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THE MA HANDBOOK

Your guide to MA & Diploma programmes in Political Economy

2009 2010

Programme Director Professor John ONeill, Room 4.045, Tel: 0161 275 4853 (john.oneill@manchester.ac.uk) Office hours: TBA Secretary to the Programme Amanda Bridgeman, Room 2.003, Tel: 0161 275 1299 (amanda.bridgeman@manchester.ac.uk) Office hours: 8.30 4.30 A full listing of all staff involved in the Programme and their contact details can be found on the following pages.

Staff & Email Address List 2009 2009/10


Room 4.045 3.018 3.067 4.054 2.052 2.047 4.011 HH6.08 CH M.49 4.028 4.034 4.038 4.027 4.023 4.053 4.029 4.037 4.042 4.003 1.049 1.071 1.068 1.072 1.012 1.011 2.046 CH M.30 1.008 CH M.52 3.020 3.070 3.065 3.063 3.006 3.010 3.079 3.076 3.062 Name Prof John ONeill Professor Keith Blackburn Professor John Salter Professor Nicola Phillips Professor John Gledhill Professor Erik Swyngedouw Professor Mick Moran Professor Julie Froud Professor Damien Grimshaw Professor Debra Howcroft Dr Tom Smith Dr Adrian Blau Dr Jethro Butler Dr Jill Lovecy Dr Stuart Shields Dr Steve de Wijze Dr Andrew Russell Dr Tom Porter Dr Huw MacArtney Dr James Pattison Dr James Evans Dr Khalid Nadvi Dr Hulya Ulku Dr Stephanie Barrientos Dr Philip Woodhouse Dr Sarah Bracking Dr Noel Castree Dr Susanne Espenlaub Dr Thankom Arun Dr Paul Simpson Mr Chris Birchenhall Dr Adam Ozanne Dr Terry Peach Dr Dan Rigby Dr Bernard Walters Dr Indranil Dutta Dr Xiaobing Wang Dr Johannes Sauer Dr David Young Email John.Oneill@Manchester.Ac.Uk Keith.Blackburn@Manchester.Ac.Uk John.Salter@Manchester.Ac.Uk Nicola.Phillips@manchester.ac.uk John.Gledhill@Manchester.Ac.Uk Erik.Swyngedouw@Manchester.Ac.Uk Michael.moran@manchester.ac.uk Julie.froud@mbs.ac.uk Damien.p.grimshaw@manchester.ac.uk Debra.howcroft@mbs.ac.uk Thomas.smith@manchester.ac.uk Adrian.Blau@Manchester.Ac.Uk Jethro.butler@manchester.ac.uk Jill.lovecy@manchester.ac.uk Stuart.shields@manchester.ac.uk dewijze@manchester.ac.uk Andrew.Russell@Manchester.Ac.Uk Tom.Porter@manchester.ac.uk Huw.Macartney@manchester.ac.uk James.pattison@manchester.ac.uk james.z.evans@manchester.ac.uk Khalid.M.Nadvi@Manchester.Ac.Uk Hulya.Ulku@Manchester.Ac.Uk Stephanie.Barrientos@manchester.ac.uk philip.woodhouse@manchester.ac.uk Sarah.L.Bracking@manchester.ac.uk Noel.castree@manchester.ac.uk Susanne.espenlaub@mbs.ac.uk Thankom.g.arun@manchester.ac.uk Paul.simpson@mbs.ac.uk Chris.Birchenhall@Manchester.Ac.Uk Adam.Ozanne@Manchester.Ac.Uk Terry.Peach@manchester.ac.uk Dan.Rigby@Manchester.Ac.Uk Bernard.Walters@Manchester.Ac.Uk i.dutta@manchester.ac.uk Xiaobing.wang@manchester.ac.uk Johannes.sauer@manchester.ac.uk David.p.t.young@manchester.ac.uk Phone 275 4853 275 3908 275 4846 275 4900 275 3986 275 3647 275 4889 275 4018 276 3457 275 0442 275 7886 275 4978 275 0905 275 4881 275 7824 275 4882 275 4250 275 4908 275 3202 275 4931 306 6680 275 4017 275 0810 275 0411 275 2801 275 2928 275 3627 275 4026 275 2820 276 3485 275 4873 275 4814 275 4828 275 4808 275 4841 275 4860 275 4871 275 4831 275 4848

The MA & Postgraduate Diploma


Our MA lasts for either twelve (full-time) or twenty-seven months (part-time) and comprises 7 individual modules and a 12000-15000 word dissertation (worth 60 credits). Modules are taught on a weekly basis in either 90 minute or two hour classes over a semester. To balance your work load, our MAs are organised so that you take 4 modules in Semester One (September to December) and 3 in Semester Two (February to May). Preparation for the dissertation begins early into the academic year. Here we provide you with training in question formation, and research planning and design. We also put in place a supervisory arrangement enabling you to get help and advice throughout the process. The bulk of writing on the dissertation then occurs between May and September. At the core of the degree are a number of compulsory modules which offer you the essentials of the discipline and provide you with the skills training necessary to successfully complete your MA. There are two distinct routes through the MA, a Standard Route and a Research Route. Route On the Standard Route there are 3 compulsory modules: Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy (30 credits), Philosophy of Social Science (15 credits) and Dissertation Research Design (15 credits). Students choose from one of four MA pathways: Theoretical Political Economy Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment Political Economy of Finance, Business and Employment Political Economy of Development. Students on the standard route take at least two core modules from their chosen pathway together with two other optional modules at least one of which will from that pathway. The Research Route is an ESRC recognised 1 + 3 programme which offers training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods. On the Research Route there are 5 compulsory modules: Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy (30 credits), Philosophy of Social Science (15 credits) & Dissertation Research Design (15 credits), Introduction to Quantitative Methods (15 credits), plus 3 Qualitative Methods modules (each worth 5 credits). Students choose from one of four MA pathways: Theoretical Political Economy Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment Political Economy of Finance, Business and Employment Political Economy of Development. Students on the research route take at least one core module from their chosen pathway together with one other optional module from that pathway. Students who register for the Postgraduate Diploma may proceed to the dissertation component of the MA if they have achieved grades of 50% or over in all taught units, and produce a viable dissertation proposal. If a student does not proceed from the Diploma to the MA but has passed all taught units at 40% or higher, they will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, for which no dissertation is required. Course Modules All take the following units Programme Core Units: Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy POEC61011 30 credits Dissertation Research Design POLI60312 Philosophy of Social Science POLI70772

Pathway units Theoretical Political Economy Core pathway units (in bold) and optional units include: (Each 15 credits) Central Concepts in Political Economy POEC POEC60062 OEC60062 Marxian Political Economy GEOG GEOG70951 OG70951 Poverty, Inequality And Government Policy In Less Developed Countries ECON60212 Microeconomic Theory ECON60101 Macroeconomic Theory ECON60111 Normative Analysis and Moral Reasoning POLI70611 Ethics PHIL60051 Global Justice POLI60181 Democracy: Theory and Practice POLI70872 Globalisation & IPE POLI70282 Critical Approaches to IPE POLI70311 Theories of Rights POLI70721

Political Economy of Society, Space and Environment Core pathway units (in (in bold) and optional units include: (Each 15 credits)

Politics, Economics and Environment POEC61002 POEC61002 Environment and Development IDPM60801 Issues in Environmental Policy GEOG70912 Environmental Economics ECON60281 Marxian Political Economy GEOG70951 Theories of Environmental Governance GEOG70901 Seminars & Key Texts in Environmental Governance GEOG70920 Climate Change, Politics & Activism GEOG70521 Environmental Valuation ECON60422

Political Economy of Finance, Business and Employment Core pathway units units (in bold) and optional units include: (Each 15 credits) Industry, the Corporation and Government ECON61222 Business & Politics under Advanced Capitalism POLI60291 Global Politics and Global Business BMAN62011 Analysing Companies: Business Models, Narrative & Numbers BMAN72201 Economic Development IDPM60711 Work & Employment in the Global Economy IDPM60131 Microfinance IDPM60361 Global Institutions, Trade Rules & Development IDPM60272 Industrial Competitiveness IDPM60002 The Analysis of Business Structures BMAN62022 ICT's and work in the new economy BMAN72142 Mergers and Acquisitions: Economic & Financial Aspects BMAN70432 Multinational and Comparative Employment Systems BMAN70052

Political Economy of Development Core pathway units (in bold) and optional units include: (Each 15 credits) Poverty, Inequality And Government Policy Policy In Less Developed Countries ECON60212 Political Economy of Development IDPM60072 Growth Development & Economic Transformation ECON60072 Migration and the Global Political Economy POLI61022 Microfinance IDPM60361

Environment and Development IDPM 60801 Anthropology, Globalisation and Development SOAN70761 Human Rights and World Politics POLI70492 Trade Theory and Development IDPM60291 Economic Development IDPM60711 Economics For Rural Development ECON60691 Agriculture in Economic Development ECON60762 Global Institutions, Trade Rules & Development IDPM60272 Topics in the Economic Development of China ECON61902

Research Training Units Introduction to Quantitative Methods (IQM): SOCS70511 (15 Credits) Qualitative Research comprising of three 5 credit modules from a range of workshop. Please see the Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods Handbook 2009-2010 for further details on both of these units. Also available as an electronic version at

http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/pg/handbooks/

Course Module Descriptions 2009 2009/10 Compulsory Modules


Course Title Title Tutor(s) POEC61011 POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to Political Economy Professor John ONeill & Professor John Salter

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE UNIT This course is the core course for the MA in Political economy and will provide the theoretical grounding students require to pursue the other pathways for the programme. The course will typically cover classical, Marxian, institutionalist, Austrian and public choice perspectives in political economy. In exploring these traditions students will become familiar with some of the major theorists in each tradition including figures such as Hume, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marx, Polanyi, Mises, Hayek and Buchanan. The course will also involve the critical analysis of central concepts in political economy as they have developed in these traditions such as, value, welfare, power, liberty, equality, self-interest, development, efficiency and exploitation. Aims: provide students with the theoretical grounding in political economy which they can employ in whichever particular pathway of study they will pursue in the MA in Political Economy programme: introduce students to the central classical and contemporary traditions of political economy; enable students to understand and evaluate the arguments of the major theorists in those tradition; enable students to critically analyse and employ central concepts in political economy. Intended Learning Outcomes: On completion of the course students will be able to: understand and evaluate the central claims and arguments by the different theorists and traditions in political economy; articulate the differences between these theorists and traditions; analyse and employ some of the central concepts of political economy. the ability to analyse the argument of key primary texts; the ability to formulate their own informed views about the traditions and texts studied; the ability to write a cogent and well-argued essay on a topic taken from the course unit; the ability to give a successful seminar presentation on a topic from the course unit. the ability to produce an advanced and substantial piece of individual written research work, to an agreed deadline; quote appropriately from published texts, and use one of the recognised referencing systems in line with the demands of accepted good practice in academic and professional writing; the ability to set appropriate goals and to work both independently and cooperatively. analytic and critical skills; the ability to argue from evidence; the ability to communicate ideas effectively; problem solving skills Teaching & Learning Process: Process: Teaching will take place in 12 weeks. Each week will include a lecture and a two-hour seminar. Students will be assigned reading to do each week, and the seminar will be led by different students each week, each of whom will have prepared a short presentation on the weekly topic. Assessment: Assessment: One essay of 6-7000 words, 75%: Seminar Presentation, 15%: Participation 10%

Course Title Tutor

POLI 60312 Dissertation Research Design Dr Jill Lovecy

Aim: This module is designed to equip students with a critical understanding of the intellectual tasks involved in developing, researching and writing up an original MA dissertation proposal. It focuses in particular on the need to locate the topic in relation to an existing scholarly literature / theoretical debate in order to develop a clearly defined research question, and on the need to identify and reflect on appropriate research methodologies. In doing so it encourages students to engage, more broadly, in active learning and to think constructively about their further intellectual development and training needs Outcome: On completion of this unit, students will: Have identified a suitable MA dissertation topic and research question and held a preliminary meeting with their dissertation supervisor Have written a short and a more detailed research proposal, formulated a plan for completing their dissertation and received critical feedback on these Have applied a range of practical and transferable skills, including IT; time management and planning; communication and presentation; bibliographic and information location and retrieval Have further developed their ability to lead, participate in and sustain collective learning through group discussion Assessment: 500-word preliminary dissertation proposal (20%); 2000-word final dissertation proposal (50%); presentation (20%); class participation (10%) Content: 1. Course Introduction 2. Preparing your MA Dissertation 3. What makes for a good dissertation? Group work on a sample of past MA dissertation proposals 4. What is the role of a literature review? Group discussion in relation to preliminary proposals 5. Meetings with Dissertation Supervisors 6. Presentations of research proposals and group feedback 7. Presentations of research proposals and group feedback 8. Presentations of research proposals and group feedback 9. Course Conclusion Teaching Methods: Students will attend a combination of plenary sessions on how to design and write a successful MA dissertation with smaller interactive discussion groups. In the second half of the semester each student will present their work-in-progress and receive feedback from group discussion and from the tutor. Attendance at all sessions of this unit forms part of its assessment Preliminary Readings: Buckler, S. and Dolowitz D. (2005) Politics on the Internet: A Student Guide, London: Routledge Burnham, P., Gilland, K., Grant, W. & Layton-Henry, Z. (2004) Research Methods in Politics. London: Palgrave Macmillan Harrison, L. (2001) Political Research: An Introduction, London: Routledge Landman T. (2003) Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics: An Introduction, London: Routledge

Course Title Tutor

POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Dr Adrian Blau

Outcome: By the end of the course students will be able to understand and evaluate different philosophies of social science; recognise how they apply to the actual study of politics; appreciate the similarities and contrasts between the study of political theory, political science, public/social policy, and international politics; and understand key theoretical terms in social science and politics, by completing a glossary. Content: How and why do we study politics in the ways that we do and should we do things differently? This course examines key issues in the philosophy of social science, with special attention to the way we actually do political science and political theory. (While many philosophy of social science courses are very abstract, this course is also aimed at guiding the practice of research in politics.) We will examine such issues as: whether politics is a science; the logic of generalisation and comparison; the fact/value distinction; interpretivism and the social construction of reality; different ideas of rationality; the analysis of power; and different types of concepts. Teaching Methods: Methods Weekly 2-hour seminar Assessment: One 3,500-word essay (75%), glossary (15%), participation (10%). Preliminary Reading: Gary King, Robert Keohane and Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994). Jon Elster, Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)

Core Pathway Modules


Theoretical Political Economy Pathway Pathway Course Title Tutor(s) POEC60062 POEC60062 Central Concepts in Political Economy Professor John ONeill & Dr Terry Peach

Aims: The unit aims to: Examine some of the central contested concepts employed in political economy; Consider the role these concepts play in different classical and modern approaches to political economy; Analyse their use in the texts of central theorists in political economy; Enable students to analyse and employ the concepts and to evaluate the different approaches to their use in political economy. Objectives: Objectives: On completion of the course students will be able to: Analyse and employ a number of central concepts of political economy Appraise the arguments employing those concepts in the theoretical traditions of political economy Analyse the use of the concepts in some central texts in political economy. On completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate: the ability to analyse the arguments of key texts; ability to develop clear and well-structured arguments of their own on the topic; the ability to write a cogent and well-argued essay on a topic taken from the course unit; the ability to give a successful seminar presentation on a topic from the course unit.

On completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate: the ability to produce an advanced and substantial piece of individual written research work, to an agreed deadline; quote appropriately from published texts, and use one of the recognised referencing systems in line with the demands of accepted good practice in academic and professional writing; the ability to set appropriate goals and to work both independently and cooperatively present a clear and well-structured argument in discussion. On successful completion of this course unit, participants should have developed: analytic and critical skills; the ability to argue from evidence; the ability to communicate ideas effectively; problem solving skills

Assessment: Assessment: Essay 3500 words 75%; Presentation (15%) and participation (10%) 25% Course Content: Content: Different theoretical traditions in political economy offer competing accounts of a number of concepts that are central to political economy, such as welfare, rationality, selfinterest, value, invisible hand, liberty, distribution, accumulation, growth, class, power, exploitation and justice. The different conceptions of such concepts are central to the debates between classical, Marxian, Austrian, institutional and neoclassical approaches to political economy. Moreover some of the concepts used to describe those traditions themselves, such as classical economics and institutional economics are themselves subject to debate. In this course we look in detail at the analysis of some of these central concepts in political economy. Doing so will allow us to deal comparatively with the texts of some of the major theorists in the field, such as Hume, Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Hayek and Sen. Teaching Methods: Methods: Teaching will take place in 8 weeks. Each week will involve a two-hour seminar. Students will be assigned reading to do each week, and the seminar will be led by different students each week, each of whom will have prepared a short presentation on the weekly topic.

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Course Title Tutor(s)

GEOG70951 Marxist Political Economy Professor Erik Swyngedouw

Aims provide students with a theoretical grounding in Marxist political economy introduce students to the central classical traditions of political economy; enable students to critically analyse and employ central concepts in political economy. Objectives: Objectives: On completion of this unit successful participants will have: read and understood the key text of Marxist Political Economy Capital Volume 1 attended the seminars, and participated in discussion; analysed and employed some of the central concepts of political economy. the ability to formulate their own informed views about the traditions and texts studied; the ability to write a cogent and well-argued essay on a topic taken from the course unit; the ability to give a successful seminar presentation on a topic from the course unit. the ability to produce an advanced and substantial piece of individual written research work, to an agreed deadline; the ability to quote appropriately from published texts, and use one of the recognised referencing systems in line with the demands of accepted good practice in academic and professional writing; the ability to set appropriate goals and to work both independently and cooperatively. Key Transferable Skills: On successful completion of this course unit, participants should have developed: the ability to communicate ideas effectively; Problem solving skills. Analytic and critical skills. The ability to argue from evidence. The ability to set appropriate goals and to work independently and/or cooperatively. Assessment One essay submission w/c 25th January 2010 3500 worth 75%; Seminar Presentation 15%; Attendance/participation 10% Course Content The first week will be an introductory session that will outline the work of Karl Marx, the dialectical method and the foundations of historical materialism. Capital Volume I will be situated in Marxs oeuvre. We shall, during the subsequent weeks, read and discuss Capital Volume 1. The course will be based on close reading, analysis and presentation of the argument developed in Capital Volume 1 with an emphasis on the contemporary significance of reading Marxs original text. Teaching Methods Teaching will be seminar based, with a two hour seminar each week over nine weeks. A student will introduce each weeks topic by giving a presentation on it. There will also be an initial two hour meeting in which the convenor will present an overview of the course and its topics. Preliminary reading Marx, K. Capital Volume 1. Penguin Classics Harvey D. Limits to Capital, Verso (2007 new and updated edition) Auxiliary Texts: Fine, B. (2003) Marxs Capital. Pluto Press. Gouverneur J. (1983) Contemporary Capitalism and Marxist Economics. Barnes and Noble. Hardt A., Negri, A. (2004) Empire. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press Harvey, D. (1981) Limits to Capital. Oxford: Blackwell Harvey, D. (2004) The New Imperialism. Oxford: Blackwell Harvey D. (2009) Reading Marx Capital, Verso (publication date Nov 2009)
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Mandel, E. (1962) Marxist Economic Theory, Merlin Press. Ollman, B. (2003) Dance of the Dialectic. University of Illinois Press. Ollman, B. (1993) Dialectical Investigations. Routledge Web Resources http://davidharvey.org/reading-capital/

Course Title Tutor

ECON60212 Poverty, Inequality & Government Policy in Less Developed Countries Dr Indranil Dutta

Aims The aim of this course is to address the question of what is meant by development and the implications which this has for: (a) the construction and interpretation of different indices of a society's well-being and (b) the degree and type of government's role in the process. Objectives At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) demonstrate an understanding of the different notions of development; (ii) establish the links between different notions of development and different indices of wellbeing, inequality and poverty; (iii) identify and calculate the major relevant indices of inequality and poverty; (iv) establish the links between the different notions of development and the role of the state; (v) demonstrate an understanding of the major elements of new institutional economics; (vi) critically evaluate the degree to which the new institutional economics provides support for the construction of development enhancing institutions. Assessment essay (counting for a 1/3 of the final mark) and two-hour unseen written exam (counting for 2/3 of final mark) at the end of semester 1 Course Content Topics include: * the meaning of development; * the concept of development and its relationship to policy objectives; * the meaning of the standard of living and indices to measure it; * inequality; its meaning and measurement; * poverty; its meaning and measurement; * construction and use of developmental indicators e.g. the UNDP's human development indicator; * market failure and the role of the state; * government failure and the role of the state; * new institutional approaches to development; * the implications of the new institutional economics for policy. Preliminary reading Sen, Amartya (1973), On Economic Inequality, Oxford University Press.

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Political Economy of Society, Space & Environment Pathway Course Title Tutor POEC61002 POEC61002 Politics, , Economics & Environment Politics Professor John ONeill

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE UNIT A variety of different and competing decision making tools and procedures have been employed in environmental decision making from formal procedures such cost-benefit analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis to deliberative institutions such as citizens juries and consensus conferences. In this course we look at the theoretical underpinnings of these different approaches. Doing so will take us into foundational issues in ethics, in particular those surrounding the utilitarian assumptions of some of these approaches. It will cover issues in social and political philosophy concerning the use of market-based approaches to the solution of environmental problems, different models of democracy and their role in environmental policy making, the appeal to justice and equality within and between different generations in environmental policy, and the compatibility of environmentalism with liberalism. Aims: Aims: The unit aims to: Introduce some of the main economic approaches to social choices about the environment in theory and practice; Examine the utilitarian underpinnings of these approaches and the debates in ethical theory about their adequacy Consider recent deliberative approaches to environmental choices; Critically assess the adequacy of these deliberative approaches Objectives: On completion of the course students will be able to: Demonstrate knowledge of some major approaches to environmental decision making; Critically examine attempts to price environmental goods; Understand the theoretical foundations of cost-benefit analysis; Critically discuss different accounts of justice between and within generations; Appraise the major different approaches to sustainability; Consider the theory and practice of deliberative democracy as applied to environmental decisions; Assess the problems in extending standard accounts of decision making to include the interests of non-humans and future generations demonstrate the ability to analyse the arguments of key texts; demonstrate ability to develop clear and well-structured arguments of their own on the topic ; demonstrate the ability to write a cogent and well-argued essay on a topic taken from the course unit; demonstrate the ability to give a successful seminar presentation on a topic from the course unit. demonstrate the ability to produce an advanced and substantial piece of individual written research work, to an agreed deadline; quote appropriately from published texts, and use one of the recognised referencing systems in line with the demands of accepted good practice in academic and professional writing; demonstrate the ability to set appropriate goals and to work both independently and cooperatively present a clear and well-structured argument in discussion. On successful completion of this course unit, participants should have developed: analytic and critical skills; the ability to argue from evidence; the ability to communicate ideas effectively; problem solving skills Learning and teaching processes: Teaching will take place in 8 weeks. Each week will involve a two-hour seminar. Students will be assigned reading to do each week, and the seminar will

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be led by different students each week, each of whom will have prepared a short presentation on the weekly topic Assessment: One essay, 3500 words; 75%: Seminar Presentation; 15%: Participation; 10%

Course Title Tutor

IDPM60801 Environment & Development Dr Philip Woodhouse

Aims This module identifies the ways that concerns with environment and natural resource management affect development policy and practice. Objectives Students completing this course will be expected to be able to demonstrate: Critical analysis of the role of scientific measurement and political values in defining environmental problems in developing countries and strategies to combat them; Understanding of the theoretical basis for frameworks of environmental governance and familiarity with the experience of implementing such frameworks in developing countries; Familiarity with models of environmental decision-making proposed to achieve sustainable development. Assessment One 3,000 word essay (100%) Course Content Making development sustainable? : Environmental Impact Assessment, sustainability indicators, and participatory decision-making. Environmental uncertainty: the role of science in environmental politics: case studies. (supported by a tutorial) Climate Change and its implications for Development The Spectre of Malthus: population growth and environmental change. The tragedy of the commons: property rights and environmental management. (supported by a tutorial) Decentralisation and equitable resource management (supported by a tutorial) Treaties and Markets: International Environmental Regulation and Management An overview of governance frameworks for managing environmental dimensions of development Teaching Methods 8 x 2-hr Lectures & 3 x 1-hr Tutorials Preliminary reading Adams, W. (2001) Green Development (2nd Edn) Routledge. Forsyth, T (2003) Critical Political Ecology Routledge London Leach, M. and Mearns R. (1996) The Lie of the Land. James Currey, Oxford. Ostrom E. (1990) Managing the Commons. Cambridge University Press. Peet , R and Watts, M (2005) Liberation Ecologies (2nd Edn) Routledge, London. Robbins, P (2004) Political Ecology: A critical Introduction. Blackwell, Oxford

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Course Title Tutor

GEOG70912 Issues in Environmental Policy Dr Noel Castree

Aims and objectives: To provide participants with a detailed working knowledge of the principles, practices and outcomes of environmental policy today To explore some of the key challenges of enacting environmental policy To give participants a detailed understanding of environmental policy challenges in a range of sectors and locations Module description This unit offers participants a real world rather than purely theoretical perspective on the links between principles, practice and outcomes in the arena of environmental policy. It builds on the compulsory semester 1 course unit for the MSc in Environmental Governance (Theories of Environmental Governance) to explore how different governance paradigms play-out on the ground. It also provides the wider policy and regulatory context for the compulsory course unit Seminars and key texts in environmental governance, enabling participants to relate the challenges faced by environmental organisations to the policy domain. The unit is split into two sections. The first maps-out some of the principal dimensions of environmental policy and explores some of the generic facets, institutions and concepts of environmental regulation. The second part, which comprises the bulk of the unit, takes participants into different topical-arenas each week, exploring how policy is framed and enacted in the spheres such as water resources, minerals extraction and atmospheric pollution. Emphasis is placed on real-world challenges and the outcomes of policy implementation. The module is team taught, and over the weeks quite aside from the topical variations the course team will expose participants to different substantive aspects of environmental policy today from the challenges of multi-level governance to the differences between hard and soft (voluntary) environmental measures, and so on. Also, a range of relevant stakeholders and institutions in the environmental policy domain will be encountered over the weeks. Finally, the ethical and moral choices that are necessarily built-into all environmental policy measures will be highlighted throughout; environmental policy is not only a technical issue because values and choices about desirable goals are always involved. Assessment The module is assessed purely on the basis of one extended piece of written work. Key journals: journals European Policy and Governance (previous called European Environment); Review of Environmental Economics and Policy; Local Environment; Journal of Environmental Planning and Management. Indicative session: session Title Governing global climate change: policies, problems and solutions Climate change, writes political scientist Scott Barrett, is arguably the greatest collective action problem the world has ever faced (2008: 257). There will be two readings: Helm, D. (2008) Climate change policy: why has so little been achieved?, Oxford Review of Economic Policy 24, 2: 211-38 Barrett, S. (2008) Climate treaties and the imperative of enforcement, Oxford Review of Economic Policy 24, 2: 239-58. Indicative further reading: Barrett, S. (1998) the political economy of the Kyoto Protocol, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 14, 4: 20-39; Bohringer, C. (2003) The Kyoto Protocol: a review and perspective, Oxford Review of Economic Policy 19, 4: 451-66; Mathews, J. (2007) Seven steps to curb global warming, Energy Policy 35: 4247-59.

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Political Economy of Finance, Business & Employment Pathway Course Title Tutor ECON61222 Industry, The Corporation and Government Dr David Young

Aims The aim of this course is to develop an understanding (both in theoretical and applied terms) of the behaviour of firms, the relationship between firms and the government, and the factors affecting industrial performance. Objectives At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) demonstrate a basic understanding of the traditional structure, conduct, performance paradigm and recent developments in industrial economics that have gone beyond this paradigm; (ii) use these basic concepts for analysing in depth a number of applied areas, especially innovation, competition policy and utilities regulation; (iii) critically evaluate the current state of knowledge in these areas. Assessment Examination in January 100% Course Content This course aims to provide a broad overview of the key analytical approaches which have been employed to study the functioning and performance of industry in both developed and less developed country settings. Following an examination of the basic SCP model and an introduction to notions of market structure and market power, the course goes on to review more up-to-date theoretical developments in the field of industrial organisation. From then on the focus of the course becomes somewhat more applied as the theory encountered earlier is used to shed light on such policy-relevant matters as the promotion of competition, the efficient regulation of public utilities and the encouragement of product and process innovation within enterprises. Teaching Methods Lectures Preliminary reading A substantial reading list is provided below. To assist students some of the most relevant, influential or useful readings for each topic have been starred. While no single volume comprehensively covers all of the topics examined by the course, the following are very useful textbooks: Carlton D. and Perloff, J. Modern Industrial Organization 4th. ed. (2004) Clarke, R., Industrial Economics (1985). Davies, S. et al., Economics of Industrial Organisation (1988). Devine, P. et al., Introduction to Industrial Economics (4th ed; 1993). Hay, D. and Morris, D., Industrial Economics (2nd ed; 1991). Martin, S., Advanced Industrial Economics (2001). Sawyer, M., The Economics of Industries and Firms (2nd ed; 1985). Scherer, F. and Ross, D., Industrial Market Structure and Market Performance (3rd ed; 1990). Waterson, M., Economic Theory of Industry (1984).

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Course Title Tutor

BMAN62011 Global Politics & Global Business Huw Maca Macartney

Aims: More formally, the course aims to examine exactly what is the connection between Aims global politics and global business. It looks at some of the most important actors, institutions and processes. It is a course, above all, in politics because, for better or worse, the political environment of business, and the nexus joining the firm and the state, are what matter in making sense of the business face of globalisation. Learning outcomes: In part the learning outcomes are substantive, and relate to the themes outlined above: at the end of the module those who take the course will have an appreciation of actors, processes, and debates. But the course also has more general pedagogic aims. A Masters course marks a departure from the prescriptive frameworks of undergraduate study. Learning here is therefore student led. Formal instruction involving passive receipt of information is kept to a minimum; there is emphasis on active and small group work and on the student led creation of case material. Teaching and learning: Lectures Assessment: Research Paper 100% Course Content: Week 1: Introduction Week 2: The Phenomenon of Globalisation? Week 3: Democratic Citizenship & Global Business Regulation: Is there a problem? Week 4: Global Business & Financial Globalisation? Week 5: Global Business & The First World Week 6: Global Business & The Third World Or The Fourth World Week 7: Hollowed Out State, Regulatory State or Competition State? Week 8: Institutions of Global Regulation Week 9: Normative Perspectives Week 10: Course Review Preliminary Reading: There are two course texts: David Held and Anthony McGrew, eds, The Global Transformations Reader, 2nd ed., Cambridge, Polity, 2003 Jan Aart Scholte, Globalization: a critical introduction, 2nd edition, revised, Basingstoke, Macmillan Palgrave, 2005

Course Title Tutors

POLI60291 Business & Politics under Advanced Capitalism Professor Michael Moran

Aims: The course unit aims to: To examine the contours of business power in the leading capitalist economies. To describe the main ways business now organises as an interest in these economies To examine the impact of business in selected policy domains To link the study of business in the Union to established theories of business power under democratic capitalism. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to demonstrate: Describe the changing pattern of business lobbying

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Describe the debates about how business power is impacting acting on selected policy domains Link the debates about business at EU level with wider analytical debate about business power under democratic capitalism.

Content: The analytical context: theories of business power. The economic context: models of capitalism and business power. The historical context: the development of business organisation. Configurations of business organizations in selected systems: the United States, United Kingdom, European Union and Japan. The organization of business lobbying at the global level. Teaching and learning methods: 1 x 1 hour, 7 x 2 hour seminars Assessment: Assessed essay Seminar Presentation Participation

3,500 words 15 min oral

75% 15% 10%

Preliminary reading: G.K. Wilson, Business and Politics: a comparative introduction, 3rd ed. Palgrave: 2003. Michael Moran, Business and Politics. Oxford University Press, 2009.

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Political Economy of Development Course Title Tutor ECON60072 Growth Development & Economic Transformation Dr Xiaobing Wang & Dr Bernard Walters

Aims: The central aim of the course is to give an overview of how economists have theorized about how a less developed country (LDC) becomes developed, with particular attention paid to structural change and economic transformation, especially how an economy becomes industrialized. The focus is on the early stages of development and very long run growth. Subsidiary aims are: identifying some of the urgent theoretical issues which hang over development economics; exposing students, through contact with the literature in the leading journals, to the frontiers of research in growth and development in LDCs; evaluating alternative perspectives; and developing the analytical skills to access the literature and to appraise critically competing viewpoints. Objectives: Objectives: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: Appreciate the complexity of development; Argue and consider varying viewpoints in this area of studies; Identify the major issues a country faces in the early stages of development; Gain an understanding of industrialization and economic transformation; Be familiar with and have a clear understanding of the current discussions on growth and development; Understand of the origins of modern growth theory; Understand the role of demand for long run growth; Recognise the importance of trade for development for growth; Be familiar with alternative, non-mainstream approaches to growth and development; Appreciate the new approach of growth diagnostics; Content: Topic 1, World Income Differences: Timing of Modern Growth Topic 2, Population and Income in Early Development Topic 3, The Role of Agriculture and the Emergence of Industry Topic 4 The Dual Sector Models Topic 5, Structural Change and Economic Development Topic 6, The Role of State Topic 7. The importance of demand for growth models. Topic 8: Endogenous Growth theory: a critical Assessment Topic 9: Growth Diagnostics Preliminary Reading: Acemoglu, Daron, 2009, Introduction to Modern Economic Growth, Princeton University Press. Meier, Gerald M. and James E. Rauch, 2005, Leading Issues in Economic Development, Oxford University Press, 8Rev Ed edition. Thirlwall, A. P. 2005, Growth and Development: with Special Reference to Developing Economies, Palgrave Macmillan; 8Rev Ed edition Thirlwall, A.P., 2002, The Nature of Economic Growth: An Alternative Framework for Understanding the Performance of Nations, Edward Elgar. Assessment A two-hour exam worth 100%

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Course Title Tutor

IDPM60072 Political Economy of Development Dr Sarah Bracking

Aims The course uses political economy to illuminate and critically evaluate development possibilities, constraints and outcomes. Within a historical context it reviews the way our global and institutional architecture has been formed, how it operates today, and how it might be influenced. The approach is empirical and practical, in the sense that is focuses on the requirements for successful development, - such as global public goods, foreign direct investment, international market access, labour - and how these are regulated, distributed and rationed. Students who take this course will achieve a broad political economy lens through which to see how other issues in development are framed. The course will include case studies of different ways countries have tried to benefit from globalisation processes, foreign direct investment, opportunities to industrialise and engage in migrant labour regimes. Objectives To provide a historical and theoretical knowledge of global economic governance and the global institutions of governance which shape political economies To review the role of political economy as a cornerstone discipline of Development Studies To provide an overview of different paradigms of political economy used in international development To illustrate the overriding ways in which debt, aid, trade, investment, and mineral resource endowments affect different developing countries prospects To assess past and current prospects of industrialisation and manufacturing in Southern countries To explain the modus operandi of major institutional regulators in the global economy, including the WTO, IMF and World Bank To analyse the representation of political economy issues in the global governance discourse To review the experience to date of developing countries influence in changing the rules of the game in the global political economy To contextualise theoretical political economy within case-study examples Assessment One 3,000 word assignment (100%) Course Content Lectures 1. Political economy of development: are the inter-state system and the global economy in conflict? 2. Markets as institutions: The political economy of market formation and market collapse [Also Seminar 1 in week two] 3. Generating resources for development (1): structural adjustment, debt and the development banks 4. Reading Week [Seminar 2 in week four] 5. Generating resources for development (2): the role of industrialisation, foreign direct investment (FDI) and multinational corporations (MNCs) 6. The political economy of agriculture, agribusiness, and rural resources [Seminar 3 in week 6] 7. Mining and development 8. Public Finance and Poverty Reduction [Seminar 4 in week 8] 9. Generating resources for development (3): the state and labour (20 April) (week 30)

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Seminars What contribution can political economy make to understanding development? How do countries attract (or repel) development finance and foreign direct investment? (Including the role of multinational companies in development). What are the prevailing patterns of industrialisation and labour relations (inc. migration) to newly industrialising economies? What is the resource curse in relation to minerals and oil? How can we explain the political economy of agriculture and agribusiness? What are the opportunities and problems of global regulation? Globalisation? Teaching Teaching Methods 8 lectures of 1 hours & 4 guided sessions of 1 hours Preliminary reading Afshar H and Barrientos S (1998), Women, Globalisation and Fragmentation in the Developing World, Macmillan Bisley, N (2007) Rethinking Globalisation Palgrave Macmillan Bond, P (2006) Looting Africa, ZEDbooks Bracking, S (2008), Money and Power: great predators in the political economy of development, Pluto Books Bush, R (2007) Poverty and Neoliberalism, Pluto Press Chari, S and Corbridge, S (2009), The Development Reader, Routledge Hoogvelt, A (2001) Globalisation and the Post-colonial World: The New Political Economy of Development, Macmillan Kiely, R (2006) New Political Economy of Development Palgrave Macmillan Madeley, J (1999) Big Business Poor Peoples: The Impact of Transnational Corporations on the Worlds poor, Zed Books Murray, W E (2006) Geographies of Globalisation, Routledge Palan, R (2000) ed. Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories, Routledge, London Payne, A (2005) The Global Politics of Unequal Development, Palgrave Polanyi, K (2002), The Great Transformation, forward by Stiglitz J reprint. Beacon Press, Boston Potte,r R B, Binns, T, Elliott, J A, Smith, D (2004) Geographies of Development, Pearson Saad-Filho, A and Johnston, D eds. (2004), Neo-Liberalism: a Critical Reader, Pluto Press Spratt, S (2009), Development Finance, Routledge Thirwell, A P(2006) Growth and Development, Palgrave, Williams, G, Meth, P and Willis, K (2009), Geographies of Developing Areas, Routledge

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Optional Optional Pathway Modules


Theoretical Political Economy pathway Course ECON60101 Title Microeconomic Theory Tutor Chris Birchenhall Aims The aim of this course is to lay the foundations of an understanding of the modern, advanced principles of microeconomic analysis. Objectives At the end of this course students should have a graduate level of understanding of (i) consumer theory as a basis for analysis of demand and welfare, (ii) the fundamental theorems of welfare economics and market failure, (iii) the theory of production and cost functions together with the theory of investment, (iv) strategic games and (v) the basic elements of contract theory Syllabus and reading list Topics: Consumer theory including dual models. General equilibrium, welfare economics and market failure. Uncertainty, prices and, time allowing, investment. Theory of production and costs. Strategic Games Insurance, asymmetric Information and contract theory. Textbooks: H Gravelle and R Rees, Microeconomics, Longman, Third edition (2004). ISBN: 058240487-8. Frank Cowell, Microeconomics: Principles and Analysis, Oxford University Press, 2006. ISBN: 0199267774. Geoffrey A. Jehle and Philip J. Reny Advanced Microeconomic Theory, 2nd Edition, Addison-Wesley (2001) ISBN: 0-321-07916-7. Hal Varian, Intermediate Microeconomics, Norton, Fifth Edition (1999). ISBN: 0-39397370-0. Hal Varian, Microeconomic Analysis, 3rd edition, Norton (1992) ISBN: 0-393-95735-7. Avinash Dixit and Susan Skeath, Games of Strategy, Norton, (1999) ISBN: 0-39397421-9. Advanced References Paul Milgrom and John Roberts, Economics, Organization and Management, Prentice Hall, (1992). ISBN: 0-13-224650-3. Andreu Mas-Collel, Michael D Whinston and Jerry Green Microeconomic Theory, Oxford UP, (1995). ISBN: 0-19-510268-1 (Pbk). Further References Detailed notes will be supplied for much of the course and these will contain additional references. Test and Assessment Essay Formal assessment of the course is based on a two hour unseen examination in January 2010. Further details of the examination will be given in class. Formative assessment will be based on a compulsory one hour test and an optional essay. Further details on the test will be provided in class. The test and the optional essay do not form part of the courses formal assessment.

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Course Title Tutor

ECON60111 Macroeconomic Theory Prof Keith Blackburn

Aims: The aim of this course is to provide rigorous training in the principal methodologies, theories and techniques of modern macroeconomic analysis. Objectives Objectives: jectives At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) understand and critically evaluate alternative approaches (ii) develop models of their own from which to derive original results. Assessment 1 hour test, 2 hour examination in January. Information Pre-requisites: Students must be taking eithECON60081 or ECON60561, or must demonstrate an appropriate quantitative background Course Content representative agent models overlapping generations model real business cycles, imperfect competition and nominal rigidities; growth and fluctuations Teaching Methods Lectures and Tutorials Preliminary reading Blanchard, O and Fischer, S, Lectures on Macroeconomics. For preliminary reading, students may wish to consult: Romer, D, Advanced Macroeconomics.

Course Title Tutor(s)

PHIL60051 Ethics Dr Tom Smith

Aims: The aim of this course is to familiarise students with some of the main philosophical issues in ethics. Objectives Intended Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit successful participants will have: (a) read and understood some of the main texts from the relevant reading lists and from elsewhere; (b) attended the seminars, and participated in discussion; (c) acquired and developed the analytic skills which are necessary for the formation of their own considered views, for the evaluation of questions, and for putting forward good answers. Key Transferable Skills: On successful completion of this course unit, participants should have developed: Problem solving skills. Analytic and critical skills. The ability to argue from evidence. The ability to communicate ideas effectively. The ability to set appropriate goals and to work independently and/or cooperatively.

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Assessment Two essays 3500 words each 100% Two compulsory Presentations - non-assessed Participation/Attendance - non-assessed but marks may be deducted for unexplained absences Course Content This course will focus on four questions of ethics: (i) which sorts of things are of ethical value and disvalue? (People? their actions? their intentions? their characters? the situations that they get themselves into?), (ii) what does their possessing this value demand of us? (e.g. that we bring about the greatest happiness of the greatest number? that we treat others as ends, not means? that we do unto others as we would have them do unto us?), (iii) how do these demands motivate our actions (e.g. by arousing our passions, or our reason?), and (iv) why does it matter to us that these demands are met (i.e. why do we care about the demands that are made by morality)? Teaching Methods Teaching will be seminar based, with a two hour seminar each week over seven weeks. A student will introduce each weeks topic by giving a presentation on it. There will also be an initial one hour meeting in which the convenor will present an overview of the course and its topics, and a final meeting of one hour. Preliminary reading Nagel T. The Possibility of Altruism. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1970. Parfit D. Climbing the Mountain (Available in draft form at: http://individual.utoronto.ca/stafforini/parfit/parfit_-_climbing_the_mountain.pdf). Wiggins D. Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality. London: Penguin, 2006 Williams B. Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy. London: Fontana, 1985.

Course Title Tutor

POLI60181 Global Justice Dr Tom Porter

Aim: Problems of global justice are at the forefront of debates in contemporary political theory. This course aims to introduce postgraduate students to these debates. The main focus of the course will be on theories about the global distribution of material resources and power between individuals, nations and states. The course will examine cosmopolitan, nationalist, statist and other responses to questions such as these: How should resources, opportunities and power be distributed on the global scale? Can states or nations be held responsible for whether they are wealthy or poor? What do citizens of affluent countries owe to poor foreigners? What environmental duties, if any, are triggered by global climate change? Outcome: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: Understand and evaluate various positions on the main problems of global justice. Situate the global justice debate within broader debates within political philosophy. Develop their own responses to urgent and theoretically complex problems of global justice. Content: This course presents some of the major contemporary philosophical debates about global justice. The issues examined will include the existence and scope of moral duties of affluent individuals towards poor foreigners, the moral significance of nationality and cocitizenship, the possibility of just global governance, and immigration. In answering these questions special attention will be paid to the work of John Rawls, Thomas Pogge, Charles Beitz and other major contemporary political philosophers. Weekly topics will include: Global Poverty and the Demands of Morality; Cosmopolitanism and Global Egalitarianism; Restricting Global Redistribution: Patriotism and Nationality; Rawls on Global Redistribution and Human Rights, Immigration and Borders.

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Teaching Methods: Methods Teaching will take place in weekly two-hour seminars. Students will be assigned reading to do each week, and the seminar will be led by different students each week, each of whom will have prepared a short presentation on the weekly topic. Assessment: One essay of 3,500 words (75%), paper/presentation (15%), participation (10%) Preliminary Reading: Caney, Simon, International Distributive Justice, Political Studies 49 (2001) Pogge, Thomas, World Poverty and Human Rights, Polity, 2002 Rawls, John, Law of Peoples, Harvard University Press, 1999 Tan, Kok-Chor, Justice Without Borders, Cambridge University Press, 2004

Course Title Tutor

POLI70311 Critical approaches to International Political Economy Dr Stuart Shields

This module is a pre-requisite for POLI70282 Globalisation & IPE Aim:

To To To To

provide an advanced introduction to the major conceptual approaches in IPE. examine critically the utility of each conceptual approach. assess on this basis the body of IPE theory and the evolution of the field of IPE. enhance students' critical, evaluative and communicative skills.

Objectives: By the end of the course you can expect to: have developed a comprehensive and considered understanding of the field of IPE. have developed a critical understanding of the scholarly literature. be able to work with and be critical of key conceptual approaches. be able to identify salient issues and new areas of research within the discipline. have enhanced your critical, evaluative, and communicative skills through your participation in class discussions, your research and delivery of class presentations your production of a course essay and your contributions to a reflective seminar portfolio. Course Content: The course is designed as an advanced-level overview of the field of International Political Economy, with emphasis on an examination of the theoretical approaches and conceptual frameworks on which it rests. In doing so, the course sets the foundations for students to continue their exploration of key aspects of IPE in the second semester in POLI70282: Globalisation and IPE. The course begins by exploring the emergence of the field of IPE, its foundations and the intellectual project it sets out to advance. It then moves on to examine in turn the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of IPE, starting with realism and neorealism and moving through liberalism and neoliberal institutionalism, classical Marxism, neo-Marxist dependency and world systems theories, neo-Gramscian theories, feminism, and constructivism. The course concludes by returning to the questions of the nature of IPE and its contributions, and of its future directions. Teaching Methods: 1 one hour introductory session 7 weekly two hour seminar Assessment: 3,500 word assessed essay (75%); presentation (15%); and seminar portfolio (10%) Preliminary Reading: Susan Strange, States and Markets: An Introduction to International Political Economy (second edition, Pinter, 1994) Nicola Phillips (ed.) Globalizing International Political Economy (Palgrave, 2005).

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Ronen Palan (ed.), Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories, (Routledge, 2000). Theodore H. Cohen, Global Political Economy: Theory and Practice, (third edition, Longman, 2004).

Course Title Tutor

POLI70611 Normative Analysis and Moral Reasoning Dr Tom Porter

Aim: This course aims to introduce postgraduate students to normative analysis and moral reasoning through the evaluation of rival contemporary theories of justice. The course will place special emphasis on understanding the ideals of liberal egalitarianism by examining both its major proponents and critics. Outcome: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: Employ a rigorous analytical approach in critically evaluating the key theories of justice in contemporary Anglo-American political philosophy. Examine and critique the central claims of liberal egalitarianism, libertarianism, and communitarianism, among others. Develop their own responses to urgent and theoretically complex problems of justice. Content: This course introduces postgraduate students to normative analysis and moral reasoning through contemporary debates about justice. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the best liberal egalitarian, libertarian, communitarian, and egalitarian approaches to justice offered in recent debates. Students will critically examine the work of Rawls, Nozick, Sandel, Dworkin and Cohen, among others. The course covers a diverse set of philosophers, but is focused on examining and assessing the best available answers to the problems of distributive justice. Weekly topics: 1) Utilitarianism: For and Against, 2) Justice as Fairness, 3) The Libertarian Objection, 4) The Communitarian Objection, 5) The Egalitarian Objection, 6) Equality of Resources, 7) Equality of Welfare. Teaching Methods: Methods Teaching will take place in weekly two-hour seminars. Students will be assigned reading to do each week, and the seminar will be led by different students each week, each of whom will have prepared a short presentation on the weekly topic. Assessment: Essay of 3,500

words

(75%),

paper/presentation

(15%),

participation

(10%).

Preliminary Reading: Clayton, Matthew and Andrew Williams (eds.) Social Justice: A Reader (Oxford: Blackwell) Kymlicka, Will. Contemporary Political Philosophy: 2nd Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press) Rawls, John, A Theory of Justice (Oxford: Oxford University Press)

Course Title Tutor

POLI70282 Globalisation & International Political Economy Dr. Stuart Shields

The module POLI70311 Critical Approaches to IPE is a pre-requisite for this course Aim: This course will interrogate a range of core issues and topics in IPE. The central theme will be

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the relationship between markets, hierarchies and networks in the emergence and consolidation of complex governance structures and processes in the context of globalisation. Students will develop a theoretically informed understanding of changing processes of political and economic governance in a globalising world. The course will start with an introductory session, followed by a session on the historical trajectory of globalisation. Subsequent sessions will cover a diverse range of topics: trade, finance, production, labour/migration, regionalism, and resistance. Outcome: On completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical and empirical knowledge of a range of issues including: whether (and in what ways) globalisation is essentially an economic process, a sociological process and/or an economic process; how political stability, power and norms are related to particular challenges arising from changing patterns of production, trade, finance, the environment, socio-cultural reproduction and the like; what kinds of institutional frameworks are evolving in the attempt to cope with the internationalisation and transnationalisation of economic activities; the political, ideological and normative implications of these changes; and the role of such questions in shaping International Political Economy as a field of study. Content: Include modes of governance of political and economic systems, the role of industrial structure and technology, the relationship between production and finance, the roles of labour and gender, trade, the environment, development, 'global governance', and the evolution of IPE. Teaching Methods: 2-hour seminar once a week for 7 weeks plus 1 hour organisational meeting Assessment: 3,500 word essay (75%), presentation (15%), tutorial portfolio (10%) Preliminary Reading: Ronen Palan, ed., Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories (Routledge, 2000) Nicola Phillips, ed., Globalizing International Political Economy (Palgrave, 2005) Robert OBrien and Marc Williams, Global Political Economy (Palgrave, 2007)

Course Title Tutor

POLI 70721 Theories Theories of Rights Dr Jethro Butler

Aim: The aim of this course is to examine recent attempts to provide a firm theoretical foundation for rights-discourse. Attention will be given to contemporary writings in moral philosophy, political philosophy and jurisprudence. Questions to be considered include: What is a right? Which theory of rights offers the best defence for rights? Do children or animals have rights? How do rights relate to other elements of a moral or political theory, such as duties and goals? Are there good reasons to abandon rights-discourse altogether? Outcome: Students will be expected to develop a good understanding of a selection of recent articles on rights theory and thus to equip themselves to take an informed and critical position on current controversies about rights. In so doing, they will acquire experience in the analysis, construction and presentation of theoretical arguments. Content: Summary of Topics 1. The analysis of rights (Hohfeld, interest theory, choice theory) 2. Subjects of rights (animals, children, future generations) 3. Human rights, welfare rights 4. Rights and utility 5. Self-ownership and property rights 6. Rights and autonomy
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7. Scepticism about rights Teaching Methods: The course will be taught in seven 2 hour sessions with a 1 hour introductory session. Seminars will include presentations by students, to be arranged at the first meeting where advice will be given regarding their format and content. Assessment: One essay of 3,500 words on a selected seminar topic (75%) plus a formal presentation to the seminar group of approximately 10 minutes (15%). Participation and attendance will form the basis of the remaining 10% of the final total mark. Preliminary Reading: Peter Jones, Rights (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 1994) purchase of this text is required Jeremy Waldron, Theories of Rights (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984).

Course Title Tutor

POLI70872 Democracy: Theory and Practice Dr Andrew Russell and Dr Stephen de Wijze

Aim: To provide a bridge between the theory and practice of democracy as found in the local, national and international arenas. Using theoretical insights, definitions and concerns, the aim of the course is to focus on a number of empirical and practical problems which concern democratic theorists and practitioners around the world. Outcome: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: Understand the key normative ideas that underlie democratic theory, and demonstrate this understanding by applying these insights to solving contemporary practical problems. Some examples of these problems are: 1. overcoming the democratic deficit, 2. ensuring adequate representation for women and minorities in liberal democratic pluralist societies 3. Finding ways of modernising elections 4. Educating the countries youth about democracy. On completion of this unit successful students will be able to demonstrate: An in-depth knowledge and understanding of the values and goals underlying democratic theory. An ability to identify and describe the complex problems that arise in the implementation of democracy at the local, national and international levels. Show an in-depth critical knowledge of the attempts to solve various contemporary problems associated with democratic theory and its application. The ability to critically reflect on the contemporary debates concerning the democratic deficit, the representation of minorities in a liberal democratic society, teaching civic skills in schools especially those concerned with inculcating the values of democracy, the effect of different electoral systems on the realisation of democratic values and ideals. To articulate and defend their own position vis vis the value and importance of democratic values and their practical implementation at the local, national and international arenas. Content: This course examines the important normative theoretical frameworks which discussions of democracy and its applications take place. For example, some of the key questions are: Why is democracy valuable? What values underlie the ideal democratic system? Should democracy be modelled on the idea of a forum or market place? These important insights are then applied to several practical concerns and issues which concern contemporary societies at the local, national and international levels. Weekly Topics: (1) Organization/Introduction (2) Democracy: Normative Underpinnings. (3) Democracy: Market or Forum? (4) Democracy and Liberalism: natural bedfellows?
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(5) Democratic Systems: Proportional versus Winner-Takes-All. (6) Representing minorities and gender in democratic societies. (7) Applying democracy at the local, national and international levels: problems and pitfalls. (8) Teaching democratic values to children and attracting first time voters. (9) The democratic deficit: turnout problems, modernising elections, compulsory voting. (10) Democracy and international affairs: what model of democracy should the UN use? Teaching Methods: 8 x 2 hour lectures Assessment: One essay of 3,500 words (75%), paper/presentation (15%), participation (10%). Preliminary Reading: Beetham, D. (2005) Democracy: A Beginners Guide (Oxford: One World Publications) Blais, Andre (2000) To Vote or Not to Vote: The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press). Christiano, Thomas (ed.) (2003) Philosophy and Democracy (Oxford: OUP) Dahl, Robert. (2000) On Democracy (New Haven: Yale UP) Eliasoph, N. (1998) Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) Fasulo, L. (2004) An Insider's Guide to the United Nations (New York; UNDP) Goodin, R. & Pettit, P. (1997) Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology (Blackwell). Gutmann, Amy and Dennis Thompson. Democracy and Disagreement (Cambridge: Harvard UP) Milner, Henry (2002) Civic Literacy: How Informed Citizens Make Democracy Work (Hanover: University Press of New England). Parkinson, John. (2006) Deliberating in the Real World: Problems of Legitimacy in Deliberative Democracy (Oxford: OUP) Pattie, C., Seyd, P. & Whiteley, P. (2003) "Citizenship and Civic Engagement: Attitudes and Behaviour in Britain" Political Studies 51, 443-68. Putnam, Robert (2000) Bowling Alone: the Collapse and Revival of American Community (New York: Simon & Schuster). Russell, Andrew; Fieldhouse, Ed; Kalra, Virinder & Purdam, Kingsley. (2003) Electoral Commission: Research Report "Voter Engagement & Young People" Shapiro, Ian (2003) The State of Democratic Theory (Princeton:Princeton University Press) Skocpol, Theda & Fiorina, Morris (eds.) (1999) Civic Engagement in American Democracy (Washington/New York: Brookings Institute/Russell Sage Foundation,). United Nations Development Programme Website: Online: http://www.undp.org/governance/ Wattenberg, Martin (2002) Where Have All The Voters Gone? (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press).

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Political Economy of Society, Space & Environment pathway Course Title Tutor ECON60281 Environmental Economics Economics Dr Dan Rigby

Aims Aims: The aim of this course is to familiarise students with the theoretical and empirical aspects of basic policy issues facing less developed countries (LDCs) in the international economy. Objectives At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) explain the key international trade and finance policy choices facing policy-makers in developing countries; (ii) assess critically aidsupported macroeconomic reform policies implemented in LDCs; (iii) demonstrate their understanding of LDCs position in the international economy and of the global factors that influence LDCs growth and development prospects. Assessment one essay of up to 2,500 (counting for 1/3 of the final mark), and one two-hour unseen written exam in January (counting towards 2/3 of the final mark). Information Pre-Requisites: ECON10041 or ECON10042 or ECON10081 or ECON10082 Course Content The course covers topics on *trade policies, *industrial sector policies, and *international financial flows to developing countries including multinational investment, debt and aid. Teaching Methods Diploma Course; Lectures/Tutorials Preliminary reading The basic textbooks for this module are: Todaro, M. and S. C. Smith (2002)*, Economic Development, Eighth edition, Longman. *There is an excellent website that accompanies this text which contains, on a chapter by chapter basis, a summary of key concepts, multiple choice quiz, recommended further readings, glossary, and a website search facility. The address is www.booksites.net/todaro. 9th edition in 2006 would be fine, but the page and chapter numbers follow 8th edition Thirlwall, A.P. (2003), Growth and Development, Seventh edition, Macmillan. * 8th edition in 2006 would be fine, but the page and chapter numbers follow 7th edition. Slightly more advanced and theory-oriented than Todaro and Smith. Lecture materials are largely based on two textbooks.

Course Title Tutor

ECON6042 ECON60422 422 Environmental Valuation Johannes Sauer

Aims: The module aims to introduce students to the rationale for, and theoretical basis of, environmental valuation. It trains students in the analysis and interpretation of data generated by commonly used environmental valuation methods.

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Objectives: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to demonstrate they can: (i) recognise and describe different categories of value attached to environmental goods and their attributes, (ii) explain the theoretical basis for environmental valuation, (iii) understand the similarities and differences between valuation mechanisms, (iv) develop and estimate various econometric models for environmental valuation, (v) assess the controversies regarding the use of valuation methods and some of the theoretical and philosophical issues surrounding those controversies. Syllabus and reading list o Framework for Environmental Valuation I - Introduction - Categorisation of Economic Value - Overview of Valuation Mechanisms: production function, revealed preference method, stated preference method, benefits transfers o Framework for Environmental Valuation II - Welfare Economics for Non-Market Valuation - Value of Public Goods - Willingness-to-pay (WTP) & Willingness-to-accept (WTA) o Contingent Valuation - Parametric Models - Distribution-Free Models - Discrete Choice Models o Demand for Recreation - Single Site Demand - Site Choice Modelling o Hedonic Pricing - Identification Problem - Hedonic Price Equations o Practical Applications, Guestlectures and New Directions Textbooks: - Champ, Boyle, and Brown (2008). A Primer on Nonmarket Valuation. Kluwer. - Garrod, G. And Willis, K. (1999). Economic Valuation of the Environment: Methods and Case Studies. Edward Elgar Publishing. - Haab & McConnell (2003). Valuing Environmental and Natural Resources: The Econometrics of Non-Market Valuation. Edward Elgar Publishing. - Pearce, D. (2006). Environmental Valuation in Developed Countries Case Studies. Edward Elgar Publishing. - Rietbergen-McCracken, J. and Abaza, H. (2000). Environmental Valuation: A Worldwide Compendium of Case Studies. Eartscan Publications Limited. Assessment: 2 hour examination 50%; 2000 word essay 30% & a Practical Assessment 20%

Course Title Tutor

GEOG GEOG70901 OG70901 Theories of Environmental Governance Dr James Evans

Aims: - Provide students with a grounding in the key theoretical approaches to environmental governance. - Understand the dominant approaches to environmental governance - Interrogate and apply the main critiques of dominant approaches to environmental governance - Explore how ontological, epistemological, explanatory and normative issues are connected within respective theories of environmental governance

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Objectives: Category of outcome Knowledge and understanding

Students should be able to:


Understand the main tenets of environmental governance Be conversant with the major approaches to environmental governance in the modern world Evaluate different approaches and critique them in relation to one another Be aware of the key contemporary debates and challenges within the field Think critically and independently Analyse and evaluate different kinds of argumentation Make connections between theoretical arguments and realworld cases Assess the merits of contrasting theories and their policy implications Read advanced academic literature Develop, articulate and sustain logical, structured and reasoned arguments in both written and oral contexts Communicate inter-personally Motivate and self-direct their learning

Intellectual skills

Practical skills Transferable skills and personal qualities

Information: This unit introduces students to the concept of environmental governance, and the main approaches to it adopted today. It will consider governance in the broadest sense, including how the environment is controlled, manipulated, and regulated (and the contestation of these processes) by a range of actors and institutions, and the cognitive and normative ideas that underpin this process. The unit will explore a broad range of approaches that span the political spectrum from left to right, in addition to considering more contemporary debates within the field. Abstract theoretical and conceptual material is intended to complement case studies of real world issues and applied policy examples from other course units, and to prepare students intellectually for future research. The unit will equip students with the necessary grounding to appreciate how different political and philosophical systems can be used to organise environmental regulation. The over-riding rationale of the unit is to provide students with the ability to recognise and critique the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to environmental governance. The unit is delivered primarily through structured seminars and debates in order to facilitate student engagement with ideas and concepts. Content: Content: The first five sessions of the course explore how we understand environmental concerns and governance, focusing on the shift from government to governance, and what this means in the context of environmental issues. The course then moves on to consider specific approaches to governing the relations between society and the environment. Influential critiques are put into play against these dominant approaches in order to encourage students to critically reflect upon contemporary approaches to environmental governance. The provisional programme for the unit is: 1. Introduction 2. The environment as political problem 3. The state and governance 4. Environmental governance 5. Governmentality 6. Reading week 7. Free market approaches 8. Radical critiques of the free market 9. Ecological modernisation 10. Risk society 11. Public participation 12. Post-structural critiques

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Teaching Methods: The unit will be delivered through small group sessions based around open seminar style discussions of set readings, supported by Blackboard discussion threads. The schedule is fairly challenging in order to cover the wide range of theories, and all students will be expected to read and to prepare prior to each session. Each week will involve students posing pertinent questions, offering reasoned answers and presenting information or ideas emerging out of the set reading more generally. Students will be expected to (i) show understanding of arguments, (ii) offer critical evaluations of the material and (iii) use readings to critique readings from other weeks. Assessment: Assessment task Long essay The assignment will require skills in critical thinking, analysis and evaluation of a major theoretical area that compares, contrasts or elaborates on the frameworks and ideas laid out in the course. Assessment criteria will include: Structure of essay (including quality of introduction, quality of conclusions, coherence/integration, consistency of prose style). Content of essay (including understanding, conceptual content, critical insight, evaluation, use of appropriate bibliographic materials). Presentation of essay (including coherence (reads as written by one person), quality of writing (style, expression, clarity), appropriate use of in-text citation, bibliography (breadth and accuracy), overall presentation, spelling and grammar). Class participation Marks awarded on the basis of the quality of individual students participation in class discussion. Assessment criteria will include: Length 2800 words Weighting within unit (if relevant) 70%

N/A

15%

Attendance Willingness to participate in discussion Evidence of reading Critical thinking (as evinced by the academic quality of verbal
contributions) Blackboard participation Marks awarded on the basis of the quality of individual students contribution to Blackboard discussion tasks. Assessment criteria will include:

N/A

15%

Completion of all tasks Quality of participation in tasks Contribution to open discussions

Course Title Tutor

GEOG GEOG70920 OG70920 Seminars & Key Texts in Environmental Environmental Governance Dr James Evans

Aims: The unit aims to: - engage meaningfully with a key academic or policy text on environmental governance through the production of a review essay and delivery of an oral presentation. - provide students with examples and understanding of the real-world applications of the theories and tools of environmental governance taught on the course. - expose students to key sectors in the environmental field and enhance their understanding of environmental governance in practice.

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Information: This student-centred and led unit runs across semesters 1 and 2, and complements Theories of Environmental Governance and Issues in Environmental Policy. In semester 1, students will write a critical review essay of a major text in the field of environmental governance, either selected from a list, or chosen by the student in consultation with the module leader. This work will be individually driven, and will allow students to focus on an aspect of environmental governance that interests them. A deeper understanding of a specialist area will be gained, while students will also enhance their critical skills. In semester 2, students attend a series of seminars given by professionals working in the environmental sector. These seminars will provide practical examples of environmental governance challenges in the real world, and give the students an understanding of the range of organisations working in the environment sector. They will give students a valuable chance to talk about employment and/or research opportunities with external organisations. Objectives: Category of outcome Knowledge and understanding

Students should be able to:


Demonstrate detailed specialist knowledge of a significant dimension of environmental governance. Understand how to construct a critical academic review. Display a working knowledge of the environmental sector in the UK, and an appreciation of their potential target employment market. Appreciate the real-world challenges associated with environmental decision-making in practice. Evaluate arguments and think analytically Write concisely and critically Situate a key text within a wider literature and wider intellectual, public and/or policy debates Relate theories and principles to real world challenges faced by environmental organisations Critically evaluate the opportunities and challenges facing different types of environmental organisation Reflect upon what type of organisation they would like to work in Identify possible employment sectors in which they would like to work Manage their time in a programme of student-led learning Engage in online debate. Evaluate arguments and think analytically Learn independently Reflect upon their own preferences

Intellectual skills

Practical skills

Transferable skills and personal qualities

Teaching & Learning Methods: This unit emphasises student-centred learning and aims to foster independent study skills. Semester 1: Students will be given time to read an entire text and think about it on a deep level. There will be an introductory session in week 2, followed by a text selection and writing workshop in week 4. Students will be expected to submit a draft of the review in week 8, and then to edit the draft in the light of the feedback and comments on the draft essay. Semester 2: Students will typically attend 6-8 seminars given by guest speakers representing a range of organisations operating in the field. Speakers will be drawn from a wide range of backgrounds covering public bodies, NGOs, professional organisations and private consultants. The seminars will focus upon the roles of different organisations, the challenges facing them, the stakeholders who they must engage with, successes and failures, and reflections upon the broader policy context in which they operate. Discussion threads will be set up on Blackboard for students to exchange comments and views on speakers. For the assessment for Semester 2, students will be required to complete
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personal blog entries noting their reflections (personal and academic) on 4 of the speakers. The blog entries are intended to be fairly informal and allow students to explore their own ideas and predilections for different sectors of the environmental industry. Assessment: Assessment task Review essay Based upon the critical reading of a key text. It will provide a critical review of the structural and substantive aspects of the text and its place within the wider literature. The review essay will be assessed formatively as a draft prior to redrafting and final submission. Assessment criteria will include: Structure of review (including quality of introduction, quality of conclusions, coherence/integration, consistency of prose style). Content of review (including understanding of text, conceptual content, critical insight, evaluation of text, use of appropriate bibliographic materials). Presentation of review (including coherence (reads as written by one person), quality of writing (style, expression, clarity), appropriate use of in-text citation, bibliography (breadth and accuracy), overall presentation, spelling and grammar). Learning logs Personal log entries on Blackboard reflecting on 4 of the speakers. Assessment criteria will include: Ability to identify intellectual issues at play (how do the abstract issues and theories that have been learnt about relate to this speakers seminar?) Reflection on key challenges in that particular sector (ability to identify the underlying tensions that the speaker is dealing with, and the key issues at play) Personal reflection (some commentary on whether this job and/or sector of the industry is appealing, and what skills may be required (either by the speaker or yourself) to operate in it) Length 2000 words (minimum) Weighting 50%

500 words per entry

50%

Course Title Tutor

GEOG70 GEOG70521 OG70521 Climate Change, Politics & Activism Dr James Evans

Aims The unit aims to: provide students with a theoretical grounding in climate change politics; familiarise students with key arguments regarding political tactics regarding climate change; enable students to interpret and respond to information they encounter about climate change outside of class. Objectives Knowledge and understanding Demonstrate detailed specialist knowledge of a significant dimension of climate change politics. Display a working knowledge of the role individuals can play within the unfolding of climate change. Appreciate the real-world challenges associated with climate change politics and environmental decision-making in practice. Intellectual skills Evaluate arguments and think critically. Write concisely and accurately.
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Relate theories and principles to real world challenges faced by climate change organisations and activists. Critically evaluate the opportunities and challenges facing different types of climate change activism. Practical skills Interact with and experience climate change activists and activism. Manage their time in a programme of student-led learning. Find ways to engage in climate change debate . Transferable skills and personal qualities Evaluate arguments and think analytically. Learn independently. Reflect upon their own preferences Assessment One essay - 3,500 wor 75%; Seminar leadership - 25% Course Content TBC Teaching Methods TBC Preliminary reading TBC

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Political Economy of Finance, Business & Employment pathway Course Title Tutor Aims BMAN72201 Analysing Companies: Business Models, Narrative & Numbers Professor Julie Froud

To introduce the concept of business model as a way of understanding the opportunities and constraints faced by companies of different kinds in delivering financial performance. To introduce literatures on shareholder value and financialisation about how capital market pressure for financial results, which originated in the US and UK and is now widespread and has an impact upon strategic choices open to management To provide practical exercises on firms and business sectors which both test understanding and require students to apply concepts and demonstrate skills with company-based case material.

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:


Analyse company financial performance, understanding how revenues, costs and the external business environment contribute to understanding business models Apply techniques of financial analysis to companies and industries, as well as critically appraise secondary accounts of performance and trajectory Explain and use case material to illustrate the political and cultural economy arguments about how increased pressure from the stock market requires giant firms to produce a narrative of corporate purpose and corroborating financial numbers. Appreciate the significance of capital market actors in the development and presentation of strategy.

Content The course is designed to allow students to develop and apply techniques of financial analysis of firms and industries. It assumes little or no familiarity with basic performance indicators used to measure and interpret corporate performance. However, the course is not simply about how to analyse performance. First, it helps to develops understanding of the concept of a business model which allows consideration of both opportunities and constraints that arise from the product and the capital markets. Second, it provides relevant context by analysing corporate performance in an era of shareholder value where investors (especially institutional investors) are more demanding. Third, it introduces the importance of narrative or stories in understanding both how companies present their strategy and achievements, as well as how these are interpreted by external commentators like analysts and journalists. Altogether, this course provides an up-to-date overview of how many companies face multiple and complex problems in developing strategy and delivering improved performance. In addition to the difficulties many firms face in competitive, mature or highly regulated product markets, firms now encounter increased pressure to deliver higher returns to shareholders, as well as being the target of campaigns for shareholder value from hedge funds and other activist investors. The course draws extensively on international company cases (some of which are based on the lecturers own research). Through use of such case material, students gain an in-depth appreciation of the strategy and performance of large multinational firms like Sony and GlaxoSmithKline, as well as of smaller companies. The course is intended to develop general financial literacy and understanding of company and sectoral performance, as well as providing an opportunity to critically reflect on some of the assumptions that underlie many approaches to strategy. During the course there are interactive seminar sessions which allow discussion of company cases and other examples. Students will have the opportunity to prepare group presentations in some of these sessions, which facilitates development of presentation and communication skills. The provisional structure of the course is given below, though the lecturer reserves the right to update lecture and seminar topics in line with current events in the corporate sector and in financial markets.

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In most weeks the session will consist of a one hour lecture and a one hour discussion session, where advance preparation is usually required. Part 1: weeks 11- 3 Understanding business models: composition of costs, sources of revenues, financing companies Analysing company performance: operating performance, returns to investors The industry context: how industry helps shape company performance Part 2: weeks 44- 5 Classical strategy, firms and the product market Evaluating arguments about sources of competitive advantage and misunderstandings about performance Part 3: weeks 66- 8 The intrusion of the capital market: shareholder value, value based management and the evidence on value creation Corporate performance in a financialized world: narrative and numbers How do hedge funds, private equity and activist investors change the decision frame for corporate managers? Part 4: weeks 99-11 Researching a financialised company and its industry Industry example and presentations Company example and presentations Teaching Methods Lectures and seminars Assessment Individual written work (30%); 2 hour examination (70%) Preliminary Reading A full reading list with week-by week readings will be provided at the start of the course. As background reading, the following will be useful: Froud, J., Johal, S. Leaver, A and Williams K. Financialization and Strategy (2006) London: Routledge Ellis, J. and Williams, D. Corporate Strategy and Financial Analysis (Pitman) Rosenzweig, P (2007) Misunderstanding the nature of company performance, California Management Review, vol.49, no.4, pp.6-20

Course Title Tutor

BMAN62022 The Analysis of Business Structures Dr Susanne Espenlaub

PrePre-requisites Knowledge of intermediate microeconomics is essential. As background all students must read Chapters 1 to 7 of the course textbook. Students without economics background are strongly advised to review these chapters prior to the start of the course (and before deciding to embark on the course). Aims This course aims to introduce students to the main ideas involved in the economic analysis of business organisational structures. It focuses on the economics of organisational architecture. Based on Brickley, Smith and Zimmerman (2007) organisational architecture is viewed as consisting of three aspects of corporate organization: the way decision rights are assigned to individuals and subunits of the firm, the systems used to evaluate the performance of individuals and business units, and the methods of rewarding individuals.
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Attracting & retaining qualified employees Incentive compensation Individual performance evaluation

Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit successful students will be able to make sense of the academic journal literature on the economics of organisational forms. They will learn how to evaluate the organisational form of a business in terms of the way the business allocates decision rights, how individuals are held accountable for their decisions (i.e. how their performance is measured), and how rewards & penalties are linked to measured performance. Content The course focuses on the economics of organisational architecture including; Incentive conflicts & contracts The allocation of decision rights Bundling tasks into jobs & subunits Divisional performance evaluation Teaching Methods A mixture of lectures, seminars and reading of books & journal articles Assessment Essay (30%) Examination (70%) Preliminary Reading Brickley, J. A., Smith, C. W. Jr., Zimmerman, J. L. (2007) Managerial Economics & Organisational Architecture, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill. All students are expected to read Chapters 1 to 7 of this this textbook as background preparation.

Course Title Tutor

BMAN72142 ICT's and work in the new economy Debra Howcroft

Aims The new economy, although ill-defined, features prominently in debates and policy issues surrounding work and employment. This is premised on the assumption that ICTs are creating a dematerialized world and that the character, rhythms and pace of work is changing as a consequence The aim of this course is to investigate contemporary developments in working life, challenge some of the deterministic assumptions surrounding the nature of change, and better explain some of the transformations that are taking place in different sectors of the economy. Particular attention will be paid to IT-enabled work, ranging from call centre agents to software developers, with a view to asking what it is like to be a new economy worker. Learning Outcomes By the end of the course unit students should be able to: Demonstrate knowledge of technological change at work. Describe the changes in new patterns of working. Using IT-enabled work, illustrate the impact of technological change and innovation on working practices. Critically evaluate the implications of ICTs on labour markets, ranging from clerical through to professional work. Demonstrate the ability to carry out independent research and critical analysis. Content 1. Introduction. 2. Technological change and innovation at work 3. Work attachment, work centrality and the meaning of work 4. The changing terrain of work, employment and relationships in the global economy
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5. Organizational life: the nature of work 6. Household and work-life boundaries 7. Gender and technology work 8. Distributed work arrangements and telework 9. Case study I: New technology work (call centres) Case study II: New technology work (software development) Teaching Methods 10 x 2 hour lectures Assessment 30% individual essay (2000 words) and 70% exam

Course Title Tutor

BMAN70432 Mergers & Acquisitions: Economic & Financial Aspects Dr Paul Simpson

Aims The module aims to provide students with a conceptual framework that will help in the understanding of mergers and acquisitions. The perspective it adopts draws from a number of traditions but is primarily concerned with the economic and financial analysis of M&A, at both a domestic and increasingly at an international level. Using these, the course investigates how the basic principles arising from an extensive theoretical tradition can give meaning to a raft of empirical findings about the phenomenon. Although its main emphasis is on the conceptual and empirical perspectives, it seeks to provide an introduction to the practical aspects of company amalgamation. This is achieved from both a private, corporate perspective as well as from a public policy angle. Learning Outcomes On completion of this unit, successful students will have an understanding

of:

the various motivations for M&A the forms they may take the constraints on activity the success of mergers and their determinants policy issues surrounding M&A.

Content Historical Overview; Domestic vs. Cross-Border Mergers; Timing of Merger Waves; Alternative perspectives on motivation; Antitrust and Regulation; Takeover defences; The Market for Corporate Control; Issues around M&A. Teaching Methods 2 hour lectures over 10 weeks Assessment 2 hour examination 100% Preliminary Reading S. Sudarsanam (2003) Creating Value from Mergers and Acquisitions. Prentice-Hall. J. F. Weston et al (2002) Takeovers, Restructuring and Corporate Governance. Fourth Edition Prentice-Hall M.A. Hitt et al (2001) Mergers and Acquisitions. Oxford University Press S. Sudarsanam (1995) The Essence of Mergers and Acquisitions. Prentice-Hall.

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Course Title Tutor

BMAN70052 Multinational and Comparative Employment Systems Professor Damian Grimshaw

Aims This course unit has the objectives of enabling students to understand and explain: the implications of the growing internationalization of business and trade for the employment policies of companies; the character of persistent difference in national employment systems among advanced capitalist countries; how differences in employment institutions in different countries shape and constrain employment policies of multinational companies; the various ways multinational companies manage labour to meet complex cross-national operations in the production and delivery of goods and services the challenges to national employment systems posed by the increasing presence of multinational companies. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course unit students will be able to: identify changes in the key characteristics of the international business environment; explore research questions around the changing nature of the multinational company and its influence on national employment systems; demonstrate skills of comparative analysis of national employment systems. Content This course unit seeks to explain the growing role of multinational companies (MNCs) and the changing character of the international division of labour, in the context of a growing internationalization of business and trade and persistent differences in the employment systems of different countries. The course unit assesses the changing international business context. It considers the different dimensions of globalisation and introduces the student to features of national employment systems, focusing on systems of corporate governance and welfare, training and labour market regulation (wage-setting and employment protection). It explores how these employment systems interact with the variety of structures and strategies of MNCs, drawing on both international business and international HRM literature. A key feature of MNC HR practices is the degree of adaptation between home and host countries, with further variations across industry sectors. These issues are explored through careful readings of survey and case study results. The course concludes with a consideration of institutions governing pan-national labour standards. Teaching Methods Lecture/Seminar two hours per week for 10 weeks Assessment 2 hour examination 100% Preliminary Reading Harzing, A-W. and Van Ruysseveldt, J. 2004. (2nd ed). International Human Resource Management. London: Sage. Rubery, J. and Grimshaw, D. 2003. The Organisation of Employment: an International Perspective, London: Palgrave.

Course Title Tutor

IPDM60272 Global Institutions, Trade Rules & Development Dr Stephanie Barrientos

Aims The overall aim of this module is to analyse current issues and policy debates relating to economic development in the context of globalization and new public and private trade rules. The course will focus on the following issues: debates over the role of multi-lateral

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organisations and government in economic development, export promotion and the new challenges and opportunities faced in a globalized world economy; new trading issues and disputes in the WTO; World Bank, IMF and the Washington consensus; changing trade dynamics governed by Multinational Corporations (MNCs) and outsourcing through global production networks; the role of global standards, especially labour standards and corporate social accountability, in local patterns of economic development; Fair trade and alternative trading systems. Objectives On successful completion of the module study fellows should acquire: A comprehensive knowledge of the main theoretical and analytical approaches relating to global institutions (public and private) and trade policy in developing and emerging economies An awareness of the interactions between global institutions, new trade rules and national policymaking in developing countries An awareness of the role of public and private actors in the formulation of export strategies, trade policy and trade regimes An understanding of developments in the area of international standards and corporate social accountability A critical appreciation of the role of multinational corporations and questions relating to technological capability building and value chain upgrading. A critical awareness of the basis of Fair Trade and Alternative Trading Systems Assessment 4000-word essay (100%) Course Content The Lecture Programme will include: 1. Analytical Approaches to Global Institutions (Public and Private) and Trade Policy 2. The Washington Consensus: IMF and the World Bank 3. The Multilateral Trading System: GATT to the WTO 4. WTO: GATS and the Doha Round of WTO Negotiations 5: Global Standards, Trade Agreements and Voluntary Certification 6: Fair Trade and Alternative Trading Systems 7: International Labour Organisation and Labour Standards 8: Corporate Social Accountability and Ethical Trade 9: The Ethica Game: A role play game on Trade Rules, Global Competitiveness and International Development Teaching Methods 2 hours lecturer per week 9 X 2 = 18 total lecture hours for the semester 5 X 2 = 10 hours tutorials Preliminary reading Gruber, Lloyd. 2000. Ruling the world: Power politics and the rise of supranational institutions Princeton: Princeton University Press. Michael J. Trebicock and Robert Howse, 2005. The Regulation of International Trade, Third Edition. Bernard Hoekman and Petros Mavroidis (2007) World Trade Organisation: Law, Economics and Politics, Routledge. Sampson, Gary P., 2005. The WTO and Sustainable Development, United Nations University Press, c. 315pp. Porter, M.E. 1998c. The Competitive Advantage of Nations. London: Macmillan. G. Gereffi and R. Kaplinsky (eds) (2001) The Value of Value Chains, Spreading the Gains from Globalisation, IDS Bulletin Vol. 32. No. 3 July (Introduction especially) Barrientos, S and Dolan, C (2005) Ethical Sourcing in the Global Food System, Earthscan, London. Jenkins, R., R. Pearson, and G. Seyfang, 2002. Corporate Responsibility and Labour Rights, Codes of conduct in the Global Economy, Earthscan. J. Stiglitz and A. Charlton (2005) Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development, Oxford University Press

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Course Title Tutors

IDPM60711 Economic Development Michael Tribe

Aims The course aims to provide a thorough review and critical assessment of contemporary issues in economic development, covering the main analytical approaches, empirical evidence and policy issues in development economics. As a core module for the Masters in International Development, it will provide the knowledge base and analytical approaches for the Programme. Objectives: Objectives: On completion of the unit students will be able to: Understand and apply the main theories and models of economic development; Understand the role of the state and the market in facilitating economic development; Apply the knowledge and skills acquired to the study of the main forces sustaining and limiting economic development today, and the design of effective policy interventions. Assessment Essay 1: 1500 word essay (30%); Essay 2: 2500 word essay (70%) Course Content 1. Concepts, Definition and Measurement of Economic Development; 2. Economic Growth: Theory and Experience; 3. Economic and non-Economic Concepts of Poverty: Definitions, Measurement and Policy; 4. The International Dimension of Economic Development; 5. Paradigms Compared: Washington Consensus/Neo-Liberalism; Structuralism; Neo-Marxism; Post-Modernism and Post-Developmentism; 6. Economic Reform: Structural Adjustment and After; 7. The Environment, Development and Developing Countries; 8. Population, Development and Developing Countries; 9. Finance and Development; 10. Issues in Economic Policy for Development: Aid, Governance, Poverty Reduction and Decentralisation Teaching Methods 1 * 2 hour lecture per week + 3*1 hour seminars/tutorials Preliminary reading H-J Chang (ed). 2003. Rethinking Development Economics. London: Anthem Press. Clunies-Ross, D. Forsyth and M. Huq. 2009. Development Economics. London: McGrawHill. J.M. Cypher and J.L. Dietz. 2008. The Process of Economic Development (3rd ed). London: Routledge. G.M. Meier and J.E. Rauch (eds). 2005. Leading Issues in Economic Development (8th ed). Oxford: Oxford University Press. J. Ravenhill (ed). 2008. Global Political Economy (2nd ed). Oxford: Oxford University Press. A.P. Thirlwall. 2006. Growth and Development (8th ed). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. M.P. Todaro and S.C. Smith. 2008. Economic Development (10th ed). Harlow: Addison Wesley Pearson.

Course Title Tutors

IDPM60131 Work & Employment in the Global Economy Dr Stephanie Barrientos

Aims The aim of this course is to examine key conceptual approaches, trends and debates relating to work and employment in the global economy. It will examine conventional and critical theories of work and employment, approaches to workers rights, labour market regulation and

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specific dimensions of labour markets such as economic migration, gender, informality and unfree labour. The course will explore changing dynamics of work in a global economy, including rising mobility and insecurity of work. It will also provide analysis of different approaches to workers rights and labour market regulation in a global economy, including private sector codes of labour practice (ethical trade), global union international framework agreements and international labour standards in trade agreements. Objectives: Objectives: On successful completion of this unit students will Demonstrate a grounded understanding of conceptual approaches, empirical trends and labour regulatory regimes Understand and be able to compare conceptual and analytical debates over work and employment in the development of the global economy Be able to critically evaluate empirical data, case studies and official reports on work and employment in the global economy Have developed their critical, analytical and writing skills, and ability to work collaboratively through academic engagement with peers on the course. Assessment 4,000 word essay (100 %) Course Content Work and Employment: Analytical Approaches and Trends Feminisation of Labour Economic Migration Informal Work Unfree Labour Child Labour Ethical Trade and voluntary initiatives International Labour Standards and Decent Work Debate Teaching Methods Seminars/Lectures and tutorials Preliminary reading reading W. Milberg (ed) (2004) Labor and the Globalization of Production Basingstoke, Palgrave N. Castree, N. Coe, K. Ward and M. Samers (2003) Spaces of Work: Global Capitalism and the Geographies of Labour London, Sage. R. Munck (2002) Globalisation and Labour: The new Great Transformation , Zed Press. P. Waterman and J. Wills (eds.) Place, Space and the New Labour Internationalisms, Oxford, Blackwell Hale and J. Wills (eds) (2006) Threads of Labour: garment industry supply chains from the workers perspective Oxford, Blackwell. G. Gereffi (2006) The New Offshoring of Jobs, Geneva, International Labour Organisation Basudeb Guha-Khasnobis and R. Kanbur (eds). (2006) Informal Labour Markets and Development Basingstoke, Palgrave K. Elliott and R. Freeman (2003) Can Labour Standards Improve under Globalisation? Washington D.C., Institute for International Economics.

Course Title Tutors

IDPM60361 Micro Finance Dr Thahkom Arun

Aims During the last two decades, a `microfinance industry' has developed that seeks to provide low-income people with micro-financial services while being financially self-sustaining. The literature on microfinance has been characterised by different trends during this period and this module aims to analyse these trends in detail, particularly in developing countries and to explore key contemporary issues in the sector.
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Objectives: Objectives On completion of this course unit, students will be able to: Critically demonstrate the awareness of current issues and debate in the field of microfinance Analyse, and evaluate microfinance experiences and case studies and critically assess proposals for microfinance initiatives. Assessment 4000 word essay/project (100%) Course Content The global context of microfinance The institutional Basis - Basic theory;how is it supposed to work, and how does it work? Microfinance products - products diversification. The `customer centred approach; competition and linkage with commercial banking Microinsurance - Causes of failure in insurance markets; microfinance models and their history Gender and microfinance - reasons for `female bias' of microfinance Microfinance and poverty Case studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America The macroeconomics of microfinance Teaching Methods 1x3 hr lecture + tutorials Preliminary Preliminary reading J. Morduch, `The Microfinance Promise', Journal of Economic Literature, 1999 D. Hulme and P. Mosley, Finance against Poverty, Routledge, 1996 J.P.Krahnen and H. Schmidit, Developemnt Finance as Institution Building, Westview Press, 1995. Arun, T., Hulme, D., and Rutherford S., Matin, I. (2004) `Finance for the poor: The way forward', Chapter 9 in C.J.Green, C.H. Kirkpatrick and V. Murinde, Finance and Development, pp.304-15, EE. Arun, T.G and Hulme, D (2008), Microfinance - A Reader, Routledge, forthcoming.

Course Title Tutor

IPDM60002 Industrial Competitiveness Dr Khalid Nadvi

Aims Globalisation is transforming the world economy in radical ways. In particular, it is placing local producers under greater pressure to engage with, and compete in, the global economy in order to survive and grow. How can local producers in the developing world enhance their abilities and their competitive edge? How are such producers linked into global markets? What possibilities are there for such producers to innovate, acquire new know-how and grow? What are the new areas of competition? What evidence is there of global industrial success, and of industrial failure, within the developing world? What are the implications for policy? This module aims to address these questions by providing students with a thorough understanding of emergent areas within global competition and industrial development. It uses an analytical framework that incorporates macro analysis of trade and industrial policy with meso (sectoral) and micro (firm and household) level insights. In addition to providing a theoretical and conceptual understanding, it draws on recent empirical evidence and research case studies. Objectives: Objectives The course has three objectives. First, students acquire a thorough knowledge and understanding of key bodies of literature in the field of global industrial competitiveness, including a sense of the leading debates within this field and a grasp of the divergent empirical evidence from different parts of the world. Second, students engage critically with the literature. Through its emphasis on group-based and interactive learning the module will strengthen students abilities in undertaking critical
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reading,

in

participating

in

group

exercises

and

in

conducting

oral

presentations.

Third, students develop independent research skills in the area of industrial competitiveness. The module will strengthen students analytical abilities, allowing them the possibility to undertake independent desk-based research on their selected themes and promote their capacities to present high quality written outputs. Assessment One 4000 word essay (100%) Course Content: Content: The module is structured in four parts. Part 1 sets the context of the wider debate on the gains from globalisation, and its implications for industrial development. Part 2 address distinct aspects of industrial restructuring and international competitiveness. This includes discussion of the model of flexible specialisation and the restructuring of large scale manufacturing; the role of local industrial clusters in promoting local competitiveness, and the significance of global value chains in organising global production and distribution activities and its implications for upgrading and governance processes. Part 3 looks more closely at innovation and technical learning in bringing about upgrading, drawing on evidence on national innovation systems, knowledge systems and learning. Part 4 returns to the theme of winners and losers by focusing in greater detail on the comparative lessons of industrial competitiveness of the Asian Drivers (China, East Asia and India) on the one hand and sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America on the other. The module concludes with a policy game session that focuses on distinct strategies for promoting industrial competitiveness. Session 1: Introduction and context setting Session 2: The Globalisation Debate: Immiserising growth or sustained competitiveness? Session 3: New Perspectives on Industrial Organisation Flexible Specialisation, Industrial Clusters and Global Value Chains Session 4: Industrial clusters: Exploring empirical evidence of collective efficiency Group case studies Session 5: Global value chains: Empirical evidence of upgrading and governance Group case studies Session 6: Technical Capabilities, Upgrading, Innovation and Learning Session 7: Industrial success: Asian Drivers China, India, East Asia Session 8: Industrial failure?: Sub-Saharan Africa & Latin America Session 9: Ecal Game: From loser to winner: Promoting industrial competitiveness what lessons for policy? Session 10: Term Paper Discussion Teaching Methods Lectures, Seminars, Group Based Presentations. Preliminary reading There are no specific texts that cover all aspects of this course, and each session will have a detailed and distinct set of readings. Nevertheless, the following are recommended: Amsden, A., (2001), The Rise of the Rest: Challenges to the west from late industrializing economies, Oxford: Oxford University Press (see Chapter 1) Best, M.H., (1990), The New Competition: Institutions of industrial restructuring, Cambridge: Polity. Dicken P., (1998), Global Shift: Transforming the World Economy, Paul Chapman. Nadvi, K. and Schmitz, H., (1999), Industrial Clusters in Developing Countries, World Development, Special Issue, vol 27., no.9. (see. especially the introduction) Porter M., (1998), The Competitive Advantage of Nations, London: Macmillan. Schmitz, H., ed., (2004), Local Enterprises in the Global Economy: Issues of Governance and Upgrading, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. (see especially Chapters 1, 2 and 4) UNIDO, (2002), Industrial Development Report 2002/2003: Competing through Innovation and Learning, Vienna: United Nations Industrial Development Organisation

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Political Economy of Development pathway Course Title Tutor ECON60762 ECON60762 Agriculture in Economic Development Dr Adam Ozanne

Aims The aim of this course is to develop awareness of the continued importance of agriculture in economic development, and of the fundamental necessity for productivity growth to meet development requirements. Objectives At the end of this course students should be able to: (i) appreciate the role of agriculture in economic development; (ii) understand the economic importance of agricultural research and innovation in promoting agricultural development; (iii) demonstrate understanding of the concepts of economic efficiency, appropriate technology and induced innovation; (iv) explain the role of prices in steering technological change in the agricultural sector; (v) understand the importance of agricultures terms-of-trade for agricultural policy; (vi) explain why the peasant farm sector may not behave in ways fully consistent with the neo-classical theory of the profitmaximizing firm. Assessment One two-hour examination in May/June and an assessed essay Information Pre-requisite: Basic microeconomics. Course Content 1. The World Food Situation 2. The Role of Agriculture 3. Efficiency and Supply Response 4-5. Peasant Economies 6. Technical Change and Induced Innovation Theory 7. Appropriate Technology and the Green Revolution 8. Returns to Research 9. Primary-Export-Led Growth and the Terms of Trade 10. Agricultural Policy And Structural Adjustment Teaching Methods Methods Lecture/tutorial Preliminary reading The World Food Situation Alexandratos, N. (1995) (Ed) World Agriculture: Towards 2010 - An FAO Study, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, Chapters 2 and 3. Gittinger, J.P. et al (1987), Food Policy: Integrating Supply, Distribution and Consumption, John Hopkins, Ch's 1, 2 and 13. The Role of Agriculture Yujiro, H. and Ruttan, V. (1985), Agricultural Development: An International Perspective, Johns Hopkins, Ch.2. Ghatak, S. and Ingersent, K. (1984), Agriculture and Economic Development, Harvester Press, Chs 3 and 5. Carl K. Eicher and John M. Staatz, Agricultural Development in the Third World, Johns Hopkins, Ch.1 in both 1984 and 1990 editions, Chs. 2, 3 and 4 in 1990 edition. Efficiency and Supply Response Colman, D. and T. Young (1989), Principles of Agricultural Economics: Markets and Prices in Less Developed Countries, Cambridge University Press, Chs 3 and 4. Ghatak and Ingersent, op.cit., pp.123-41.
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Schultz, T.W. (1964), Transforming Traditional Agriculture, New Haven: Yale University Press, esp. Ch.3. Ellis, F. (1988), op.cit., Ch.4.

Peasant Economies Ellis, F. (1988), Peasant Economics: Farm Households and Agrarian Development, Cambridge University Press, Ch's 4 to 8. Technical Change and Induced Induced Innovation Theory Ellis, op.cit., Ch.11. Eicher and Staatz, op.cit., (1985), Ch.4, (1990), Ch.5. Appropriate Technology and the Green Revolution Eicher and Staatz (1984), op.cit., Ch.26 by Scobie and Posada and Ch.27 by Hayami (Note: Ch's 25 and 26 in the 1990 edition). P.B.R. Hazell and C. Ramasamy. (1991). The Green Revolution Reconsidered: The Impact of High Yielding Rice Varieities in South India. Johns Hoplins University Press. Baltimore. D.K. Freebairn (1995), Did the Green Revolution Concentrate Incomes? A Quantitative Study of Research Reports. World Development, 23, 2: 265 279. Returns to Research Eicher and Staatz (1984), op.cit., Chs 22 & 23 by Schultz and Ch.24 by Evenson. Leathers, H.D. and Foster, P. (2004, 3rd ed.), The World Food Problem, Lienne Rienner:London, pp.378-81. Lesser, W. and Lee, D. (1993), Economics of Agricultural Research and Biotechnology. Ch. 8 in A.J. Rayner and D. Colman (Eds.), Current Issues in Agricultural Economics, Macmillan, esp. pp.189-197. Ellis, F. (1992), Agricultural Policies in Developing Countries, Cambridge University Press, Ch.10, esp. pp.242-7. PrimaryPrimary-ExportExport-Led Growth and the Terms of Trade D. Colman and T. Young (1988), Economic Principles for Agricultural Development. Cambridge University Press, Ch.11 (pp.37-47). Colman and Nixson (1994, Second Ed.), op.cit., Ch.5, especially pages 159-168. I.D.M. Little, T. Scitovsky and M. Scott (1980), Industry and Trade in Some Developing Countries, Oxford University Press, Ch.2. Gillis, M. et al. (1992, Third Ed.), Economics of Development, W.W. Norton and Co., Ch.15. Agricultural Policy and Structural Adjustment Lensink, R. (1996), Structural Adjustment in Sub-Saharan Africa, Longman. Schultz, T.W. (Ed.) (1978), Distortions of Agricultural Incentives, Indiana University Press, especially papers by Schultz, Hopper and Johnson. Smith, L.D. (1988), "Structural Adjustment, Price Reform and Agricultural Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa", J. of Agric. Econ., 40(1), pp.21-31. Commander, S. (Ed.) (1989), Structural Adjustment and Agriculture: Theory and Practice in Africa and Latin America, Heinemann.

Course Title Tutor

IDPM60291 Trade Theory and Development Dr. Hulya Ulku

Aims The aim of the course is to provide analytical techniques to gain insight into international trade theory, trade policy tools and their implications for growth and development. Upon the completion of this course students will have a good understanding of trade theories, international trade policies, world trading system and their consequences on many issues in developing countries. The first half of the course will provide an in-depth analysis of main trade theories. This section aims to equip students with the skills to use trade theories to understand the impact of different trade policies and economic factors on economy. The second half of the
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course will focus on the practical aspects of the in international trade, such as political economy of trade, the effect of different trade policies on economic growth and development, and the implications of WTO rules for developed and developing countries. Objectives On successful completion of this unit students will: be expected to demonstrate a good understanding of the main trade models, their assumptions, implications, and differences among different theories be expected to use trade theories to provide an analytical discussion of the impact of a trade policy develop an understanding of the underlying causes of various trade policies of developed and developing countries from both economic and political perspective develop a critical understanding of the role of trade flows in promoting economic growth and economic development be able to critically discuss the issues related to trade openness, liberalisation and economic performance be expected to discuss the limits of trade policy reform Assessment 30% will be determined by a class group presentations and a 1500 report on the topic of the presentation. 70% will be determined by a 4000-word essay. Information Information Pre-requisites: The principles of economics and basic algebra. Course Content Lecture 1: Trade Theories: Overview of the Course; Introduction to Trade Theories; Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: the Ricardian Model. Lecture 2: Trade Theories: Factor Proportions (Heckscher Ohlin) Model Lecture 3: Trade Theories: Specific Factor Model and Standard Trade Theory Lecture 4: Trade Theories: Strategic Trade Theory Lecture 5: The Instruments of Trade Policy and the Lecture 6: Evaluating the Benefits and the Costs of Free Trade and Protection Lecture 7: The Political Economy of Trade Policy Lecture 8: Regionalism vs. Globalism: Trade creation and trade diversion. Discussion of NAFTA, Mercosur or the EU Lecture 9: WTO Rounds, TRIMS and TRIPS Lecture 10: Trade Policies in Developing Countries: Inward vs. Outward Trade Policies Teaching Methods Lectures and presentations Preliminary reading Krugman, P. R. and Obstfeld, M., "International Economics, Theory and Policy," 5th Edition, Addison, Wesley and Longman, 2000. Pugel, Thomas, International Economics, 12th edition, McGraw-Hill-Irwin, 2004. Begg, David, Fischer, Stanley, Dornbusch, Rudiger Economics, 7th Ed. Falvey, R.E., "The Theory of International Trade," Greenaway, D. and Winters, A. (edt.), "Surveys in International Trade," Blackwell, 1994. Economic Development and International Trade / Greenaway, D (Ed), Book, 1988 Dunkley, G., Free Trade: Myths, Reality and Alternatives, London: Zed Books, 2004. - ISBN 1-85649-863-8 Todaro, M.P., Smith, S.C., Economic Development, Eighth Edition, 2002. Cole, M., 2000, Trade Liberalisation, Economic Growth and the Environment, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ISBN 1-84064-176-2 Buffie, E., 2001, Trade Policy in Developing Countries / Cambridge University Press, - ISBN 0-521-00426-8 Hoekman, B; Kostecki, M., 2001, The Political Economy of the World Trading System: The WTO and Beyond, 2nd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-829431-X McCulloch, N; Winters, A; Cicera, X., 2001, Trade Liberalization and Poverty: A Handbook, London: Centre for Economic Policy Research, ISBN 1-898128-62-6

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Srinivasan, T.N. , 2000, Developing Countries and the Multilateral Trading System: From the Gatt to the Uruguay Round and the Future, Book, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press Hoekman, B; Mattoo, A, 2002, Development, Trade and the WTO: A Handbook, World Bank 2002, Washington-ISBN 0-8213-4997-X The Development Dimensions of Trade / OECD, 2001. - ISBN 92-64-19675-7 Toye, J., 2003, Trade and Development: Directions for the 21st Century, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2003. - ISBN 1-84376-044-4 Chang, H-J; Green, D., 2003, The Northern WTO Agenda on Investment: Do as we say, not as we did, Geneva: South Centre/ CAFOD, 2003 Correa, C., 2000, Intellectual Property Rights, the WTO and Developing Countries: The Trips Agreement and Policy Options, Zed Books / Third World Network, 2000. - ISBN 1-85649-7372 Peet, R, 2003, Unholy Trinity: The IMF, World Bank and the WTO London: Zed Books, 2003. - ISBN 1-84277-073-X

Course Title Tutor

POLI 70492 Human Rights in World Politics Dr James Pattison

Aim: to discuss, analyse and critically evaluate the foundations of human rights discourses in world politics, to research specific human rights issues informed by a theoretical understanding, to understand the role of historical context in shaping differing relationships between theories and practices of human rights, to develop a sensitivity to questions of exclusion and marginality, to enhance students' presentation skills, to promote and improve students' discursive skills, to encourage 'team-work' and co-operation in a learning environment and to raise to Masters level, students research skills. Outcome: By the end of this course you should be able to identify, outline, analyse and critically assess specific theories of human rights and how they inform specific practices, have a developed sensitivity to the context within which human rights theories and practices have arisen, have a sound grasp of the complex dynamics in world politics which frustrate the protection of human rights around the globe, express your own views with recourse to (and sometimes rejection of) the literature covered in the module, provide a well-structured and coherent presentation with the use of visual aids and answer questions about your presentation confidently. Content: This module is designed to provide an advanced introduction to questions of the theory and practice of human rights in world politics. The teaching programme revolves around three key areas: (1) the foundations of human rights; (2) the development of human rights norms and their enforcement in world politics; and (3) the exclusions and silences of the global human rights regime. Outline: Welcome Questionable universality Human rights and foreign policy: The United Nations I: The UN Charter and International Bill of Human Rights The United Nations II: The Vienna Conference Womens rights as human rights Guest speaker: An invited human rights practitioner Humanitarian intervention after the Cold War Teaching Methods: The course will be taught on the basis of seven, weekly, two-hour seminars plus a one hour welcome in the first week. Seminars are absolutely central to the learning experience at masters level and attendance is compulsory. Each student must prepare for every seminar questions and tasks have been set in advance. The achievement of learning outcomes wholly relies on your co-operation in preparing the set tasks ready for discussion. You are expected
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to contribute to the discussions based on wide reading. Each week a team of students will be called upon to make a group presentation. This is peer assessed and counts as 15% of your final mark. Student/s who are presenting will normally have a presentation task specified for them. This is to enable the seminar to succeed as a pedagogical whole and to facilitate as much free discussion as possible. Assessment: Assessment Essay of 3 500 words: 75%, Presentation to seminar group: 15%, Participation: 10% Preliminary Reading: Reading Dunne, Tim and Nicholas J. Wheeler, eds. (1999), Human Rights in Global Politics Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Course Title Tutor Tutor

ECON6 ECON61902 Topics in the Economic Development of China Dr Xiaobing Wang

Aims The course unit aims to familiarise students with different perspectives on the current issues of the Chinese economy: the development strategy, the source and the potential of economic growth, labour market integration and segregation, and income distribution. Objectives On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: (i) Gain an understanding of how Chinas reform period economy functions. (ii) Explore the degree and characteristics of Chinas transition and economic development. (iii) Establish the links between the labour market formation and the consequences for industrial development. (iv) Demonstrate an understanding of the current situation, the causes and the solution of the urban-rural divide and the increasing inequality. (v) Identify the major economic problems China is facing today and consider potential solutions. Assessment Presentation 10%; a 1500-word Essay 20%; 2 hours Unseen Examination 70% Information Pre-requisite: Intermediate Economics and Introductory Econometrics Teaching Methods Lectures and Tutorials Preliminary reading This course does not have a textbook. We shall learn from a large number of articles (mainly empirical) on the Chinese economy.

Course Title Tutor

ECON60691 ECON60691 Economics for Rural Development Dr Adam Ozanne

Aims The aim of this course is to provide students who have had no previous exposure to economics with an understanding of the basic concepts and underlying principles of microeconomic theory. For students with a non-economics background, it provides the foundation required for taking other economic courses.

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Objectives At the end of this course, students should understand and be able to explain the theories of production, consumption, exchange and welfare. Assessment Assessment One two-hour examination in January and a 2000 word assessed essay. Course Content Week 1: Intoduction: The Economic Problem Week 2: The Market Economy: Supply and Demand I

Market vs State
Week 3: The Market Economy: Supply and Demand II Week 4: Demand: Theory of Consumer Behaviour I

Sales Tax
Week 5: Demand: Theory of Consumer Behaviour II Week 7: Supply: Theory of Production I

Demand Theory
Week Week Week Week 8: Supply: Theory of Production II 9: Monopoly 10: Public Goods and Externalities 11: Welfare Economics: Equity vs. Efficiency

Externalities
Week 12: Revision Class

Public Goods
Teaching Methods Lectures and tutorials Preliminary reading There is no single best textbook for the course. However, study fellows are advised to examine the following three textbooks and purchase at least one. Begg, D., Fischer, S. and R. Dornbusch, Economics, McGraw-Hill, 1984 (2nd ed.). Chacholiades, M., Microeconomics, Macmillan, 1986. Colman, D. and T. Young, Principles of Agricultural Economics: Markets and Prices in Less Developed Countries, Cambridge University Press, 1989.

The following books have also been used in the preparation of the course: Heilbroner, R., The Worldly Philosophers, Pelican, 1983. Mair, D. and Miller, A.G. (editors), A Modern Guide to Economic Thought: An Introduction to Comparative Schools of Thought in Economics, Edward Elgar, 1991. Lipsey, R.G. and Chrystal, K.A, An Introduction to Positive Economics, Oxford University Press, 1995. Nicholson, W., Microeconomic Theory: Basic Principles and Extensions, Dryden Press, 1992 (5th ed.). Varian, H.R., Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, Norton, 1990 (2nd ed.). Pindyck, R.S. and Rubinfeld, D.L., Microeconomics, Maxwell Macmillan International, 1992 (2nd ed.). Ruffin, R.J., Intermediate Microeconomics, Harper Collins, 1992 (2nd ed.). Glahe F.R. and Lee, D.R., Microeconomics: Theory and Applications, Harcourt Brace Jovanovitch, 1980. Griffiths, A. and Wall, S., Intermediate Microeconomics: Theory and Applications, Pearson Education, 2000 (Second ed.). Field, B.C., Environmental Economics: An Introduction, McGraw-Hill, 1994. Besanko, D. and Braeutigam, R.R., Microeconomics, John Wiley & Sons, 2005 (Second ed.). Hubbard, R.G. and OBrien, A.P., Microeconomics, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006.

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Course Title Tutor

SOAN70761 Anthropology, Globalisation & Development Professor John Gledhill

Aims THERE WILL BE NO READING WEEK FOR THIS COURSE This course examines ways in which anthropology can contribute to the interdisciplinary study of globalization and development. Beginning from an analysis of the contemporary forms of capitalism and the political as well as economic dimensions of neoliberalism, it aims to highlight the ways in which ethnographically grounded research can enrich broader political economy-based perspectives through the analysis of specific issues such as urban poverty/violence and the workings of the global food system, emphasising the ways in which the problems of the South cannot be divorced from those of the North. The second half of the course examines anthropological critiques of the development process itself, the role of the multilateral agencies and the significance of recent changes in the discourse of the international agencies towards a greater focus on participation, pro-poor policies and social capital, concluding with a review of what anthropological research can teach us about the prospects for and problems with efforts to achieve radical change in current models of development through grassroots action. Objectives The course will give students an understanding of how development works in practice as well as the skills to critically assess some of the core assumptions on which development interventions are founded. Assessment One 4000-word assessed essay Course Content Development, Globalisation and Neoliberalism Capitalism or Capitalisms? Neoliberalism or Something Different? Latin America and Africa: The Development of Underdevelopment? Poverty, North and South The Latin American Megacity: Citizenship, "Social Exclusion", Urban Segregation and Violence The Political Economy and Political Ecology of Food: A Case Study of Global Interconnections Development as a Hegemonic Project Power, Empowerment and Participation Counter-Movements 1: The Changing Faces of Grassroots Social Movements in Latin America Counter-Movements 2: Anti- and Alter-Globalization Movements Teaching Methods Lectures/Tutorials Preliminary reading Ted. C. Lewellen's very clearly written and quite comprehensive introductory book - The Anthropology of Globalization (2002, Greenwood) is available as an ebook through the Rylands library. Type the title into the Rylands catalogue (http://catalogue.li.man.ac.uk/TalisPrsim) to access it (Athens password is required off-campus). You may find this a useful reference throughout the course. Several of the readers published by Blackwell offer a collection of relevant essays at a more advanced level. I particularly recommend: Ong, Aihwa and Stephen J. Collier (eds.). Global Assemblages: Technology, Politics and Ethics as an Anthropological Problem. (2004, Blackwell Publishing). and Edelman, Marc and Angelique Haugurud (eds.) The Anthropology of Development and Globalization: From Classical Political Economy to Contemporary Neoliberalism. (2004, Blackwell Publishing). An excellent text on the anthropology of development is
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Gardner, Katy and David Lewis, Anthropology, Development and the Postmodern Challenge (1996, Pluto Press).

Course Title Tutor

POLI6 POLI61022 Migration and the Global Political Economy of Inequality Professor Nicola Phillips

Aim: The course introduces students to the major debates surrounding contemporary migration and aims to foster a sophisticated understanding of the relationship between migration and global structures and politics of inequality. Migration is an under-explored theme in IPE and generally neglected in longstanding debates about globalisation, but represents one of the most dynamic and integral processes in contemporary patterns of global restructuring. It is central to a range of debates in IPE surrounding globalisation, transnationalisation, production and value chains, governance, development and citizenship. The conceptual theme of the course is inequality, which links these debates together and provides the most useful conceptual and empirical lens through which to think about migration. Outcome: On completion of this unit successful students will be able to: demonstrate a broad understanding of major approaches to the study of migration in the global political economy understand and be able to evaluate critically the relationship between migration and inequality in this context demonstrate their understanding of these issues through theoretical analysis and use of case studies have developed and improved their analytical, critical and writing skills have developed their abilities to work effectively with their peers in small and large groups. Content: The weekly breakdown of the course is as follows: Week Week Week Week Week Week 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: Introduction The changing global division of labour, global inequalities and migration Migration and the political economy of social inequality and exclusion Migration and development I: brain drain and the north-south divide Migration and development II: remittances and the new development agenda Migration, unfree labour and human trafficking

Teaching Methods: The course is taught on the basis of a one-hour introductory session and then five three-hour workshops. The course is taught in the first 6 weeks of the semester. Assessment: 3,500-4,000 word essay (75%), portfolio (25%). Preliminary Reading: Castles, S. and M. Miller (2009) The Age of Migration (fourth edition, Palgrave) Cohen, R. (2006) Migration and Its Enemies: Global Capital, Migrant Labour and the NationState (London: Ashgate). Kapur, D. & J. McHale (2005) Give Us Your Best and Brightest: The Global Hunt for Talent and Its Impact on the Developing World (Washington DC: Center for Global Development). Downloadable from http://www.cgdev.org/ Pritchett, L. (2006) Let Their People Come: Breaking the Gridlock on Global Labor Mobility (Washington DC: Center for Global Development). Downloadable from http://www.cgdev.org/ Sassen, S. (2001) The Global City: New York, London, Tokyo (Princeton University Press).

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MSc Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 Theoretical Political Economy Pathway (Standard Route) Route)
SEM 1 9.00 MONDAY TUESDAY TUESDAY ECON60111 (T) Macroeconomic Theory Coupland 3 Th A POLI60181 Global Justice HBS G34 PHIL60051 Ethics ALB G.018 POLI60181 Global Justice HBS G34 PHIL60051 Ethics ALB G.018 POLI70311 Critical Approaches to IPE Arthur Lewis G.019 THURSDAY POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson FRIDAY

10.00

11.00

12.00 POLI70721 Theories of Rights Simon 4.47 POLI70721 Theories of Rights Simon 4.47

ECON60111 (L) Macroeconomic Theory Roscoe 3.2 POLI70311 Critical Approaches to IPE Arthur Lewis G.019 ECON60111 (L) Macroeconomic Theory Roscoe 3.2 POLI70611 Normative Analysis & Moral Reasoning Simon 4.47 POLI70611 Normative Analysis & Moral Reasoning Simon 4.47 POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE Coupland 3 LG9 GEOG70951 Marxian Political Economy Coupland 3 LG9 GEOG70951 Marxian Political Economy Coupland 3 LG9

ECON60101(L) Microeconomic Theory Dover Street Basement Theatre ECON60101(L) Microeconomic Theory Dover Street Basement Theatre ECON60101(T) Microeconomic Theory Beyer Theatre

13.00

14.00

15.00

ECON60101(T) Microeconomic Theory Uni Place 4.211

16.00

17.00

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 Theoretical Political Economy Pathway (Sta (Standard Standard Route) SEM 2 9.00 MONDAY POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 TUESDAY WEDNESDAY

10.00

11.00

12.00

13.00

POLI70282 Globalisation & IPE Alan Turing G113 POLI70282 Globalisation & IPE Alan Turing G113 ECON60212 (T) Poverty, Inequality Roscoe 1.001 ECON60212 (T) Poverty, Inequality Roscoe 1.001

14.00

ECON60212 (L) Poverty, Inequality Coupland 3 LG10 ECON60212 (L) Poverty, Inequality Coupland 3 LG10 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8

15.00

POEC POEC60062 EC60062 Central Concepts in PE Crawford Seminar C POEC POEC60062 EC60062 Central Concepts in PE Crawford Seminar C POLI70872 Democracy: Theory & Practice ALB 4.051 POLI70872 Democracy: Theory & Practice 4.051

16.00 17.00

18.00

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 (Standard Standard Route) Political Economy of Society, Space & Environment pathway ( SEM 1 9.00 MONDAY TUESDAY ECON60281 ECON60281 Environmental Economics Uni Place 4.210 ECON60281 Environmental Economics Uni Place 4.210 WEDNESDAY IDPM60801 Environment & Development Coupland 3 LG9 IDPM60801 Environment & Development Coupland 3 LG9 THURSDAY POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson

10.00

11.00

GEOG70521 Climate Change, Politics & Activism Uni Place 6.206 GEOG70521 Climate Change, Politics & Activism Uni Place 6.206

12.00 GEOG70920 Seminar & Key Texts Coupland 3 LG10 GEOG70920 Seminar & Key Texts Coupland 3 LG10 GEOG GEOG70901 OG70901 Theories of Environmental Governance POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE Coupland 3 LG9 GEOG GEOG70901 OG70901 Theories of Environmental Governance GEOG GEOG70951 OG70951 Marxian Political Economy Coupland 3 LG9 GEOG70951 Marxian Political Economy Coupland 3 LG9

14.00

15.00

16.00

17.00

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 (Standard Standard Route) Political Economy of Society, Space & Environment pathway ( SEM 2 9.00 MONDAY POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 POEC61002 Politics, Economics & Environment Coupland 3 LG9 POEC61002 Politics, Economics & Environment Coupland 3 LG9 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8 WEDNESDAY THURSDAY GEOG70912 Issues in Environmental Policy Beyer Lec Th GEOG70912 Issues in Environmental Policy Beyer Lec Th

10.00

11.00

12.00

13.00

14.00

15.00

GEOG70532 Governing Global Environmental Change Beyer Lec Th ECON60422 Environmental Valuation Seminar A Crawford House GEOG70532 Governing Global Environmental Change Beyer Lec Th ECON60422 Environmental Valuation Seminar A Crawford House

16.00 17.00

GEOG70920 Seminar & Key Texts runs on Tuesdays at various times during semester 2

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 (Standard Standard Route) Political Economy of Finance, Business & Employment pathway ( SEM 1 9.00 TUESDAY BMAN62011 Global Politics & Global Business G6 MBS West BMAN62011 Global Politics & Global Business G6 MBS West WEDNESDAY IDPM60131 Work & Employment in the Global Economy Roscoe 3.9 IDPM60131 Work & Employment in the Global Economy Roscoe 3.9 BMAN72201 Analysing Companies 3.103 MBS W IDPM60131 Work & Employment in the Global Economy Roscoe 3.9 BMAN72201 Analysing Companies 3.103 MBS W BMAN72201 BMAN72201 Analysing Companies 3.103 MBS W THURSDAY POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson FRIDAY

10.00

11.00

12.00

13.00 IDPM60711 Economic Development Alan Turing G209 POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE Crawford Seminar C IDPM60711 Economic Development Alan Turing G209

14.00

15.00

IDPM60361 Micro Finance Uni Place 4.206

16.00

17.00

IDPM60361 Micro Finance Uni Place 4.206 IDPM60361 Micro Finance Uni Place 4.206

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 (Standard Standard Route) Political Economy of Finance, Business & Employment pathway ( SEM 2 9.00 MONDAY POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness HBS G33 Weeks 20/22/24 POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness HBS G33 Weeks 20/22/24 IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness HBS G33 Weeks 20/22/24 TUESDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY

10.00

BMAN70052 Multinational & Comparative Employment Structures 1.5 Kilburn

IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness Arthur Lewis G.035/36 Weeks 19/21/23/25/26

11.00

12.00

BMAN70052 Multinational & Comparative Employment Structures 1.5 Kilburn BMAN70052 Multinational & Comparative Employment Structures 1.5 Kilburn

13.00

14.00

BMAN70432 Mergers & Acquisitions 3.103 MBS West

IPDM60272* Global Institutions, Trade Rules & Development Simon 4.50

IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness Arthur Lewis G.035/36 Weeks 19/21/23/25/26 IDPM60002* Industrial Competitiveness Arthur Lewis G.035/36 Weeks 19/21/23/25/26 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8

15.00

BMAN70432 Mergers & Acquisitions 3.103 MBS West

IPDM60272* Global Institutions, Trade Rules & Development Simon 4.50

16.00

BMAN72142 ICTs work in the New Economy Harold Hankins 10.08 BMAN62022 Analysis of Business Structures G6 MBS West BMAN72142 ICTs work in the New Economy Harold Hankins 10.08 BMAN62022 Analysis of Business Structures G6 MBS West BMAN62022 Analysis of Business Structures G6 MBS West

17.00 *IDPM60002 & IDPM60272 will have one joint lecture on Friday 26th March 2pm-5pm (week 26) in University Place 4.205

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 Political Economy of Development Pathway (Standard (Standard Route)
SEM 1 9.00 MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY IDPM60801 Environment & Development Coupland 3 LG9 IDPM60801 Environment & Development Coupland 3 LG9 ECON60691 (L) Economics for Rural Development Coupland 3 LG14 ECON60691 (L) Economics for Rural Development Coupland 3 LG14 SOAN70761 Anthropology, Globalisation & Development Dover St Basement Theatre SOAN70761 Anthropology, Globalisation & Development Dover St Basement Theatre SOAN70761 SOAN70761 Anthropology, Globalisation & Development Dover St Basement Theatre THURSDAY POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE HBS Hanson FRIDAY

10.00

11.00

12.00

13.00

14.00

IDPM60711 Economic Development Alan Turing G209


ECON60691 (T) Economics for Rural Development Dover Street BS5 POEC61011 Theoretical Approaches to PE Crawford Seminar C

15.00

IDPM60711 Economic Development Alan Turing G209


16.00 ECON60691 (T) Economics for Rural Development Dover Street BS5 IDPM60291 Trade Theory & Development Coupland 3 LG14 IDPM60291 Trade Theory & Development Coupland 3 LG14

17.00

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MA Political Economy Course Unit Timetable 2009 2009/10 Political Economy of Development Pathway (Standard (Standard Route)
SEM 2 9.00 MONDAY POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 ECON60762 (T) Agriculture in Econ Development Coupland 3 LG14 POLI60312 Dissertation RD Chem G.53 IDPM60072 Political Economy of Development Beyer Theatre IDPM60072 Political Economy of Development Beyer Theatre TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

10.00

ECON61902 (L) Topics in the Development of China

POLI61022 Migration & Global Political Economy Coupland 3 LG12

POLI70492 POLI70492 Human Rights in World Politics Coupland 3 LG14

ECON60072 Growth Development & Economic Trasformation Coupland 3 LG9 ECON60072 Growth Development & Economic Trasformation Coupland 3 LG9

11.00

ECON61902 (L) Topics in the Development of China

12.00

13.00

ECON60212 (L) Poverty, Inequality & Government Policy in Less Developed Countries Coupland 3 LG10 POLI61022 Migration & Global Political Economy Coupland 3 LG12 ECON60212 (L) Poverty, Inequality & Government Policy in Less Developed Countries Coupland 3 LG10 POLI61022 Migration & Global Political Economy Coupland 3 LG12 POLI70772 Philosophy of Social Science Roscoe 4.8

POLI70492 Human Rights in World Politics Coupland 3 LG14

ECON60212 (T) Poverty, Inequality & Government Policy in Less Developed Countries Roscoe 1.001

ECON60212 (T) Poverty, Inequality & Government Policy in Less Developed Countries Roscoe 1.001

14.00

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