYPE (-0) UNKNOWN (DUU TEST (2)CU TEST-UNSATURATED (3)CU TEST-SATURATED (4)DIRECT SHEAR (5)CD TEST/ HOLENO.SAMPNO.DATEYR.DATEDA, TOWN, RANGE, SECTIO TO BORING, STATNO. OFFSET, LINE1,LINE2,LABN0 TO SPT.BEDRKS TO WATERS, GRAD01 TO COLL. LOSSIG TO SPECGR.MAXDD TO QUSTR.QUSTA, STRENGTH TO CU (-0) UNKNOWN

158

MISSING UALUES COUNTY TO QUSTR.QUSTA TO CU (-0)/ THE FOLLOWING SERIES OF -IF- STATEMENTS COMPUTE BOTH COMMENT THE AASHTO AND UNIFIED CLASSIFICATION CODES-FOR THOSE PROGRAMS NOT REQUIRING EITHER OF THESE TUO CLASSIFICATIONS. THESE STATEMENTS SHOULD BE OMITTED (TEXTUR EQ 67 OR G8 OR 70 OR 71 OR 73 OR GO OR 62) AASHT0=13 IF (GRAD09 GE 35.5 AND LL GE 40.5 AND PI GE 10.5 AND PI GT (LL-30)) IF AASHT0=12 (GRAD03 GE 35.5 AND LL GE 40.5 AND PI GE 10.5 AND PI LE (LL-30)) IF AASHTO=ll CGRAD09 GE 35.5 AND LL LT 40.5 AND PI GE 10.5) AASHTO=10 IF (GRAD09 GE 35.5 AND (LL GE 40.5 OR EQ -1) AND PI LT 10.5) IF AASHTO=09 (GRAD09 GE 35.5 AND LL LT 40.5 AND PI LT 10.5) AASHT0=08 IF (GRAD09 LT 35.5 AND LL GE 40.5 AND PI GE 10.5) AASHTO=06 IF (GRAD09 LT 35.5 AND LL LT 40.5 AND PI GE 10.5) AASHTO=05 IF (GRAD09 LT 35.5 AND (LL GE 40.5 OR EQ -1) AND PI LT 10.5) IF AASHTO=04 (GRAD09 LT 35.5 AND LL LT 40.5 AND PI LT 10.5) AASHTO=03 IF (GRAD08 GE 50.5 AND GRAD09 LT 10.5 AND (LL EQ -1 OR PL EQ -1 IF OR PI EQ -1)) AASHTO=07 (GRAD08 LT 50.5 AND GRAD09 LT 25.5 AND PI LT 6.5) AASHT0=02 IF (GRAD07 LT 50.5 AND GRAD08 LT 30.5 AND GRAD09 LT 15.5 IF AND PI LT 6.5) AASHTO=01 (TEXTUR EQ 67 OR 68 OR 70 OR 71 OR 73 OR 60 OR 62) AASHT0=13 IF (AASHTO NE 05 OR 06) IF GI=RND( (GRAD09-35)( .2+.005(LL-40) )+.01(GRAD09-15)(PI-10) (AASHTO EQ 05 OR 06) GI=RND( .01(GRAD09-15)(PI-10) IF (PL EQ -1 OR LL EQ -1 OR GI LT 0) GI=0 IF ASSIGN MISSING GI (-8) (TEXTUR EQ 67 OR 68 OR 70 OR 71 OR 73 OR 60 OR 62) UNIF=35 IF (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI GT (.73(LL-20) ) AND 7) AND LL LT 50) IF UNIF=01 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI GT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50) UNIF=02 IF (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI GT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL EQ 50) UNIF=03 IF (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) OR 4) AND LL LT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 1 OR 2)) UNIF=04 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) OR 4) AND LL LT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 4 OR 5)) UNIF=05 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI LT ( .73(LL~20) ) OR 4) AND LL LT 50 AND IF ORGANI EQ 3) UNIF=0G (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI EQ ( .73(U_-20) ) AND GT 7) AND LL LT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 1 OR 2)) UNIF=07 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AND GT 7) AND LL LT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 4 OR 5)) UNIF=08 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND (PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AND GT 7) AND LL LT 50 AND IF ORGANI EQ 3) UNIF=09 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 1 OR 2)) UNIF=10 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 4 OR 5)) UNIF=11 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND ORGANI EQ IF 3) UNIF=12 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND IF (ORGANI EQ 1 OR 2)) UNIF=13 IF (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND (ORGANI EQ 4 OR 5)) UNIF=14 (GRAD09 GE 50 AND PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL GT 50 AND ORGANI EQ IF

159

3) UNIF=15

(GRAD09 GE 50 AMD PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AND LL EQ 50 AMD (ORGANI EQ 1 OR 2)) UMIF=1G (GRAD09 GE 50 AMD PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LL EQ 50 AMD IF (ORGAMI EQ 4 OR 5)) UNIF=17 (GRAD09 GE 50 AMD PI LT ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LL EO 50 AMD ORGAMI EQ IF 3) UNIF=18 (GRAD09 GE 50 AMD PI EQ ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LL EQ 50) UMIF=19 IF (GRAD09 GE 50 AMD (PI GE ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LE 7 AMD GE 4)) IF UNIF=20 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD (PI LT IF (.73(LL-20)) OR 4)) UNIF=21 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD (PI LT IF (.73(LL-20)) OR 4)) UMIF=24 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD (PI GT IF (.73<LL-20)) AMD 7)) UMIF=22 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD (PI GT IF (.73(LL-20)) AMD 7)) UMIF=25 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD ((PI EQ IF (.73(LL-20))) OR (PI GT ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LE 7 AMD GE 4))) UMIF=23 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD GRAD09 GT 12 AMD ((PI EQ IF (.73(LL-20))) OR (PI GT ( .73(LL-20) ) AMD LE 7 AMD GE 4))) UNIF=26 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD GRAD09 LT 5) UMIF=27 IF (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD GRAD09 LT 5) UNIF=28 IF (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF (PI LT (.73(LL-20)) OR 4)) UMIF=29 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF (PI GT (.73(LL-20)) AMD 7)) UMIF=30 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG LE 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF ((PI EQ (.73(LL-20))) OR (PI GT (.73(LL-20)) AMD LE 7 AMD GE 4))) UMIF=31 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF (PI LT (.73(LL-20)) OR 4)) UMIF=32 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF (PI GT (.73(LL-20)) AMD 7)) UMIF=33 (GRAD09 LT 50 AMD GRADOG GT 50 AMD (GRAD09 GE 5 AMD LE 12) AMD IF ((PI EQ (.73(LL-20))) OR (PI GT (.73(U_-20) ) AMD LE 7 AMD GE 4))) UMIF=34 (TEXTUR EQ G7 OR G8 OR 70 OR 71 OR 73 OR GO OR G2) UMIF=35 IF IF (AASHT01 ME 9999) AASHT0=AA5HT01 (UMIF1 NE 9999) UMIF=UMIF1 IF IF (SAMD EQ 999) SAND=-0 IF (SAMD ME 999) SAMD=GRAD07-GRAD09 ASSIGN MISSING AASHTO. UMIF (-8) UAR LABELS GI GROUP INDEX'AASHTO AASHTO CLASSIFICATIONAJMIF UNIFIED CLASSIFI CATION UALUE LABELS GI (-8) MISSING DATA/ AASHTO (-O)UNKNOUN (l)A-l-A (2)A-1-B (3)A-2-4 (4)A-2-5 (5)A-2-6 (G)A-2-7 (7)A-3 (8)A-4 (9)A-5 (10)A-S (1DA-7-5 (12)A-7-6 (13)A-8/ UNIF (-O)UNKNOWN (Ol)CL (02)CH (03)CL-CH (04)ML (05)OL (OG)ML-OL (07)ML-CL (08)CL-OL (09)ML-OL OR CL (10)MH (ll)OH (12)MH-0H (13)MH-CH (14)CH-0H (15)MH-0H OR CH (lG)ML-MH (17)0L-0H (18)MH-0H OR ML-OL (19)ANY COMBINATION (20)CL-ML (2DGM (22)GC (23)GM-GC (24)SM (25)SC (2G)SM-SC (27)GU OR GP=G (28)SU OR SP=S (29)G-GM (30)G-GC (3DG-GM OR G-GC (32)S-SM
IF

160

COMMENT

COMMENT

N OF CASES PRINT FORMATS

(33)S-SC <34)S-SM OR S-SC (35)PT THE ABOUE STATEMENT IS THE LAST STATEMENT WHICH SHOULD BE OMITTED IF THE AASHTO AND UNIFIED CLASSIFICATIONS ARE NOT REQUIRED THE NUMBER OF CASES (N OF CASES) WILL COINCIDE WITH THE NUMBER OF SAMPLES CONTAINED WITHIN THE DATA BANK AT THE TIME OF PROCESSING 2508 SPECGR.EO,EF,CC,CR (3)/ QUSTR. OUST A, STRENGTH TO COHESION. POREPRESS. MAJOR, PO. PC, CU C2)/ GRDSUR TO DEPTHB, BEDRKS TO WATERF, GRAD01 TO NATDD.MAXDD TO CBRS02, ANGLE, SO, SF (1VPROJPR, PROJPA,CONTPR,ROADPR,ROADSU TO BORING. LINE1, LINE2. LABNO (A)

READ INPUT DATA PROG SAUE FILE FINISH G'7/8/3

161

PROGRAM NUMBER 4

THIS PROGRAM HILL ACCESS THE MAGNETIC TAPE ONTO UHICH DATA IS STORED FROM PROG1 AMD THE SPSS PROGRAM CREATED IN PR0G3 AND PLACE THE NEU SPSS FILE ONTO A HEM MAGNETIC TAPE. THIS SPSS FILE IS TO BE USED IN PROCESSING INFORMATION STORED WITHIN THE GEOTECHNICAL DATA BANK.

12345. ABC. TP2. P20. TC200. TU38000. CM77000. T350

PASS= PFILESCGET.PR0G3) REQUESTCS0IL1.1414) COMMON (SPSS) SPSSC I=PRQG3. D=SOILl S=PROG) REQUEST ( TAPE 1 580 . WR I TE . UP=* ) COPYBF (PROG. TAPE. RB. RA) RETURN(SOILl) G/7/8'9
. . .

162

APPENDIX

USER'S MANUAL:
The user
is

PART

referred to the discussion under Data


for
a

Processing and the SPSS text (^2)


control

description of the

cards which may be used for data processing.

Example Problems
Examp
1

Existing soils data from Tippecanoe County (code 79)


are desired for the preliminary design of
a

highway

in

the
in

northeast corner of the county.

The area

is

included

Township 2k North and Range


includes:

West.

Information required

compaction test data; California bearing ratio


samples were retypes according

test data; and depths from which the soil

moved.
to

Additionally, the frequency of soil

the AASHTO soil

classification system

is

desired.

The

program deck setup would be:

163

TP1 12345. ABC. CM150000. L10000. T350 P20. TU38000. TC200.


.

PASS= "SOIL DATA FOR DAYBAN. REQUEST (TAPE. 1580) COPYBF (TAPE. PROG) REWIND(TAPE) RETURN (TAPE) REWIND (PROG) COMMON (SPSS) SPSS(G=PROG) 7/8/9
SELECT"" IF

THE

STATE OF

INDIANA*

LIST CASES

FREQUENCIES FINISH G/7/8/9

EQ 5 (COUNTY EQ 79 AND TOWN EQ 24 AND TOWNDI EQ 1 AND RANGE 2) AND RANGDI EQ C ASES=2508/UARIABLES=TESTEF,MAXDD.MAXWD.OPTIMC.CBRS01.CBRSO2. DEPTHT.DEPTHB INTEGER=AASHTO (1.13)

Examp

researcher at
a

prestigious Midwestern University

suspects that

relationship exists between the coefficient


(CC)

of consolidation

and

the

initial

void

ratio

(E0)

of

soils found within the State of

Indiana.

The following deck

setup would produce

plot of the coefficient of consolida-

tion versus the initial


PASSSOIL DATA FOR THE DAYBAN. REQUEST (TAPE. 1580) COPYBF (TAPE, PROG) REWIND (TAPE) RETURN (TAPE) REWIND(PROG) COMMON (SPSS) SPSS(G=PROG) 7/8/9 PROG GET FILE CC WITH EO SCATTERGRAM FINISH G/7/8/9

void

ratio:

12345, ABC. CM150000, L10000. T350, P20, TU38000, TC200, TP1

STATE OF

INDIANA-

a
DC
I

o a o Q

Q
DC UJ

>