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Introduction to Poetry

Stanza
The stanza in poetry is equivalent or equal to the paragraph in prose. Often the lines in a stanza will have a specific rhyme scheme. Some of the more common stanzas are: Couplet: a two line stanza Triplet: a three line stanza Quatrain: a four line stanza

Meter
Meter is an organized way to arrange stressed/accented syllables and unstressed/unaccented syllables.

Rhyme Scheme
Rhyme scheme is the pattern of rhyming words at the end of each line. Not all poetry has a rhyme scheme. They are not hard to identify, but you must look carefully at which words rhyme and

Rhyme
Rhyme is when the endings of the words sound the same.
Dust of Snow by Robert Frost The way a crow [A]

Repetition
Repetition is the repeating of a sound, word, or phrase for emphasis. Inside Inside the house (I get ready) Inside the car (I go to school) Inside the school (I wait for the bell to ring)

Shook down on me [B] The dust of snow [A] From a hemlock tree [B] Has given my heart [C] A change of mood [D] And save some part [C] Of a day I had rued. [D]

Poetic Devises

Simile
A figure of speech in which things are compared using the words like or as as.

Metaphor
A figure of speech in which things are compared by stating that one thing is another.

The clouds looked like cotton candy. Grandpa was as stubborn as

Clouds are cotton candy. [ They are fluffy] Grandpa was a mule. stubborn] [They are

Alliteration
Repetition of words with the same beginning sounds
Silvery snowflakes fall silently Softly sheathing all with moon Until sunrise slowly shows Snow softening swiftly

Imagery
Imagery is an appeal to the senses. The poet describes something to help you to see, hear, touch, taste, or smell the topic of the poem.
Fog The fog comes on little cat feet. HEAR] [ SEE,

It sits looking over harbor and city [SEE]

Poetic Devises
Personification
A figure of speech in which objects are given human qualities
The sun played peek-a-boo with the clouds. A brave handsome tree fell with a creaking rending cry.

Onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia is pronounced: \-n-m-t-p, \

Words that sound like the objects or actions they refer to


A pesky mosquito buzzed around my head.

My Teacher
By: Dianne Veras

My teacher is fun and glad, she cheers me up when I'm sad.

There are those that need her help, she tells them, "You don't need to yelp." There are things she likes to do, like blowing through a kazoo. She loves to travel and read to, some of those things I like to do. I'm glad to be in her class, because she tells us of her past.

War by Saud

War Sad, destructive Killing, injuring, destroying A thing that kills life. Terminator

River by Miki River Clear, wonderful Slapping, whirling, flowing The river is cold. Water

Nature by Khaled Nature Beautiful, pure Refreshing, enjoying, relaxing Nature is healthy. Fun