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WiMAX In Depth

IEEE 802.16 EXTRA Slides Used


Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access

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Conditions

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Two Options

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Soft Handovers an MS communicating with more than one BS is supported. Fast BS Switching The MS is only transmitting and receiving from one BS at any one time but can switch from one BS to another between frames

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Privacy (in the Mobile Spec)

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Has two parts: An encapsulation Protocol using any of a set of cryptographic suites and the rules for applying them A key management protocol/scheme for distributing cryptographic keys

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Architecture (Mobile)

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WiMAX News

November 16, 2005: WiBro Demonstrated in South Korea KT has shown off the homegrown mobile wireless data standard, WiBro: The standard has aspects of mobile WiMax and cellular technology, and may wind up converging with international mobile standards in the future. KT claims access at speeds of up to 60 kilometers per hour. They have two access devices that can function as WiBro modems and for voice calls. The service will roll out in 2006.

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February 21, 2006: Proxim Wireless Launches 3.5 GHz Products


Ots Tsunami MP-16 uses the 3.5 MHz licenced band in Europe and Asia. The company says the product is in trials with nine firms. This band is not yet sorted out for use in the US, but is widely expected to lead licensed fixed WiMax deployments in Europe. The product is in queue for certification.

January 19, 2006: First Certified WiMax Products Announced


Aperto, Redline, Sequans and Wavesat have passed the first, simple round of testing which covers just a simple air link, and is so limited that a number of companies, including Alvarion, sat this round out. The four companies who have WiMax certification will certainly trumpet the fact, but it doesnt change the dynamics of the industry. These initial certifications work in the 3.5 GHz band The press release from the WiMax Forum notes that the Spanish testing lab has 26 reservations for base station and customer premises equipment in the queue, which will be completed over the next two months. Subsequent waves of testing will cover more and more aspects of WiMax performance and interoperability, such as quality of service and advanced radio features.
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More NEWS

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Nortel Builds Vast Albertan WiMax Network

Nortel will roll out 8,000 square miles of WiMax: A governmental group and Nortel will build the network designed for 1 to 3 Mbps of access in heavily underserved areas of the province.

December 07, 2005: Mobile 802.16e Standard Approved


The basis for what will be mobile WiMax was approved by the IEEE today: Now that the standard is done, the hard part is developing hardware and replicating cellular infrastructure. All the challenges that faced rolling out 3G networks, land and planning rights for transmitters, etc. equally apply to mobile WiMax. Add to that, that its a new standard without the real-world evolution thats happened in the mobile world, and theres going to be a long lag between today and real, functioning, interoperable mobile WiMax equipment. Over the next two to three years, however, well be reading stories every week in the mainstream press that continue to inflate the abilities of fixed WiMax something mobile carriers are said to be very interested in for licensed use to backhaul tower trafficand mobile WiMax. Fixed WiMax doesnt operate in moving vehicles dozens of miles from a base station running at 72 Mbps. It can run fast, far, and mostly static, and not all three: you get fast when youre close up and slow when youre far away. TechDirt is saying it will be 2008 before we see anything resembling real mobile WiMax given the timetable that took fixed WiMax from 802.16 standards work to a ratified proposal to the very first stages of certification that dont offer real interoperable benefits today.
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And Lastly

November 11, 2005: Intel Makes Global WiMax Investment ZDNet reports that Intel released a slew of money around the world for WiMax development: This includes a $1.12 billion contract for a project in Taiwan, which will agree to provide the necessary spectrum for the work. The project will be government-assisted until 2008 to bring businesses into the fold. The article says Intel has 13 more Europe and Americas networks up and running, with 10 more theyve sponsored due to appear by years end. This includes projects in The Dominican Republic and Austria

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The Future for WiMAX

There are four end-game results for WiMAX: 1. The market share secured by non-WiMAX operators will be so large that WiMAX, in either its fixed or mobile value proposition, will simply not be able to get a foothold to deliver on the scale economics promised and will ultimately die or be relegated to niche applications such as wireless backhaul. This is a multi-standard outcome since multiple non-WiMAX standards might exist. (3G, Flash-OFDM and UMTS-TDD, 802.20) 2. The massive industry support for WiMAX and the technical superiority of the standard over some of the other mBWA technologies will encourage non-WiMAX operators to upgrade gradually to WiMAX, and new operators entering the market will automatically support WiMAX. This is a single standard outcome. 3. The existing non-WiMAX operators will continue to support their mBWA technologies while the new operator entrants will deploy WiMAX. This is a multi-standard outcome. 4. One of the non-WiMAX, proprietary standards sees a high level of early market traction and is able to establish itself as a de facto standard before WiMAX can gain any momentum. This is a single standard outcome.
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The above from IPWireless

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The WiMAX View

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