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390

IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, Vol. 9, No. 2, June 1994

ANALYSIS OF SELF EXCITED INDUCTION GENERATOR FEEDING INDUCTION MOTOR

L. Shridhar, Student Member, Bhim Singh, C. S. Jha and B.P. Singh, SM Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Delhi, Hauz Khas New Delhi 110 016, FAX 91-11-6862037, INDIA

Abstract The paper is motivated to assess the suitability of a self excited induction generator (SEIG) to supply dynamic loads like induction

Self Excited Induction Generators (SEIGs) are

motors. An algorithm is proposed to Predict the increasingly being considered for autonomous

steady state performance of an SEIG feeding an

induction

results are presented for different operating powered systems

conditions of an SEIG-IM system. A good agreement reached between the predicted and test results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Experimentally recorded transients of an SEIG

during a Series Of

presented to demonstrate the

sustain the starting of an IM. By analyzing the performance of a typical 7.5

kW, 3 -phase SEIG feeding induction motors of the Capacitor. The induced voltage and current

would continue to rise, until the var supplied by

for the design of an SEIG-IM system in aUto"mus the capacitor is balanced by the var demanded by

applications like agricultural pumpsets. the machine. This results in an equilibrium state being reached and the machine now operates as an

SEIG

value of the capacitor, speed of the prime mover, parameters of the machine and the load [1,2]. A majority of system loads is dynamic in nature, varying both in quantity and quality. Contribution of induction motors(1Ms) to such loads is significant. A review of the available literature reveals that although a lot of work has been reported on the SEIG feeding static loads, prediction of its behavior while feeding an IM remains to be properly explored. Behavior of the SEIG feeding an induction motor is of interest not only from the operational point of view but also from the view point of assessing its suitability to feed such loads. Further, it will be desirable to study the ability of the SEIG to withstand switching of dynamic loads, such as, starting of induction motors.

and frequency decided by the

Keywords:

different ratings, useful guidelines are proposed

applications in micro-hydro. biogas and wind

2. INTRODUCTION

The

(IM). The computed and experimental

lower unit

brushless cage rotor construction, absence of a separate dc source, better transient performance and inherent overload protection are its main advantages over the conventional alternators. It is well known that if an appropriate capacitor bank is connected across an externally driven induction machine, an EMF is induced in the machine windings due to the excitation provided by

at

a voltage

switching Operations are

ability of an SEIG to

Autonomous Power Generation, Induction

Generator, Capacitor Self Excitation, Analysis

1. NOMENCLATURE

Main

Symbols:

Subscripts:

c

capacitance/phase

c

capacitive

F

p.u.

frequency

g

air gap

I

p.u. current

1

leakage

P

p.u. power

L

load

R

p.u. resistance

out

output

s

slip of the motor

r

rotor

v

p.u. voltage

s

stator

p.u. speed

t

terminal

X

p.u. reactance

M

motor

z

p. U. impedance

 

~llp.u. quantities are at the base of respective generator quantities, except, the output power of the motor and the system var for which the

rated motor Power and generator power, magnetizing reactance, Xm) of an SEIG is the first

For an SEIG feeding a static

of

Prediction of operating frequency, F and

saturation

level

(and hence

the

value

respectively, are taken as base quantities.

step in its analysis.

93 SM 453-1 EC

A paper recommended and approved

by the IEEE Electric Machinery Committee of the

IEEE Power Engineering Society

at the IEEEIPES 1993 "=r

Canada, July 18-22, 1993. Manuscript submitted Aug.

28, 1992; made available for printing

PRINTED IN USA

for presentation

Meeting, Vancouver, B.C.,

12, 1993.

RL load, various techniques are available to

estimate values of these two unknowns

(F and

Xm)

[ 3,4,6-91.

When an IM is fed from an SEIG, apart from Xm F; slip and saturation level of the motor are

and

also unknown. The SEIG-IM system thus has four unknowns to be evaluated before its performance can be determined. The identification of these four parameters becomes complicated, as the methods used with an SEIG feeding static loads are not directly applicable to an SEIG-IM systems. Thus, to predict performance of an SEIG-IM system for a given operating condition, it is necessary to develop a suitable analytical technique.

This paper is addressed to the analysis of the SEIG feeding power to an induction motor. An algorithm is proposed to predict the performance of an SEIG-IM system. The predicted and experimental results are presented for different operating conditions. The selection of capacitor for the starting of the motor is discussed and experimental results are presented for a sequence of the IM switchings on an SEIG. The study is extended to cover a range of standard motors to confirm the general trend. Based on the analysis, useful guidelines are provided for designing an autonomous SEIG-IM system for applications like an agricultural pumping system.

0885-8969/94/$04.000 1993 IEEE

3. THEORY

for

the analysis of an SEIG feeding a static RL load is

briefly discussed; which is then extended to develop an algorithm for analyzing an SEIG-IM system.

Here,

at

first

the

technique

[3,4]

used

3.1 Static RL Load

 

The

steady

state

response

of

an

SEIG

feeding

a

static

RL

load

can

be

predicted

for

any

prime

mover

speed,

capacitance

and

load

conditions

from the

equivalent circuit

of

Figure

l(a),

if

all

its

parameters

are

known.

Only

the

magnetizing

reactance,

is

assumed

to

be

affected

by

the

magnetic

saturation,

and

all

other

equivalent

be

circuit

constant. It can be noted that all parameters

are known either from experimentation

/F

availagle

except X,,

parameters

However,

of

of

the

the

machine

variation

flux

are

of

assumed

X,

is

with

to

V

or

(a

design.

measure

magnetic

level),

[3].

Further,

the

generated

frequency

unknown.

Estimation

 

of

X,

problem

in

the

analysis

of

an

I

I

I

1

and

F

SEIG

f

is

a

system.

is

also

special

Fig l(a) Equivalent circuit of SEIG feediw

RL bad

3.1.1

Estimation

of Xm and F

Applying

 

Kirchoff's

voltage

law

to

the

loop

current

I,,

we

obtain

Is zs

where

=o

Zs is loop

impedance

and

391

and are obtained by simplifying equation (3)[4). Now the performance of the SEIG can be obtained as follows :

1. Values

can be obtained by solving

the simultaneous equations (4) and (5), using a

suitable

technique.

of

X,

and

F

numerical

2. After obtaining X, and F, V can be computed

from the magnetization chara%teristics of the machine.

Vg ,is known, the required performance can

be determined using the standard equations 141.

3. Once

3.2 Induction Motor Load

 

Figure

l(b)

shows

the

equivalent

circuit

of

an

SEIG-IM

system.

Here,

X,,

F,

Xm

and

s

are

the

four

unknowns.

The

methodology

discussed

above

for

the

static

RL

load

gives

two

equations

(4)

and

(5),

which

are

solvable

for

only

two

unknowns.

The

following

algorithm

is

proposed

to

identify

X,,

F,

XMm

and

s

and

then

predict

the

performance

of

the

SEIG-IM

system.

1. Assume

nominal

values

of

Vt

and

F.

2.

For

a

given

power

output

of

the

motor,

obtain

 

-

XMm and

8,

(Appendix

I).

3. Once XMm and s are known, the equivalent circuit

load

of

the IM is

reduced

to

an

equivalent

RL

(Figure

l(c)).

4. Now the equivalent circuit of

Figure

l(b)

is

transformed into that of

Figure

l(a)

and

is

now

solved for X, and F using the method described

for

the

static

load.

5. Obtain the corresponding value of Vg and then

calculate

Fi

and repeat, until errors in Vt and F during two

successive iteration

quantity

6. Go

V,

r

to

Step

2 with

(

say,

updated

are

values

less

of

than

Vt

a

and

small

e

=

1.OE-04).

 

zs

=

z1

+ z2 + z3

 

z1

=

zr

Zml(Zr

 

+

Zm)

I

I

I

I

Zr

=

{Rr/(F-Y

)+jXlr>

 

SEIG

IM

2,

=

jx,

Rm/(R,

+

jx,)

 

Z2 = Rs

+

jXls

 

Fig l(b) Equivalent circuit of SEIG feeding Induction Motor

Z3

=

ZL

Zc/(zL

 

+

zc)

Since

under

steady

state

 

operation

 

of

the

RMS

ixMIS

' "Mlr

SEIG,

Is

can

not

be

equal

to

zero,

 

2,

=

0

Equating,

the

 

real

and

 

imaginary

parts

 

of

(3)

to

zero,

 

the

following

two

nonlinear

equations

with

unknowns

X,

and

F

are

obtained.

 

IM

f(X,,,,F)

=

(A1

X,

+ A2)F6

+

(A3

X,

+A4)F5

+

Fig Hc) Cooversion of Induction Motor circuit into equivalent RL element,

 

(As

Xm

+ A6)F4

+

(A7

X,

+ A8)F3

 

+

(A9

Xm

+

A10)F2

+

(A11

Xm

+AlZ)F

 

+

A13

Xm

+

A14

=

0

(4)

 

the

algorithm. In summary, for

l(d)

Figure

shows

the

a given operating

flow

chart

of

I(XmtF)

=

(B1

X,

+

B2)F5

+

(B3

X,

+

B4)F4

 

+

condition, during each iteration the algorithm

 

(B5

,X,,

+

B6)F3

+

(B7

X,

+ B8)F2

+

replaces the

IM

load

by

an

equivalent

RL

load

and

(Bg

Xm

+ Blo)F

 

+

Bll

X,

+

B12

=

0

(5) solves for this RL load. The iterations are continued with updating of relevant quantities till

 

The

coefficients

-

and

B~

-

B~~

in the

the

convergence

is

obtained.

The

algorithm

was

above

equationsare

functionsof

 

machine

applied

to

various

trials

and

convergence

was

parameters,

load

impedance,

 

capacitance

and

 

speed;

achieved

in

3-5

392

Calculate

HotorSlip

Obtain

AL and X,

I

Calculate X, and F

I

Calculate

Ut

Performm

t

M

-

Update

U+, andF

Fig l(d) Flow Chart of the Algorithm for analysis of SEIG-IM system

4. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

This section is divided into two sub sections.

1. Steady-state operation of an SEIG-IM system,

2. Starting of an IM on an SEIG.

4.1 Steady-State Operation

To

check the validity

of

the proposed

algorithm, extensive experiments were carried out

on an SEIG-IM test rig, schematically shown in Figure 2. A standard 3-Phase squirrel cage

induction motor of 10 hp (7.5 kW), 4 pole, 415 VI

14 A,

parameters R,

is

operated as an SEIG. The SEIG was driven by a 10 kW

dc motor.

electrically loaded by coupling them to separately

excited dc generators of appropriate rating. Following tests were performed on the system using suitable instrumentation.

For a

1. The SEIG was driven

0.1013,

delta

Rm =

connected stator with p.u.

=0.0493,

Rr=0.0409,

22.1

and unsaturated

circuit

Xis= Xlr =

2.15;

were

Xm =

The induction motors

(IMs)

at a fixed

speed.

fixed value of capacitor C, the performance was monitored for different loads on the induction motor.

2.

Test described in 1 was repeated for different values of C to estimate the most appropriate value.

3.

Tests mentioned in 1 and 2 were repeated for

different constant speeds of the prime mover.

4.

Tests described in 1 - 3 are repeated for motors of different frame sizes.

Detailed characteristics are presented for a

5hp

induction motor and the same is considered for

an

elaborate discussion. However, a set of

characteristics is presented for a series of standard motors.

CAPACITOR

BANK

.!

Fig 2 Block diagram of the SEIG-IM test rig

4.1.1

Load

Characteristics

Fig. 3(a) shows variations of terminal voltage

and operating

frequency

with output

power

of

the

generator

for different values of capacitors.

It

is seen that it is possible

power

capacitor

capability of the SEIG. However,

larger

its rated

to load the motor up to

of double

in enhanced

rating.

A

power

of

the effect

on

an

SEIG

results

0.2

0

0.1

0.2

0.3

frequency

0.4

0.6

0.8

Fig.3(a) Variation of Voltage p and out (P.U Frequency ) with Power Output

393 capacitor variation on the frequency is marginal. It is observed from Figure 3(b) that
393
capacitor variation on the frequency is marginal.
It is observed from Figure 3(b) that over this
4.1.2
Motors
of
Different
Frame
Sizes
In
order
to
provide
a
general
basis
of
range of loading,
the
generator
winding
current
information,
four
typical
motors
of
different
remains well within the rated value (1.0 P.u.).
ratings
(Appendix-II),
are
chosen
for
Considering a maximum permissible operating voltage
investigation.
Vmax
=
1.10
P.u.,
for
a
capacitance
of
50
PFlphase, the rated load on the motor corresponds
to
0.43
p.u.
load
on
the
generator.
Further, a
Fig. 4(a) shows load characteristics of the
SEIG with motors of different ratings operated from
no load to respective rated load conditions. It is
good agreement is
noticed
between
the
test
and
seen that using a
single valued capacitor and
predicted results, shown by points and continuous
lines, respectively. Figure 3(c) shows variations
without violating the voltage and current levels
(1.10 p.u. and 1.0 p.u.,respectively), the SEIG can
in var and capacitance requirement of the SEIG-IM
supply an
IM rated upto 5 hp. This means that
system with load
in
order
to
maintain
the
terminal
voltage at 1.0 P.u
-
The
figure
also
shows
the
variation
in
power
factor of the load
(IM)
with
the
power
output.
It
may be noted
that
the
pattern
of
various
an
similar to that with a static RL load. However, the
inherent dynamism in the IM results in an improved
power factor with Pout. This is the reason why the
characteristics of
the
SEIG
with
IM
load
is
using a single valued capacitor bank the SEIG can
safely feed an IM load of half its rating.
To improve the voltage regulation of the SEIG
various types of voltage regulators are being
employed [lo-121, which control the var supplied to
the system with the change in load. Figure 4(b)
shows the variation of capacitance to be effected
with the load in order to maintain the terminal
voltage at 1.0 p.u- for four different motors.
SEIG
with
an
IM
load
has
higher
power
capability
Using such a regulator it is seen that now the same
and
improved
voltage
regulation
than
while
loaded
SEIG can safely supply an IM of 7.5
hp (75% rating
with a
static
RL load of
a
power
factor
even
as
of the SEIG). However, for 10 hp induction motor
good
as
0.8;
as
shown
in
Figure
3(d).
The variation
load
it
is
seen
that
the
generator winding current
of
the
motor
speed,
n
with
load
is
also
shown
in
exceeds
its
rated
value.
the figure.
vt
(P.U.)
I.
(P.U.)
1.4 I
IS
I'
A//
Current
- 0.6
OBt
7.6 hp
- 0.4
-
Is
0.2
0.2
CWt
-0.2
~
lo
0'
"
0
0.1
02
0.3
0.4p0.6
0.8
0.7
0.8
0.0
1
I1
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
OB
P
(P.U.)
Fig 3(b) Variation of Qenerag Current and Motor Output Power
M~ut (P.u.)
Fin 4(a) Characteristic8 of SEI0 for Induction Motor load of
different ratings
with Output Power of Generator
VAR and PF
(p. u.)
c
(
v, -
1.0
0 0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
06
0.8
0.7
0.8
0.0
1
1.1
YAW!
(P.U.)
I2O
Fie.4(b) Capacitance requwement and generator current for
Io
0
02
0.4
0.8
0.8
1
12
Induction Motor load of different ratings
Fig 3(c) Variation of IM Pt%r
(P.U.)
Factor, System var and Capacitance
4.1.3 Effect of Prime Mover Speed
demand with Power Output
So
far
the
study
is
referred
to
a
constant
-I- -
1.2
0.8
speed system. SEIGs are also being proposed for
variable speed Wind Energy Conversion System
(WECS). It therefore becomes relevant to examine
the effect of varying prime mover speed. Fig. 5(a)
shows variation of Vt for different speeds for a 5
hp IM load. Fig. 5(b) shows variation of the
capacitance required to obtain a nominal voltage at
different speeds. At higher prime mover speeds, a
larger voltage is generated and power capability of
PF -LO
C
PF-0.8 * 32.6pF
C
32S)LF- 600
0.8
OA t
i300
0.2 '
'
lo
0
0.1
02
0.3
0.4
0.6
0.6
Po , (P.U.)
Fig 3(d) Characteristics o! SEIG for static and dynamic loads
the SEIG is enhanced. Further, the voltage
regulator required to maintain the rated terminal
voltage with load in a variable speed system should
follow the characteristics shown in Figure S(b).
Hence, a substantial effect of speed is noticed on
the performance of the SEIG-IM system. Again, a
close correlation is seen between the computed and
test results.

394

0.8

0.8 I

y t

\.

0.86

\

V.l.06

]

-1

0.4 0

0.2

0.4

0.0

0.8

1

1.2

1.4

1.8

kcul

Fig 5(a) Effect of Prime Mover Sbed on Terminal Voltage

(P.U)

TO

c ()v)

 
 

vt - 1.0 p.u.

 

y;

1.06

 

-$-

0.96

40

90

IIIIIIIIIIIIII

0

0.1

02

0.9

0.4

Ob

0.0

0.7

0.8

0.Q

1

1.1

12

 

%,,ut

(P.U.)

Fig 5(b) Effect Prime Mover Speed on Capacitance requirement

4.2 Starting

of an Induction

Motor on an SEIG

Having studied the steady state operation

of

the SEIG-IM system,

it becomes desirable

to

look

into starting

of an IM on an SEIG.

 

It is found

that

to start

a 5 hp motor

on a

7.5 KW SEIG, a much larger capacitance (107 PF) is required as compared to the capacitance (50 PF)

.This

value of capacitance can be obtained by using the already proposed algorithm with a slight modification. Here, the equivalent circuit of the motor in Figure l(c), will now correspond to s = 1 (i.e. block rotor condition). Thus, this block rotor equivalent circuit of motor can be converted into an equivalent RL load. Now for this load, the minimum capacitance required for ensuring self excitation can be calculated (51. It is also noticed that for very small motors (112 hp and 1 hp), the capacitance required for the steady state operation is also sufficient for the starting. To test effectiveness of the algorithm in choosing the value of capacitance to satisfactorily start the induction motor on the SEIG, various switching operations were performed. Measurements were taken of the terminal voltage, the generator stator current and the load current. An X-Y recorder interfaced to a CRO was used to reproduce the switching transients, which are shown in Figure 6. These figures correspond to the following sequence of operation.

required for the steady-state

operation.

i Self Excitation: The SEIG was driven at the synchronous speed and a delta connected capacitor bank of 50 pF/phase was switched on to the terminals of the machine. 50 pF/phase capacitance corresponds to the steady-state requirements of the 5 hp IM.

ii Motor Starting: Once the machine reached the steady-state self-excited condition, the 5 hp IM along with a delta connected capacitor bank (57 )cF/phase) was switched on to the terminals of the machine. As the induction motor picked up speed and the system assumed its steady-state, the 57 kF/phase capacitor bank was taken off.

iii Switching-in of Additional Motor: As the SEIG- IM system got stabilized, an additional 1 hp motor was switched on to the system. This was done to simulate a multi-motor system.

Load Rejection: As the SEIG-IMs system settled

to the new steady state condition,

were simultaneously

operating with only 50 pllphase capacitor bank

the SEIG

iv

both motors

taken off leaving

connected across its terminals.

Since a 2-channel CRO was used, it was

possible to record only two signals at

Hence, every switching action was performed twice,

a time.

due

to which the switching instants in Figure 6(c)

are

not properly synchronized with those of Figures

6(a) and 6(b). It is observed that during various switching operations, the SEIG assumes the new steady state operating condition without loosing self- excitation. Further, the current and the voltage overshoots are found to be within the tolerable limits. These observations thus demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in calculating the

value of starting capacitor and also the ability of

the SEIG to sustain IM switchings.

It may be noted that the prediction of the value of starting capacitor is based on the steady - state analysis. For a detailed study of the switching operation, transient analysis should be done, which is beyond the scope of the present paper. The various switching results shown are mainly aimed at assessing suitability of the SEIG-IM system in lower ratings, where direct on line (DOL) switching is used. In higher ratings where soft switching of motors is desired, the starting capacitor may not be required. The authors have been engaged to develop an SEIG-IM system for low power agricultural pumping application using micro-hydel and wind energy in lower ratings (up to 50 kW). The proposed analysis thus suggests feasibility of an SEIG-IM system

having two sets of capacitor banks. One is continuously rated for the running operation, while the other is short time rated for starting of the

IM.

The latter is to be removed once the IM picks

up

speed. The values of these capacitors can be

obtained from the proposed analysis as discussed

before. The steady state analysis gives the value

of the starting capacitor that can satisfactorily

start the motor. In applications where the induction motor rating is much lower than that of the generator, the system can do away with the requirement of starting capacitor. Although, transient analysis is not carried out in the paper, the experimented results demonstrate the feasibility of the system to withstand the switching transients as severe as that due to the starting of induction motors.

5. CONCLUSION

Detailed analysis of the SEIG feeding power to

a dynamic load (induction motor) is presented.

An algorithm is proposed for the prediction of

steady state performance of the SEIG-IM system. Theoretical results are presented for a variety of

operating conditions along with the experimental ones; and a close agreement has been observed between the two. Salient observations with regard

to

the IM load have been extensively discussed.

The

steady state analysis is extended to determine

the

value of capacitor required for the starting of

an

induction motor. Various experimental results

are presented for a sequence of switching operations. Based on the analysis, the suitability of the SEIG for dynamic loads has been illustrated. Design of an SEIG-IM system for low power pumping system has been proposed. Effect of speed

395 I t-l.O iii iv 1ii Fig. 6 Switching transients of SEIG-IM system variation on
395
I
t-l.O
iii
iv
1ii
Fig. 6 Switching transients of SEIG-IM system
variation on the performance of the SEIG-IM system
has been briefly discussed.
The study is extended
[41
N.
H.
Malik
and
S.
E.
Haque,
"steady State
to cover a range of standard motors and the results
analysis and
performance
of
an
+,solated
seem to confirm the general
Followings are the main
investigation.
trend presented here.
observations of the
self excited
induction
generator , IEEE
Trans. on
Energy
Conversion, vol. EC-1,
no.3, pp.133-139,
September 1986;
N.
H.
Malik and A.A.
Mazi,
Capacitance
[51
requirements
for
isolated
self
excited
generators", ibid, vol. EC-2,
no.
1, pp.
62-69
1.
Using a single valued capacitor bank (i.e.
without a voltage regulator), an SEIG can safely
supply an Induction motor rated upto 50% of its
own rating.
March 1987.
Y.
Uctug and M Demirelker, " Mo~elling,
analysis and control of wind turbine , Proc.
IEE, pt C, vol. 223, pp.
268- 275, July 1988.
C.
Grantham,
D. Sutanto
and
B.
Mismail,
2.
Using a voltage regulator that maintains the
rated terminal voltage, an SEIG can safely feed
an induction motor rated upto 75% of its rating.
"Steady state and Transien:,
Analysis of Self
Excited Induction Generator ,ibid. pt B, vol.
136, pp 61-68.
S.
P.
Singh,
Bhim
Sinqh
and
M.
P.
Jain,
3.
The SEIG can sustain the starting transients of
the IM without losing self excitation.
"Performance characteristics and optimum
utilization of a cage machine as capacitor
4.
The proposed algorithm is effective not only in
predicting the performance of an SEIG-IM system
but also in calculating the value of capacitance
required for the starting of the motor.
excited induction generator", paper no. 90
SM 284-0 EC, presented at the IEEE/PES 1990
Summer Meeting, Minnesota,l990.
A1 Jabri
A.
K.
and Alolah
A.I.,
"Capacitance
requirement
for
Isolated
Self
Excited
Induction Generator"
Proc.
IEE,
pt
B,
vol.
5.
It is possible to design an SEIG-IM system using
two sets of capacitor banks (for starting and
running), for low power agricultural pumping
System, with ratings of the SEIG and the IM
being in a ratio of 2:l.
137, pp. 155-160,
199b
D.
U.
Novotny, D.
J.
Gritter and G.
H.
Stud sm a nn ,
" Se 1f
ex c it at ion
in invert er
driven induction machine", IEEE Trans.
on
Power Apparatus and Systems, vol. PAS-96,
J.
Arrillaga and D. B. Watson, "Static power
conversion
from
self
excited
generators"
Proc. IEE, vol.
induction
125, no. 8,
6. REFERENCES
pp.
743- 746, August,
1978.
no. 4, pp. 1117-1125,
July/August 1977
D
Bessett and F.
M. Potter, "Capacitive
Elder,
J.T.
Boys,
J.
L.
Woodward,
Eici;ation
for induction
generator", AIEE
excited
induction machine
as
131, pt. C, no.
low
cost
Trans.,
pp. 540-5,45,
May 1935.
generator",
ibid, vol.
2, PP.
[21
B.
C.
DOXey,
Theory and application of
33-40, March 1984.
capacitor-excited induction generator*,
The
[13]
:.S.
Murthy,
C.S.
Jha and P. S. Nagendra
Rae,
Engineer,
no. 29, pp.
893-897,
November
i963.
Analysis
of
grid
connected
induction
[31
S.
S.
Muthy,
0.P.Malik.
and
A.
X.
Tandon
"Analysis
of
self-excited
induction
generators driven by hydrolwind turbines under
realistic system constraints", IEEE Trans. on
generators" Proc.IEE, vo1.129,
pt.
C. no.
6,
Energy Conversion
, vol.
5, no.1,
PP.
1-7,
pp. 260-265,'
1982.
March 1990
396 APPENDIX - I --br. Bhim Sinah, was born at Rahamapur in U.P. in 1956.
396
APPENDIX - I
--br. Bhim Sinah, was born at Rahamapur in U.P. in
1956. He received his B.E. degree from Roorkee
University, and M.Tech and Ph.D. degree from IIT-
Delhi in 1977, 1979 and 1983 respectively.
Algorithm for obtaining operating XMm and s
From 1983 to 1990 he was with the department
of
1. Read
motor
parameters,
magnetization
characteristic (variation of XMm with V IF and
electrical engineering, University of Roorkee. At
present he is Assistant Professor at IIT Delhi.
He has over 80 papers to his credits in the field
g
'
2.
Set 'Mout XMm = XMmo (no load value).
3.
Calculate s for the given PMout.[131
4.
For this s, find VMg = Vt - Is 54s
5.
Obtain Xm corresponding to VM
6.
Update Xm
and repeat
from jtep
3
to
Step
5
unless difference in Xu,
between two successive
iteration
is
less
tha;;" a
small
quantity
(say
1.OE-03) .
APPENDIX -11
Details of Induction Motors
at 50 Hz
IEC
Power
volt
Current
stator
r/min
Frame
hP1kW
V
A
Winding
80
110.75
415
1.7
Star
2800
l0OL
312.2
415
4.9
Delta
1410
ll2M
5j3.7
415
7.6
Delta
1430
132s
7.515.5
415
11
Delta
1450
of CAD, Power Electronics and Analysis and Control
of Electrical Machines.
Prof. C. S Jha, was born at Vijainagar in Bihar
(India) in 1934 and educated at Patna University,
IISc, Bangalore, Heriot Watt College, Edinberg
(U.K.), and Bristol University (U.K.). Has been a
Professor of Electrical Engineering at IIT Delhi
since 1964.
He has made significant contributions in electrical
machine theory and application and published a
large number of papers. He has been involved in the
planning and administration of technical education
in India since the early 1970s. He was Director of
the prestigious IIT at Kharagpur (1974-78), was
Educational Advisor to the Government of India on
technical education planning and has been active in
curriculum planning and development of engineering
education in India. He has been Visiting Professor
at many universities in the West, a member of the
board of Trustees of Asia Institute of Technology,
Bangkok (1974-86) and is a member of UNESCO
international meeting group on continuing education
of engineers since 1975.
At present, he is the Vice Chancellor of the
132M
1017.5
415
14
Delta
1450
BIOQRAPHY
-L. Shridhar (Student Member) was born in
Bhilainagar, MP
(India) in 1966.
He received his
B.E.
degree
from Maulana Azad
College of
Banaras Hindu University at Varanasi.
--Prof. B.P. Sinah was born in Singhiya, in 1940. He
received his B.Sc. (Engg.) degree in 1963 from
BITS, Sindri, ME in Electrical Engg. in 1966 from
Calcutta University and PhD in 1974 from IIT Delhi.
He was a Senior Fellow at BE College, Howrah (1963-
1966) and after serving MIT Muzaffarpur as a
faculty member for over a decade (1966-78), he
joined IIT Delhi in 1978, where he is a Professor
Technology Bhopal, and the M.Tech
degree from
with the Dept.
of Electrical Engg.
He
was
a
Institute bf Technology -8anaras Hindu University,
Varanasi.
He joined the department of electrical
engineerin Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
in July 1986 and is presently, a full time research
scholar with the department working, towards his
Ph.D. degree. His areas of interest are computer
based analysis and design of electrical machines
and their efficient energy conversion and
visiting Professor at California State University,
Long Beach during 1988 to 1990.
His research interests are in design, analysis and
control of electrical machines.
application in non-conventional power plants.