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WILKES-BARRE, PA WEdnESdAy, SEPtEmBER11, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
NANTICOKE A girl talking to 16-year-old
vehicular homicide suspect Tyler Duda on a cell-
phone heard the crash, then the screams and later
paramedics talking about the fatal accident on
West Union Street.
Arrest papers led Tuesday against Tyler Duda,
16, of Tamanini Drive, Kingston Township, allege
he was talking to the girl while he was driving to
her house in Nanticoke on July 5. He was jailed
at the county prison for lack of $1 million bail
Tuesday after arraignment.
Luzerne County District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis said Duda took his mothers 2013 Ford
Edge without her knowledge. Duda was joy riding
Teen charged
with vehicular
homicide
Authorities allege Tyler Duda
was traveling in excess of 70
mph when his car struck and
killed Nicholas Zurilla
Photo
Over the last fewdays, weve seen some encouraging signs,
in part because of the credible threat of U.S. military action.
JENNIFERPELTZ
AssociatedPress
NEW YORK When this years
Sept. 11 anniversary ceremony unfolds
today at ground zero, the mayor who
has helped orchestrate the observances
from their start will be watching for his
last time in ofce. And saying nothing.
Over his years as mayor and chair-
man of the National Sept. 11 Memorial
& Museum, Michael Bloomberg has
sometimes tangled with victims rela-
tives, religious leaders and other elected
ofcials over an event steeped in sym-
bolismand emotion.
But his administrationhas largely suc-
ceeded at its goal of keeping the com-
memoration centered on the attacks
victims and their families and relatively
free of political image-making. In that
spirit, no politicians including the
mayor were allowed to speak last
year or will be this year.
Memorial organizers expect to take
primary responsibility for the ceremony
next year and say they plan to continue
concentrating the event on victims
loved ones, even as the forthcoming
museum creates a new, broader frame-
work for remembering 9/11.
As things evolve in the future, the
focus on the remembrance is going to
stay sacrosanct, memorial President
Joe Daniels says.
At todays ceremony on the 2-year-old
memorial plaza, relatives will again read
the names of the nearly 3,000 people
who died when hijacked jets crashed
into the World Trade Center and the
Pentagon and near Shanksville. Readers
also will recite the 1993 trade center
bombing victims names.
At the Flight 93 National Memorial
in Shanksville, where todays ceremony
will include bell-ringing and wreath-lay-
ing, ofcials gathered Tuesday to mark
the start of construction on a visitor
center. The Pentagon plans a morning
ceremony for victims relatives and sur-
vivors of the attacks, with wreath-laying
and remarks from Defense Secretary
Chuck Hagel and other ofcials, and
an afternoon observance for Pentagon
workers.
Deciding how to mark the anniversa-
ry of the worst terror strike in U.S. his-
tory was a sensitive task for Bloomberg
and other leaders in the months after
the attacks, perhaps especially for the
then-new mayor. Ofcials were plan-
ning a memorial service for thousands
of families from90 countries, while also
setting a tone for how the public would
commemorate 9/11.
That was the challenge that we
faced, and it was an enormous one,
recalls Jonathan Greenspun, who then
was part of Bloombergs community
affairs unit and nowis a political consul-
tant. There was a recognition, by the
mayor, that the ceremony had to tran-
scend typical memorial services and the
politics that are sometimes associated
with them.
Ofcials elded about 4,500 sugges-
tions including a Broadway parade
honoring rescue workers and a one-min-
ute blackout of all Manhattan before
crafting a plan centered on reading
names at ground zero.
Our intent is to have a day of obser-
No politicians
will speak at
9/11 ceremony
For second year in row,
politics will take back seat
to honoring victims
Obama: Give diplomacy a chance
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama asked Congress on
Tuesday to postpone a vote on air-
strikes against Syria to allow time
to explore a Russian proposal to get
Syria to turn over its chemical weap-
ons to international control.
Obama made the dramatic last-
minute turnaround in closed-door
meetings with members of Congress
and then in a prime-time address to
the nation, even as he was dispatch-
ing Secretary of State John Kerry
to Geneva to meet with his Russian
counterpart later this week. Their
goal: a binding resolution in the U.N.
Security Council, where Russia had
threatened to veto any move against
its ally in Syria.
Over the last few days, weve
seen some encouraging signs, in
part because of the credible threat of
U.S. military action, Obama said in
a 15-minute address from the White
House. Its too early to tell whether
this offer will succeed but this ini-
tiative has the potential to remove
the threat of chemical weapons with-
out the use of force.
As the United States stepped back
from the thorny debate over whether
to strike, Syria said it was already
agreeing to the Russian proposal to
surrender its chemical weapons and
adhere to a longstanding global arms
control agreement that bans the pro-
duction, stockpiling and use of such
weapons. We are ready to honor
our commitments under this conven-
tion, including providing informa-
tion about these weapons, Syrian
Foreign Minister Walid al Moallem
said in Moscow.
Obama, as well as the leaders of
France and Britain, agreed to work
President asks Congress to delay Syria vote to
explore Russian plan on chemical weapons
ANITAKUMAR, WILLIAMDOUGLAS
and MATTHEWSCHOFIELD
mcClatchy Washington Bureau
Group calls for tighter
power plant controls
JONOCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
SCRANTON A Philadelphia environmental
advocacy group has identied 50 U.S. power plants
as the most prolic carbon dioxide polluters world-
wide and Pennsylvania has some of the worst
offenders.
According to a report released Tuesday by
PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center, the
states power plants are the third largest contribu-
tors to these emissions after the ones in Texas and
California. Overall, the countrys 50 heaviest carbon
dioxide emitters send up 2 percent of the worlds
carbon dioxide that is a byproduct of electricity gen-
eration.
PennEnvironment researchers lookedat the more
than 6,000 power plants in the United States and
found, in 2011, 50 of those power plants produced
30 percent of total carbon emissions.
The report, called Americas Dirtiest Power
Plants, points to the United States as the second
greatest contributor to carbon emissions world-
wide, pumping about 5,250 million metric tons
(mmt) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
China emits about 9,750 mmt. India ranks third,
contributing 2,000 mmt to the annual global share
of carbon emissions, according to the report.
The report showed the countrys heaviest carbon-
emitting coal-red plant is the Scherer Power Plant
in Georgia, which pushed out 21.3 mmt in 2011.
Heavy trucks and afternoon trafc along
Lackawanna Avenue in Scranton mufed Elowyn
Corbys voice as she spoke at a press conference
Tuesday in front of U.S. Sen. Robert Caseys ofce.
Corby, PennEnvironments Global Warming and
Clean Energy Associate, said motor vehicles still
double power plants emissions. The report notes
that, to reduce the threat of global warming, a com-
prehensive emissions policy should encourage alter-
native vehicle fuel as well.
Corby prefaced her speech by saying that in
the last two years uncanny weather patterns only
point to an increasing global temperature, and
See DUDA | 10A
September 21- 28, 2013
visit us online at bloomsburgfair.com
A NEWS: Local 3A
nation &World: 5A
Obituaries: 6A
Editorials: 9A
INSIDE
Weather: 10A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS: 8B
TASTE: 1C
Birthdays: 3C
television: 4C
movies: 4C
Puzzles: 5C
Comics: 10d
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
Memorial takes shape on accident site
Flowers memorializing John
P. Brdaric Jr. are left near the
Swoyersville work site where
he died Monday after a church
steeple fell on the excava-
tor that he was operating. The
Occupational Safety and Health
Administration immediately
sent a representative to the
scene. Brdaric, 60, was owner
of an excavating firm and Buck
Mountain Quarry. The col-
lapse occurred at about 11:40
a.m. as he and his crew were
razing the former St. Marys
of Czestochowa Church on
Shoemaker Street. His obituary
appears today on Page 6A.
Aimee dilger | the times Leader
Center faults Pa. plants
for their carbon emissions
See POWER | 10A See 9/11 | 10A
Let themeat
cool cake
NATION & WORLD, 5A
Boomers facing a
cancer care crisis?
Its not baking, its creating TASTE, 1C
AP Photo
In a speech to the nation Tuesday, President Obama blended the threat of military action with the hope of a diplomatic solution as
he works to strip Syria of its chemical weapons.
See SYRIA | 10A
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE City
Council on Thursday will con-
sider a resolution to hire an
architectural rm to prepare
a study for the former First
National Bank building on
Public Square.
Mayor Tom Leighton told
council the Williams Kinsman
Lewis Architectural Firm,
Wilkes-Barre, has bid $68,500 to
do the preliminary design on the
building that has been vacant
since the early 1970s.
The study will determine
what it will cost to repair
the buildings roof and
masonry to get it sta-
bilized for prospective
developers.
The costs will be paid
from $1.3 million in gam-
ing funds that city received for
the building. Leighton said he
hopes that by doing the work,
developers will show interest.
The economy appears to be
better now, he said.
In 2010, James Burke and
architect Don Sanderson
had proposed to establish an
Anthracite Miners Museum in
the former bank building, but
withdrew their interest more
than two years ago. The
building was built in
1906 and a tree grows
on the roof.
At the time, Leighton
said he was supportive
of the project but told
Burke that he couldnt
commit to a specic
project because there
were other interested develop-
ers.
The structure was the rst
building on Public Square,
according to Burke. He and
Sanderson planned to raise
$600,000 to transform it into
a museum. Sanderson said the
one-story buildings 40-foot-high
ceiling made it not scally fea-
sible to build a second oor.
Burke has since developed a
relationship with Kings College
to be the home of his Anthracite
Heritage Foundation, having
held several events there to cel-
ebrate the regions mining his-
tory.
In another matter,
Councilwoman Maureen Lavelle
asked Leighton to have the city
look into complaints about a
four-unit apartment building on
South Hancock Street. Lavelle
said a fth unit was been added,
which is a violation of the city
zoning regulations.
Lavelle said no permits have
been issued for work done on
the building. Leighton said city
ofcials will look into the mat-
ter.
The city will remove the large
metal structure on Public Square
to make way for construction of
a permanent stage. Leighton
said Pittston has expressed
interest in the structure and the
city will let it go at no charge.
PAGE 2A Wednesday, September 11, 2013 NEWS THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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OBITUARIES
Baker, WilliamJr.
Benoski, Stella
Bolita, Eleanor
Boyd, Mary Rose
Brdaric, John Jr.
Crawford, Millie
Focht, Phyllis
Grey, Linda
Judge, Peter
Koscielnik, Esther
Krueger, Edythe Ann
McLaughlin, Judith
Rogers, Kenneth
Savage, AndrewII
Seashock, Michael
Stempleski, Stephen
Stewart, Deborah
Thomas, Charlie
Valunas, Albert
Page 6A
WHO TO CONTACT
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correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
2013-
W-B eyes frmto study First National Bank repairs
Council will vote on accepting a city
architectural companys bid of $68,500
to do preliminary design work
Docs: Ofcials
misused US
surveillance
program
SAN FRANCISCO Government ofcials
for nearly three years accessed data on thousands
of domestic phone numbers they shouldnt have
and then misrepresented their actions to a secret
spy court to reauthorize the governments sur-
veillance program, documents released Tuesday
show.
The Obama administration had earlier conced-
ed that its surveillance programscooped up more
domestic phone calls and emails than authorized.
But until Tuesday, the depths of the programs
abuse were unknown.
According to the documents released by the
administration, a spy court judge in 2009 was so
fed up with the governments overreaching that
he threatened to shutter the surveillance program
designed to ght terrorism. Judge Reggie Walton
said in March 2009 that he had lost condence
in ofcials ability to legally operate the surveil-
lance program.
The NSA told the Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Court that month that from a tech-
nical standpoint, there was no single person who
had a complete technical understanding of how
the programs computer systemworked.
Walton issued his blistering opinion after dis-
covering government ofcials had been accessing
domestic phone records for nearly three years
without reasonable, articulate suspicion that
they were connected to terrorism. For instance,
he noted that only 1,935 phone numbers out of
17,835 on a list investigators were working with
in early 2009 met that standard.
Walton said the governments excuse that ana-
lysts believed his order applied only to archived
phone records strained credulity, and he
ordered the National Security Agency to conduct
an end-to-end review of its processes and poli-
cies while also ordering closer monitoring of its
activities.
Later in 2009, a Justice Department lawyer
reported to the spy court a likely violation of
NSA surveillance rules. The lawyer said that in
some cases, it appeared the NSAwas distributing
sensitive phone records by email to as many as
189 analysts, but only 53 were approved by the
court to see them.
Walton wrote he was deeply troubled by the
incidents, which he said occurred just weeks
after the NSAhadperformeda major reviewof its
internal practices because of the initial problems
reported earlier in the year.
The judge said in November 2009 that on
the same day the NSA counterterrorism ofce
reminded employees they were not allowed to
indiscriminately share phone records with co-
workers and one day after a similar reminder
from the agencys lawyers an NSA analyst
improperly shared information with colleagues
who were not approved to see it.
Walton also noted that sometimes a U.S. phone
number would be reassigned by phone compa-
nies, and in such cases the NSAwould scrutinize
therecordsof aninnocent customer. Waltoncalled
such cases a source of concern by the court. He
noted that, months earlier, the court ordered the
NSA to explain more fully how it chooses which
phone numbers to search and to delete any infor-
mation that was improperly collected.
This report was not sufciently detailed to
allay the courts concerns, Walton wrote. He
ordered the NSA going forward to regularly tell
the court the number of phone records searched,
the time period they could be searched and
details about how the NSA analysts were con-
ducting searches suggested by results from other
searches.
Aspy court judge in 2009
threatened to shutter the
program
PAUL ELIAS
Associated Press
DUPONT Borough residents and
the owner of Continental Bar and Grill
came to Tuesday nights council meeting
in response to complaints about activities
at the establishment.
John Slivkanch, of Center Street, pre-
sented a petition with 30 signatures of
residents in the vicinity of Continental
seeking permit parking only in that area.
He then repeated his complaint from
the August public meeting that patrons are
littering, and some cases, urinating in his
property when they leave the bar.
Amari Oliveira, the establishments
owner, said he feels discriminated against
by the residents and police in the area.
He took issue with occasions when
borough ofcers entered his bar, accusing
them of harassment, and said he believed
black and latino customers are routinely
treated with more scrutiny when leaving
the bar than white customers.
But acting police Chief John Saranchek
denied the accusations. He said ofcers
have entered the bar only in response to
calls.
He said that on the night of Aug. 16
alone, 13 calls were received from eight
different callers between 9:41 p.m. and
2:07 a.m. While he didnt provide specic
numbers, Saranchek said no patrons were
singled out on the basis of race or skin
color.
Several residents also denied accusa-
tions of discrimination and said their com-
plaints concerned noise and lewd behav-
ior.
Bill DeFazio, the owner of the building
that houses Continental, however, sup-
ported Oliveiras contention, and said he
had very loud and popular musical acts
when he ran Corner Pocket Lounge but
never received complaints about noise.
Oliveira said he installed thousands of
dollars worth of sound proong to the
windows and walls. He said he also red
a D.J. who repeatedly exceeded volume
limits and regularly monitors whats going
on outside during closing times when he
is present.
Borough ofcials told residents about
their intentions to have private meetings
involving DeFazio, Oliveira and police
ofcers.
The regular council meeting will be on
Oct. 8 at 7 p.m.
Dupont residents, bar owner clash over complaints
B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
JIMMcCABE
Circulation Manager
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Production Director
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WALT LAFFERTY
Regional Business Development
Director &General Manager
(570) 970-7158
wlaferty@civitasmedia.com
DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@civitasmedia.com
2013-254
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLC
Leighton
WHATS NExT?
Wilkes-Barre City Council will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday at City Hall,
4th foor, Council Chambers. Public comment is allowed.
Grand opening of West Side Trail set for Sept. 21
WEST WYOMING A
grand opening to celebrate
the completion of the West
Side Trail will be held at
Dailey Park at 10 a.m. on
Sept. 21, council announced
Monday.
The multimunicipal proj-
ect began in 2000 as a mis-
sion to promote a healthy
lifestyle and cut down on
childhood obesity.
In keeping with
Pennsylvania Department
of Transportations Safe
Routes to School initiative,
the project encourages fami-
lies to walk their children to
school.
The sidewalk and bike
path network, which runs
from West Pittston to
Edwardsville, includes routes
to Tenth Street Elementary
in Wyoming Borough and the
Wyoming Area Secondary
Center and JFK Elementary
School, both in Exeter.
The project was made pos-
sible through a combination
of grants from the PennDOT
and the state Department of
Conservation and Natural
Resources, totaling roughly
$2.1 million.
In other business, council
approved the payment in the
amount of $51,899 to Bower
Inc. for work relating to the
West Side Trail project.
Council also announced:
A bulk pickup will be
held Sept. 30. Each resident
can place two bulk items on
the curb. Freon-containing
items or building materials
are not allowed.
The last yard waste pick-
up will be Nov. 14. The bor-
ough will schedule two leaf
collections later in the year.
The West Side Council
of Governments equipment
meeting will be at 7 p.m. Sept.
12 in the town hall. The r
egular COG meeting is
scheduled 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in
the town hall.
CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
WILKES-BARRE City police on
Tuesday asked for assistance in locat-
ing a teenage run-
away.
Alexus Lexy
Kasteleba, 14, has
been a runaway since
March. She had been
known to frequent the
Tolling Mills section
of Wilkes-Barre and
the Boulevard Town
Homes area and is believed to be har-
bored by family members, police said.
Kasteleba is 5 feet tall with hazel
eyes and has mouth piercings. She was
recently seen with dyed black hair.
Anyone who sees her or knows of
her whereabouts should call 911.
HAZLETON City police report-
ed the following:
Police are investigating several
thefts at Cedar Street Supply in which
several storage lockers were broken
into. Items taken are unknown at this
time.
Madelyn Paulino, of Hazleton,
reported someone broke into her 2010
Honda Pilot while it was parked in the
500 block of Hayes Street sometime
between Aug. 30 and Sept. 2 and stole
a Garmin GPS unit, an iPad, a purse
and a watch.
Police are investigating the theft
of a red Troy-Bilt lawn mower in the
700 block of Alter Street sometime
between 3 p.m. Sunday and 4 p.m.
Monday.
Anyone with information about
any of these incidents should contact
Hazleton police at 570-459-4940 or via
dialing 911.
WILKES-BARRE Amy
Marcinkiewicz, 34, of North Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre, has been charged
with providing false identication to
law enforcement and receiving stolen
property as a result of a theft investiga-
tion initiated on July 30, police said.
NOXEN TWP. State police in
Tunkhannock are investigating a case
of animal cruelty in which someone
shot a dog.
The Beagle/German shepherd mix
named Romeo was shot once in the
front left leg and once through his
right ear after he wandered away from
his residence at 113 Dimmock Hill
Road at about 8 p.m. Sunday.
It appears that the dog was shot
with a small-caliber round.
Romeo was treated and the cost for
medical care was more than $5,000,
police said.
Anyone with information, tips or
leads should call state police at 570-
836-2141.
EXETER Chelsea Renee
Smith, 27, of Hunlock Township, was
arraigned Tuesday on charges of pos-
session of a controlled substance, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia, driving
with a suspended license, driving the
wrong way and driving a vehicle with-
out insurance. She was jailed at the
Luzerne County Correctional Facility
for lack of $1,000 bail.
Police allege Smith, driving a
1992 Jeep Cherokee, was stopped on
Wyoming Avenue because the vehi-
cles registration had been suspended.
Several heroin packets were found
inside the vehicle, according to the
criminal complaint.
Police say they learned Smith was
wanted by Wilkes-Barre police on
unrelated drug charges and by the
Luzerne County Sheriff s Department
on a charge she failed to appear in
court. Smith was taken to the coun-
ty prison, where a search allegedly
revealed a heroin packet in her sock,
the complaint states.
A preliminary hearing is scheduled
on Sept. 18.
HANOVER TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Multiple vehicles were entered
and electronics stolen on Center and
Sobieski streets early Sunday morn-
ing.
An employee at Hanover Beverage,
South Main Street, reported Monday
the front glass doors were smashed.
Cynthia Hanusofski, of Lee Park,
reported Monday that she contacted
Verizon for telephone and Internet
service and learned two accounts had
been opened using her name. The
rst account was opened in February
and closed in May having an unpaid
balance, and the second account was
opened in August and remains active
with an unpaid balance.
KINGSTON A Kingston man
was arraigned Tuesday after Kingston
police allegedly found nearly $900 and
15 heroin packets behind a dumpster
near the Turkey Hill on Main Street.
Qawee Abdul Rivers, 19, of Penn
Street, was charged with two counts
each of possession of a controlled
substance and possession of a small
amount of marijuana, and one count
each of possession with intent to
deliver a controlled substance and
tampering with evidence. He was also
charged by Edwardsville police with
deant trespass and disorderly con-
duct.
Rivers was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for lack
of $16,000 bail.
According to the criminal com-
plaints:
Police spotted a BMX bicycle in
front of Turkey Hill at about 2:30
a.m. Tuesday. The bicycle was ridden
by a man who ed a ght at Hilltop
Apartments earlier in the morning.
Rivers was spotted crouching behind
a dumpster near the store, police
said. A records check showed Rivers
was wanted by the Luzerne County
Sheriff s Department for allegedly fail-
ing to appear in court on an unrelated
charge.
A search of the trash bin revealed
nearly $900 and heroin packets on the
ground, the complaint states. A small
bag of marijuana and two prescription
tablets were allegedly found in Rivers
underwear.
Edwardsville police allege Rivers was
not permitted at Hilltop Apartments
where he was involved in a ght with
a woman, according to the complaint.
A preliminary hearing is scheduled
on Sept. 18.
POLICE BLOTTER
Kateleba
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Juan Borbon
was close to GAR High School
when Marquis Allen was attacked
with a machete that nearly severed
on Feb. 9, 2012.
But, Borbon testied Tuesday, he
wasnt involved in the ght between
students of African American and
Dominican descent.
He said he was getting sandwich-
es for him and his pregnant girl-
friend at a nearby Dominican store.
Borbon, 21, faces a number of
charges on allegations he swung the
machete at Allen, then 15, who was
trying to break up the ght and help
someone who was being jumped.
Prosecutors and defense attor-
neys completed calling witnesses
Tuesday. They will present their
closing arguments to a jury today
before the jurors are instructed on
the charges and sent to deliberate.
Borbon testied in his own
defense Tuesday, with the help of a
Spanish interpreter, saying he start-
ed his day by going to Scranton with
his aunt, Rosemary Borbon, to apply
for jobs. They returned between
2:30 and 3 p.m., when Borbon was
dropped off near Blackman and
Hazle streets, and walked the three
miles to the Dominican store, about
two blocks from GAR High School.
There, he said, he bought two
sandwiches and returned to his
aunts home on Franklin Street
around 3:30 p.m.
Prosecutors witnesses testied
differently. Yansy Abreau, 18, said
Borbon met him at GAR, where the
two joined a group that was going
to ght a group of black kids.
Neither Borbon nor Abreu was a
student at GAR at the time.
Abreu, who failed to abide by
a subpoena and was taken to the
courthouse by investigators, tes-
tied Borbon had a machete and
swung it at Allen, hitting Allens
wrist.
Abreu said he didnt remember
what Borbon looked like or what he
was wearing, and he said he didnt
supply the machete to Borbon.
Abreu is under juvenile supervision
for unspecied charges.
When asked by Borbons attor-
ney, Paul Galante, if Borbon had
previously been known to carry a
machete, Abreu said yes, but that
he hadnt carried one since about a
month before the GAR incident.
Several witnesses testied
Tuesday the male they saw swing
the machete at Allen had his hair,
dyed red, pulled back into a puffy
ponytail. Prosecutors say that
is how Borbon appeared at the
time and he has since changed his
appearance.
Allen, who attended GAR at the
time, testied that after school that
day he saw the two groups ght-
ing and broke up two people before
going to a group of three Hispanic
males jumping a black male.
I pushed them off and told them
to chill, Allen said, noting he next
reached down to pick up the male
with his right hand.
He said thats when someone
grabbed two of his left ngers and
hit him with what he thought was
a bat until he saw the machetes
blade.
The person wielding the machete,
he said, had reddish hair in a pony
tail. Allen waited for the ambu-
lance that took him to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
where he underwent nine hours of
surgery.
Borbons aunt, Rosemary Borbon,
and his girlfriend and mother of
his two children, Aleyey Ovalles,
also testified Borbon had been in
Scranton in the morning, got sand-
wiches and returned home around
3:30 p.m.
Deputy District Attorney Alexis
Falvello asked Borbon and Ovalles if
they were lying to protect Borbon.
Both women said no, with the help
of interpreters. Rosemary Borbon
said her nephews hair was red that
day; Ovalles said it was black.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 3A
All non-union Luzerne
County government employ-
ees must work at least 37.5 per
week effective Jan. 2, and the
administration will attempt
to negotiate the change
into union contracts as they
expire, county council decided
Tuesday.
Full-time county employ-
ees currently work anywhere
from 32.5 to 40 hours a week
depending on the position and
department.
Most non-union workers at
the courthouse follow a sched-
ule of 32.5 hours, but non-
union prison staffers are at
35 hours. Human service non-
union employees have been at
37.5 hours for years.
County Manager Robert
Lawton has vowed to stream-
line and reduce staff to com-
pensate for paying some
employees to work more.
Council had planned to
make the new directive
effective within 30 days but
changed to Jan. 2 to allow
Lawton more time to develop
a plan and factor changes into
the 2014 budget.
Lawton announced Tuesday
he has appointed deputy bud-
get/nance director Donna
Magni the interim budget/
nance division head because
senior accountant Brian Swetz
isnt permitted to serve in the
temporary division head post
for more than 90 days. Swetz
was made interim budget head
in June.
Magni, who has a bachelors
degree in accounting, was
hired as deputy in February
2011 at $40,000 and wont
receive an increase to handle
the temporary division head
duties.
She will be instrumental in
preparation of the 2014 bud-
get because Lawton expects
the yet-to-be-hired profes-
sional recruiter to be seeking
budget/nance division head
applicants through Nov. 15.
Chief Solicitor C. David
Pedri told council the emails
council members send to each
other will be publicly posted
on the county website, www.
luzernecounty.org, starting
Oct. 1.
Council members pushed
for the online posting, which
occurs in some Florida
counties but is unusual in
Pennsylvania, to increase
transparency.
The move also will elimi-
nate the need to process
Right-to-Know requests for
these emails. Pedri told coun-
cil candidate Kathy Dobash
on Tuesday his ofce spent
$10,000 reviewing about
30,000 emails to comply with
her request last spring for all
emails exchanged by council
members since January 2012.
Pedri also announced plans
to start publicly posting all
Right-to-Know requests and
the information provided in
response on the county web-
site by the end of the month.
His ofce has received about
140 public information
requests this year to date, and
Pedri said the online posting
will give all citizens access to
the information supplied by
his ofce.
Councilman Edward Brom-
inski complained Tuesday that
newly appointed Controller
Walter Mitchell is still operat-
ing his insurance and nan-
cial estate planning rm out-
side county business hours.
Brominski said the council-
adopted administrative code
says the controller cannot have
other outside employment.
Pedri said the countys home
rule charter does not ban the
controller from other outside
employment, and the charter
supersedes the administrative
code if the two conict. He
said he will provide an opinion
to council on the matter.
Mitchell was recently
appointed to ll the rest of
Walter Grifths term until the
controller elected in November
takes ofce in January.
WILKES-BARRE
Horton St. work
will cause delays
Wilkes-Barre city crews at 7 a.m.
today are to begin a per-
manent street restora-
tion on Horton Street.
The project will be
ongoing through
Thursday.
Horton Street will
remain open to trafc;
however, it is expected to be slow mov-
ing. Motorists should expect delays in
this area and choose alternate routes if
possible.
HAZLE TWP.
Produce vouchers
at Toohils expo
Vouchers from
the Pennsylvania
Department of
Agriculture worth
$20 at participating
farmers markets and
roadside stands will
be available to eligible
seniors at state Rep.
Tarah Toohils annual
Senior Citizens Expo from 10 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Laurel Mall.
The voucher program, known as
the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition
Program, was established to promote
the consumption of fresh, nutritious,
locally grown fruits and vegetables
among older Pennsylvanians.
Vouchers will be provided on a rst-
come, rst-served basis at the Luzerne
Wyoming Link to Aging and Disability
Resources table in the Kmart wing of
the mall. Only those who missed the
voucher handouts at area senior cen-
ters are eligible to receive them.
To qualify, seniors must be 60 or
older by Dec. 31 and have a total
household income, before taxes, of
less than $21,257 for a single person
and $28,694 for a couple. Proof of
age, income and county residence are
required.
The Senior Expo will feature more
than 70 exhibitors. A number of health
screenings will be also available, cour-
tesy of area health-care providers,
including glucose, cholesterol, blood
pressure and colon cancer. Blood work
and glucose tests will be performed
8-10 a.m.; participants must refrain
from eating after midnight.
WILKES-BARRE
Trial still onin
Plymouthhomicide
The Dec. 9 homicide trial for
William Allabaugh, 25, is still on
schedule, a Luzerne County judge
said Tuesday.
Allabaugh, of
Plymouth, is charged
in the September
2012 shooting
death of 39-year-old
Scott Luzetsky, and
wounding of Stephen
Hollman, then 29,
at Bonnies Bar in
Plymouth.
In July, the trial was put on hold
due to a letter written by Allabaughs
mother regarding the representation
of his previous attorneys.
Allabaugh had since been assigned
new attorneys, Robert Buttner and
John Hakim. Although on Tuesday
Hakim said he had to withdraw his
appearance because he had personal
and professional relationships with
Luzetskys sisters.
Another pre-trial hearing will be on
Oct. 10, Judge Lesa Gelb said.
DALLAS TWP.
Magazine gives area
colleges highmarks
U.S. News & World Report gave
high marks in the northern states
regional universities category to area
colleges that offer masters degrees in
the magazines 2014 Best Colleges
edition published on Tuesday.
University of Scranton tied for 8th
place with Ithaca College in New York
ranked among 139 schools of higher
learning in the northern states. Kings
College tied with ve other schools for
the 37th spot. Misericordia University
ranks 43rd and Wilkes University tied
with seven other schools ranking 74th.
Misericordias 43rd ranking is up 24
places from 2007.
U.S. News used a rubric of factors
such as tuition costs, retention rates
and class sizes to determine the overall
affordability and attractiveness of its
ranked schools. The publication also
looked at total enrollment, average
standardized test scores for incoming
students and six-year graduation rates.
Council OKs 37.5-hour workweek
Full-time county
employees currently
work between 32.5
and 40 hours
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Borough:
Hauler
violates
order
SHEENADELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE The borough of
West Wyoming says that despite a judges
order that businessman Joseph Russell
stop running a hauling company, he con-
tinues to operate the business under
another entity.
Incourt papers ledTuesdaybysolicitor
Linell Lukesh, the borough led a request
to hold Russell in contempt and sanction
himfor failing to abide by Luzerne County
Judge Michael Voughs ruling to stop oper-
ations at Russells Hauling.
On July 23 the borough led a request
for a special injunction against Russells
Hauling to cease and desist because of
neighbor complaints and Russells alleged
failure to have the business properly
licensed and zoned.
In early August, Vough ruled the busi-
ness must stop operation until further
order of the court.
The borough charged Russell continues
to operate his business at a neighboring
auto dealer to the Apollo Drive business,
and that the borough continues to receive
complaints from neighbors regarding
noise.
After hearing from a Times Leader
reporter about the most recent ling,
Russell said he is not operating his haul-
ing business in West Wyoming and had
been asked by the owner of VP Auto Parts
to operate and manage the salvage yard
there.
Russell also said his hauling business is
in the process of opening an ofce in the
borough of Wyoming.
I have to work and support my fam-
ily, Russell said. Working for (VP Auto
Parts) allows me to do that. Imjust trying
to make a living. AmI not allowed to work
at any other business?
Court papers led Tuesday by the bor-
ough allege that VP Auto Parts business
has been inactive for years and that Russell
has not completely moved out of his haul-
ing business. Russell said the auto parts
business is owned by John Pisanechi, who
could not be reached for comment.
(Russell) is clearly trying to usurp the
courts order and continue to operate a
business where he has no proper permit
nor license and is in violation of local ordi-
nance, and most clearly, the courts order
to cease and desist, Lukesh wrote.
Russell has been nothing but unco-
operative Lukesh wrote, and remains
in deliberate non-compliance with the
judges order.
The borough asks that Russell be
ordered to stop any other business in
West Wyoming, be held in contempt, pay
damages for police and code enforcement
services, and pay the costs for Tuesdays
ling.
In emails attached to Lukeshs l-
ing, neighbors Charles Umphred
and Tom and Linda Ciampi said that
because of continued noise they have
had to call 911 a number of times
since the business was ordered to stop.
Juan Borbon says he
was not involved in fght
in which teen was hurt
outside GAR High School
Borbon denies role in machete attack
IN BRIEF
K
LOCAL
Clark Van Orden/The Times Leader
A lane of Wyoming Avenue in Kingston was closed Tuesday morning after a garbage truck leaked hydraulic fluid for several blocks
near Abes Hot Dogs.
Fluid leak closes Kingston street
Owner of Russells Hauling
maintains he has stopped
operating business
in West Wyoming
Allabaugh
Toohil
PAGE 4A Wednesday, September 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Clarks Summit - Carbondale - Dallas - Hamlin - Honesdale - Nanticoke - Duryea
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PITTSBURGH As gas drilling
booms in Pennsylvania, major industry
groups are backing efforts to change the
states endangered and threatened spe-
cies laws, alterations that environmental-
ists say could have far-reaching effects on
wildlife.
The Marcellus Shale Coalition, the
Pennsylvania Independent Oil & Gas
Association, andtheAssociatedPetroleum
Industries of Pennsylvania outlined their
support in an Aug. 26 letter obtained
by The Associated Press. The industry
said the proposed legislation provides
for more efcient and effective resource
development as well as transparency
and accountability.
Legislation in the state House and
Senate would put some limits on the
exclusive authority that the Pennsylvania
Game Commission and Pennsylvania Fish
and Boat Commission currently have to
list birds, animals, sh and other species,
and to grant special consideration to spe-
cial wild trout streams.
The bills would instead give the
state Independent Regulatory Review
Commission a major role in the listing
process.
George Jugovic, a lawyer with the envi-
ronmental group Penn Future, said the
existing system is working well, and that
the political independence of the Game
and Fish commissions makes them better
able to protect at-risk species. In contrast,
the Regulatory ReviewCommission mem-
bers are political appointees.
The legislation is a bad idea wrapped
in a number of bad ideas, Jugovic said.
The state programs are separate from
federal endangered species listings and
are often used to manage species that
are threatened in a particular region but
perhaps not nationally. Pennsylvania lists
about 88 birds, sh, amphibians and other
animals as endangered or threatened. For
example, the black-crowned night heron is
listed as endangered in Pennsylvania, but
not nationally.
In practical terms, developers and oil
and gas companies face additional restric-
tions whena parcel of landis listedas habi-
tat for a threatened or endangered species.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NatioN & World Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 5A
WASHINGTON The
U.S. is facing a crisis in how
to deliver cancer care, as the
baby boomers reach their
tumor-prone years and doc-
tors have a hard time keep-
ing up with complex new
treatments, government
advisers reported Tuesday.
The caution comes even as
scientists are learning more
than ever about better ways
to battle cancer, and devel-
oping innovative therapies
to target tumors.
And while doctors try
to optimize treatment, the
Institute of Medicine found
daunting barriers to
achieving high-quality care
for all patients. Overcoming
those challenges will require
changes to the health care
system, and savvier consum-
ers.
We do not want to fright-
en or scare people who are
getting care now, said Dr.
Patricia Ganz, a cancer spe-
cialist at the University of
California, Los Angeles, who
chaired the panel.
But too often, decisions
about cancer treatments
arent based on good evi-
dence, and patients may not
understand their choices
and what to expect, the
panel found. For example,
some studies suggest that
two-thirds or more of can-
cer patients with poor prog-
noses incorrectly believe
the treatments they receive
could cure them.
Topping the list of recom-
mendations is nding ways
to help patients make more
informed decisions, with
easy-to-understand informa-
tion on the pros, cons and
costs of different treatments.
The patient cant be pas-
sive, Ganz said. Its an
important partnership that
we need.
The risk of cancer increas-
es with age, and older adults
account for just over half of
the 1.6 million new cases
diagnosed each year. By
2030, new diagnoses are
expected to reach 2.3 mil-
lion a year as the population
ages. The report warns there
may not be enough oncology
specialists to care for them.
Perhaps a bigger concern
is the growing complexity of
care. Increasingly, scientists
are nding genetic differenc-
es inside tumors that help
explain why one persons
cancer is more aggressive
than anothers. More impor-
tant, that also means certain
cancer drugs will work for,
say, lung cancer in one per-
son but not the next.
If your doctor doesnt
know that, or your hospital
doesnt do the test, you dont
have that opportunity for
newer, targeted therapies,
Ganz said. But, we are liv-
ing in an information age
where its impossible to keep
up.
Its not just a matter of
knowing the latest treat-
ments, but deciding if
theyre worth it for an indi-
vidual patient. Consider:
Of 13 cancer treatments
approved by the Food and
Drug Administration last
year, only one was proven
to extend survival by more
than a median of six months,
the report said. The drugs
all cost more than $5,900 for
each month of treatment.
For older adults, treatment
decisions may be even more
complicated because
the studies that test differ-
ent therapies dont include
enough people over age 65,
who tend to have multiple
health problems along with
cancer, Ganz explained.
HENRIETTA, N.Y.
School bars girls
diabetes dog
A diabetic 11-year-old whose family
paid $20,000 for a dog trained to sniff
out blood sugar swings at school is
being tutored at home after the school
district refused to allow the service ani-
mal in class.
Madyson Siragusas parents say her
dog named Duke is no different than the
seeing-eye dogs allowed inside public
buildings and are pressing the Rush
Henrietta Central School District to
reconsider.
We have no idea what changed their
mind, Keri Siragusa said of district
ofcials who seemed receptive to the
idea when she proposed it before the
summer recess.
But shortly before the start of the new
school year, Siragusa said, the suburban
Rochester district sent a letter barring
the dog because of concerns it would be
a distraction, scare other children and
aggravate allergies.
WASHINGTON
Feds to create
pot banking rules
The Justice Department and federal
banking regulators will help clear the
way for nancial institutions to transact
business with the legitimate marijuana
industry without fear of prosecution,
Deputy Attorney General James Cole
told Congress on Tuesday.
The issue has taken on greater urgen-
cy now that Colorado and Washington
have become the rst states to legalize
recreational use of marijuana.
Currently, processing money from
marijuana sales puts federally insured
banks at risk of drug racketeering
charges.
EL-ARISH, EGYpT
9 militants killed
in army raids
Egyptian army troops backed by
helicopter gunships attacked suspected
hideouts of Islamic militants in the Sinai
Peninsula on Tuesday, killing nine and
arresting 10, a military ofcial said. The
latest raids raised the death toll from four
days of operations to 29.
Ofcials have described the military
offensive that started Saturday as the
biggest sweep of the region in recent
years, aiming to weed out al-Qaida-
inspired groups who have taken hold in
villages in northern Sinai.
A military ofcial said militant infra-
structure including weapons caches, mis-
sile launchers, and nearly 100 vehicles
were targeted in the operation. The
ofcial said troops, often with the help of
air cover, have also targeted shacks and
homes used by militants as hideouts, and
areas where they stacked fuel.
NEWORLEANS
Godzilla creators
sue to crush beer
The Japanese company that produced
the classic series of Godzilla mov-
ies has sued a New Orleans brewery,
claiming the MechaHopzilla beer brand
infringes on its copyrights and trade-
marks.
The lawsuit was led Friday in U.S.
District Court in New Orleans by Toho
Co. Ltd. It includes photographs of the
Mechagodzilla character Toho intro-
duced in 1974 and a beer can produced
by New Orleans Lager & Ale Brewing
Co. LLC, known as NOLA Brewing.
The lawsuit says NOLA Brewing did
not get permission from or pay Toho to
use the trademarked character.
Brewery president and CEO Kirk
Coco says his company applied for a
trademark when the beer went on sale
last year.
AP photo
Working out for Santa?
David Hall gives 11-year-old Star the reindeer
a walk Monday at the Delaney Park Strip
near downtown Anchorage, Alaska. Hall said
he takes Star for a walk every week and helps
take care of her habitat.
Study: Aging US to strain cancer care
As more baby boomers are
diagnosed, doctors, treatments
may be stretched thin
LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
All quiet
on the
weather
front
WASHINGTON After a
couple years of wild, deadly and
costly weather, the United States
is mostly getting a lucky break
this year. So far.
Summer is almost over, and as
of Tuesday morning, not a single
hurricane had formed this year.
Tornado activity in 2013 is also
down around record low levels,
while heat waves are fewer and
milder than last year, accord-
ing to the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration.
Meteorologists credit luck,
shifts in the high-altitude jet
stream, and African winds and
dust.
Its been great, said Deke
Arndt, climate monitoring chief
for NOAAs National Climatic
Data Center in Asheville, N.C.
I hope that we ride this pattern
out through this year and follow-
ing years.
There have been eight tropi-
cal storms in the Atlantic. Not
one has reached the 74 mph
wind threshold to become a hur-
ricane, though Tropical Storm
Humberto off the coast of Africa
is likely to become one soon.
If Humberto stays a tropi-
cal storm through 8 a.m. EDT
today, it will be the latest date for
the rst hurricane of the season
since satellites started watching
the seas in 1967, according to
the National Hurricane Center.
This year, overall storm activ-
ity in the Atlantic an index
that combines number and
strength is about one-fth the
average. Thats despite warmer-
than-normal seas, which usually
fuel storms.
It has also been a record of
nearly eight years since a major
hurricane one with winds
of 110 mph blew ashore in
the United States. That was
Hurricane Wilma, which hit
Florida in October 2005.
Meteorologists say dry, stable
and at times dusty air blowing
from Africa is choking storms
instead of allowing them to
grow. On top of that, shifts in the
jet stream the same river of
air some blame for wild weather
in 2011 and 2012 have caused
dry air and wind shear, which
interfere with storm forma-
tion, said Gerry Bell of NOAAs
Climate Prediction Center.
Plain old random chance
is also a big factor, said MIT
meteorology professor Kerry
Emanuel.
Nobodys complaining,
said former National Hurricane
Center director Max Mayeld.
Luck, shifts in jet stream, and
African winds and dust credited
for lack of big storms in US
SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
Environmental group warns against modifying existing rules
AP photo
ATurkish policeman fires tear gas Tuesday during clashes over the death of Ahmet Atakan in Hatay, Turkey. Atakan, 22, died Monday night
in Hatay after his family says he was hit in the head by a tear gas canister shot by police during an anti-government protest.
Gas industry: Change Pa. endangered species laws
KEVIN BEGOS
Associated Press
Indian court convicts 4 in fatal gang rape
NEW DELHI An
Indian court convicted four
men Tuesday in the deadly
gang rape of a young woman
on a moving New Delhi bus,
a brutal crime that galva-
nized public anger over the
widespread yet widely
tolerated sexual violence
faced by Indian women.
As word of the verdict
ltered out, protesters out-
side the courthouse chanted
Hang them! Hang them!
The men were convicted
on all 11 counts against
them, including rape and
murder, and now face the
possibility of hanging. The
sentences are expected to
be handed down today.
Judge Yogesh Khanna
said in his verdict that
the men, who tricked the
23-year-old rape victim and
her male friend into board-
ing the bus they were driv-
ing, had committed mur-
der of a helpless person.
The parents of the
woman, who cannot be
identied under Indian
law, had tears in their eyes
as the verdicts were read.
The mother, wearing a pink
sari, sat just a few feet from
the convicted men in a tiny
courtroom jammed with
lawyers, police and report-
ers. The hearing lasted only
a few minutes, and the four
men were quickly led from
the courtroom by police-
men after the verdicts were
read.
Speaking before the con-
victions, the father of the
victim called for the four to
be executed.
For what happened with
her, these brutes must be
hanged, he told report-
ers as he left home for the
courthouse. Nothing but
the death penalty is accept-
able to us.
The Associated Press
AP photo
Indian policemen look out from a van carrying four men convicted in
the fatal gang rape of a young woman on a moving New Delhi bus last
year in New Delhi, India, on Tuesday.
IN BRIEF
SOURCE: Institute of Medicine AP
Aging U.S. faces crisis in cancer care
Older adults account for just over half of the 1.6 million new
cases diagnosed in 2012. By 2030, new diagnoses are ex-
pected to reach 2.3 million as the population ages.
1.6 million new cases in 2012
53% were ages 65 or older
13.7 million survivors in 2012
59% were ages 65 or older
CANCER DIAGNOSES
CANCER SURVIVORS
More tear gas in protest over tear gas
PAGE 6A Wednesday, September 11, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477 80022591
ANGELELLA - Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in
Prince of Peace Parish, St. Marys
Church, West Grace Street, Old
Forge. Friends may call 10:30
a.m. until Mass.
BANASHEFSKI - Elynore, divine
liturgy and requiemservices 10
a.mThursday in John the Baptist
Byzantine Catholic Church,
Chestnut Street, Wilkes-Barre
Township. Friends may call 8:30
a.m. to services.
BEREZNAK - Robert, funeral 11
a.m. today at Harman Funeral
Homes &Crematory Inc. (East),
669W. Butler Drive, Drums.
CIAVARELLA - Bertha, funeral
9 a.m. today at Nat &Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass 9:30
a.m. in Our Lady of Hope Parish,
40 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
HARRISON- Lorraine, funeral
11 a.m. Friday at Clarke Piatt
Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday and
10 a.m. to services Friday.
KOZUB - Yuliya, funeral noon
today at Yeosock Funeral Home,
40 S. Main St., Plains Township.
Friends may call 10 a.m. to
services.
KRESESKI - Ann, funeral 9:30
a.m. today at Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial
10 a.m. in Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Duryea.
MOONEY - Holly, funeral 9:15
a.m. today at Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Theresas
Church, Shavertown.
NEARE - Ray Sr., memorial Mass
9:30 a.m. Saturday in St. Joseph
Marello Parish, 237 WilliamSt.,
Pittston.
RHOADS - Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
SOBOLESKI - Arlene, funeral 9
a.m. Thursday at George A. Strish
Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. in Holy Family
Parish, Sugar Notch. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. today and 8 a.m.
to services Thursday.
FUNERALS
DEBORAH STEWART,
46, of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, at
home after a courageous battle
with cancer. Born in Nanticoke,
she was a daughter of Margaret
Swiderski. She was a graduate
of Nanticoke High School. She
worked with Humford Equities,
Wilkes-Barre, for many years.
She enjoyed her animals and will
be sadly missed by all who knew
her. In addition to her mother,
she is survived by her son, Bill;
and a brother, Sam.
Private funeral services
were held at the convenience
of the family. Arrangements
were entrusted to the Daniel J.
Hughes Funeral & Cremation
Service, 617 Carey Ave., Wilkes-
Barre.
ANDREW M. SAVAGE II,
70, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Saturday at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Arrangements are pend-
ing and entrusted to Kniffen
OMalley Funeral Home, 465 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
STELLA E. BENOSKI,
91, formerly of Conyngham
Street, Ashley, passed away
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, in
Wilkes-Barre. She was born
June 1, 1922, in Ashley,
daughter of the late John and
Magadelene Kunsal Rozitski.
Preceding her in death were her
husband, Bernard L. Benoski;
sisters, Jean Kapustensky, Helen
Stewart, Anna Fritz and Sophie
Tomchak; and brothers Joseph
and Frank Rozitski. Surviving
are brother Chester Rozitski,
Somerville, N.J.; numerous niec-
es, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Funeral services 11 a.m.
Friday at George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St.,
Ashley. Mass of Christian Burial
11:30 a.m. in St. Leos/Holy
Rosary Church. Friends may call
10 a.m. to services.
PETER J. JUDGE,
69, of Avoca, passed away
Tuesday at Geisinger
Community Medical Center,
Scranton.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
EDYTHE ANN KRUEGER,
75, of Laurel Run, passed away
Tuesday morning at her home,
with her family by her side.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main
St., Plains Township.
KENNETH G. ROGERS,
49, died Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013,
at home. Born June 17, 1964,
in Scranton, he was a son of the
late Joseph J. and Ann M. Barber
Rogers. Preceding him was a
brother, Timothy. Surviving
are wife, Linda Galacci-Rogers;
son, Noah; stepdaughter, Sarah
Tollok (Kris); grandchildren,
Benjamin and Samuel; siblings
Joseph (Joyce), Agnes Jones
(Dave Sr.), Eddie (Kandy),
Brian (Denise), Ann Marie
Martin (William), Theresa
Chickeletti (Rob), Christopher
(Heather); nieces and nephews.
Blessing services 3 p.m.
Saturday at Thomas P. Kearney
Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main
St., Old Forge. Friends may call
1 p.m. to services. For directions
or to leave condolences, visit
www.kearneyfuneralhome.com.
MARY ROSE BOYD,
77, of Wilkes-Barre, died
Monday at Little Flower Manor.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105
N. Main St., Ashley.
ELEANOR D. BOLITA,
96, formerly of Plains Township,
died Sept. 4, 2013, at Elderwood
Health Care at Riverwood,
Grand Island, N.Y. Born in
Wilkes-Barre, daughter of
the late Thomas and Eleanor
Grabowski Rampola, Eleanor
was a former member of St.
Francis Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Preceding her were her husband,
John, and daughter Dolores
Gray. Surviving are daughter
Joan Ciechoski, Grand Island;
sister, Dorothy E. Kozloski,
Wilkes-Barre; ve grandchil-
dren; 12 great-grandchildren;
two great-great-grandchildren.
Mass of Christian Burial
9:30 a.m. Thursday in St.
Benedicts Parish, St. Dominics
Church, Austin Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre. Funeral arrangements by
Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S.
Main St., Plains Township.
StEpHEN StEMpLESKI
Sept. 9, 2013
Stephen Stempleski, 67, of
Hanover Township, also known
as Stemp to his close friends
and family, entered into eternal
life on Sept. 9, 2013, surround-
ed by his loving family, at the
Geisinger Hospice after his long
battle with cancer.
Stephen was born in Korn
Krest, a son of the late Kathryn
Stempleski and Stanley
Stempleski.
Stephen served in the U.S.
Army for six years with the artil-
lery division, during which time
he served a tour in the Vietnam
War and earned a Purple Heart
for being wounded.
Returning from his service, he
started his family by marrying his
late wife, Marion, in 1972, and
later expanded his family with
the birth of his son, Christopher
Rodgers.
Stephen was employed with
Penn Refrigeration for 35 years
with the Sheet Metal Union, retir-
ing in 2011.
Stempwill bebest remembered
for his love of the Philadelphia
Phillies and Philadelphia Eagles.
He looked forward to his yearly
trips to Phillies games with his
son and grandchildren. Stemp
was a family man who loved
spending time with his only son,
Christopher, and his family.
Stemp also enjoyed playing
golf, going to Mohegan Sun and
playing poker games at home
with his family.
He will be sadly missed by
many.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
his wife, Marion (Kovalchick)
Stempleski; and sister, Janice
Grose.
Stephen is survived by his
son, Christopher Rodgers, and
his wife, Maureen Rodgers;
grandsons, Darryl Rodgers,
Justin Klein and Zachary Klein;
niece and nephew, Wendy and
John Kane, and their family;
and Donald and Debbie Grose
and their family; the Boggs fam-
ily; and his extended family, the
Brady family.
Deacon Thaddeus
Wadas will conduct
blessing services 7 p.m.
Thursday at Stanley
S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc.,
614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call 5 p.m. until
time of services. Military honors
and interment services will be at
10:30 a.m. Friday at Indiantown
Gap National Cemetery,
Annville.
CHARLIE tHOMAS
Sept. 9, 2013
Charlie Thomas, formerly of
Knox Street, Hanover Township,
passed away Monday in Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Born Sept. 21, 1931, in
Hanover Township, he was a
son of the late William and Ester
Thomas. He was a graduate of
Hanover High School, class of
1949. He was a U.S. Air Force
veteran of the Korean Conict.
He was formerly employed as
purchasing clerk for Wyoming
Health Care (First Hospital),
Kingston, retiring in 2012.
He was a member of Baptist
Tabernacle Church, Wilkes-Barre;
American Legion Post 609; VFW
Post 5267; AMVETS Post 59,
Hanover Township; and Oak
Grove Club, Wilkes-Barre.
Charlie enjoyed his time spent
with his family on numerous vaca-
tions, including the Maryland
beaches and Disney World. He
also enjoyed being with his two
dogs, Shadow and Bandit.
He was preceded in death by
wife, Rose Thomas; and broth-
ers, William, James, David and
Robert.
He is survived by son, Charles
J., and his wife, Cheryl Thomas,
Hanover Township; daughter,
Tammy, and her husband, Albert
Walker, Hanover Township;
grandchildren, George and
Yuannis Polemitis; Michelle,
Charles D. and Dylan Thomas;
and Matthew, Marissa and
Zachary Walker.
Funeral will be at
10 a.m. Friday from
Mamary Durkin Funeral
Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be
in St. Marys Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Thursday.
Those who desire may give
memorial contributions to the
SPCA, Fox Hill Road, Plains
Township.
Esther M. Koscielnik, 82,
of Union Street, Nanticoke,
passed away Monday evening,
Sept. 9, 2013, at her home.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on May
24, 1931, to the late Leo and
Carolyn Avondale Jolley, she
attended GAR High School,
Wilkes-Barre.
Upon moving to Nanticoke,
Esther was a faithful and dedi-
cated member of St. Marys
Church, now a part of St.
Faustina Parish Community.
Esther was employed as a
sewing machine operator for
Rox Anne Garment Co., retir-
ing 20 years ago.
She was preceded in death by
a daughter, Barbara Mattey.
Surviving are her son, Joseph
Consola, at home; daughter,
Diane Lewis, Nanticoke; four
grandchildren; ve great-
grandchildren; and a son-in-law,
Robert Mattey.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11 a.m. Thursday
from the Grontkowski Funeral
Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green
St., Nanticoke, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 11:30
a.m. in her parish church, St.
Marys, Nanticoke. Ofciating
will be the Rev. James Nash.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends are invited to join the
family for calling hours 6 to 8
p.m. today.
JOHN BRDARIC JR.
Sept. 9, 2013
John Brdaric Jr., 60, of Bunker
Hill, passed away at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township, after a tremen-
dous accident while doing what
he loved to do tear things
apart.
Born Aug. 4, 1953, in
Kingston, he was a son of
Helene Lazar Brdaric and
the late John Butch Sr. He
was the owner/operator of
Brdaric Excavating Co. He was
president of the Bunker Hill
Outlaws. His passion was driv-
ing snowmobiles, Harleys and
RZRs.
He was preceded in death,
in addition to his father, by his
companion of 10 years, Lou
Anne Evans.
Surviving are his children,
Jamie and her husband, Bryan
Fedor, and John and his wife,
Carrie, both of Kingston
Township; grandchildren,
Colbie and Brooklyn Brdaric,
and Ashlyn Wilson; his former
wife, Nancy Brdaric; extended
grand-family, Maddi Evans,
Plains Township, and Brynlee
OBoyle, Luzerne; and his dog,
Tyler.
Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. Friday in
Holy Family Parish, Luzerne,
with the Rev. Michael Zipay
ofciating. Interment will be
in Mount Olivet Cemetery,
Kingston Township. Family and
friends are to meet with the
family 3 to 8 p.m. Thursday at
Betz-Jastremski Funeral Home
Inc., 568 Bennett St., Luzerne.
Johns family requests that
friends go directly to the church
Friday morning.
To light a virtual candle or to
leave a message of condolence
for Johns family, please visit
www.betzjastremski.com.
WILLIAMBILL LAURANCE BAKERJR.
Sept. 4, 2013
WilliamBill Laurance Baker
Jr., 90, died Wednesday, Sept. 4,
2013, in Fellowship Community,
Whitehall, surrounded by his
family. He was the husband
for 55 1/2 years of Elizabeth
Bettieann Ann (Kos) Baker,
who died in 2010.
He was a son of the late
William Laurance Sr. and
Jeanette Minerva (Jessup)
Baker, and was preceded in death
by his brother, Donald Baker, in
2010. Born in Sheridan, Ind.,
he was a former resident of
Mountain Top, Columbus, Ohio,
and Sheridan.
A 1952 graduate of Bowling
Green State University, Ohio,
with a bachelors degree in
elementary education, he met
his wife there and was a mem-
ber of Sigma Chi fraternity. He
was a sales coordinator for St.
Regis Paper Co., before retiring
in 1984. Previously, he was a
national representative for Sigma
Chi. He was a 1941 graduate of
Columbus North High School.
He was a U.S. Navy veteran of
World War II, serving as a phar-
macists mate, rst class, primar-
ily in the Asiatic Pacic Theater
from 1942 to 1947, and later
served in the U.S. Navy Reserve
as a hospital corpsman, rst
class, from 1947 to 1955.
He was a member of the
American Legion and the Civil
War Trust. He was a big fan of
Dale Earnhart Sr.
He is survived by his son,
Michael, Allentown; daughters,
Dr. Lisa (Baker) and her hus-
band, Dr. Robert Vaughn, New
Tripoli, Juliana, Martinsburg,
W. Va.; Ann, Virginia Beach, Va.;
Laura (Baker) and her husband,
William Curley, Mountain Top;
grandchildren, Kari (Baker)
and her husband, Ryan Lenhart,
Mount Laurel, N.J.; Elizabeth
(Vaughn) and her husband,
Gregory Bringhurst, Easton;
Amy Vaughn, New Tripoli;
Patrick and Delaney Curley,
both of Mountain Top; sister,
Saundra (Baker) Spicer, wife of
the late John Spicer, Columbus;
nephew, nieces and numerous
cousins.
Visitation with prayer
and military services
will be held 7 to 9 p.m.
Friday at George Strish
Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St.,
Ashley. Services will be 9 to 10
a.m. Saturday, with prayer ser-
vice at 10 a.m., in the funeral
home.
Contributions, if desired,
may be made to Fellowship
Community, 3000 Fellowship
Drive, Whitehall, PA 18052;
Sigma Chi Foundation, 1714
Hinman Ave., Evanston, IL
60201; and/or the American
Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718,
Oklahoma City, OK 73123.
LINDA L. GREY
Sept. 6, 2013
Linda L. Grey, 68, of Dallas,
passed away Friday evening
in the Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Born in Kingston, she was a
daughter of the late Jonah and
Emma Fay (Nulton) Smith. She
was a graduate of Dallas High
School, class of 1963.
Prior to retirement, she
was employed by Kuharchick
Construction of Exeter for
more than 20 years. She was a
leader of Luzerne County 4-H
Horse and Pony of Luzerne
County.
Preceding her in death was
her granddaughter Carrie Lynn
Martin.
Surviving are children,
Wendy Cadwalader and her hus-
band, Chris, Monroe Township,
and John Grey and his wife,
Monika, Tunkhannock; grand-
children Katie-Jo Cadwalader,
Brianna and Autumn Grey;
brother, William Smith, and his
wife, Dolores, Peneld, N.Y.; sis-
ter, Norma Mullison, Westville,
N.J.; half-brothers, Jonah
Smith and his wife, Nancy,
Beaumont, and Ronald Wright,
Noxen; half-sisters, Nancey
Gallup, Beaumont, and Bonita
Wilmont; best friends, Lynda
and Dick Heuer, Shickshinny;
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will
be held at 1 p.m. Saturday in
the Nulton-Kopcza Funeral
Home, 5749 state Route 309,
Beaumont, Monroe Township.
Interment will be in the
Beaumont Cemetery. Friends
may call noon until time of ser-
vice.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
of Northeastern Pennsylvania,
1541 Alta Drive, Suite 204,
Whitehall, PA 18052; or the
Carrie Martin Scholarship Fund
of the The Luzerne Foundation,
140 Main St., Second Floor,
Luzerne, PA 18709.
EStHER M.
KOSCIELNIK
Sept. 9, 2013
Judith A. McLaughlin, 69,
a resident of Bonham Nursing
Center, Stillwater, passed away
Sept. 9, 2013.
She was born Sept. 28,
1943, in Berwick, a daughter
of the late Robert and Alberta I.
Wallen Smith.
Judith lived in Orlando, Fla.,
and was a former resident of
Huntington Mills.
She was a graduate of
Northwest High School.
She had been employed in
retail banking.
Over the years, she enjoyed
going to Disney World.
Judith was preceded in
death by her husband, John J.
McLaughlin.
There will be no calling
hours.
Arrangements are by the
Clarke Piatt Funeral Home Inc.,
6 Sunset Lake Road, Hunlock
Creek.
ALBERt F. VALUNAS
Sept. 9, 2013
Albert F. Valunas, 92, of
Hanover Township, passed
into the hands of the Lord on
Monday evening, Sept. 9, 2013,
at the Gino Merli Veterans
Center, Scranton.
Born Aug. 7, 1921, in
Plymouth, he was a son of the
late George and Anna Tribendas
Valunas.
Albert was a graduate of
Plymouth High School. He was
a member of Exaltation of the
HolyCross Church, Buttonwood,
Hanover Township, and a mem-
ber of the former St. Casimirs
Church, Lyndwood, Hanover
Township.
He was a U.S. Army Air
Corps veteran, serving during
World War II. He was a gradu-
ate of Ofcer Candidate School,
and was a ight instructor dur-
ing the war. He was honorably
discharged from the U.S. Army
Air Corps as a warrant ofcer.
Albert was a private pilot
with a commercial rating and
additional aviation certica-
tions. He was employed by
Glenn L. Martin Aircraft
Corp. for two years and was
then employed by the Federal
Aviation Agency as an air trafc
controller at the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Airport.
He was a member of the
AMVETS, Post 59, Hanover
Township; the Fraternal Order
of Eagles, Aerie 546, Plymouth;
and the Notre Dame Club,
Hanover Township.
Throughout his life, he was
an avid hunter and sherman.
He greatly enjoyed spending
time outdoors.
Albert was preceded in death
by his wife, the former Dorothy
M. Groblewski; brothers,
George Valunas; the Rev. John
Valunas, pastor of St. Marys
Church, Wanamie; Stanley
Valunas and Joseph Valunas;
and son-in-law, Francis Toth.
Surviving are his children,
Allan G. Valunas and his wife,
Nancy, Shavertown; Paula Toth,
Harrisburg; and Neil J. Valunas
and his wife, Eileen, Hanover
Township; grandsons, Allan
Valunas and his wife, Melanie,
and Brian Valunas and his wife,
Jill; great-grandchildren, Alexa,
Madelyn, Colby, Caroline,
Aidan and Ian.
Family and friends
are invited to attend
a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m.
Thursday in Exaltation of the
Holy Cross Church, 420 Main
Road, Buttonwood, Hanover
Township. Interment will
be in St. Casimirs Church,
Muhlenburg. There will be no
calling hours.
Funeral arrangements are by
the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral
Home, Plymouth.
In lieu of owers, contribu-
tions may be made in Alberts
name to the St. Jude Childrens
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place,
Memphis, TN 38105; or the
Wounded Warrior Project, P.O.
Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675.
To submit online condolences
to Alberts family, please visit
www. sj grontkowski f uneral -
home.com.
MILLIE ISABEL HARVEY CRAWFORD
Sept. 4, 2013
Millie Isabel Harvey
Crawford, of Georgetown,
Texas, and formerly of Lake
Carey, died Wednesday, Sept. 4,
2013, at the home of her daugh-
ter and son-in-law, Janet and
Thomas Nelson, of Georgetown.
Millie was born Feb. 17,
1915, in Marcy, Tunkhannock
Township, Wyoming County, a
daughter of the late Ross and
Bessie Milhime Harvey.
Prior to retirement, she
worked as the assistant chief
clerk for Wyoming County for
more than 34 years. She was a
member of the Tunkhannock
Baptist Church, where she
taught Sunday school and was
a youth leader for many years.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
brothers, Stirel Harvey and
Ross Harvey Jr.
Also surviving, in addition
to her daughter Janet, is a
daughter, Barbara, and Clinton
Closs, East Aurora, N.Y.; sister,
Edith James, Faireld, N.J.;
grandchildren, Tom and Amy
Nelson, Round Rock, Texas;
Todd and Patty Nelson, Cedar
Park, Texas; Rochelle and Ed
Fitzpatrick, East Aurora; Amy
and Chris Tedesco, Hamburg,
N.Y.; great-grandchildren,
Andrew and Lizzy Nelson,
Austin, Texas; Peter Nelson,
Round Rock; Charlotte, Luke
and Cade Nelson, Cedar Park;
Alicia, Ashley, Autumn and
Anna Fitzpatrick, East Aurora;
a very special nephew and his
wife, Clyde and Betty Harvey,
Tunkhannock; and several
other nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be at 2 p.m.
Friday at Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home Inc., 73 W.
Tioga St., Tunkhannock, with
Mr. William Noble of the
Tunkhannock Baptist Church
ofciating. Interment will
be in Sunnyside Cemetery,
Tunkhannock. Friends may call
noon until the time of service
at the funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made
to Milwood Baptist Church,
AWANA Clubs, c/o Tom
Nelson, 3303 Stonewall Drive,
Round Rock, TX 78681.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at www.
sheldonkukuchkafuneralhome.
com.
to view
Legacy
obituaries
online, visit
www.timesleader.com
MICHAEL ALBERt SEASHOCK
Sept. 10, 2013
Michael Albert Seashock, 51,
of Furnace Street, Shickshinny,
died Tuesday morning, Sept.
10, 2013, at home.
Born July 23, 1962, in
Fayetteville, N.C., he was a son
of Paul J. Seashock Sr. and his
wife, Cindy, Shickshinny, and
the late Joan Elizabeth Frable
Seashock.
He served in the U.S. Army
and was employed by Fox
Transportation, Hometown,
until he retired due to ill health.
In addition to his mother, he
was preceded in death by three
brothers, Timothy R., David S.
and Johnny Seashock.
Surviving are his wife, the
former Sharon Heckman, whom
he married on Oct. 29, 2008;
a son, Michael T. Seashock,
at home; two daughters,
Elizabeth Seashock, at home,
and Crystal M. Seashock,
Shickshinny; three stepsons,
Isaiah L. Hays and his wife,
Amanda, Bloomsburg; Andrew
L. Hays, at home; and Joshua
A. Hays and his wife, Suellen,
Glen Lyon; ve grandchildren,
Haylee Conrad, Makenzee
Hays, Renat Hays, Damian
Hays and Savannah Hays; a
sister, Lisa Marie Fish, and her
husband, Jody, Stroudsburg;
and two brothers, Paul J.
Seashock Jr. and his ancee,
Deb, Milford, and Robert J.
Seashock, Berwick.
Visitation will be
2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday at the Mayo
Funeral Home Inc., 77
N. Main St., Shickshinny. There
will be no funeral services.
In lieu of owers, donations
can be made to the family to
help with expenses.
For additional information or
to send condolences, please visit
www.mayofh.com.
JUDItHA.
MCLAUGHLIN
Sept. 9, 2013
Phyllis C. Focht, 91, of
McKendree Road, Shickshinny,
died Monday afternoon, Sept.
2, 2013, in Berwick Retirement
Village II.
Born Sept. 15, 1921, in
Brewer, Maine, she was a
daughter of the late Walter E.
and Lena (Carney) Day.
She lived in Philadelphia
and Bala Cynwyd for a num-
ber of years, then returned to
Maine before nally moving to
the Shickshinny area 24 years
ago.
She was a member of
the VFW Ladies Auxiliary
631, Northport, Maine; the
American Legion Auxiliary
No. 495, Shickshinny, and
was a former president of
the Ladies Fraternal Order of
Police Auxiliary Lodge No. 28,
Ardmore.
She was a member of
McKendree United Methodist
Church.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Wesley F.
Focht, who died Sept. 4, 1999.
Surviving are a daughter,
Jeannine Farrer, Shickshinny;
three sons, Donald Rogers,
Maine; Walter Focht,
Shickshinny; and John Focht,
Bala Cynwyd; 13 grandchildren
and 12 great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at 11:30 a.m. Sunday in
McKendree United Methodist
Church, 477 McKendree Road,
Shickshinny, with her pastor,
Gail Kitchen, ofciating.
In lieu of owers, donations
can be made to McKendree
United Methodist Church, c/o
Sandra Shaw, 8 Sunshine Road,
Shickshinny, PA 18655.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the Mayo Funeral
Home Inc., Shickshinny.
pHYLLIS C.
FOCHt
Sept. 2, 2013
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 7A
W-Bpromotes frefghters
EDWARDLEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A
Missouri man jailed on
drunken-driving and aggra-
vated assault-related offenses
might face vehicular homi-
cide charges after a co-work-
er died.
An autopsy is scheduled
today on the body of Shane
Stewart, 25, of Missouri,
who died at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township.
He was pronounced dead at
5:08 p.m. Monday.
Stewart was injured when
he was struck by a Dodge
Ram pickup allegedly driven
by Patrick R. Ramirez, 25,
of Blue Spring, Mo., in the
parking lot of McDonalds
Restaurant on Kidder Street
in Wilkes-Barre just after
12:30 a.m. Monday.
Ramirez was charged
Monday with aggravated
assault while driving under
the inuence of alcohol, driv-
ing under the inuence of
alcohol, accidents involving
death or
personal
i n j u r y ,
aggravated
assault by
v e h i c l e
and care-
less driv-
ing. He
r e ma i ns
jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack
of $50,000 bail.
The charges were led
against Ramirez before
Stewart died.
City police allege
Ramirez, Stewart and Stuart
Thompson spent the night
drinking at a restaurant on
Coal Street, Wilkes-Barre,
where they were picked
up by Derick Marsh and
returned to the Host Inn,
where they were staying.
Stewart left the hotel with
Ramirez and Thompson,
police said. A security guard
at the hotel told police he
tried to stop the three men
from leaving the parking
lot because they appeared
intoxicated, according to the
criminal complaint.
At the McDonalds park-
ing lot, Thompson said,
Stewart and Ramirez argued
about who wanted to drive,
the complaint states.
Ramirez got into the
drivers seat as Stewart
yelled at him to stop, police
said. Witnesses allegedly
told police Ramirez accel-
erated and Stewart landed
on the ground and was pos-
sibly run over by the truck.
Ramirez stopped about 20
feet away and got out, looked
at Stewart and drove away,
according to the complaint.
Police arrested Ramirez at
the Host Inn.
Ramirez refused to sub-
mit to a blood-alcohol test at
Geisinger Wyoming Valley,
police said in the complaint.
The three men are
employed by a construction
company from Missouri
building the hotel at the
Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs casino, the complaint
states.
Victimin alleged DUI dies
Charges against Patrick Ramirez, 25, could
be updated to include vehicular homicide
Ramirez
MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
KINGSTON Mike
Harper has gathered
about 800 signatures in
two weeks urging the
Wyoming Valley West
School Districts board to
reconsider the elimina-
tion of the middle school
librarian position, and
he plans to present them
to the board at tonights
monthly meeting.
Im hoping I can get
up to the podium and
bring this to the fore-
front, Harper said
Tuesday. I think a lot
of middle school parents
arent even aware they
dont have a librarian.
The district decided
to eliminate the posi-
tion last month and
use a part-time aide to
help students. Joann
Prushinski, the state-cer-
tified librarian who had
been managing the mid-
dle school facility, was
shifted to elementary
librarian, spreading
her time among three
schools.
Harper, a Kingston res-
ident who runs Sharper
Embroidery and Screen
printing in Luzerne, said
Prushinski is a friend and
her sister works in his
business, which is what
prompted him to act.
But he added the goal is
not necessarily reinstat-
ing Prushinski in her old
post, just that the post be
reconstituted.
The Pennsylvania
State Board of Education
has recommended there
always be a state-certified
librarian, Harper said.
The middle school is
now the only building in
the district without one.
He added that students
coming from the newly
renovated State Street
Elementary School, with
a state-of-the-art library,
will be transferring to a
middle school with near-
ly 14,000 books and no
librarian.
Union President Linda
Houck had promised
last month to file a labor
grievance because the
decision to eliminate the
post and move Prushinski
to the elementary schools
should have, by law and
contract, been announced
last December.
The move is being
grieved, said Harper,
but he believes the
issue needs to be put in
the public eye as well.
Hopefully, some parents
will show up and we can
get them thinking about
this, he said. I invite
all concerned parents,
taxpayers and voters
to come to the middle
school on Chester Street,
Kingston, at 7 p.m.
Petition launched to restore
Valley West librarian post
After districts recent personnel
moves, middle school has 14,000
books but no librarian
Clark Van Orden photos | The Times Leader
Clockwise from top: Cheryl Murtha, pins an assistant chief badge on husband William Murthas coat lapel during a promotion ceremony
for Wilkes-Barre Fire Department employees Tuesday morning at City Hall; Mayor Thomas Leighton shakes the hand of Thomas Burke
after he was promoted to assistant chief. Looking on are Carol Ann Burke and Mary Ellen Hnasko, Thomas Burkes mother; Michael Bilski
gets promoted to captain as his wife, Joan Bilski, watches the official title change.
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Times Leader Correspondent
WYOMINGBorough
Council approved the
purchase a security sys-
tem for use in its office
area at a cost of $700 on
Tuesday night.
Council also autho-
rized its solicitor, Jarrett
Ferentino, to prepare and
negotiate the terms of
an Intergovernmental
Cooperation Agreement
with West Wyoming
to allow for certain
connections into the
West Wyoming sewer
system at Stites Street.
Council approved the
acceptance of Forty
Fort terminating an
i n t e r m u n i c i p a l
agreement for code
enforcement. Ferentino
said specifics of code
enforcement would be
addressed at its October
meeting.
Offers for the purchase
of a used borough pickup
truck will be opened at
its October meeting.
Resident Frank Prokop
asked council to clarify
ownership of a specific
piece of property on
First Street.
Ferentino said he
was familiar with the
property and would
be reviewing relevant
documents, reporting
back to council.
The next meeting of
council will be on Oct. 8
at 7:30 p.m.
Wyoming approves purchase of security system
TheAssociated Press
HARRISBURG Gov.
Tom Corbetts administra-
tion is being told it must
shift tens of thousands of
Pennsylvania children froma
state-subsidized health insur-
ance program to Medicaid,
although the Republican
governor is not saying yet
whether he will comply with
the federal directive.
U.S. Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius told Corbett in a
Friday letter that the switch
is required by the 2010 fed-
eral health care law and that
it will simplify coverage for
families by aligning children
under the same program as
their parents.
Corbett has protested
that some children will have
to nd new doctors, but
Sebelius said many other
states have already prepared
for the transition by elimi-
nating age-based eligibility
rules for Medicaid coverage
and by extending Medicaid
eligibility to children 6 or
older whose families earn up
to 133 percent of the federal
poverty level. Advocates for
the poor say children are
better off under Medicaid
anyway because its coverage
is more comprehensive than
Pennsylvanias Childrens
Health Insurance Program,
or CHIP.
Corbetts top insur-
ance regulator, Michael
Consedine, on Tuesday
called Sebelius response
disappointing and could
not yet say whether the
administration will comply
with it or seek to block it,
perhaps through a court
challenge.
I dont think the gover-
nors ready to give up the
ght for this program, so
we continue to evaluate our
options, Consedine said.
Currently, Pennsylvanias
Medicaid program covers
children under 6 whose
families earn up to 133 per-
cent of the federal poverty
level, and children 6 and
over whose families earn
up to 100 percent of the fed-
eral poverty level about
$23,550 for a family of four
this year. The 2010 federal
health care lawalso expands
Medicaid to working-age
adults who earn up to 133
percent of the federal pov-
erty level, although Corbett
has said he will not allow
Pennsylvania to participate
without certain cost-savings
concessions fromthe federal
government.
The change for children
takes effect Jan. 1, although
Sebelius offered in her letter
to cooperate in a phased-in
transition. She also sug-
gested that Pennsylvania
can structure its child health
care to make two programs
appear more like one that
resembles CHIP, with differ-
ent plan benets and cost-
sharing obligations for some
families.
Consedine said the
administration will seek
more information about
those ideas.
Feds: Pa. must switch CHIP kids to Medicaid
PAGE 8A Wednesday, September 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
GLENMAURA REdUcEd Premier location.
Almost new all brick Frank Betz design. 1st foor
MBR Suite w/6ft walk-in shower + 3 other BRs &
baths all w/cherry vanities w/granite or marble. Cherry
HW foors, gourmet kitchen w/cherry cabinets &
granite Island & bar. Beautifully designed landcaping
+ loads of upgrades. Property on 42 Norton Avenue
dir: L on Main St - R on Huntsville Rd - L on Norton
- Home on L
MLS# 13-1263 PEG 714-9247 $997,500
MOUNTAINTOP Quality built 6000SF
home on 3acres. Radiant heat on 1st foor, 5
car garage, 10 ceilings on 1st foor, 2-story
FR w/FP, in-ground pool, covered patio,
wet bar in LL. Builders own home! One of
a kind!
MLS# 13-1975 JIM 715-9323 $797,500
SHAVERTOWN New on Market - Custom brick Colonial on
6.7acre property, set off long private drive: this gracious home
offers teak wood foors & beautiful molding in living & dining
rooms. Modern eat-in kitchen opens to family room w/freplace,
1st foor offce, wonderful 3 seasons room - Master has exceptional
bath & closet - HW throughout 2nd foor - Finished LL for
additional recreational space. The fabulous new Gunite pool is
surrounded by slate tile - Landscape is abundant w/perrenials.
MLS# 13-3223 RHEA696-6677 $665,000
MOUNTAINTOP Exquisite 3350SF beauty
on 7.49 mostly wooded acres. Spacious rooms.
Great foor plan. Amazing kitchen. Lots of HW
& tile. 3 car garage. Great house!
MLS# 13-2011 TERRY d. 715-9317 $589,400
dALLAS Stately stone front home on cul-de-sac in Overbrook
Farms - Beautiful HW foors throughout bright rooms - Great
kitchen opens to patio & lush lawn - Family room has handsome
stone, wood burning freplace - Huge Master Bedroom - custom
blinds throughout - 3 baths on 2nd foor.
MLS# 13-1769 MARGY 696-0891 $519,000
KINGSTON TWP. FIREWOOD FARMS - Custom Cedar home
on 5acres in serene setting captures wonderful views from huge
windows, expansive decks & patios - Large stone freplace in LR -
Oversize Master Bedroom & bath - Stunning new offce w/built-in
desk, built-ins & separate entry door. MLS# 13-243 RHEA
696-6677 $395,000
HANOVER TWP. Stately 2-story Tudor on a double lot
this 3BR home offers beautiful landscaping, C/A, patio, 3
season room & pool with spectacular views. MLS# 13-1979
PATTYA. 715-9332 $299,900
WILKES-BARRE Youll love how close this attractive
new 2BR, 2 bath Condo w/huge great room & kitchen is
to the Kirby Center, offces, theater, restaurants & shops!
MLS# 13-122 PEG 714-9247 or ANdY 714-9225
$219,900
42 Norton Avenue - dALLAS In the heart of Dallas
Borough - 4BR Traditional w/bright open plan, deck,
hot tub, pool, 2 car garage. Home Sweet Home!
dir: L on Main St - R on Huntsville Rd - L on Norton
- Home on L
MLS# 13-3433 TRAcY 696-0723 $212,000
dALLAS REdUcEd New on Market - Lovely stand
alone Ranch Condo. 2BR, 2 bath, LR with HW, kitchen w/
granite & tile. Nice rear deck.
MLS# 13-3153 RHEA696-6677 $210,000
BUcK TWP. NEW LISTING Charming 4BR Lakefront Cottage
only 2 hrs. to Phila & NYC features cozy living room w/stone FP, porch,
eat-in kitchen, MBR w/French doors to porch overlooking lakefront, modern
bath, gleaming HWfoors & new solid wood doors in 1st fr BRs & hall. Quiet
natural lake surrounded by hundreds of ac for hiking, hunting, just relaxing.
Come for a visit & stay for the lifestyle. MLS# 13-3627 ANN LEWIS
714-9245 $199,900
HUNLOcK cREEK Country living at its best! 3BRs, 2
baths, huge FR, extra workshop w/attached 2 car garage.
MLS# 13-1428 ANNIE 905-0253 $179,900
dALLAS Ranch with 3BRs, 1 & 3/4 baths.
Finished lower level w/FR & offce. Spacious
LR, DR, screened porch, 1 car garage & nice
yard.
MLS# 13-1035 JUdY 714-9230 $165,000
LUZERNE Beautiful 3BR w/walk in dressing room (can be used as
4th BR) on a quiet 1 way street . 1st foor laundry, perennial gardens, garage,
enclosed porches & storage. Move right in! Nothing to do but unpack & enjoy
life!! Amust see!
MLS# 13-2982 MARY M. 714-9274 or cHRISTINA
714-9235 $129,900
KINGSTON Great location! 3BR, 2 bath home
is waiting for its new owners. Entry opens to LR/
DR combo - large lovely rear yard - garage w/lots of
storage. MLS# 13-2659W MATT 714-9229 $124,000
LARKSVILLE NEWLISTING Raised Ranch
w/eat-in kitchen, LR, DR, 3BRs, 1 3/4 baths.
Clean & neat w/nice backyard & recreation
room in lower level.
MLS# 13-3632 JUdY 714-9230 114,900
MOUNTAINTOP 3BR home w/2 full & 2 half baths.
LR, DR, FR w/FP, fnished basement. Gas heat & C/A.
32acre lot , 2 car garage & large deck.
MLS# 13-1739 ANdY 714-9225 $289,900
dALLAS Charming 4BR, 2.5 bath home in Highpoint
Acres. Move-in ready, remodeled kitchen, new paint &
carpet in neutral tones. Wonderful screened porch & side
yard. Neighbors share community pool.
MLS# 13-3198 RHEA696-6677 $247,500
INdIAN LAKE Charming Lakefront Retreat
surrounded by hundreds of acres of woodlands for
your enjoyment! Only 2hrs to Philadelphia & NYC!
MLS# 13-3059 ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $229,900
BEAR cREEK NEW LISTING Well-built & meticulously
maintained country charmer situated on 1.2 partially wooded acres only
minutes from Geisinger, Malls, Casino, Pocono attractions & 2hrs. To Phila
& NYC. Friends & family will enjoy the huge country kitchen & dining area
next to the family room. Sylvan setting will beckon & surround you! MLS#
13-3622 ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $225,000
KINGSTON REdUcEd Elegant all brick 2-story
4BRs - 2 have own bath. DR & sun room open to
private patio & yard. Professionally landscaped.
MLS# 13-2349 SALLY 714-9233 $349,000
KINGSTON NEW LISTING Move-in ready! Completely
remodeled 3000SF, 2-story, 4BR, 3 bath home. LR, DR, offce &
FR w/sliding door to large deck overlooking in-ground pool (new
liner). House features HW, crown moldings, ultra large modern bath
w/radiant heat in foors. 2nd foor laundry.
MLS# 13-3663 TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $324,900
MOUNTAINTOP Reduced Stunning 2-story on a fat lot. 4BRs,
2.5 bath home has HW foors, modern kitchen, foor to ceiling
stone FP, 2nd foor laundry, tile walk-in shower & jetted tub in
MBTH & large maintenance free deck!
MLS# 13-2698 PATTYA. 715-9332 $299,900
MOUNTAINTOP Fabulous 2.27acre cul-de-sac lot
w/private setting for this 4BR, 5 bath 4900SF home.
Numerous upgrades include in-ground pool & fnished
basement.
MLS# 13-2878 dANA715-9333 $489,900
HARVEYS LAKE Modern 3BR, 2 bath, 2200 SF home
w/50 lakefront; LR w/full glass wall, DR w/FP, modern kit
w/appliances; 2nd fr laundry; 2 car+ garage; deck; fnished
dock.
MLS# 13-1120 RAE 714-9234 $449,900
174 Kimberly Lane - TRUcKSVILLE Elegance
& comfort combine to give you all that you wish for!
Traditional home with 1st foor Master.
dir: Rt.309 to R on Carverton - R on Staub Rd -
Follow to Kimberly - Home on L.
MLS# 13-2678 TRAcY 696-0723 $444,000
WILKES-BARRE 2 Vacant lots zoned for
Multi-Family. Two deeds for property. Being sold
together.
MLS# 13-1991 ANdREA714-9244 49,000
360 W. Mountain Road - PLYMOUTH TWP.
REdUcEd Room galore - Spacious 4BR, 3 bath w/
large LR, modern eat-in kitchen, fnished lower level,
beautiful HW foors situated on 8.84acres. Great view!
Property on L.
dir: Huntsville Road to Weavertown Road onto W
Mountain Road 2.4miles -
MLS# 12-3655 cLYdETTE 696-0897 $228,000
94 Grandview Avenue - dALLAS Modern, well-
maintained 3BR, 2 bath 2300SF home; large LR &
DR; eat-in tile kitchen w/appls; FR w/FP; offce; mud
room/laundry; gas heat & A/C; HW; 2 decks; garage;
Excellent location; Just move in!!
dir: Cross Valley Expressway, follow Rt 309 at split R
on Grandview. MLS# 13-3079 RAE 714-9234 199,000
115 Huckleberry Lane - dURYEA NEW LISTING
2007 Spacious Ranch features vaulted ceilings, oak
kitchen, Master Suite w/garden tub, 3BRs, almost
fnished
basement, in-ground fberglass pool, patio, 2 car
oversized garage. All set on a 1.23 acre lot.
dir: Blueberry Hill Estates, Blueberry, left on
Huckleberry, home is on the left. MLS# 13-4248
MAUREEN 585-0607 314,900
SHAVERTOWN New on Market - Gracious home in
wonderful Woodridge II location. American Cherry foors fow
through spacious rooms w/walls of custom cabinets, windows
& French Doors The bright kitchen has large breakfast area
Great 4 seasons room w/gas freplace opens to expansive
wrap around deck that overlooks a Sylvan pool w/retractable
cover. Abrick patio, additional yard w/lush trees complete this
3.96 acre property. All bedrooms have private baths a lower
level game room w/freplace opens to pool area. Call to see
this special home!
Property on 115 Huckleberry Lane
dir: Blueberry Hill Estates, Blueberry, left on Huckleberry,
home is on the left. MLS# 13-3156 RHEA696-6677 $895,000
SHAVERTOWN NEW LISTING Stately 2-story set on
1acre lot on cul-de-sac. This 4yr old home offers premium
fnishes throughout. 5BRs, 4.5 baths, spacious kitchen w/
granite tops, 1st foor BR Suite.
MLS# 13-3572 GERI 696-0888 $454,900
P
E
N
d
IN
G
1000 Lantern Hill Road - SHAVERTOWN Woodridge II REdUcEd: - 3yrs old open
foor plan. HW foors, FR w/2story FP, LL fnished w/wet bar, movie theater, exercise
room. Breathtaking views. Upgraded landscaping with 3 waterfalls.
dir: Rt.309N - L on Sutton Road - R into Woodridge II - House on R.
MLS# 12-4215 GERI 696-0888 549,000
MOUNTAINTOP Outstanding offering for New
Construction! Finished lower level! 4BRs, 2.1 baths,
3 car garage. Landscaped!
MLS# 13-747 cORINE 715-9331 $329,900
Buying? Selling?
Call the Experts!
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
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Its easy to understand the frustra-
tion of Anthony Maniscola, the for-
mer Pennsylvania Turnpike inspector
general who says the toll-road com-
mission ought to be disbanded and
folded into the state government.
The commission has long served as
a cash cow for politicians. A March
grand jury report found that turnpike
employees regularly hit up contrac-
tors for contributions to politicians.
The spreading of the wealth was even
ritualized: The party in power got 60
percent of the take, and the minority
party got the rest.
But folding the Turnpike
Commission into the state
Department of Transportation
wouldnt solve that problem. To extri-
cate political money from govern-
ment contracting, vendors must be
prohibited from funding politicians
campaigns.
Whether they want to or not, gov-
ernment contractors in Pennsylvania
are expected to support political can-
didates. Doing a good job can be far
less important to their survival as
businesses than keeping the political
class happy.
Outrageously, there is no limit on
how much money a vendor can give a
politician in Pennsylvania. For state-
wide candidates, contributions in the
hundreds of thousands of dollars are
not unusual.
Its true that its especially easy
for politics to overrule good govern-
ment when it comes to independent
authorities such as the Turnpike
Commission, which are shielded from
public view. Maniscola noted that the
turnpike commissioners are political
appointees who can inuence person-
nel and contracting.
The commission says it has cleaned
up its act and become more transpar-
ent. But how much can we expect of
the commission or any other agency
when the states politicians are tak-
ing baths in campaign cash?
New Jersey has an imperfect but
tough pay-to-play law that prohibits
contractors from donating more than
$300 to candidates, and authorities
are enforcing it. Last month, a state
court ordered an engineering rm to
pay $1 million in penalties on top of
a $2.6 million settlement stemming
from its violations of the states pay-
to-play law. Seven executives and
shareholders of the rm, Monmouth
County-based Birdsall Services
Group, face criminal charges, while
two more have pleaded guilty. The
prosecution put Birdsall out of busi-
ness, and it will act as a stiff deter-
rent to others.
What if Pennsylvanias attorney
general had the power to conduct
similar prosecutions? There would
probably be more law enforcement
actions like the one that yielded
criminal charges against high-rank-
ing turnpike employees and a former
state Senate leader. And contractors
would be more worried more about
doing good work than currying polit-
ical favor.
Maniscola was the Turnpike
Commissions rst inspector general,
and he shouldnt be the last. But no
inspector general can clean up an
entrenched pay-to-play culture on
his own. Pennsylvania needs strong
campaign-nance laws and robust
enforcement to do that.
Philadelphia Inquirer
Other OPInIOn: turnPIke cOmmIssIOn
PennDOTwouldnt take
politics out of turnpike
mALLArD FILLmOre DOOnesBurY
Investigation due
for national group
On Aug. 6, the General Accounting
Ofce announced that it is nally
going to do a nationwide investiga-
tion into how Planned Parenthood,
the largest abortion provider in our
country, spends taxpayer dollars. Of
course, the mainstream media is virtu-
ally ignoring this story.
The government funding to Planned
Parenthood should denitely be cut
because taxpayers are subsidizing
abortion. The money is fungible,
meaning that every dollar the govern-
ment gives Planned Parenthood for
other services frees up money for it to
spend on abortion care. Mechanisms
to segregate public from private funds
are mere accounting gimmicks and
funding schemes.
Planned Parenthoods annual report
for 2011-2012 reveals that it received
$542.4 million from taxpayers in
government grants and reimburse-
ments. During that same time frame,
the 333,964 abortions performed
represented a record high for them. It
should also be noted that as Planned
Parenthoods government funding
went up, abortions increased and real
health services for women went down.
I actually nd one more thing trou-
bling, the fact that Susan B. Komen
still gives Planned Parenthood grant
money, even though there has been
shown to be a direct link between
abortions and breast cancer. The
Coalition on Abortion/Breast Cancer
reported that on Aug. 14 there was
a Bangladesh study published in the
Journal of Dhaka Medical College on
risk factors for breast cancer, led by
Dr. Suraiya Jabeen. The authors found
a statistically signicant 20.62-fold
increased risk among women with
abortion histories by far the high-
est risk elevation reported among
73 published abortion-breast cancer
studies.
Barbara Yanchek
Jermyn
YOur OPInIOn: Letters tOthe eDItOr
senD us YOur OPInIOn
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 9A
Editorial
Restaurant inspections, health edu-
cation and screenings for sexually
transmitted diseases and tuberculosis
are some of the services at risk due to
an Erie County Department of Health
budget shortfall.
As Kevin Flowers reported Thursday,
the county Health Departments nan-
cial problems are twofold. The state
has cut $234,000 from the countys
budget, which runs through June
2014. Because the county is required
to match state funding dollar for dollar,
the cuts actually will amount to at least
$468,000.
The Pennsylvania Health
Department is itself under nancial
pressure. In March, Michael Wolf,
secretary of health, proposed consoli-
dating 60 state-run health centers that
serve rural residents into 34 centers.
That action would have required the
district ofce in Crawford County
to close, but the State Employees
International Union, which represents
nurses, sued to block the closings. The
Pennsylvania Supreme Court issued an
injunction in July to halt the consolida-
tions.
Erie County doesnt have a district
health ofce. Instead, it operates
its own health department. But the
state nances the bulk of the county
Health Departments budget $5
million of the $6.5 million budget for
this year. Cuts in state funding have
been a challenge for the county Health
Department for years, even as the need
grows to tackle public health problems
in our region.
On June 14, for example, we report-
ed that the number of active tubercu-
losis cases had increased from 2011 to
2013, compared to 2007-2010. County
Health Department ofcials stressed
that the increase in TB patients didnt
pose a health risk, but its not hard to
imagine that cuts to health education
programs could lead to an increase in
communicable diseases.
On July 22, we reported that Erie
County was experiencing a mini-
outbreak of syphilis, with six cases
reported in July. Thats as many STDs
as normally occur in a year, Charlotte
Berringer, R.N., director of com-
munity health for the county Health
Department, said then. Sexually
transmitted diseases are serious, and
syphilis can lead to life-threatening
complications. Syphilis can be easily
treated, but only if the patient has been
screened and then has access to treat-
ment.
The county Health Department also
inspects every restaurant and business
that sells food at least once a year. We
publish the inspection results weekly
in the Erie Times-News and on GoErie.
These inspections give Erie residents
peace of mind when they dine out. Its
also reassuring to know that vendors at
Eries many fairs and festivals have fol-
lowed proper food-safety procedures.
We are going through all of our
programs and services and making a
determination about how we can pro-
vide basic services. We will de-
nitely be cutting or restricting some
programs, Andy Glass, director of the
county Health Department, said when
Erie County Council discussed the
impact of the funding cuts.
These steep cuts require the atten-
tion of our legislative delegation to
Harrisburg as well as Erie County of-
cials. Public health is everybodys busi-
ness.
Erie Times-News
Other OPInIOn: BuDget shOrtFALL
Health department cuts
unhealthy for community
Since his death in
1951, Sgt. Bernard
Fisher has roamed
half the globe.
Killed while
repositioning in a
delaying maneuver
against a erce
enemy attack
near Seoul, South
Korea, Fishers
remains initially
rested somewhere
in the eld for
six months, until a U.S.
unit recovered remains of
four men. Unidentied,
they were transferred to
Tanggok, South Korea,
then to Japan, then to
Hawaii.
For all that time, Fisher,
a Wilkes-Barre native with
squared jaw and curved-up
coif, remained Missing in
Action and presumed dead.
It wasnt until last year, fol-
lowing one more exhuma-
tion, that the government
determined it had found
Fisher, and could give him
a nal burial.
That burial occurred July
27, with the Army relaying
a family request to be left
alone in their grief. I wrote
all this in a July 12 story.
After the story ran,
Sgt. Fishers brother and
sister-in-law, Ken and
Marina Fisher, stopped by
the paper to thank
me for the coverage,
to share a few addi-
tional insights about
Sgt. Fisher, and to
promise an update
after the burial. They
fullled that promise
with a letter, a photo
and a phone call.
Marina said people
who graduated from
St. Marys High
School with Sgt.
Fisher had joined forces
and arranged to have a
Catholic Mass held in his
name at St. Mary of the
Immaculate Conception
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
During the Aug. 24
Mass they presented
an American ag to the
church, complete with a
brass stand and plaque that
commemorates Sgt. Fisher,
class of 47.
Marina also offered a
poem she wrote, an ode
to a man who died at the
age of 21, and spent nearly
triple that time wending
his way to a nal, tting
resting place in Arlington
National Cemetery.
Her homage concludes
with a quote from rst-cen-
tury Roman poet Horace.
Its the title and most
famous line of an ode writ-
ten to spur fellow citizens
to defend
Rome.
The line
fell out of
favor after
the horrors
of World
War I, par-
ticularly
after Wilfred Owen used
it mockingly in his own
poem about gas attacks
in the trenches, prefacing
Horaces line with The old
lie:
But it seems clear that
Horaces original intent
truly applies here. Sgt.
Fisher did not merely die
defending fellow soldiers
and his country. He died
in a war that country
never ofcially declared.
For decades he was not
ofcially dead, his remains
found but deemed uniden-
tiable, his family denied
true closure.
Sgt. Bernard Fishers
brief life, heroic death and
epic journey home make
him a truly exceptional
defender of our freedoms.
Marinas poem:
The Final Homecoming
On a sultry summer day
in Arlington, Virginia, The
funeral cortege pauses.
Rising above the cemetery
entrance are statues of
eagles, reminiscent of our
own Market Street Bridge.
A long way and the
Honor Guard, with utmost
precision, transfers the
ag-draped casket to cais-
son.
Thirty-eight family mem-
bers begin the walk behind
the warrior, about to arrive
at his nal resting place.
Sixty-two years later, after
being declared Missing
in Action on January 1,
1951, at the age of 21, Sgt.
Bernard J. Fisher comes
home via a very circuitous
route.
The Army band plays
a Catholic hymn and the
chaplain says prayers com-
mitting his body to the
earth. The ag is folded
and presented to a family
member along with other
tributes.
Bernie, you fought the
good ght; you nished
the race; and you will be
awarded the prize, which
the Lord will give you on
the last day.
Dulce et decorum est pro
patria mori
It is sweet and right to
die for your country.
- Horace
Mark Guydish, a reporter for The
Times Leader, can be reached at
829-7161 or email mguydish@times-
leader com.
Six-decade trek to a heros fnal rest
mark
Guydish
Staf
Columnist
cOmmentArY: mArk guYDIsh
Fisher
PennEnvironment contends green-
house gas emissions cause this collec-
tive warming.
Scientists predict that extreme
weather events will become more fre-
quent and severe for future generations,
unless we act now to cut the pollution
that is fueling the problem, Corby said
in a prepared statement. Americas
dirtiest power plants are the elephant
in the room when it comes to global
warming.
Evidence of climate change became
real this year by way of hot spells and
ash ooding in the state, and were
approaching the one-year anniversary
mark for Hurricane Sandy, whichstruck
the New York/New Jersey coastline last
October, Corby said. These meteorolog-
ical oddities are all symptoms of human-
assisted global warming, she said.
Corby called for legislators to tighten
controls on emissions for old coal-red
power plants and better construc-
tion standards for new plants. He said
they chose to speak at Caseys ofce
because he is in a good place to support
President Barack Obamas power-plant
control efforts as legislators and the fed-
eral Environmental Protection Agency
are moving to set newstandards for old
and planned power plants this year.
(Casey) has yet to come out in
support of President Obamas plan to
limit pollution from existing and future
power plants, Corby said. We hope
that the senator will be able to take a
strong stance on climate in the future.
We want him to be a champion for the
climate.
In an email message, a spokesman
for Casey said the senator believes the
energy issue calls for balance.
Pennsylvania is one of the coun-
trys top energy producers and (Casey)
believes that our state can lead the way
in reducing our reliance on foreign oil
and promoting clean energy, the state-
ment said.
Casey believes the nations energy
portfolio should be diverse, including
both renewable and fossil-based fuels,
but he recognizes the importance of
green power, the statement said.
Developing cleaner energies will
boost our economy and reduce carbon
emissions, the statement said.
Bernard McGurl, Lackawanna River
Corridor Associations executive direc-
tor, backed Corbys efforts to get legis-
lators moving toward stricter policies,
and he also urged them to seek alterna-
tive power sources.
Theres newer technologies that are
available wind power, solar power
and a variety of natural gas and clean
coal that are much more efcient
and have reduced emissions of car-
bon dioxide, McGurl said.
But Corby rejected natural gas as an
alternative, saying PennEnvironment is
not in favor of exploration because of its
contested side effects.
Just looking how its produced and
how its transported, often (leaking
methane) gas along the way, completely
nullies anyadvantage we wouldexpect
to see in terms of global warming pollu-
tion, so we dont think natural gas is a
solution, Corby said.
PAGE 10A Wednesday, September 11, 2013 WEATHER www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
86/68
Chihuahua
77/58
Los Angeles
79/62
Washington
94/73
New York
92/75
Miami
88/76
Atlanta
87/67
Detroit
94/69
Houston
93/73
Kansas City
92/68
Chicago
89/67
Minneapolis
84/59
El Paso
82/69
Denver
71/55
Billings
81/55
San Francisco
70/57
Seattle
92/62
Toronto
89/63
Montreal
83/66
Winnipeg
71/48
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
THU SAT
SUN MON
FRI
TUE
TODAY
93
68
Show-
ers, heavy
t-storms
87 59
Partly
sunny and
breezy
66 43
Pleasant
and warm-
er
73 50
Partly
sunny and
nice
73 51
Cooler; a
p.m. show-
er
69 46
Mostly
sunny
71 51
Hot and
humid;
a p.m.
t-storm
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 14
Month to date 43
Year to date 745
Last year to date 860
Normal year to date 550
Anchorage 57/51/sh 61/51/pc
Baltimore 92/71/t 91/66/t
Boston 93/73/pc 87/66/t
Buffalo 88/69/t 76/54/t
Charlotte 90/65/pc 89/66/t
Chicago 89/67/t 78/56/pc
Cleveland 90/69/t 79/58/t
Dallas 96/74/t 96/75/s
Denver 71/55/t 68/54/t
Honolulu 89/74/s 88/74/s
Indianapolis 91/70/pc 86/58/s
Las Vegas 88/73/t 91/76/pc
Milwaukee 85/63/t 74/53/c
New Orleans 89/74/pc 91/74/pc
Norfolk 88/70/pc 88/70/t
Okla. City 95/70/s 95/67/s
Orlando 90/72/t 90/73/t
Phoenix 96/80/pc 100/82/t
Pittsburgh 87/68/t 80/57/t
Portland, ME 90/67/pc 79/61/t
St. Louis 97/73/pc 89/62/pc
San Francisco 70/57/pc 72/57/pc
Seattle 92/62/s 88/61/s
Wash., DC 94/73/t 91/68/t
Bethlehem 1.78 -0.05 16
Wilkes-Barre 2.05 -0.50 22
Towanda 1.43 -0.09 16
Port Jervis 2.91 +0.04 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Tuesday.
Today Thu Today Thu Today Thu
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:40 a.m.
1:09 p.m.
7:20 p.m.
11:08 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 84-90. Lows: 63-69. Very warm and humid today with sun and
clouds; a thunderstorm in spots in the afternoon.
Highs: 81-87. Lows: 70-76. Partly sunny, very warm and humid today.
Partly cloudy, very warm and humid tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 89-95. Lows: 67-73. Partly sunny, hot and humid today; a show-
er or thunderstorm around, mainly later.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 92. Low: 75. Partly sunny, hot and humid today with a thunder-
storm around during the afternoon.
High: 93. Low: 73. Hot and humid today with some sun; a thunder-
storm in spots during the afternoon.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Tuesday
High/low 92/66
Normal high/low 75/54
Record high 96 (1931)
Record low 34 (1956)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. Trace
Month to date 0.10"
Normal m-t-d 1.27"
Year to date 18.47"
Normal y-t-d 26.30"
93/68
90/68
93/73
93/69
90/68
92/68
92/69
88/66
91/67
92/66
89/68
92/70
92/71
95/69
92/75
Summary: Heat will reach from the central Plains to the East and will continue
in the Northwest today. Showers and storms will affect the Great Lakes and the
Four Corners. Storms will dot the Appalachians and the South.
WASHINGTON
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta on
Tuesday said given the
chance, he would vote
against an attack on Syria.
Barletta, R-Hazleton,
said based on infor-
mation he has, both
publicly disclosed
information and
classied, an attack
on Syria would
have two devastat-
ing results: the U.S.
would be drawn
into a war it could
not get out of and a retali-
ative attack would happen
here at home.
Barletta said he has
attended several briengs
and he was hoping to hear
something to make him
want to support President
Obamas plan. He said
there is no vote scheduled
in the U.S. House.
I left the meetings with
more questions and fears
that a strike in Syria would
cause retaliation right here
at home, Barletta said.
They tried to reassure
us that there would be no
boots on the ground, but
there were no assurances
that, upon retaliation by
Syria, that we would not
be drawn into war.
The U.S. should not
strike Syria alone without
a coalition of allies,
he said. He said
calls to his ofces
have overwhelm-
ingly opposed
attacking Syria.
This has by far
been the most one-
sided issue since
been in Congress,
he said.
Im still not convinced
that there is a clear cut
plan after the attack and
moving forward, he said.
I dont believe the U.S.
should act as the worlds
policeman and go into a
war alone.
Barletta said he is not
certain the House will ever
vote on the issue.
If we do vote, I will vote
no, he said.
On Tuesday, Barletta
used a hearing before
the full House Homeland
Security Committee to
raise questions of border
security and its relation
to a potential terrorist
attack in retaliation for any
American military action
in Syria.
We know theres a
signicant presence
of Hezbollah in Latin
America. We know our
borders are open. How real
is the possibility of Iran
engaging in retaliation in
the United States through
its Hezbollah proxies in
Latin America? he said.
For Congress to approve
a military action, he
said, a compelling argu-
ment must be proven that
national security interests
are immediately at stake,
or that a failure to attack
would cause the U.S. harm
in the near future.
I nd neither to be the
case, Barletta said. I do
not believe that President
Obama has adequately
made the case for me to
vote to send our men and
women into harms way.
Barletta against US strike in Syria
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
What thEYrE saYIng
Here is what other federal elected ofcials are saying
about the situation with Syria:
U.s. rep. Matt Cartwright, D-Moosic: At this point
Imundecided and still collecting information and input
fromthe intelligence community and constituents. I
have approached the subject of military action in Syria
with a healthy amount of skepticismand I aminterested
in hearing the administration make the case for action.
U.s. sen. Bob Casey, D-scranton: As the facts
come in, a clear and convincing case is being made
that the U.S. cant just walk away without taking action
against the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad. You have
to consider the gravity of the crime against humanity. .
U.s. sen. Pat toomey, r-Zionsville: Undecided
Barletta
From page 1A
syria
with Donald Kinney Jr.,
16, in Nanticoke, and they
were on their way to the
girls house after she invited
them to hang out, accord-
ing to arrest papers.
While talking to Duda
on the phone, the girl alleg-
edly told police, she heard
Kinney tell Duda to slow
down, and then heard the
crash that claimed the life of
Nicholas Zurilla, 59, in front
of Zurillas house at 340 W.
Union St.
Zurilla was thrown
through the Fords wind-
shield, knocking Kinney
unconscious. Limbs were
severed from Zurillas body,
arrest papers say.
Kinney was treated for
facial injuries at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, police said.
The Ford careened out of
control and struck a parked
vehicle which slammed
into two other parked cars
and came to a stop 115
yards away against the front
porch at 409 W. Union St.
The girl kept the phone
open listening for 40 min-
utes after the fatal crash,
according to the complaint.
A state police reconstruc-
tion of the crash alleges
Duda was traveling in
excess of 70 mph when he
struck Zurilla, arrest papers
say. The speedlimit onWest
Union Street is 25 mph.
Duda was arraigned
by District Judge Donald
Whittaker on charges of
homicide by vehicle, third-
degree murder, accidents
involving death, driving
without a license, speeding,
reckless driving and failing
to stay in lane.
Duda had no comment
when he was escorted to his
arraignment and returned
to the police department.
Hes a good boy, he
would give you the shirt off
your back, said a woman
who refused to give her
name at Dudas arraign-
ment. She said she is a rela-
tive of Dudas and said he
attends Dallas High School.
This incident is a trag-
edy that has already unnec-
essarily taken one life
affecting the victims entire
family, Salavantis said in a
news release. It will doubt-
lessly forever change the
lives of (Duda) and his fam-
ily.
Zurilla had been sitting
on the porch of his neigh-
bor, Paul Murphy, at 341
W. Union St. As Murphy
was about to enter his
house, Zurilla was cross-
ing the street and said
in a loud voice, This
car is going to hit me,
according to arrest papers.
Murphy turned around
and had seen a car, and
a body in front of it going
directly upward and to the
left, arrest papers say.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled for Sept. 20.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
tyler Duda was charged with vehicular homicide in the death of
nicholas Zurilla on tuesday afternoon in nanticoke.
From page 1A
Duda
Jason Reidmiller | For The Times Leader
Lackawanna river Corridor association
Executive Director Bernie Mcgurl and
Elowyn Corby of PennEnvironment discuss
Pennsylvanias carbon emissions in rela-
tion to climate change tuesday in front of
U.s. sen. robert Caseys office in scranton.
WhErE thEYarE
Pennsylvania coal-fred power plants ranked on PennEnvironments 100
Dirtiest Power Plants list
8th First Energy Bruce Mansfeld, Beaver County
40th Hatfelds Ferry Power Station, Fayette County
47th Keystone power plant, Armstrong County
48th Conemaugh power plant, Indiana County
54th Homer City Generating Station, Indiana County
59th PPL Brunner Island SteamElectric Station, York County
65th PPL Montour, Montour County
From page 1A
Power
vances that are simple and
powerful, Bloomberg said
as he and then-Gov. George
Pataki announced the plans
in 2002.
For years, the ceremo-
nies did include politicians
reading names and texts,
and Bloomberg made
remarks that over the years
touched on Hurricane
Katrina, the 2005 London
subway bombings and the
Biblical King Davids grief
at the death of his son
Absolom, among other
topics.
Bloombergs role hasnt
always been comfortable,
especially for a mayor
whose brisk, pragmatic
personality and early criti-
cisms of the memorial
struck some victims rela-
tives as insensitive.
When the ceremony was
shifted to nearby Zuccotti
Park in 2007 because of
rebuilding at the trade cen-
ter site, some victims rela-
tives threatened to boycott
the occasion.
The lead-up to the
10th anniversary brought
pressure to invite more
political gures and to
include clergy in the
ceremony. And when
Bloomberg mentioned the
idea of ending the name-
reading the next year,
some of the relatives were
aghast.
By next years anni-
versary, Bloomberg will
be out of ofce, and the
museum is expected to be
open beneath the memorial
plaza.
While the memorial
honors those killed, the
museum is intended to
present a broader picture
of 9/11, including the
experiences of survivors
and rst responders.
But the organizers expect
they will always keep the
focus on the families on
the anniversary, Daniels
said. We see ourselves as
carrying on a legacy.
a test of the twin beams of the
tribute in Light intersect with
still-under construction tower
Oneas theyrisebehindthebuild-
ing and above lower Manhattan
on Monday in newYork.
From page 1A
9/11
with Russia and China to
explore the proposal that
wouldcall for the destruction
of Syrias chemical weapons.
France said it would pro-
pose a resolution that would
include a requirement that
those responsible for an Aug.
21 alleged chemical weap-
ons attack in a Damascus
suburb be referred to the
International Criminal Court
for trial.
Obamaworkedanewtotry
torally support froma skepti-
cal nation for military action
against Syria, even if that is
nowmore to proda deal than
an imminent threat. He said
that U.S. armed forces would
remain on standby, ready to
strike if necessary.
America is not the
worlds policeman, he said.
Terrible things happen
across the globe, and it is
beyond our means to right
every wrong, but when with
modest effort and risk we
can stop children from being
gassed to death and thereby
make our own children safer
over the long run, I believe
we should act.
He added, I know that
after the terrible toll of Iraq
and Afghanistan the idea of
any military action no matter
how limited is not going to
be popular.
Earlier Tuesday, Obama
told Democratic and
Republican senators in
separate closed-door meet-
ings that they should post-
pone any vote on the use
of force until negotiations
with Russia and Syria are
exhausted. He did not lay
out a timetable in his conver-
sations with lawmakers or in
his address.
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., already
had postponed a Wednesday
vote in the Senate as an
increasing number of law-
makers expressed opposition
to the use-of-force proposal
and support for diplomatic
negotiations. But Reid said
Tuesday that the U.S. should
not withdraw possible mili-
tary intervention which
he said led to Syrias willing-
ness to negotiate especial-
ly given Syrias extremely
lowlevel of credibility.
The days events were a
sharp change from Monday,
when the Obama administra-
tion had been pressing for-
ward with an aggressive lob-
bying campaign to persuade
lawmakers andthe American
people to back a proposal to
use military force in Syria
despite pending negotiations
with Russia on its proposals.
The diplomatic door has
opened ever so slightly, and
while I have doubts about
this eleventh-hour offer, it
would be wrong to slam
the door shut without due
consideration, Sen. Robert
Menendez, D-N.J., chair-
man of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, said
after Obamas speech. A
negotiated solution to a cri-
sis is always preferable and if
this possibility is legitimate,
Ill give it serious thought. At
the same time, the credible
use of military force is neces-
sary to keep on the table.
I appreciate the compli-
cated issues the president
faces, said Sen. Chuck
Grassley, R- Iowa. Still, I
dont think the case for mili-
tary action has been made.
Military action should be
the last resort, so this diplo-
matic offer, if credible and
enforceable, needs to be con-
sidered.
Testifying before the
House Armed Services
Committee, Kerry said
were waiting on the
Russian proposal, but were
not waiting long.
The president believes
we need to keep this threat,
this reality, absolutely on the
table, he said. He wants the
Congress to act.
The White House
announced Tuesday that
more countries signed a
statement on the need to
reinforce the prohibition
against the use of chemi-
cal weapons. Thirty-three
nations now support the
statement. The statement
does not endorse military
action against Syria.
Chinese reaction to the
developments was also favor-
able. A Chinese Foreign
Ministry spokesman, Hong
Lei, said in Beijing that the
proposal can help ease the
current tension in Syria,
solve the Syrian issue politi-
cally and safeguard the peace
and stability of Syria and the
whole region.
France, the only country
that had said it would join
the United States in a mili-
tary strike on Syria, said it
would support the Russian
proposal. But French Foreign
Minister Laurent Fabius
attached three conditions:
that Assad agree to place
his entire chemical weapons
arsenal under international
control and allow it to be
destroyed, that the operation
be conducted quickly under
a binding U.N. resolution,
and that those responsible
for the attacks be referred to
the International Criminal
Court.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Mike Hull returned to practice
Tuesday. For Penn State, the timing
couldnt have been better.
The dynamic linebacker spent much
of last week resting his sprained knee,
sitting out the Nittany Lions win over
Eastern Michigan.
Theyll very much need him back this
week.
Penn State coach Bill OBrien said
Hull is expected to play Saturday against
Central Florida, the toughest opponent
on the Lions non-conference schedule.
Hull made a name for himself last sea-
son by helping the Lions improve their
pass defense after the team struggled
to get off the eld on third downs dur-
ing an 0-2 start. His speed and coverage
abilities will be especially important
against UCF and standout quarterback
Blake Bortles.
This season, the Lions have opened
2-0 despite barely having Hull at all. The
junior went down in the rst quarter of
the opener against Syracuse and briey
returned after a trip to the locker room
before being shut down for the second
half.
It remains to be seen how close to 100
ROB MAADDI
APPro Football Writer
PHILADELPHIA That jaw-dropping,
eye-popping frenetic pace the Philadelphia
Eagles showed in Chip Kellys debut can be
even faster.
No, really.
Kellys hurry-up offense sparkled in his NFL
debut as the Eagles opened the season with
a 33-27 win over the defending NFC East-
champion Washington Redskins on Monday
night.
Michael Vick and Co. executed Kellys dont-
stop-for-a-breath offense with precision and
efciency, running 53 plays in the rst half and
racking up 443 total yards. While the rest of
the league and a national television audience
watched in awe the way the Eagles moved at
lightning speed, Kelly sees room for improve-
ment.
I felt like it was slow, to be honest with you,
Kelly said Tuesday. Im not joking. Weve got
to do a better job. We left the ball on the ground
too much. We didnt get the ball to the ofcials.
We could have sped things up from a process
between plays. Thats something we need to
continue to work on.
It looked like Kelly was still coaching Oregon
against Pac-10 opponents in the rst half. The
Eagles controlled the ball 20:20 and averaged
2.6 plays per minute. They outgained RG3 and
the Redskins 322-75, had a 21-3 edge in rst
downs and led 26-7.
Still, it was the rst real test for Philadelphia
under Kelly. Theres still a learning process and
players should get more familiar with the way
he wants the offense to move as they gain expe-
rience in it.
I saw a team play their rst game, Kelly
said. I was pleased, but we still have got a lot
of work to do. Theres so many things we can
K
sports
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Wednesday, September 11, 2013
SECTION B
Bowyer denies intentional spinout at Richmond race
JENNA FRYER
APAuto Racing Writer
CONCORD, N.C.
Clint Bowyer feels awful
for costing Ryan Newman
a win, though his apology
for spinning at Richmond
is not an admission of guilt.
Ryan Newman also feels
terrible. Only his sympathy
is for Martin Truex Jr., the
unwitting participant in a
botched race-xing attempt
by Michael Waltrip Racing
that has put two friends
in an awkward position
and spoiled the start of
NASCARs championship
race.
I feel bad for Martin, and
I feel he didnt know any-
thing about it and he had
the carpet ripped out from
underneath him, Newman
told The Associated Press
on Tuesday. And I know
exactly how that feels.
Its been a roller-coaster
for NASCAR since there
were seven laps to go in
Saturday nights race at
Richmond. Newman was
on his way to a victory that
would have given him the
nal spot in the 12-driver
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship eld. Then
Bowyer spun to bring out
a caution, setting in motion
a chain of events that cost
Newman the win and the
Chase berth, cost Jeff
Gordon a Chase berth and
put Truex and Joey Logano
in the nal two spots.
There were way too
many questions about the
nal moments of the race
and NASCAR launched an
investigation, determining
Monday that MWR had
manipulated the outcome
of the race and levying
unprecedented sanctions
that put Newman in the
Chase and bumped Truex
out. MWR was also ned
$300,000, general manager
Ty Norris was suspend-
ed indenitely, Bowyer,
Truex and Brian Vickers
were docked 50 points
each, and their crew chiefs
were placed on probation
through the end of the year.
Bowyer, previously
scheduled to spend the day
at ESPN, denied the spin
was deliberate. In his rst
interview, he said he had
apologized to Newman in a
phone call for bringing out
a caution while Newman
was leading, but said it was
racer protocol for costing
Newman a win.
Asked specically if the
apology was an admission
of guilt, Bowyer said: Lets
not dig too much into this.
The topic was covered
again in a second appear-
ance, and Bowyer denied
deliberately spinning.
No, he said. Anytime
something happens on the
race track, its unfortunate.
If I had a crystal ball and
could have told you every-
thing lined up just perfectly
the way it did, theres no
way you could do all that
math and know everything
that happened.
Bowyer also revealed
he had poison oak all over
his arm from cutting a tree
down last week when asked
about his team allegedly
talking in code during the
race. His crew chief had
inquired about his arm
right before he spun, at one
AP photo
Clint Bowyer gets sideways on the front stretch during the
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Richmond International
Raceway in Richmond, Va. His reputation has been battered, his
team blasted by NASCAR for manipulating the outcome of a piv-
otal race. Now Clint Bowyer will do his best to pick up the pieces
and try to salvage his season.
Year 2 of
girls fall
soccer is
underway
JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
The Wyoming Valley
Conference fall soccer
experiment was interesting,
to say the least.
Last season was the rst
time WVC teams joined
the rest of the state and the
Lackawanna Conference in
playing in the fall, creating
a fury of interesting dynam-
ics. For starters, conference
ofcials were unsure of the
retention rate of players
better known as the eld
hockey effect would have
on the sport.
In the end, only GAR
dropped its girls soccer pro-
gram and the most of the
league suffered minimal ros-
ter drops due to the season
change. The result, how-
ever, was the creation of a
cluttered lump of a singular,
16 team division (in hope-
fully its last season). The
disparity between the top
soccer clubs and the bottom
tier left countless blowouts
and very few close games.
Needless to say, scoring was
at an all-time high.
The traditional girls soc-
cer powers Berwick,
Dallas, Coughlin contin-
ued on to district playoffs
while some new faces
Holy Redeemer, Wyoming
Valley West, Lake-Lehman
entered the mix.
Returning Times Leader
all-stars
*Allie Barber, junior for-
ward, Pittston Area - Often
targeted and difcult to
defend, Barbers speed
poses problems for defenses
and tends to score at will.
She led the league in scor-
ing as a freshman and was
second during her sopho-
more season with 44 goals,
11 assists and 99 points.
*Kaylee Hillard, senior
midelder, Lake-Lehman
- Enables Emily Sutton
and Shoshana Mahoney
to get downeld opportu-
nities with a strong leg.
Orchestrates much of the
Black Knight offense.
*Megan Lercara, junior
forward, Coughlin - Showed
leadership at the tail end
of last season, stepping up
with six goals and 17 assists
to propel the Crusaders into
the District 2 playoffs.
*Shoshana Mahoney,
senior forward, Lake-
Lehman - Brings a wealth
of speed and ball-handling
skills to the pitch. Totaled
23 goals, 16 assists for 62
points and led the Black
Knights to a strong nish.
*Emily Schramm, junior
midelder, Holy Redeemer
- Schramm led to Royals to
a seven-game improvement
with 14 goals and 11 assists
for 39 points.
*Emily Sutton, senior
midelder, Lake-Lehman -
Suttons decision to choose
soccer over cross country
panned out with 17 goals,
COLLEgE FOOTBALL
Kellywants Eagles even faster
AP photo
Eagles head coach Chip Kelly talks with running back LeSean McCoy (25) along the sidelines during the second half of Mondays game against
Washington.
Lions Hull expected
to return vs. UCF
AP photo
Penn State head coach Bill OBrien speaks during his weekly press conference, Tuesday in State
College.
OBrien prepares to
face former mentor
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Bill OBriens coaching career was
more or less launched by a phone call
from George OLeary to Jim Bernhardt.
Do you know anybody thats smart
enough to get into graduate school at
Georgia Tech and dumb enough to want
to coach? said OLeary, who was taking
over as head coach of the Yellow Jackets.
I got just the guy for you, said
Bernhardt, who was OBriens position
coach at Brown.
Its a story OBrien has told a few
times since taking over at Penn State,
including on Tuesday at his weekly
press conference. Its one of the more
important moments in his career.
That call eventually led to OBrien,
who had been working as a linebackers
coach at his alma mater, to OLearys
staff and the world of major college foot-
ball.
That he is now the head of his own
program, preparing to face OLearys
Central Florida squad on Saturday,
is thanks in part to the mentoring he
received while at Georgia Tech.
I have a fantastic relationship with
Coach OLeary, said OBrien, who
coached under OLeary from 1995-2001
at Tech. I think that probably I took
two big lessons from him in coaching
that Ive always kept with me.
One was organization. He was a very
organized guy. There wasnt a wasted
moment during the day, and that had
a lot to do with work ethic. We worked
extremely hard, all of us did, when we
worked for him. He demanded that of
us. So I learned a lot about that.
And then I just learned about how
important the physical toughness, resil-
iency of your football team is. Thats a
very important characteristic of a good
football team. And when you dont have
that, then youre going to struggle. But
when you have that, when you have a
physical, resilient, tough football team,
then youve got a chance to win games.
OBrien has done plenty of that, using
his experience under OLeary to eventu-
ally land a spot with the New England
Patriots before coming to Penn State.
Billy I thought came up through the
ranks the right way, OLeary said. He
learned. He got better, he got better
and he continued to get better. It didnt
suprise me that hes had the success he
had at New England, the success he had
when I was at Georgia Tech with him.
That bond with his former boss
helped put together this series between
the Knights and Nittany Lions.
Penn State needed a last-minute
replacement for Virginia, which bailed
out of its trip to Happy Valley in favor
of hosting Oregon last week. And the
Lions were also looking for a unique
destination for players and fans who
have no trips to bowl games for the next
few years.
Voila. The coach-to-coach connection
See OBRIEN | 7B See HULL | 7B See SOCCER | 7B
See EAGLES | 7B
See NASCAR | 7B
PAGE 2B Tuesday, September 10, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
at Cincinnati -170 Chicago +160
at San Francisco -140 Colorado +130
at Philadelphia -175 San Diego +165
at Miami -105 Atlanta -105
Washington -120 at NewYork +110
at St. Louis -175 Milwaukee +165
at Los Angeles -140 Arizona +130
American League
Kansas City -115 at Cleveland +105
at Baltimore -135 NewYork +125
at Toronto -115 Los Angeles +105
at Tampa Bay -135 Boston +125
Oakland -160 at Minnesota +150
Detroit -160 at Chicago +150
at Seattle -140 Houston +130
Interleague
at Texas -140 Pittsburgh +130
NCAAFOOTBALL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
TCU 6 3 (62) at Texas
Tech
at Louisiana Tech 7 7 (57) Tulane
at Arkansas St. 10 7 (66) Troy
Friday
at Boise St. 24 23 (57) Air Force
Saturday
at Rutgers 34 27 (51) E. Michigan
Stanford 30 29 (52) at Army
at West Virginia 38 39 (56) Georgia St.
Louisville 7 13 (59) at Kentucky
Marshall 6 8 (68) at Ohio
at Michigan 35 37 (56) Akron
at Indiana 4 2 (63) Bowling Green
Virginia Tech 7 7 (51) at East Carolina
Maryland 7 7 (48) at UConn
at Pittsburgh 20 21 (52) NewMexico
at Wake Forest 3 3 (53) Louisiana-Monroe
W. Kentucky 7 10 (54) at SouthAlabama
Fresno St. 10 9 (66) at Colorado
at Florida St. 35 32 (65) Nevada
at Nebraska 4 4 (70) UCLA
Georgia Tech 10 8 (56) at Duke
at Oregon 20 27 (70) Tennessee
at Texas 3 4 (62) Mississippi
at Southern Cal 17 14 (43) Boston College
Iowa 3 2 (48) at Iowa St.
Alabama 7 7 (62) at Texas A&M
N. Illinois 24 28 (62) at Idaho
at Auburn 7 6 (51) Mississippi St.
Washington-x 7 9 (62) Illinois
at Penn St. 3 5 (50) UCF
Ball St. 2 3 (61) at NorthTexas
at Middle Tenn. 3 6 (52) Memphis
at Arkansas 19 22 (49) Southern Miss.
at South Carolina 11 13 (51) Vanderbilt
at Oklahoma 28 24 (49) Tulsa
at California OFF OFF (OFF) Ohio St.
at Kansas St. 35 38 (54) UMass
at South Florida 10 12 (43) FAU
at Rice Pk 6 (58) Kansas
at LSU 38 37 (55) Kent St.
Notre Dame 23 20 (50) at Purdue
UTEP 6 6 (55) at NewMexico St.
at Northwestern 35 31 (59) W. Michigan
at Arizona 24 26 (65) UTSA
at Utah +3 3 (57) Oregon St.
at UNLV 16 7 (56) Cent. Michigan
at Arizona St. 4 5 (52) Wisconsin
x-at Chicago
OfKey
Ohio St. QB questionable
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
at NewEngland 10 12 (43) N.Y. Jets
Sunday
at Philadelphia 7 7 (54) San Diego
at Baltimore 6 6 (43) Cleveland
at Houston 8 8 (43) Tennessee
at Indianapolis Pk 3 (42) Miami
Carolina 2 3 (44) at Bufalo
at Atlanta 6 7 (47) St. Louis
at Green Bay 6 7 (49) Washington
at Kansas City 2 3 (46) Dallas
at Chicago 5 6 (41) Minnesota
NewOrleans 3 3 (47) at Tampa Bay
Detroit Pk 1 (47) at Arizona
at Oakland 3 6 (39) Jacksonville
Denver 3 4 (55) at N.Y. Giants
at Seattle 3 3 (44) San Francisco
Monday
at Cincinnati 6 7 (40) Pittsburgh
BOXING
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Floyd Mayweather Jr. -280 Saul Alvarez +230
LATEST LINE
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Durham3, Indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durham2, Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 3, Rochester 2
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Pawtucket 5, Rochester 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester 9, Pawtucket 1
Sunday, Sep. 8: Pawtucket 3, Rochester 0
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Pawtucket 1, Durham0
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Pawtucket 2, Durham, 1
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Pawtucket at Durham,
7:05 p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Durhamat Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Durhamat Pawtucket,
7:05 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Durhamat Pawtucket, 1:05p.m.
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5,
10 innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Harrisburg 3, Erie 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1, 12 innings
Friday, Sep. 6: Harrisburg 4, Erie 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Harrisburg 5, Erie 1
Harrisburg 3, Trenton 1
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Trenton 8, Harrisburg 2
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Harrisburg at Trenton,
7:05 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Friday, Sep. 13: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
(x-if necessary)
NEWYORK - PENN LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-3)
State College 2, Jamestown 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Jamestown 6, State College 5
Saturday, Sep. 7: State College 12, Jamestown 4
Sunday, Sep. 8: State College 6, Jamestown 0
Tri-City 2, Aberdeen 0
Friday, Sep. 6: Tri-City 1, Aberdeen 0
Saturday, Sep. 7: Tri-City 3, Aberdeen 0
Championship
(Best-of-3)
State College 1, Tri-City 0
Tuesday, Sep. 10: State College 2, Tri-City 1, 11
innings
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Sep. 12: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake 3, Las Vegas 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Salt Lake 5, Las Vegas 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Las Vegas 3, Salt Lake 2
Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 6
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake vs. Omaha
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Omaha at Salt Lake, 8:35 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Omaha at Salt Lake, 8:35
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Omaha at Salt Lake, 3:05 p.m.
(x-if necessary)
MONDAYS MLB LATE BOX
SCORES
Dodgers 8, Diamondbacks 1
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261
A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .289
Goldschmidt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .290
Er.Chavez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .290
Prado lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .284
M.Montero c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233
G.Parra rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .269
Gregorius ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .261
Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Davidson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Delgado p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .192
Langwell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Nieves ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .304
E.De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Roe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Sipp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Owings ss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .308
Totals 32 1 4 1 3 7
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Puig rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .343
C.Crawford lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286
b-Van Slyke ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .252
H.Ramirez ss 3 3 2 1 1 0 .343
Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 2 2 0 2 .293
Ethier cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .272
Uribe 3b 4 3 4 4 0 0 .279
M.Ellis 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269
Federowicz c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .241
Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .122
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Punto ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258
Totals 34 8 12 8 3 10
Arizona 000 010 0001 4 1
Los Angeles 023 020 10x8 12 1
a-struck out for Langwell in the 5th. b-singled
for C.Crawford in the 8th. c-fied out for Thatcher
in the 9th.
E_Delgado (1), Uribe (5). LOB_Arizona 7, Los
Angeles 6. 2B_Er.Chavez (14), Gregorius (16),
H.Ramirez (24), Ad.Gonzalez (29). HR_Ethier
(12), of Delgado; Uribe 2 (9), of Delgado 2;
Ad.Gonzalez(20), ofDelgado; H.Ramirez(18), of
E.De La Rosa; Uribe (10), of E.De La Rosa. RBIs_
Gregorius (24), H.Ramirez (53), Ad.Gonzalez 2
(89), Ethier (51), Uribe 4 (44). S_Nolasco.
Runners left in scoring position_Arizona 4
(Nieves, Gregorius, Goldschmidt, Davidson); Los
Angeles 3 (Ad.Gonzalez, Puig, M.Ellis). RISP_Ari-
zona 1 for 10; Los Angeles 3 for 9.
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Delgado L, 4-62 2-3 7 5 5 1 2 70 4.04
Langwell 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00
E.De La Rosa 2-3 2 2 2 0 1 11 4.26
Roe 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.15
Sipp 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 16 3.82
Bell 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 4.50
Thatcher 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 4 3.35
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
NolascoW, 13-96 2-3 3 1 0 1 6 100 3.14
Howell 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.30
Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 5.14
Jansen 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 1.94
Inherited runners-scored_Langwell 1-0, Bell
2-1, Thatcher 1-0, Howell 2-0. WP_Thatcher,
Marmol.
Umpires_Home, Jordan Baker; First, Adrian
Johnson; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Fieldin Cul-
breth.
T_2:59. A_52,410 (56,000).
Giants 3, Rockies 2, 10 innings
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Co.Dickerson lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .285
C.Gonzalez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .302
c-Rutledge ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .233
Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111
LeMahieu 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .286
Tulowitzki ss 3 0 1 1 1 0 .311
Cuddyer rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .327
R.Wheeler 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .160
Arenado 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .269
Torrealba c 4 0 0 1 0 0 .234
Blackmon cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .272
Chacin p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .186
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-J.Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Culberson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Totals 37 2 9 2 1 3
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pagan cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .274
Scutaro 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .294
Belt 1b 5 0 2 2 0 1 .283
Posey c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .312
Sandoval 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .278
1-Adrianza pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .285
B.Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258
G.Blanco lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .252
Lincecump 2 0 0 0 0 2 .077
a-H.Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278
Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .277
Totals 38 3 10 3 1 7
Colorado 011 000000 02 9 1
San Francisco 010 000 010 13 10 0
One out when winning run scored.
a-fied out for Lincecum in the 8th. b-bunted
intoadoubleplayfor Corpas inthe10th. c-singled
for C.Gonzalez in the 10th.
1-ran for Sandoval in the 9th.
E_Arenado (11). LOB_Colorado 6, San Fran-
cisco 8. 2B_LeMahieu (20), Arenado (26), Belt
(32), Sandoval (23). HR_Posey (15), of Chacin.
RBIs_Tulowitzki (73), Torrealba (13), Belt 2 (55),
Posey (70).
Runners left in scoring position_Colorado 2
(Cuddyer, Torrealba); San Francisco 4 (Lincecum,
Sandoval, Posey, G.Blanco). RISP_Colorado 1 for
7; San Francisco 2 for 9.
Runners moved up_Tulowitzki, Torrealba,
Scutaro, B.Crawford 2. GIDP_J.Herrera.
DP_San Francisco 2 (Scutaro, Belt), (Posey,
B.Crawford, Scutaro).
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Chacin 7 4 1 1 1 5 100 3.09
Belisle BS, 4-4 1 2 1 0 0 1 20 4.43
Corpas 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.11
Ottavino L, 1-3 1-3 3 1 1 0 1 22 2.88
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lincecum 8 7 2 2 1 3 107 4.40
Romo 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.44
J.Lopez 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 4 1.75
S.Casilla W, 6-2 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 1.96
IBB_of Chacin (G.Blanco). WP_Lincecum.
Umpires_Home, Jerry Layne; First, AlanPorter;
Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt.
T_3:04. A_41,078 (41,915).
White Sox 5, Tigers 1
Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Jackson cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .275
Tor.Hunter rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .297
Mi.Cabrera 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .353
a-R.Santiago ph-3b4 0 0 0 0 2 .224
Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272
V.Martinez dh 3 1 2 1 0 0 .296
N.Castellanos lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .286
Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .322
B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .306
Iglesias ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .320
Totals 30 1 4 1 1 9
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf-lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .265
Beckham2b 2 1 0 0 2 2 .274
Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .282
A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .222
Konerko 1b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .248
Gillaspie 3b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .251
Viciedo lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .266
Le.Garcia cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .173
Jor.Danks rf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .243
Phegley c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .211
Totals 30 5 8 4 4 11
Detroit 000 000 1001 4 1
Chicago 200 300 00x5 8 0
a-grounded out for Mi.Cabrera in the 1st.
E_Scherzer (3). LOB_Detroit 3, Chicago 5.
2B_Gillaspie 2 (12). HR_V.Martinez (12), of Sale.
RBIs_V.Martinez (74), Konerko 2 (49), Viciedo
(49), Phegley (20).
Runners left in scoring position_Detroit 1
(R.Santiago); Chicago 3 (De Aza, Gillaspie, Vicie-
do). RISP_Detroit 0 for 1; Chicago 3 for 10.
Runners moved up_Tor.Hunter, A.Dunn.
GIDP_B.Pena, Jor.Danks, Phegley.
DP_Detroit 2 (Infante, Iglesias, Fielder), (In-
fante, Iglesias, Fielder); Chicago 1 (Al.Ramirez,
Beckham, Konerko).
Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Scherzer L, 19-3 4 6 5 4 2 6 90 3.01
J.Alvarez 3 1 0 0 2 4 46 5.57
Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 2.09
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Sale W, 11-12 8 4 1 1 1 8 114 2.90
N.Jones 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.80
Umpires_Home, Brian Gorman; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Manny
Gonzalez.
T_2:40. A_17,193 (40,615).
Astros 6, Mariners 4
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Villar ss 4 1 1 2 1 1 .272
Altuve 2b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .279
Crowe cf-lf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .255
Wallace 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .226
a-B.Laird ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .184
M.Dominguez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .235
Carter lf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .217
B.Barnes cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243
Krauss dh 3 1 1 0 1 2 .185
1-Elmore pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .243
Corporan c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .240
2-Ma.Gonzalez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .217
C.Clark c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Paredes rf 3 1 1 2 0 1 .185
Totals 35 6 8 5 4 12
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .262
A.Almonte rf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .258
Seager 3b 2 0 0 0 3 0 .278
K.Morales dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280
Ibanez lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .252
M.Saunders lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236
Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .249
Ackley cf 1 0 0 0 3 0 .257
Zunino c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .223
Franklin 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .221
Totals 31 4 5 3 8 5
Houston 011 000 0046 8 1
Seattle 100 000 2014 5 3
a-struck out for Wallace in the 8th.
1-ran for Krauss in the 9th. 2-ran for Corporan
in the 9th.
E_Villar (8), A.Almonte (2), Smoak (4), B.Miller
(8). LOB_Houston 7, Seattle 8. 2B_Altuve (26),
Crowe (6), Krauss (4), A.Almonte (3). HR_A.
Almonte (1), of Lo; B.Miller (6), of Fields. RBIs_
Villar 2 (6), Crowe (10), Paredes 2 (10), B.Miller
(31), A.Almonte 2 (5). SB_Villar (14), Altuve (32).
SF_Paredes.
Runners left in scoring position_Houston 6
(Carter 3, M.Dominguez 2, B.Laird); Seattle 2
(B.Miller, K.Morales). RISP_Houston 3 for 15;
Seattle 0 for 3.
Runners moved up_Corporan, A.Almonte.
GIDP_K.Morales.
DP_Houston 1 (Wallace, Villar, Cosart).
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cosart 5 2 1 0 6 3 91 1.95
Zeid H, 4 1 0 0 0 1 0 20 5.50
Lo BS, 3-5 1 2 2 2 0 1 14 5.40
K.ChapmanW, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 2.19
Fields S, 4-5 1 1 1 1 0 0 20 5.91
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
T.Walker 5 5 2 2 1 8 84 3.60
Rufn 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.70
Luetge 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.18
Capps H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 13 5.19
Furbush H, 18 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.07
FarquharL,0-3BS,4-171-32 4 3 2 1 26 4.71
LaFromboise 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 13.5
Inherited runners-scored_Furbush 2-0,
LaFromboise 1-1.
Umpires_Home, Dan Iassogna; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Gerry Davis.
T_3:23. A_9,808 (47,476).
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Top 25 Football Schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Thursday, Sept. 12
No. 24TCUat Texas Tech, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 14
No. 1 Alabama at No. 6Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Oregon vs. Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio St. at California, 7 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford at Army, Noon
No. 7 Louisville at Kentucky, Noon
No. 8 LSUvs. Kent State, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Florida State vs. Nevada, 3:30 p.m.
No. 11 Michigan vs. Akron, Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma St. vs. Lamar, 7:30 p.m.
No. 13 South Carolina vs. Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Tulsa, Noon
No. 16 UCLAat No. 23 Nebraska, Noon
No. 17 Northwestern vs. Western Michigan, 9
p.m.
No. 19Washingtonvs. Illinois at Chicago, 6p.m.
No. 20Wisconsin at Arizona State, 10:30 p.m.
No. 21 Notre Dame at Purdue, 8 p.m.
No. 25 Mississippi at Texas, 8 p.m.
baseball
TODAYS EVENTS
HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY
Dallas/Coughlin/MMI Prep/Wyoming Semi-
nary/Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
Crestwood at Berwick, 3:30 p.m.
Hanover Area at WyomingArea
HazletonArea at WyomingValley West
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary
MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Nanticoke at Meyers
PittstonArea at Coughlin
Tunkhannock at Dallas
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Nanticoke at Crestwood
WyomingArea at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
WyomingValley West at Delaware Valley
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER
GAR at Holy Redeemer
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Berwick at Meyers
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
WyomingArea at HazletonArea
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLSTENNIS
Coughlin at Berwick
Crestwood at WyomingValley West, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary
Hanover Area at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
Holy Redeemer at MMI Prep, 4 p.m.
GAR at WyomingArea
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Dallas at Coughlin
MMI Prep at Meyers
PittstonArea at Wyoming valley West
Tunkhannock at WyomingArea
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Kings at Muhlenberg, 7:30 p.m.
COLLEGE GOLF
PSU-Hazleton at Penn College, 11 a.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
Misericordia at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
Kings at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
Marywood at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEYBALL
PSUYork at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
Berwick at Hanover Area
GAR at Elk Lake
Meyers at PittstonArea
Northwest at Tunkhannock
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
MMI at Nanticoke
WyomingValley West at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Lake-Lehman at WyomingValley West
MMI Prep at Nanticoke
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Berwick at HazletonArea
Crestwood at North Pocono, 4:30 p.m.
GAR at Hanover Area
Holy Redeemer at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
COLLEGE GOLF
Kings at Moravian (Woodstone), 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
Wilkes at Baptist Bible, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
LebanonValley at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEYBALL
PSUHazleton at Penn College, 1 p.m.
PSU-York at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
WilliamPaterson at Kings, 7 p.m.
local calendar
MLB
12:30 p.m.
WGNChicago Cubs at Cincinnati
2 p.m.
ROOTPittsburgh at Texas
7 p.m.
CSNSan Diego at Philadelphia
ESPNBoston at Tampa Bay
SNYWashington at N.Y. Mets
YES N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore
10 p.m.
ESPNArizona at L.A. Dodgers
WNBA
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Phoenix at Chicago
what s on tv
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
NewEngland 1 0 0 1.000 23 21
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 18 17
Bufalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
West
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
Thursdays Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sundays Games
NewOrleans 23, Atlanta 17
Chicago 24, Cincinnati 21
NewEngland 23, Bufalo 21
Tennessee 16, Pittsburgh 9
N.Y. Jets 18, Tampa Bay 17
Kansas City 28, Jacksonville 2
Seattle 12, Carolina 7
Miami 23, Cleveland 10
Detroit 34, Minnesota 24
Indianapolis 21, Oakland 17
San Francisco 34, Green Bay 28
St. Louis 27, Arizona 24
Dallas 36, N.Y. Giants 31
Mondays Games
Philadelphia 33, Washington 27
Houston 31, San Diego 28
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
NewOrleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
Football
NFL MONDAYLATE BOXSCORE
Texans-Chargers Stats
Houston 7 0 7 1731
San Diego 7 14 7 028
First Quarter
SD_Mathews 14 pass fromRivers (Novak kick),
14:45.
Hou_Daniels 1 pass from Schaub (Bullock
kick), 3:11.
Second Quarter
SD_Royal 6 pass from Rivers (Novak kick),
12:24.
SD_V.Brown 10 pass fromRivers (Novak kick),
:18.
Third Quarter
SD_Royal 1 pass from Rivers (Novak kick),
10:42.
Hou_Graham 7 pass from Schaub (Bullock
kick), 4:57.
Fourth Quarter
Hou_Daniels 9 pass from Schaub (Bullock
kick), 14:44.
Hou_Cushing 18 interception return (Bullock
kick), 9:30.
Hou_FGBullock 41, :00.
A_59,522.
Hou SD
First downs 26 14
Total Net Yards 449 263
Rushes-yards 28-120 20-80
Passing 329 183
Punt Returns 3-21 1-5
Kickof Returns 4-116 1-42
Interceptions Ret. 1-18 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 34-45-1 14-29-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-17 2-12
Punts 3-45.0 6-47.8
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-73 7-55
Time of Possession 36:31 23:29
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGHouston, Foster 18-57, Tate 9-55,
Keo 1-8. San Diego, Mathews 13-33, R.Brown 5-27,
Rivers 1-18, McClain 1-2.
PASSINGHouston, Schaub 34-45-1-346.
San Diego, Rivers 14-29-1-195.
RECEIVINGHouston, Johnson 12-146, Fos-
ter 6-33, Daniels 5-67, Hopkins 5-66, Graham
4-27, Tate 2-7. San Diego, Royal 3-24, Gates 2-49,
R.Brown 2-24, Mathews 2-22, Woodhead 2-16,
V.Brown 2-13, Floyd 1-47.
MISSED FIELD GOALSHouston, Bullock
51 (WL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NFL Fined Detroit DT Ndamukong Suh
$100,000 for his illegal low block of Minnesota C
John Sullivan in a Sept. 8 game.
BUFFALO BILLS Signed CB Johnny Adams
from the practice squad. Released DT Jay Ross.
Signed DB Brandon Smith to the practice squad.
DALLAS COWBOYS Released S Eric Framp-
ton fromthe injured reserve list.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Released OL Tommie
Draheimfromthe practice squad. Signed DTJor-
dan Miller to the practice squad. Terminated the
practice squad contract of OTMatt Reynolds.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Signed RB Joe Ban-
yard to the practice squad. Released DE Tristan
Okpalaugo and RB Bradley Randle fromthe prac-
tice squad.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS Placed RB Shane
Vereen on the injured reserve/return list. Re-
signed TE MatthewMulligan. Signed DLA.J. Fran-
cis to the practice squad. Released WR Quentin
Sims fromthe practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS Signed RB Brandon
Jacobs.
NEW YORK JETS Re-signed WR Ben Obo-
manu. Released LB Scott Solomon.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGOBEARS Signed OTJonathan Scott
toa one-year contract. SignedQBJerrodJohnson
to the practice squad. WaivedTE KyleAdams. Ter-
minated the practice squad contract of G Derek
Dennis.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Named Tom Garfnkel
president and CEO.
NEWYORKJETS Re-signed QBBrady Quinn.
Released LB Danny Lansanah. Signed WR Rah-
saanVaughn to the practice squad.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS Placed LB Larry
Foote, C Maurkice Pouncey and RB LaRod Ste-
phens-Howling on the injured reserve list. Signed
RBJonathan Dwyer, C/GFernando Velasco and K
Shayne Graham.
Canadian Football League
B.C. LIONS Agreed to terms with DE Chris
Wilson.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed RB
Shawnbrey McNeal to the practice roster.
Arena Football League
ORLANDO PREDATORS Announced WR
Braylon Bell, DE Brian McNally, NG Derek Walker,
C Jef Maddux and LB Nekos Brown were added
to the roster through the ofseason assignment
process.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
FLORIDA PANTHERS Released G Mack
Shields, D Alex Gudbranson, D Myles Harvey, D
George Hughes, F Trevor Lewis, F Liam Heelis
and F Corey Trivino. Returned F Francis Beauvil-
lier to Rimouski (QMJHL), F Chris Clapperton to
Blainville (QMJHL), and F Alexander Delnov to
Seattle (WHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Sent D Kyle Bur-
roughs to Regina (WHL), C Victor Crus Rydberg
to Plymouth (WHL), D Jesse Graham to Niagara
(OHL), D Loic Leduc to Cape Breton (QMJHL),
and DAdamPelech to Erie (OHL).
American Hockey League
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS Signed C Kevin
Lynch to a one-year contract.
MANCHESTER MONARCHS Agreed to
terms withGMartinJones onatwo-year contract.
ECHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS Agreed to terms with
FWilliamRapuzzi.
LACROSSE
Major League Lacrosse
OHIOMACHINE Traded DDiogo Godoi and a
2014 third-round draft pick to Boston for D Brian
Farrell.
SOCCER
National Womens Soccer League
WASHINGTONSPIRITNamed Mark Parsons
coach and general manager. Promoted director
of operations Ashlee Comber to vice president
of operations.
COLLEGE
MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE Suspend-
ed Hawaii special teams and safeties coach Chris
Demarest one game for inappropriate sideline
conduct during a Sept. 8 game against Oregon
State.
AUBURN Named Knut Hjeltnes as throws
coach for track and feld.
GUILFORD Named Casey Godwin womens
assistant soccer coach, and Freddy Gomez and
Peter Truitt mens assistant soccer coaches.
NEW MEXICO Named Julie Weddle diving
coach.
TEXASWOMENSNamedJerod Stidhamas-
sistant softball coach.
WINTHROP Named John Murrian volunteer
assistant baseball coach.
transactI ons
BULLETIN BOARD
CAMPS/CLINICS
Sem Cradle Lacrosse is ofering
a clinic for boys and girls ages 4
to 8 at Wyoming Seminary Upper
School in Kingston. Program
sessions will be held Saturdays
fromnoon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street
beginning Saturday, Sept. 21 and
continuing through Nov. 2. Cost
is $120. The programprovides
all necessary equipment with no
additional feel. The curriculum
is designed to teach the basics
of lacrosse. It will be directed
by Semcoach Catie Kersey. For
more information or to register,
contact Kersey at ckersey@
wyomingseminary.org.
LEAGUES
Newport Biddy Basketball
registration for grades 1-7 will be
Sept. 16, 18, 21 and 22 from6-8
p.m. at K.M. Smith Elementary
School.
MEETINGS
Crestwood Football Booster
Club will have a meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m.
at Tonys Pizza. Parents of all
junior high and varsity players are
welcome to attend.
GAR Memorial High School
Football Booster Club will meet
Thursday Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. in the
Choral Roomat the high school. It
welcomes newmembers.
Hughestown Sports Club will
have a meeting at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 18, at Granteeds,
Parsonage St. in Pittston. Game
tickets and season tickets are
available and can be purchased
at the meeting or by contacting
any club member. For more
information, call Barbara Kapish
at 457-5705.
Mountain Top Area Little
League will have board
elections Sept. 19 at 8 p.m. at
the Alberdeen Complex. Any
member of the league can
come to the meeting to vote,
or request an absentee ballot
fromAndrea ONeill at 574-5551.
Amember is anyone who was
a rostered coach, manager,
board member or attended four
meetings over the past year.
To see who is running or for
more information, visit www.
mountaintoparealittleleague.com
Nanticoke Area Little League
will have their monthly meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. in
the high school cafeteria. Election
of ofcers will be conducted as
well. For information, call Wade at
735-0189.
Wyoming Area Ice Hockey will
be holding its monthly parents
meeting on Monday Sept. 16
in the West Wyoming Borough
Building at 7 p.m. Upcoming
Meet the Warriors, Flyers game
bus trip and Mohegan Sun arena
certifcation will be discussed.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Back Mountain Bandits
Boys and Girls Lacrosse
Registration for 2014 season
will be Saturday Sept. 21 from10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dallas American
Legion. The league is for boys
in age groups U-9, U-11, U-13
and U-15 and girls in grades
3-8. Family Discounts apply and
there are no mandatory fund
raisers. Registration fee includes
US Lacrosse registration, US
Lacrosse Magazine and a
teamuniform. The league is
also looking for volunteers for
board positions and all aspects
of the organization. For more
information, visit www.laxteams.
net/bmylax/ or email bmtlax@
gmail.com.
College Showcase Softball
Tryouts will be held at Kirby Park
Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. and Sept. 15 at
2 p.m. Please contact 592-7272.
Wyoming Valley West Lady
Spartans Jr. Basketball League
will be holding registrations for
girls grades 3-6 that reside in
the WVWSchool District on:
Monday, Sept. 16 at 6-8 p.m.;
Wednesday, Sept. 18 at 6-8 p.m.;
and Saturday, Sept. 21 fromnoon
to 2 p.m. at the WVWMiddle
School Gymon Chester Street
in Kingston. The cost is $45 plus
a fundraiser. Applications for
coaching and teamsponsors
will be accepted at these times.
Please contact Chris 406-3181
for additional information.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Assembly 59 will have a golf
tournament Saturday, Sept. 21
at the Hollenback Golf Course
on North Washington Street in
Wilkes-Barre. The tournament
begins at 9 a.m. The cost is $40
per person. For more information,
call Butch at 829-3398 or
825-3584. Refreshments will be
served afterwards at the North
End Slovak Club.
Bass Fishing Tournament will
be held Sept. 21 at Blytheburn
Lake on Blytheburn Rd. in
Mountain Top. Boats in the
water at 6:30 a.m. and out at 11
a.m. The fee is $40 per team.
The tournament is limited to 10
boats. Reserve early. This is a
fundraiser for the Blytheburn
Lake Association. For more
information, call 868-6895 or
678-5261.
Commonwealth Medical
College will have its ffth annual
golf tournament Monday, Sept.
30, at Huntsville Golf Course in
Shavertown. Registration is at 9
a.m. and the tournament begins
at 10 a.m. All proceeds beneft
The Commonwealth Medical
College scholarships. For more
information, call 504-9619.
Dallas Rotary Clubs 30th
Annual Golf Classic, to support
Dallas Rotary charities, will
be held at the IremCountry
Club on Monday, Sept. 23. The
tournament starts at 12:30 p.m.
The sponsorship donation is
$100 and the player entry fee is
$110. The format is captain and
crew. Individuals are welcome
and will be teamed up with others
in a group. For more information
or an entry form, call Kevin
Smith at 696-5420. Sponsors
and players should respond by
Sept. 12.
Harper Family will have its
annual event Saturday, Sept. 21
at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Course.
The tournament starts at 1
p.m. and will be a captain and
crewformat. The cost is $95
per person, which includes the
golf, a gift for each golfer and
dinner to be held at Blue Ridge
Trail following play. Awards will
be given to three fight winners.
There will also be prizes for
closest to the pins and a pot of
gold hole. There will also be door
prizes. All proceeds will beneft
the American Heart Association.
For more information, call Paul F.
Harper at 592-5191 or email him
at harperpunar@yahoo.com. The
deadline for entry is Sept. 14.
Holy Rosary Golf Tournament
is set for Sept. 15 at Pine
Hills Country Club in Taylor.
Registration is at noon for a 1
p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $90
per player, $360 for a foursome,
and includes lunch and dinner.
Contact Debbie at 451-1762 or
Holy Rosary School at 457-2553
for information, registrations and
sponsorships.
Kings Softball will have a golf
tournament Sunday, Sept. 29,
at Four Seasons Golf Course.
The cost is $75 per golfer, which
includes 18 holes of golf, cart,
beverages and a meal. The
format is captain and crew.
Reservations are required by
Sept. 20. For more information,
email softball@kings.edu or call
208-5855.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little
League Board of Directors
announces that nominations are
nowopen for all board positions
In order to submit your name
for nomination, please email
bbordow@ptd.net indicating
your interest. Nominations will
be submitted at the KFF Board
meeting on Monday, Sept. 16 at
6:30 p.m. at the Kingston Rec
Center. All interested members
are encouraged to attend. For
more information, please visit
kfl.org.
Knights of Columbus Pittston
Council #372 local level 2013
soccer challenge will be held at
noon Sept. 22 at the James Clark
Park located along Curry Street
in Pittston for all area boys and
girls ages 10-14. Winners progress
through local, district and state
competitions. Participants will
compete in their respective
age groups. There is no cost
for admission. Participants are
required to have proof of age
and written parental consent to
compete. For more information,
call Don Mac Rae at 815-4454 or
Mitch Megliola at 335-3002.
Luzerne County Special
Olympics Golf Tournament will
be held Sunday, Sept. 22 with
a noon check-in and a 1 p.m.
shotgun start at Four Seasons
Golf Course in Exeter. The
tournament will beneft Luzerne
County Special Olympians fall/
winter/spring training. To register
or to donate, please email Frank
at fvt315@netzero.comor call
510-5600.
Northwest Area Hoopster
Classic Golf Tournament will
be held Sept. 21 at Mill Race Golf
Course in Benton. The cost is
$75 per person, which includes
18 holes of golf, a cart, door
prizes, a meal, drinks and snacks.
Registration is at 7:30 a.m. and
the tournament starts at 8 a.m.
The format is four-man scramble.
For more information, call Lisa at
256-3412.
Shavertown United Methodist
Church 7th Annual Golf
Tournament will be held at the
Mill Race Golf and Camping
Resort in Benton Saturday, Oct. 5.
Registration starts at 9 a.m. and
the tournament begins at 10 a.m.
Entry fee is $80, which includes
green fees, carts, free use of
driving range with unlimited
balls, snacks, barbecue chicken
dinner following the tournament,
souvenirs and prizes. Hole
sponsorships are available for
$80, which gives sponsors a
sign at the tee box and a listing
in the program. To donate prizes
for the golfers, call the church.
Make checks payable to SUMC
and include the names of those
in your foursome. Singles will be
paired. Mail checks and entry
formto Shavertown United
Methodist Church 163 N. Pioneer
Ave., Shavertown, Pa. 18708.
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Activated RHP Clay Bu-
chholz fromthe 60-day DL. Designated RHPJose
De La Torre for assignment.
LOSANGELESANGELS Activated INF Howie
Kendrick of the 15-day DL.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Reinstated OF Josh
Reddick fromthe 15-day DL.
NEW YORK YANKEES Signed LHP Mike
Zagurski. Transferred DH Travis Hafner to the
60-day DL.
National League
NEWYORK METS Recalled SS Ruben Tejada
fromLas Vegas (AAA).
SAN DIEGO PADRES Selected the contract
of INFTommy Medica fromSanAntonio (Texas).
American Association
AMARILLOSOXTraded INFSteve Rinaudo to
SanAngelo (United) to complete an earlier trade.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS Traded RHP Der-
ek Blacksher and RHPJosh Strawn to Long Island
(Atlantic) for two players to be named.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com baseball Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 3B
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 88 58 .603 8-2 W-1 47-25 41-33
Tampa Bay 78 65 .545 8 3-7 L-1 44-27 34-38
Baltimore 77 67 .535 10 1 6-4 L-1 42-31 35-36
NewYork 77 68 .531 10 2 5-5 W-1 44-31 33-37
Toronto 67 77 .465 20 11 7-3 L-1 35-35 32-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 82 62 .569 4-6 L-3 44-27 38-35
Cleveland 77 67 .535 5 1 6-4 L-1 45-29 32-38
Kansas City 76 69 .524 6 3 7-3 W-1 40-35 36-34
Minnesota 62 80 .437 19 15 5-5 W-1 29-39 33-41
Chicago 58 85 .406 23 20 2-8 W-2 33-34 25-51
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 83 60 .580 8-2 W-3 47-27 36-33
Texas 81 62 .566 2 3-7 L-1 39-30 42-32
Los Angeles 68 76 .472 15 10 6-4 W-1 35-40 33-36
Seattle 65 79 .451 18 13 4-6 L-2 33-40 32-39
Houston 48 96 .333 35 30 4-6 W-1 23-49 25-47
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 87 57 .604 5-5 W-2 51-20 36-37
Washington 75 69 .521 12 6 7-3 W-4 40-31 35-38
Philadelphia 66 78 .458 21 15 5-5 L-1 39-34 27-44
NewYork 64 79 .448 22 17 3-7 L-2 28-40 36-39
Miami 53 90 .371 33 28 4-6 L-4 30-43 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 83 60 .580 5-5 W-3 44-25 39-35
Pittsburgh 82 61 .573 1 5-5 W-1 45-25 37-36
Cincinnati 82 64 .562 2 6-4 L-2 47-26 35-38
Milwaukee 62 80 .437 20 18 4-6 W-2 31-40 31-40
Chicago 62 82 .431 21 19 6-4 W-2 29-46 33-36
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 84 59 .587 6-4 W-1 44-28 40-31
Arizona 72 71 .503 12 8 4-6 L-2 40-31 32-40
San Diego 66 77 .462 18 14 6-4 W-4 41-33 25-44
Colorado 66 79 .455 19 15 3-7 L-4 41-31 25-48
San Francisco 65 79 .451 19 16 5-5 W-2 37-37 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sundays Games
N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 3
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
ChicagoWhite Sox 4, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 5, Detroit 2
Toronto 2, Minnesota 0
Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3
Oakland 7, Houston 2
Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 1
Mondays Games
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Minnesota 6, L.A. Angels 3
Pittsburgh 1, Texas 0
Detroit at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 3
N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 5
L.A. Angels 12, Toronto 6
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Kansas City (Shields 10-9) at Cleveland (Kazmir
8-7), 12:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 7-10) at Texas (Garza
3-3), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 10-9) at Baltimore (Feld-
man 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 15-6) at Toronto (Dickey 12-
12), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Dempster 8-9) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 8-3),
7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 13-7) at Chicago White Sox
(Quintana 7-6), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (Gray 2-3) at Minnesota (Pelfrey 5-11),
8:10 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 4-5) at Seattle (Maurer 4-7),
10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sundays Games
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 6, Miami 4
Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
San Diego 5, Colorado 2
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Mondays Games
Atlanta 5, Miami 2
Chicago Cubs 2, Cincinnati 0
Washington 9, N.Y. Mets 0
Pittsburgh 1, Texas 0
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
San Diego 8, Philadelphia 2
Atlanta 4, Miami 3
Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 1
Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 8-11) at Cincinnati
(Leake 12-6), 12:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 7-10) at Texas (Garza
3-3), 2:05 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 8-7) at San Francisco (Petit
3-0), 3:45 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 8-13) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee
12-6), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 13-6) at Miami (Fernandez 11-6),
7:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 8-13) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler
7-4), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 6-4) at St. Louis (Lynn 13-10),
8:15 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 13-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 13-5),
10:10 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS STATS
Padres 8, Phillies 2
San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Venable rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Denorfa lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Gyorko 2b 5 3 3 1 0 1 .246
Headley 3b 5 1 3 2 0 2 .243
Blanks 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .259
Amarista cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260
R.Cedeno ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .313
R.Rivera c 4 0 1 2 0 2 .184
Cashner p 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271
Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 40 8 13 8 0 10
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bernadina cf-rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .170
Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
C.Hernandez 2b 0 0 0 1 1 0 .280
Utley 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .276
M.Martinez cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171
Ruf rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
Frandsen 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Asche 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .268
Galvis lf-ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .212
Rupp c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .250
Cloyd p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077
Miner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
E.Martin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Orr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214
Lu.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Mayberry ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .230
Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 2 7 2 2 10
San Diego 100 340 0008 13 0
Philadelphia 000 010 0102 7 1
a-fouled out for E.Martin in the 6th. b-singled
for Lu.Garcia in the 8th.
E_Utley (16). LOB_San Diego 5, Philadelphia 6.
2B_Gyorko (25), R.Cedeno (2), R.Rivera (2), Utley
(24), Frandsen (9). HR_Asche (5), of Cashner.
RBIs_Gyorko (45), Headley 2 (40), Blanks (35),
R.Cedeno 2 (9), R.Rivera 2 (5), C.Hernandez (4),
Asche (20).
Runners left in scoring position_San Diego
3 (Blanks, Cashner 2); Philadelphia 5 (Ruf,
M.Martinez 2, Rupp 2). RISP_San Diego 7 for 13;
Philadelphia 1 for 6.
Runners moved up_Amarista. GIDP_Galvis.
DP_San Diego 1 (Gyorko, R.Cedeno, Blanks).
San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cashner W, 9-8 72-3 4 2 2 1 7 108 3.40
Thayer 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.48
Brach 0 2 0 0 0 0 12 3.81
Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.93
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cloyd L, 2-4 4 9 7 7 0 4 73 4.56
Miner 1 3 1 1 0 3 28 4.15
E.Martin 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 6.68
Lu.Garcia 2 1 0 0 0 0 15 5.01
Savery 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.84
Cloyd pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Brach pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored_Thayer 2-1,
Gregerson 2-0, Miner 2-2. WP_Miner.
Umpires_Home, Mark Wegner; First, Tim
Timmons; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Laz Diaz.
T2:46. A29,242 (43,651).
Angels 12, Blue Jays 6
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Cowgill cf 6 0 0 0 0 2 .254
Aybar ss 6 1 1 1 0 0 .267
Trout dh 4 2 1 0 1 1 .337
Trumbo 1b 5 5 5 2 0 0 .244
J.Hamilton lf 5 2 3 4 0 0 .243
Iannetta c 4 2 3 2 1 0 .225
Calhoun rf 5 0 2 2 0 1 .291
G.Green 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .248
An.Romine 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245
Totals 44 12 18 12 2 4
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Reyes ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .295
Goins 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .291
Lawrie 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .260
Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .279
R.Davis lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .267
Arencibia c 3 2 1 0 1 0 .205
Nickeas c 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Sierra rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .255
Gose cf 4 1 2 4 0 1 .244
Pillar dh 4 0 0 1 0 1 .161
Totals 36 6 9 6 1 2
Los Angeles 401 033 01012 18 0
Toronto 040 002 000 6 9 2
E_R.Davis (2), Gose (3). LOB_Los Angeles
8, Toronto 4. 2B_Trumbo 3 (29), Iannetta (14),
Calhoun (6), An.Romine (3), Lawrie (15), Sierra
(7). HR_Aybar (6), of Buehrle; Trumbo (32), of
Buehrle; J.Hamilton (20), of Buehrle; Iannetta
(9), of Jenkins; Gose (1), of Williams; R.Davis
(5), of Williams. RBIs_Aybar (51), Trumbo 2 (91),
J.Hamilton 4 (67), Iannetta 2 (35), Calhoun 2
(23), G.Green (13), R.Davis (22), Gose 4 (8), Pillar
(8). S_An.Romine.
Runners left in scoring position_Los Angeles 6
(An.Romine, G.Green 2, Trout, Aybar 2); Toronto
2 (R.Davis, Reyes). RISP_Los Angeles 7 for 20;
Toronto 2 for 7.
Runners moved up_J.Hamilton, Calhoun, Lind,
Pillar.
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Williams W, 7-10 5 9 6 6 1 1 80 4.81
Kohn 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.28
Boshers 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.97
Brasier 2 0 0 0 0 0 17 3.00
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Buehrle L, 11-8 4 12 8 8 1 2 77 4.18
Jenkins 2 4 3 3 0 1 36 3.75
Romero 2 2 1 1 1 1 38 9.95
L.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 5.40
Buehrle pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
Williams pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_Kohn 2-1, Jenkins
1-0.
Umpires_Home, TimWelke; First, Toby Basner;
Second, Hal Gibson; Third, Mike Everitt.
T2:43. A19,079 (49,282).
Nationals 6, Mets 3
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Span cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .281
Zimmerman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .274
Werth rf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .328
Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283
Ad.LaRoche 1b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .237
W.Ramos c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .277
T.Moore lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .226
C.Brown lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286
c-Hairston ph-lf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .188
Lombardozzi 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Zimmermann p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .107
Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Z.Walters ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Kobernus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167
R.Soriano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 36 6 11 6 0 6
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .255
Lagares rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .264
Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
F.Francisco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Dan.Murphy 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .284
Duda 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .240
Ju.Turner 3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .273
Satin 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .280
den Dekker cf 3 0 1 2 1 1 .276
T.dArnaud c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .159
Quintanilla ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .228
Gee p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .132
Feliciano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Baxter ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .204
Totals 33 3 9 3 3 6
Washington 111 001 0026 11 2
NewYork 000 102 0003 9 0
a-singled for Stammen in the 7th. b-lined out
for Feliciano in the 7th. c-homered for C.Brown
in the 9th. d-popped out for Clippard in the 9th.
E_Ad.LaRoche 2 (11). LOB_Washington 3, New
York 7. 2B_Span (27), Werth 2 (20), T.Moore (8),
Dan.Murphy (34), Ju.Turner (12). HR_Werth (23),
of Gee; Ad.LaRoche (19), of Gee; Hairston (10),
of Byrdak. RBIs_Werth 2 (71), Ad.LaRoche (59),
W.Ramos(46), Hairston2(26),Ju.Turner (15), den
Dekker 2 (5). SB_den Dekker (3). CS_Desmond
(5), E.Young (10), den Dekker (1). S_Gee.
Runners left in scoring position_Washington
2 (Zimmermann, Ad.LaRoche); New York 4
(T.dArnaud, Lagares, Quintanilla, Dan.Murphy).
RISP_Washington 3 for 9; NewYork 2 for 9.
Runners moved up_Lombardozzi, Duda.
GIDP_Span.
DP_New York 1 (Quintanilla, Dan.Murphy,
Duda).
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ZimmrmnnW, 17-85 8 3 3 1 4 85 3.36
Stammen H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.85
Storen H, 20 1 0 0 0 2 0 19 4.88
Clippard H, 31 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.22
R.Soriano S, 40-461 1 0 0 0 0 14 3.36
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gee L, 11-10 6 1-3 9 4 4 0 5 89 3.61
Feliciano 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.32
Black 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.38
F.Francisco 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 6 9.00
Byrdak 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 8 8.10
Zimmermann pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_Stammen 1-0,
Feliciano 1-0, Byrdak 1-1. WP_Zimmermann.
Umpires_Home, John Hirschbeck; First, James
Hoye; Second, JimReynolds; Third, BobDavidson.
T3:02. A20,307 (41,922).
Yankees 7, Orioles 5
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .274
A.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .301
D.Adams 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .192
Cano 2b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .308
A.Soriano lf 5 2 2 3 0 1 .253
Granderson dh 5 1 1 0 0 3 .242
Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .228
I.Suzuki rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Nunez ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .257
C.Stewart c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .217
a-Overbay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252
Au.Romine c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207
J.Murphy c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667
Totals 40 7 11 7 1 12
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Markakis rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .271
Machado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291
C.Davis 1b 2 2 2 2 2 0 .295
A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293
Wieters c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .231
McLouth lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264
Hardy ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .264
B.Roberts 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .238
Urrutia dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .276
Totals 31 5 6 4 3 4
NewYork 001 002 0407 11 1
Baltimore 000 040 0105 6 1
a-struck out for C.Stewart in the 7th.
E_Nunez (12), C.Davis (5). LOB_New York 7,
Baltimore 4. 2B_Gardner (33), A.Rodriguez 2
(7), Granderson (10), Mar.Reynolds (14). HR_A.
Soriano(14), ofMig.Gonzalez; Mar.Reynolds (18),
of Mig.Gonzalez; A.Soriano (15), of Gausman;
C.Davis (49), of Nova. RBIs_A.Rodriguez (12),
Cano (98), A.Soriano 3 (47), Mar.Reynolds 2
(62), Markakis (55), C.Davis 2 (126), Wieters (71).
SF_Markakis, Wieters.
Runners left in scoring position_New York 3
(A.Soriano, Cano, Gardner). RISP_New York 2 for
10; Baltimore 2 for 3.
Runners moved up_Machado.
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Nova 6 6 4 4 2 2 79 3.17
WarrenW, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.56
Kelley H, 11 2-3 0 1 1 1 1 21 4.01
M.Rivera S, 42-49 11-3 0 0 0 0 0 19 2.22
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Mig.Gonzalez 6 6 3 3 0 6 94 4.00
Gsmn L, 2-5 BS, 1-11 3 3 3 0 2 24 6.30
Fr.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 3.86
Stinson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.82
Matusz 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 3.42
Gausman pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WP_Kelley 2.
Umpires_Home, Jim Joyce; First, Jef Nelson;
Second, JimWolf; Third, Ed Hickox.
T3:12. A25,697 (45,971).
Red Sox 2, Rays 0
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .296
Victorino cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .292
D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .310
Napoli 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260
J.Gomes lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .239
Nava rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .298
Saltalamacchia c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .259
Middlebrooks 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Drewss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .244
Totals 29 2 4 2 1 9
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .261
a-W.Myers ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .290
Zobrist 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276
Longoria 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .264
Joyce lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .244
Loney 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .307
Scott dh 2 0 0 0 0 2 .244
b-D.Young ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263
De.Jennings cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .247
J.Molina c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Y.Escobar ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .261
Totals 28 0 4 0 3 9
Boston 000 020 0002 4 0
Tampa Bay 000 000 0000 4 0
a-grounded into a felders choice for DeJesus
in the 6th.
LOB_Boston 3, Tampa Bay 4. 2B_Napoli
(35), Y.Escobar (24). RBIs_J.Gomes (48),
Saltalamacchia (54). SB_Pedroia (17).
CS_DeJesus (2), Joyce (2). S_Nava. SF_
Saltalamacchia.
Runners left in scoring position_Boston
2 (Drew, J.Gomes); Tampa Bay 2 (J.Molina,
W.Myers). RISP_Boston 1 for 4; Tampa Bay 0for 2.
GIDP_Zobrist.
DP_Boston 2 (Saltalamacchia, Saltalamacchia,
Drew), (Pedroia, Napoli).
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Buchholz W, 10-0 5 3 0 0 1 6 74 1.61
BreslowH, 14 2 0 0 0 2 0 33 2.01
Tazawa H, 24 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.84
Uehra S, 19-22 11-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.10
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Price L, 8-8 8 3 2 2 0 9 127 3.45
Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 2.76
Inherited runners-scored_Uehara 1-0. WP_
Price 2.
Umpires_Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Vic
Carapazza; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Gary
Cederstrom.
T3:10. A18,605 (34,078).
Braves 4, Marlins 3
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
J.Schafer cf-rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .262
J.Upton rf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .259
1-B.Upton pr-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .191
F.Freeman 1b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .306
Gattis lf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .248
Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
McCann c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .263
C.Johnson 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .330
Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .248
El.Johnson 2b-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .256
Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Terdoslavich ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236
D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Uggla 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182
Totals 34 4 9 4 5 6
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Coghlan lf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .276
Lucas 3b-2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .237
Yelich cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .279
Stanton rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .250
Morrison 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .254
D.Solano 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .250
A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234
M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .228
Brantly c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .216
d-Ruggiano ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .225
Koehler p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091
a-Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Z.Phillips p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Polanco 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .249
2-Marisnick pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Totals 33 3 6 3 3 10
Atlanta 202 000 0004 9 1
Miami 300 000 0003 6 1
a-popped out for Koehler in the 5th. b-struck
out for Ayala in the 8th. c-fied out for Qualls in the
8th. d-struck out for Brantly in the 9th.
1-ran for J.Upton in the 4th. 2-ran for Polanco
in the 9th.
E_Gattis (6), Lucas (7). LOB_Atlanta 10, Miami
7. 2B_Gattis (17), McCann (12), Stanton (23),
Polanco (10). RBIs_Gattis 2 (54), McCann (53),
C.Johnson (61), Stanton (47), Morrison (33),
D.Solano (28). SB_El.Johnson (4). S_Teheran 2.
Runners left in scoring position_Atlanta 7
(C.Johnson 2, J.Schafer, El.Johnson, Simmons,
B.Upton 2); Miami 3 (Hechavarria, Stanton 2).
RISP_Atlanta 3 for 16; Miami 2 for 6.
Runners moved up_Gattis. GIDP_Simmons.
DP_Miami 1 (Lucas, D.Solano, Morrison).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ThrnW, 12-7 62-3 5 3 3 3 6 111 3.05
Avilan 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.48
Ayala H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.08
D.Carpenter H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.03
Kimbrel S, 46-49 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 0.91
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Koehler L, 3-10 5 8 4 4 3 2 80 4.80
Z.Phillips 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 0.00
A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.45
Qualls 1 1 0 0 1 2 18 2.86
M.Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.90
Z.Phillips pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inheritedrunners-scored_Avilan2-0, Ayala 3-0,
A.Ramos 1-0. IBB_of Qualls (J.Schafer). HBP_by
Avilan (Yelich). PB_Brantly.
Umpires_Home, JoeWest; First, SamHolbrook;
Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Rob Drake.
T3:13. A19,095 (37,442).
Royals 6, Indians 3
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .271
Bonifacio 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .237
Hosmer 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .303
B.Butler dh 3 1 2 1 0 0 .293
2-Getz pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225
Moustakas 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .230
S.Perez c 5 0 2 1 0 1 .288
Lough rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .283
L.Cain rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257
A.Escobar ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .235
J.Dyson cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .270
Totals 36 6 11 6 4 7
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .258
Swisher 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240
Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .280
C.Santana dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .264
Brantley lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .278
As.Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .234
Y.Gomes c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .302
Kubel rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .214
Chisenhall 3b 3 0 3 0 0 0 .229
1-Jo.Ramirez pr-3b1 1 0 0 0 0 .400
Totals 36 3 12 3 0 9
Kansas City 000 013 1106 11 0
Cleveland 100 000 2003 12 1
1-ran for Chisenhall in the 7th. 2-ran for
B.Butler in the 9th.
E_McAllister (2). LOB_Kansas City 9, Cleveland
6. 2B_B.Butler (25), Moustakas (22), Bourn (19),
Chisenhall (17). 3B_Lough (4). HR_A.Escobar (4),
of McAllister. RBIs_B.Butler (75), Moustakas 2
(38), S.Perez (67), A.Escobar 2(48), Bourn2(42),
Brantley (60). SB_Getz 2 (15). SF_B.Butler.
Runners left in scoring position_Kansas City
3 (Hosmer, Bonifacio, S.Perez); Cleveland 4 (As.
Cabrera, Bourn, Brantley, Kipnis). RISP_Kansas
City 4 for 8; Cleveland 2 for 7.
Runners moved up_Bonifacio. GIDP_
Moustakas, Brantley, As.Cabrera, Y.Gomes.
DP_Kansas City 3 (Bonifacio, A.Escobar,
Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Bonifacio, Hosmer),
(Bonifacio, A.Escobar, Hosmer); Cleveland 1
(Swisher, As.Cabrera).
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Guthrie W, 14-10 6 9 1 1 0 2 99 4.11
K.Herrera 1-3 3 2 2 0 1 20 3.70
Hochevar H, 6 12-3 0 0 0 0 5 29 1.70
G.Holland S, 41-44 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.37
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
McAllister L, 7-9 5 6 4 4 3 2 78 4.11
Hagadone 11-3 2 1 1 0 2 21 5.40
C.C.Lee 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 3.00
Rzepczynski 11-3 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.17
B.Wood 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 12 0.00
McAllister pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_Hochevar 1-0,
Hagadone 1-0, C.C.Lee 2-1, Rzepczynski 1-0. HBP_
by McAllister (B.Butler). Balk_McAllister.
Umpires_Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Mike
Estabrook; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Doug
Eddings.
T3:24. A12,615 (42,241).
Cubs 9, Reds 1
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .240
Barney 2b 2 2 1 1 2 0 .215
Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .229
Do.Murphy 3b 5 1 2 3 0 2 .282
Lake lf 4 2 2 0 1 1 .313
D.McDonald rf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .235
Castillo c 5 2 3 3 0 0 .272
Boscan c 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Sweeney cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .286
E.Jackson p 4 2 1 1 0 0 .080
Limp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Grimmp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 38 9 13 9 4 3
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .291
B.Hamilton cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Phillips 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .264
C.Izturis 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .194
Votto 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .306
N.Soto 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ludwick lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .256
Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Paul lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .236
Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265
D.Robinson rf-lf-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Frazier 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Hannahan 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .219
Cozart ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256
Hanigan c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .212
b-C.Miller ph-c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .235
Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
G.Reynolds p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167
Christiani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-H.Rodriguez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250
Partch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Heisey rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Mesoraco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241
Totals 35 1 10 1 1 4
Chicago 023 101 2009 13 0
Cincinnati 000 000 1001 10 1
a-singledfor Christiani inthe5th. b-doubledfor
Hanigan in the 7th. c-grounded out for Ondrusek
in the 9th.
E_Bruce (3). LOB_Chicago 8, Cincinnati 9.
2B_Do.Murphy (7), Lake (13), Sweeney (12),
Votto (29), Ludwick (5), Cozart (27), C.Miller (4).
HR_Castillo (5), of Cingrani; Do.Murphy (10), of
G.Reynolds; Castillo (6), ofPartch; E.Jackson (1),
of Partch. RBIs_Barney (40), Do.Murphy 3 (20),
D.McDonald (2), Castillo 3 (28), E.Jackson (4),
C.Miller (6). SB_Lake (4). SF_Barney.
Runners left in scoring position_Chicago 4
(Do.Murphy 2, Lake 2); Cincinnati 8 (Bruce 2,
G.Reynolds, Ludwick, B.Phillips, B.Hamilton,
Cozart 2). RISP_Chicago 3 for 9; Cincinnati 1 for
11.
Runners moved up_Cozart. GIDP_Rizzo, Choo,
B.Phillips.
DP_Chicago 2 (Rizzo, St.Castro, Rizzo),
(E.Jackson, St.Castro, Rizzo); Cincinnati 1
(Frazier, B.Phillips, Votto).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.JacksonW, 8-15 7 9 1 1 0 4 98 4.76
Lim 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 0.00
Grimm 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.40
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cingrani L, 7-4 12-3 3 2 2 1 1 37 2.92
G.Reynolds 12-3 6 4 3 0 0 35 5.66
Christiani 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 25 0.00
Partch 12-3 3 3 3 2 0 41 6.75
Duke 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 7.20
Ondrusek 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 22 4.30
Inherited runners-scored_Christiani 2-1. HBP_
by Lim(N.Soto), by Christiani (Rizzo). WP_Lim.
Umpires_Home, Paul Emmel; First, Alfonso
Marquez; Second, TedBarrett; Third, MikeDiMuro.
T3:48. A21,396 (42,319).
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Jayson
Werth kept up his power
surge with a home run
and two doubles, leading
the charging Washington
Nationals past the New York
Mets 6-3 on Tuesday night
for their fourth straight win.
Jordan Zimmermann
wound up with his
NL-leading 17th victory and
Rafael Soriano closed for his
40th save as Washington
tries to make a late playoff
push.
The Nationals have won
six of seven, and have 18
games left this season. They
began the day seven games
behind Cincinnati for the
nal NL wild-card spot.
AdamLaRoche and pinch-
hitter Scott Hairston also
homered and Denard Span
extended his hitting streak
to 21 games. Catcher Wilson
Ramos threw out two run-
ners who tried to steal sec-
ond and lined an RBI single.
Werth has gone 10 for 18
during Washingtons win-
ning streak with two homers
and ve doubles. Hes scored
ve runs and driven in ve
while raising his batting aver-
age to .328.
Werth homered in con-
secutive games for the fourth
time this season. Before this
year, he had done it only
twice since joining the Nats
in 2011.
Zimmermann (17-8)
topped the Mets for the rst
timeinvestarts this season.
He gave up three runs and
eight hits inve-plus innings.
Zimmermann, Colorados
Jorge De La Rosa and St.
Louis Adam Wainwright all
started the day with 16 wins.
Detroits Max Scherzer tops
the majors with 19.
Relievers Craig Stammen,
Drew Storen, Tyler Clippard
and Soriano combined
for four scoreless innings.
Soriano reached 40 saves for
his third team, having done
it with Tampa Bay and the
NewYork Yankees.
Werth hit his 23rd homer
in the rst and LaRoche led
off the second with his 19th.
Both homers sailed into the
Party City Deck above the
wall in left-center eld, and
LaRoches drive was caught
on the y by a fan wearing a
Mets jersey.
Padres 8, Phillies 2
PHILADELPHIA Jedd
Gyorko and Chase Headley
each had three hits to back
Andrew Cashners strong
pitching in San Diegos vic-
tory. Gyorko, who entered in
a 3-for-28 slide, scored three
runs and drove in another.
Headley added two RBIs for
the Padres, who have won
four straight andsixof seven.
Cashner (9-8) earned his
rst victory since Aug. 2,
throwing 7 2-3 masterful
innings while limiting the
Phillies to four hits and a
walk. He matched a season
high with seven strikeouts
and retired his rst 11 bat-
ters before giving up a dou-
ble to Chase Utley.
Cashner had allowed just
one run in his previous two
outings but did not get a
decision in either one.
Philadelphia had won
three in a row.
The Padres, who had
13 hits, struck early with
Headleys RBI single in the
rst inning.
They added three runs in
the fourth on an RBI double
by Ronny Cedeno and a two-
run double by Rene Rivera.
In the fth, San Diego
scored four runs on six sin-
gles, including ve in a row
to open the inning. Six hits
in one inning tied a season
high.
Cedeno and Kyle Blanks
nishedwith two hits apiece.
Cody Asche hit his fth
home run in the fth inning
for the Phillies rst run. The
homer was Asches third in
six games.
Phillies starter Tyler Cloyd
(2-4) was not sharp in his
rst major league start in
three weeks. The right-
hander allowed seven runs
and nine hits over four-plus
innings. He struck out four
and walked none.
Braves 4, Marlins 3
MIAMI Julio Teheran,
working on 10 days rest,
overcame a rough rst
inning and pitched into the
seventh to help the Braves to
the victory.
Teheran (12-7) gave
up three runs in the rst,
then none after that, and
he left with a 4-3 lead. Luis
Ayala came on to strike out
Giancarlo Stanton with
the bases loaded to end the
seventh, and Craig Kimbrel
pitched around a one-out
double by Placido Polanco
in the ninth for his major-
league-leading 46th save in
49 chances.
Pinch-runner Jake
Marisnick made the nal out
trying to advance to third
when a pitch by Kimbrel got
past catcher Brian McCann.
Atlanta went 3 for 16 with
runners in scoring position,
but Evan Gattis had his third
straight two-RBI game.
Werth helps Nats stay hot in win over Mets
AP photo
Miami Marlins Logan Morrison (5) is forced out at second on a
fielders choice hit by Donovan Solano as Atlanta Braves shortstop
Andrelton Simmons (19) throws to first during the first inning of
a Tuesdays game in Miami. The Marlins Giancarlo Stanton scored
on the play.
The Associated Press
BALTIMORE Alfonso
Soriano hit two home runs,
including a tiebreaking shot
in the eighth inning, and the
New York Yankees rallied
past the Baltimore Orioles
7-5 Tuesday night to end
a six-game losing streak at
Camden Yards.
Mark Reynolds also hom-
ered for the Yankees, who
won for the second time in
six games to bolster their
postseason hopes. New
York still trails Tampa Bay,
Baltimore and Cleveland
in the hunt for the nal AL
wild-card slot.
Chris Davis hit his major
league-leading 49th home
run for the Orioles and
raised his RBI total to 126.
Baltimore led 4-1 in the fth
inning before faltering.
Soriano and Reynolds
launched the comeback with
solo homers in the sixth off
Baltimore starter Miguel
Gonzalez.
Alex Rodriguez led off the
eighth with a double against
rookie Kevin Gausman (2-5)
and Robinson Cano deliv-
ered an RBI single. Soriano
followed with a two-run shot
to center, his 15th homer in
43 games since New York
reacquired him in a July
26 trade with the Chicago
Cubs. The victory was man-
ager Joe Girardis 556th
with the Yankees, tying Billy
Martin for sixth place on the
franchise list.
Angels 12, Blue Jays 6
TORONTO Mark
Trumbo matched a team
record with four extra-
base hits, including back-
to-back home runs with
Josh Hamilton, and Chris
Iannetta and Erick Aybar
also went deep as Los
Angeles beat Toronto.
Trumbo had a career-best
ve hits and became the rst
player in Angels history to
collect ve hits and score
ve runs in the same game.
He went 5 for 5 with three
doubles and two RBIs as the
Angels won for the eighth
time in 11 meetings with the
Blue Jays.
Red Sox 2, Rays 0
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.
Clay Buchholz allowed
three hits over ve innings in
his rst start since early June
and the AL East-leading Red
Sox beat the Rays.
Buchholz (10-0), sidelined
by a strained neck, hadnt
pitched in the majors since
beating the Los Angeles
Angels on June 8. The right-
hander, who made three
rehab starts in the minors,
struck out Jose Molina with
two on to end the second.
Jonny Gomes and Jarrod
Saltalamacchia both drove in
a run for the Red Sox, who
extended their lead over
second-place Tampa Bay to
8 1/2 games in the East.
Royals 6, Indians 3
CLEVELAND Jeremy
Guthrie got a major assist
from his defense in pitching
six innings, Alcides Escobar
hit a rare home run and the
Kansas City Royals snapped
a six-game losing streak in
Cleveland, 6-3 on Tuesday
night to close on the Indians
and two others in the ALs
cramped wild-card scram-
ble.
Soriano leads Yankees to comeback win over Os
AP photo
Baltimore Orioles Chris Davis, right, rounds the bases past New York Yankees third baseman Alex
Rodriguez after hitting a two-run home run his 49th of the season in the fifth inning of Tuesdays
game in Baltimore.
IRA PODELL
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK Mets ace
Matt Harveys ailing elbowis
feeling better, and the right-
hander said Tuesday he is
still optimistic he can avoid
reconstructive surgery that
would likely sideline him for
all of next season.
Harvey will visit Dr. James
Andrews on Monday before
deciding whether he will
undergo Tommy John sur-
gery.
Everything feels ne, my
arm feels great, the 24-year-
old right-hander said. I am
still very optimistic about
everything, but I am not a
doctor so we will see what
happens.
In his rst public com-
ments since Aug. 26, when
the Mets saidhe hada partial
ligament tear, Harvey said he
hasnt yet had a second MRI
to determine the best course
of action going forward.
He has been icing his
elbowand riding a stationary
bike since he was shut down
for the season last month.
Harvey said the swelling is
down and that pain subsided
two days after he put a ball
down.
We wanted to get the sec-
ond opinion, let the swelling
settle down before we went
in and started any rehab or
anything like that, he said.
Were going to wait to see
how Monday goes with Dr.
Andrews.
I am not going to make
an immediate decision while
I amdown there.
Whether it is another
week or whatnot, I am going
to talk to as many people as
I can. If we do go the sur-
gery route, having it sooner
so maybe I can get back in
September next year its a
possibility. We havent gotten
that far.
Harvey, the All-Star game
starter for the National
League, joined Mets team-
mates David Wright and
Zack Wheeler, along with
Jeff Wilpon the teams
chief operating ofcer at
a Manhattan rehouse in
advance of the anniversary of
the Sept. 11 attacks on New
York.
Harvey was in middle
school in Connecticut on the
day the World Trade Center
was struck by hijacked airlin-
ers.
Harvey to visit Dr.
James Andrews
DETROIT
Ndamukong Suhs latest
controversial play drew a
hefty ne.
The Detroit defen-
sive tackle was docked
$100,000 by the NFL for
his illegal low block on
Minnesota center John
Sullivan in the Lions
season-opening victory
Sunday. Suh hit Sullivan
during an interception
return by Detroit line-
backer DeAndre Levy, and
the penalty negated what
would have been a touch-
down.
NFL spokesman Randall
Liu said Tuesday that vice
president of football opera-
tions Merton Hanks noti-
ed Suh of the ne. Suh
was not in the locker room
at Detroits practice facil-
ity when it was open to
reporters Tuesday. A text
message was sent to him
seeking comment.
Suh said Sunday he
wasnt goingafter Sullivans
knees, adding that the two
had discussed the play at
halftime. Detroit players
said Suh apologized to the
team Tuesday.
He just basically said
that he cant make those
types of mistakes he
cant put us in a position
where weve got to battle
back from mistakes like
that, wide receiver Nate
Burleson said.
Its believed to be the
largest ne for an NFL
player for an on-eld viola-
tion, although suspensions
without pay can result in
bigger nancial hits.
PAGE 4B Wednesday, September 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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PITTSBURGH
Mike Tomlin stressed to
Jonathan Dwyer when the
coach cut the Pittsburgh
Steelers running back 10
days ago that the decision
to release the teams lead-
ing rusher in 2012 was not
a personal one.
We kept the guys that we
kept because of the things
they did, not because of the
things Jonathan didnt do,
Tomlin said.
No hard feelings, appar-
ently.
Dwyer practically sprint-
ed to the teams practice
facility after the Steelers
re-signed him on Monday.
A day before, the Steelers
lost LaRod Stephens-
Howling for the season
due to a knee injury.
While allowing it may take
Dwyer a day or two to get
back up to speed, Tomlin
didnt rule out Dwyer play-
ing a signicant role when
Pittsburgh (0-1) travels
to Cincinnati (0-1) next
Monday night.
I dont anticipate that
being a major problem,
Tomlin said, but well play
it by ear and see how he
looks on the practice eld
and in the classroom.
Dwyers presence
couldnt hurt after the
Steelers managed just 32
yards on 15 carries in an
uninspired 16-9 loss to
Tennessee last week. Isaac
Redman lost two fumbles
and ran for just nine yards
on eight carries while Felix
Jones who surprisingly
beat out Dwyer for the nal
roster spot spent most
of the day on the sidelines.
Tomlin insisted he
remains condent in
Redmans ability as a
starter while rookie
LeVeon Bell recovers
from a sprained right foot.
Center Maurkice Pouncey
will undergo surgery on
Thursday to repair torn
knee ligaments in his right
knee and wont play until
2014 after teammate David
DeCastro fell on him less
than 5 minutes into the
game.
Losing Pouncey was
a blow to the group, not
only in terms of what hes
capable of, but emotion-
ally, the manner in which
it happened, Tomlin said.
The Steelers signed vet-
eran Fernando Velasco on
Monday but utility line-
man Kelvin Beachum will
get the rst shot at replac-
ing perhaps the most irre-
placeable player on the ros-
ter. In addition to being a
captain, Pouncey made the
blocking calls at the line of
scrimmage and served as
the big brother to a group
lled with second and
third-year guys.
Now the group will have
to go it alone while also
bringing Velasco up to
speed. Titans coach Mike
Munchak said Velasco will
do great. At the moment,
merely doing OK would
be an improvement for a
group rattled by one of the
more miserable openers in
recent memory.
Beachumto start, Dwyer back as Steelers regroup
WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
AP photo
Steelers running back Jonathan Dwyer (27), seen in a preseason
game against the Panthers and Josh Norman (24), was cut by
the Steelers before the season, but was re-signed by the team on
Monday.
ASHBURN, Va. At least theres a
ready-made excuse to be made for Robert
Grifn III. He was coming off a knee injury,
was rusty after sitting out the preseason
and perhaps was a bit too psyched for his
own good.
His teammates cant say the same. The
Washington Redskins came out of the
gate unfocused and off-kilter in their sea-
son opener, deserting the fundamentals of
sound football. Dropped passes. Penalties.
Turnovers. Missed assignments. By the
time they woke up, they were 26 points
behind in the third quarter.
What a letdown. After their franchise
player spent an entire offseason talking
about howhe was all in for Week 1, all the
Redskins got out of the season opener was a
bunch of garbage-time points in a 33-27 loss
to the Philadelphia Eagles.
Thats whats really disappointing about
last night, linebacker Ryan Kerrigan said
Tuesday, is we had a good game plan going
in, and they didnt throwanything at us that
we hadnt seen, but they out-executed us.
Its easy to say the Redskins drew a short
straw, facing a fast-paced Eagles offense
making its NFL debut under coach Chip
Kelly, but coach Mike Shanahan said his
team essentially knew what was coming.
Theres only one play we saw that we
didnt practice against, Shanahan said.
Besides, the Redskins offense should
have feasted on an overhauled Eagles
defense. There were also intangibles that
should have worked in Washingtons favor:
a home game on a Monday night, returning
as NFC East champions against a division
rival that went 4-12 last year.
Redskins cant explain
their collective letdown
JOSEPH WHITE
AP Sports Writer
AP photo
Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin
III, bottom, is sacked by a Philadelphia Eagles
defender during the second half of Mondays
game at FedEx Field in Landover, Md.
Suh hit with largest fne in NFL history for illegal block
NOAHTRISTER
AP Sports Writer
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER FOOTBALL Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 5B
PASSI NG
WVC STATISTICAL LEADERS
PASSING
(Minimum 10 attempts)
Division 4A.........................................Att. ..........Cmp........ Pct. ..... Yds.....TD...... Int. .......QBR
Mike Baur, Wyo. Val. West...................... 28 ............ 18 ............ 64.3...... 337.....2 .........2 ...........174.67
Julius Ward, Hazleton Area................... 40............ 20............ 50.0...... 271 .....1..........2 ...........105.16
Dale Berkheimer, Williamsport............. 30............ 14 ............ 46.7...... 108.....0.........4...........50.24
Division 3A.........................................Att. ..........Cmp........ Pct. ..... Yds.....TD...... Int. .......QBR
C.J. Curry, Berwick................................ 40............ 23............ 57.5 ...... 587.....6 .........1............225.27
Brian Beauchemin, Tunkhannock ........ 12............. 5.............. 41.7 ...... 92.......1..........0...........133.57
Ryan Eli, Tunkhannock.......................... 11.............. 7.............. 63.6...... 80.......0.........0...........124.73
TimPilch, Coughlin............................... 20 ............ 8.............. 40.0 ..... 165 .....2 .........2 ...........122.30
James Emmett, Pittston Area .............. 29 ............ 14 ............ 48.3...... 213 .....1..........2 ...........107.56
Justin Mucha, Dallas............................. 17 ............. 9.............. 52.9...... 78.......0.........1............79.72
Division 2A-A......................................Att. ..........Cmp........ Pct. ..... Yds.....TD...... Int. .......QBR
J.T. Levandowski, Nanticoke ................. 19............. 9.............. 47.4....... 237.....3 .........1............193.73
Jimmy Strickland, Holy Redeemer....... 48 ............ 25............ 52.1 ...... 424.....6 .........1............163.37
Logan Womelsdorf, Northwest ............. 20 ............ 11............. 55.0...... 134.....3 .........0...........160.78
Jake Peters, Hanover Area.................... 32 ............ 12 ............ 37.5 ...... 247.....3 .........2 ...........120.78
Josh Sayre, Lake-Lehman .................... 17 ............. 7.............. 41.2...... 133 .....1..........2 ...........102.78
Rashaun Mathis, GAR........................... 35 ............ 15 ............ 42.9...... 117......0.........0...........70.94
Ryan Gorki, Wyoming Area ................... 15............. 8.............. 53.3...... 52.......0.........1............69.12
Matt DeMarco, Meyers.......................... 17 ............. 4.............. 23.5...... 5.........0.........0...........26.00
Division 4A......................At....Yds ... Avg... TD
Eric Acosta, WVW.............. 26 ...228....8.8.... 4
Isaac Foust, Wil ................. 43 ...222....5.2.... 2
Mike Baur, WVW................ 29 ...145.....5.0.... 1
Julius Ward, Haz ............... 24....68......2.8.... 2
Zach Zukoski, Haz............. 20 ...62......2.1..... 1
Nick George, Haz .............. 5......43......8.6.... 0
Billy Davidson, WVW......... 5......26......5.2.... 2
Dale Berkheimer, Wil......... 11.....23......2.1..... 1
Rhomello Martin, Wil......... 6......22......3.7 .... 0
Shawn Judge, WVW.......... 7......14.......2.0.... 0
Jordan Mason, WVW......... 4......10 ......2.5.... 0
Division 3A......................At....Yds ... Avg... TD
Paul Cole, Cou................... 47....283....6.0.... 4
Tanner Kahlau, Cre ........... 13....225....17.3 ... 4
TimPilch, Cou................... 34 ...224....6.6.... 1
Kyle Gattuso, PA................ 42 ...213 ....5.1..... 2
Frank Aigeldinger, Cre....... 30 ...166 ....5.5.... 0
Brian Beauchemin, Tun..... 31 ....143.....4.6.... 1
Dain Kowalski, Ber ............ 25....110.....4.4.... 4
Ryan Cywinski, Tun ........... 21 ....94......4.5.... 0
Justin Mucha, Dal ............. 33 ...93......2.8.... 0
Jacob Zbegner, Cre........... 11.....61 ......5.5.... 1
Jay Popson, Cre ................ 13....49......3.8.... 0
Hassan Maxwell, PA.......... 14....45......3.2.... 0
Alex Klinger, Ber................ 5......38......7.6..... 0
Tyler Layton, Cou.............. 4......32......8.0.... 0
Jorden Stout, Ber.............. 6......32......6.1..... 1
C.J. Curry, Ber ................... 6......31.......5.2.... 0
Brett Storrs, Dal ................ 9......28......3.1..... 0
Kyle Trenholm, Ber............ 3......26......8.7 .... 0
Nick Talanca, Ber .............. 6......26......4.3.... 1
Matt Bobeck, Cre.............. 7......23......3.3.... 0
Brandon Cole, Cre............. 2......21.......10.5 .. 0
Nate Maczuga, Ber ........... 4......20......5.0.... 0
Division 2A-A...................At....Yds ... Avg... TD
Matt DeMarco, Mey........... 30 ...347....11.6... 5
Joey Vigil, LL...................... 20 ...300 ...15.0 .. 4
Brian Belcher, Han............ 33 ...195 ....5.9.... 2
Rich Sickler, GAR .............. 22....181.....8.2.... 1
Pat Hempel, Nan............... 12....178.....14.8... 1
Austin Mazonkey, Nwt ...... 43 ...173.....6.0.... 1
Jef Skursky, WA................ 32....158 ....4.9.... 2
Tyler Burger, Nwt .............. 23....141 .....6.1..... 2
Anthony Maurent, GAR..... 27....120....4.4.... 1
Dustin Jones, LL................ 21 ....106....5.0.... 1
Pat Villani, HR.................... 15....105 ....7.0..... 1
Nate Mahalak, Mey ........... 18....103 ....5.7 .... 1
Mark Robinson, Mey ......... 2......93......46.5.. 1
Zahir Dunell, Mey.............. 11.....87......7.9..... 2
Blake Balderamma, Nan... 9......82......9.1..... 1
Ron Kotz, Nan ................... 13....82......6.3.... 0
Josh Sayre, LL................... 6......67 ......11.2... 1
Rashaun Mathis, GAR....... 23....65......2.8.... 0
Brady Butler, LL ................ 11.....54......4.9.... 0
Terry Eyerman, Mey.......... 3......49......16.3... 0
Ryan Gorki, WA.................. 17 ....48......2.8.... 0
AdamSchechterly, Nwt .... 10....47 ......4.7 .... 0
Jimmy Strickland, HR....... 18....47 ......2.6.... 1
JimStuart, LL.................... 3......45......15.0 .. 1
Mike Kremenic, Han.......... 5......43......8.6.... 1
Alec Norton, Nan............... 5......38......7.6..... 0
Elido Veras, Han ................ 4......35......8.8.... 0
Isaiah Taylor, Han.............. 12....34......2.8.... 1
Charles Ross, HR .............. 3......31.......10.3 .. 1
Michael Dempsey, Mey..... 3......27 ......9.0.... 0
Dakota Brown, Nwt ........... 5......25......5.0.... 0
Marty Michaels, WA .......... 8......20......2.5.... 0
RUSHI NG
RECEI VI NG
Division 4A......................Rc ...Yds....Avg. ..TD
Jef Ochs, Haz................... 10....132 ... 13.2 ...1
Mike Sands, WVW............. 8......170 ... 21.3...2
Jermichael Bunch, WVW.. 5......88..... 17.6....0
Tajmir Williams, Wil ........... 5......38..... 7.6 .....0
Gavin Kopczynskie, Haz.... 4......60..... 15.0...0
Tanner Bashnick, Wil......... 4......23..... 5.8.....0
Nick George, Haz .............. 3......32..... 16.0...0
L.J. Wesneski, WVW.......... 2......62..... 31.0...1
Jeremy Kozich, WVW........ 2......43..... 21.5...0
Tyler Gardner, Wil .............. 2......21...... 10.5...0
Justin Hofman, Wil........... 2......19 ..... 9.5.....0
Jerah Reeves, Wil .............. 2......13...... 6.5.....0
Zach Zukoski, Haz............. 2......11 ...... 6.5.....0
Malik Wilson, Wil ............... 2......8....... 4.0.....0
Division 3A......................Rc ...Yds....Avg. ..TD
AndrewForce, Ber............. 8......340... 42.5...4
Kyle Trenholm, Ber............ 5......110.... 22.0 ..1
Darik Johnson, Cou........... 5......105 ... 21.0...1
Michael Harth, PA ............. 5......105 ... 21.0...0
Will Updegrove, Ber .......... 4......100... 25.0...1
Brett Stage, Tun ................ 4......94..... 23.5...1
Ryan Cywinski, Tun ........... 4......47 ..... 11.8....0
Logan Brace, Dal ............... 4......14...... 3.5.....0
Rich Weinstock PA ............ 3......69..... 23.0...1
Kyle Gattuso, PA................ 3......4....... 1.3.....0
Connor Sheloski, Cre........ 2......59..... 29.5...1
Chris Behm, Dal ................ 2......41 ..... 20.5...0
Dave Parsnik, Cou............. 2......29..... 14.5 ...0
Ian Mazonkey, Ber............. 2......26..... 13.0...0
Michael Schwab, PA.......... 2......25..... 12.5...0
Trevon Simmons, Ber........ 2......8....... 4.0.....0
Division 2A-A...................Rc ...Yds....Avg. ..TD
Eric Kerr, HR...................... 10....173.... 17.3....3
Anthony Maurent, GAR..... 5......62..... 12.4 ...0
Nick Long, Nwt.................. 5......40..... 8.0.....2
Rich Sickler, GAR .............. 5......28..... 5.6.....0
Jason Hoggarth, HR.......... 4......80..... 20.0 ..1
Eric Shorts, HR.................. 4......77 ..... 19.3...1
Elido Veras, Han ................ 4......56..... 14.0...1
Farrad Condry, WA............ 4......27 ..... 6.8.....0
Stephen Morgan, Han....... 3......104... 34.7...1
Joey Vigil, LL...................... 3......45..... 15.0...0
Darius Washington, HR..... 3......39..... 13.0...1
Isaiah Taylor, Han.............. 3......33..... 11.0....0
Pat Villani, HR.................... 3......33..... 11.0....0
Kyle Gavrish, Nan.............. 3......32..... 10.7 ...0
Ben Steve, WA................... 3......21...... 7.0.....0
Mark Robinson, Mey ......... 3......8....... 2.7.....0
Pat Hempel, Nan............... 2......79..... 39.5...1
Eric Gurzynski, Nwt........... 2......23..... 11.5....0
Austin Mazonkey, Nwt ...... 2......22..... 11.0....0
Rashaun Jackson, GAR..... 2......14...... 7.0.....0
Division 4A................... TD... 2pt ... Kick.. Tot.
Eric Acosta, WVW............ 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
Julius Ward, Haz.............. 2...... 1........ 0 ....... 14
Mike Baur, WVW.............. 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Billy Davidson, WVW....... 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Isaac Foust, Wil ............... 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Mike Sands, WVW........... 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Zach Zukoski, Haz........... 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Ian Ultsh, WVW................ 0...... 0....... 9........ 9
Tristan Williams, Haz....... 0...... 0....... 7........ 7
Division 3A................... TD... 2pt ... Kick.. Tot.
Tanner Kahlau, Cre ......... 5...... 0....... 0 ....... 30
Dain Kowalski, Ber .......... 4...... 1........ 0 ....... 26
Paul Cole, Cou................. 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
AndrewForce, Ber........... 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
Kyle Gattuso, PA.............. 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Olivia Seely, Ber .............. 0...... 0....... 11....... 11
Brian Beauchemin, Tun... 1....... 0....... 1 ........ 7
Daquan Hellenthal, Ber... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Darik Johnson, Cou......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Alex Klinger, Ber.............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
TomMitchell, Cou ........... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
TimPilch, Cou................. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Brett Stage, Tun .............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Connor Sheloski, Cre...... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Jorden Stout, Ber............ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Nick Talenca, Ber ............ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Kyle Trenholm, Ber.......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Will Updegrove, Ber ........ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Rich Weinstock, PA.......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Jacob Zbegner, Cre......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Division 2A-A................ TD... 2pt ... Kick.. Tot.
Matt DeMarco, Mey......... 5...... 0....... 0 ....... 30
Pat Hempel, Nan............. 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
Eric Kerr, HR.................... 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
Joey Vigil, LL.................... 4...... 0....... 0 ....... 24
Brian Belcher, Han.......... 3...... 0....... 0 ....... 18
SCORI NG
Division 4A............... W....L ... PF.. PA.. St. Pts.
Wyoming Valley West ..2 .....0... 75...12...17
Williamsport................1......1.... 24...46..9
Hazleton Area .............0.....2 ... 45...71...0
Division 3A............... W....L ... PF.. PA.. St. Pts.
Coughlin......................2 .....0... 29...17...17
Berwick .......................2 .....0... 97...14...16
Crestwood...................1......1.... 47...62 ..8
Dallas...........................0.....2 ... 0.....57...0
Pittston Area...............0.....2 ... 18...62 ..0
Tunkhannock...............0.....2 ... 13...53 ..0
Division 2A-A............ W....L ... PF.. PA.. St. Pts.
Northwest (A) .............2 .....0... 40 ..31...14
Lake-Lehman..............1......1.... 67...13...8
Nanticoke....................1......1.... 55...39 ..8
Hanover Area ..............1......1.... 52...61...7
Holy Redeemer ...........1......1.... 68 ..48..6
Meyers.........................1......1.... 63...56 ..6
GAR.............................0.....2 ... 26...75...0
Wyoming Area.............0.....2 ... 21 ...64..0
NOTE: CP is Championship Points toward the
divisional title.
Teams get nine points for defeating a Class 4A
opponent, eight for a Class 3Aopponent, seven
for a Class 2Aopponent and six for a Class A
opponent.
The teamwith the most Championship Points is
the division winner.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6
Berwick 56, Pottsville 7
Coughlin 26, Hazleton Area 16
Crestwood 40, North Pocono 21
Lackawanna Trail 54, Hanover Area 40
Lake-Lehman 60, Montrose 0
Mid Valley 29, Wyoming Area 14
Mifin County 25, Williamsport 0
Nanticoke 48, Col-Montour Vo-Tech 0
Old Forge 49, Meyers 6
Scranton 34, Pittston Area 18
West Scranton 35, Tunkhannock 0
Wyo. Val. West 35, Delaware Valley 12
SATURDAY, SEPT. 11
Abington Heights 17, Dallas 0
Holy Redeemer 44, Holy Cross 20
Northwest 12, Susquehanna 7
Dunmore 48, GAR 7
FRIDAYS GAMES
(7 p.m.)
Abington Heights at Williamsport
Carbondale at GAR
Hanover Area at Lakeland
Hazleton Area at Delaware Valley
Holy Cross at Northwest
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Area
Meyers at Lackawanna Trail
Montrose at Tunkhannock
Pittston Area at Crestwood
Wyoming Valley West at Scranton
SATURDAYS GAMES
Nanticoke at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
Old Forge at Holy Redeemer, 1 p.m.
Berwick at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Western Wayne at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
WVC STANDI NGS
Anthony Maurent, GAR... 3...... 0....... 0 ....... 18
Tyler Burger, Nwt ............ 2...... 1........ 0 ....... 14
Zahir Dunell, Mey............ 2...... 1........ 0 ....... 14
Jef Skursky, WA.............. 2...... 1........ 0 ....... 14
Isaiah Taylor, Han............ 2...... 1........ 0 ....... 14
Nick Long, Nwt................ 2...... 0....... 0 ....... 12
Blake Balderramma, Nan1....... 1........ 0 ....... 8
Nate Mahalak, Mey ......... 1....... 1........ 0 ....... 8
Jimmy Strickland, HR..... 1....... 1........ 0 ....... 8
Pat Villani, HR.................. 1....... 1........ 0 ....... 8
Farrad Condry, WA.......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Antonio Ferrari, LL .......... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Jason Hoggarth, HR........ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Dustin Jones, LL.............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Mike Kremenic, Han........ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
JT Levandowski, Nan ...... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Tyler Long, LL.................. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Austin Mazonkey, Nwt .... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Matt Mitchell, Nwt........... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Stephen Morgan ............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Tyler Myers, Nan ............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Mark Robinson, Mey ....... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Charles Ross, HR ............ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Josh Sayre, LL................. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Eric Shorts, HR................ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Rich Sickler, GAR ............ 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
JimStuart, LL.................. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Elido Veras, Han .............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Darius Washington, HR... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Jordan Williams, Nan...... 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Bobby Wright, LL............. 1....... 0....... 0 ....... 6
Division 1 Division Overall
W L W L PF PA
Wallenpaupack 1 0 2 0 63 26
Abington Heights 0 0 2 0 45 0
Scranton 0 0 2 0 79 47
Scranton Prep 0 0 2 0 84 7
West Scranton 0 0 2 0 89 12
Delaware Valley 0 0 0 2 20 85
North Pocono 0 0 0 2 34 88
Valley View 0 1 1 1 26 56
Division 2 Division Overall
W L W L PF PA
Dunmore 0 0 2 0 96 20
Lakeland 0 0 1 1 48 45
Mid Valley 0 0 1 1 36 26
Western Wayne 0 0 1 1 25 69
Honesdale 0 1 0 2 45 57
Riverside 0 0 0 2 12 80
Division 3 Division Overall
W L W L PF PA
Carbondale 1 0 2 0 60 0
Lackawanna Trail 0 0 2 0 93 47
Old Forge 0 0 2 0 62 13
Holy Cross 0 0 0 2 27 101
Susquehanna 0 0 0 2 27 37
Montrose 0 1 0 2 0 104
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6
Carbondale 26, Riverside 0
Crestwood 40, North Pocono 21
Lackawanna Trail 54, Hanover Area 40
Lake-Lehman 60, Montrose 0
Mid Valley 29, Wyoming Area 14
Old Forge 49, Meyers 6
Scranton 34, Pittston Area 18
Valley View26, Lakeland 21
Wallenpaupack 28, Honesdale 26
West Scranton 35, Tunkhannock 0
Wyoming Valley West 35, Delaware Valley 12
SATURDAY, SEPT. 7
Abington Heights 17, Dallas 0
Dunmore 48, GAR 7
Holy Redeemer 44, Holy Cross 20
Northwest 12, Susquehanna 7
Scranton Prep 49, Western Wayne 0
FRIDAYS GAMES
(7 p.m.)
Abington Heights at Williamsport
Carbondale at GAR
Hanover Area at Lakeland
Hazleton Area at Delaware Valley
Holy Cross at Northwest
Honesdale at Valley View
Meyers at Lackawanna Trail
Montrose at Tunkhannock
North Pocono at Riverside
Scranton Prep at Mid Valley
Wallenpaupack at Allentown Dieruf
West Scranton at Dunmore
Wyoming Valley West at Scranton
SATURDAYS GAMES
Nanticoke at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
Old Forge at Holy Redeemer, 1 p.m.
Western Wayne at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
LACKAWANNA
CONFERENCE
MAJOR COLLEGE FOOTBALL
SI: Oklahoma St. players paid for play
Magazine details payments in frst of fve-part series on program
STILLWATER, Okla.
Boosters and assistant coaches
at Oklahoma State handed out
tens of thousands of dollars to
players for at least a decade
as the program grew into a
national power under coach-
es Les Miles and then Mike
Gundy, according to a Sports
Illustrated article released
Tuesday.
The article, which quoted
several former players by name,
said some players received
$2,000 to $10,000 annually,
with a few stars receiving
$25,000 or more. Eight play-
ers told SI they received cash,
while 29 others were named by
teammates as taking money.
The transgressions cited
stretched from 2001 until at
least 2011, the magazine said.
Oklahoma State said it has
notied the NCAA about the
report and launched its own
investigation.
Sports Illustrated said its
ve-part series included inter-
views with more than 60 for-
mer players who played for
Oklahoma State from 2001-10.
Among the allegations of mis-
conduct and potential NCAA
violations are:
An Oklahoma State assis-
tant coach, Joe DeForest, paid
cash bonuses to players of up
to $500 for performance.
Boosters and assistant
coaches funneled money to
players and provided sham jobs
for which players were paid.
Tutors and school person-
nel completed school work for
players and professors gave
passing grades for little or no
work.
The programs drug policy
was selectively enforced, allow-
ing some players to go unpun-
ished for repeated positive
tests.
Some members of a host-
ess program used by the foot-
ball coaching staff had sex with
recruits.
NCAA rules bar boosters
from providing cash or other
benets based on athletic
performance. NCAA spokes-
woman Emily Potter declined
comment when asked about
Oklahoma State, citing the
organizations longstanding
policy.
SI reported that eight for-
mer Cowboys told the maga-
zine they had received cash
paymentsand 29 others were
named by teammates as having
also taken money.
Former player Calvin
Mickens said he was handed
cash in the locker room by a
stranger after Oklahoma States
2005 season-opening victory, a
game in which he played well.
I was like, Wow, this is the
life! Mickens told SI. Im 18,
playing football and I just got
$200.
He said he got money at other
times, including $800 later that
season after the game at Texas
A&M, and saw teammates get-
ting similar handouts. Former
defensive tackle Brad Girtman
said he saw some star players
get monster payments, while
he once received $500 from a
member of the football staff.
Miles has said he didnt know
of any improprieties while he
was the Oklahoma State coach.
I can tell you this: We have
always done things right, he
said after LSUs game Saturday
night in Baton Rouge, La.
ONLINE
To read the report, go to:
http://tinyurl.com/onq94bn
The Associated Press
Aggies
brace for
Round 2
Heisman winner Manziel
quiet as Bama game
approaches
KRISTIE RIEKEN
AP Sports Writer
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
Everything went right for
No. 6 Texas A&M in last years
upset of top-ranked Alabama
that helped launch Johnny
Manziels run to the Heisman
Trophy.
As the
Aggies pre-
pare for the
rematch, they
insist its
just another
game, saying
it so much it
almost seems as if they are try-
ing to convince themselves.
But no matter how much
they repeat the sentiment thats
being fed to them by coach
Kevin Sumlin and the rest of
the staff, everyone knows that
it isnt just another game. Its
arguably the biggest game in
the programs history.
As much as Sumlin tries to
downplay the hype surround-
ing this week, even those in his
family arent buying that its
business as usual. He said his
9- and 11-year-old sons watch
television and see all the satel-
lite trucks parked near the sta-
dium.
They recognize how big
things are, he said with a
laugh.
Things have changed dras-
tically for the Aggies since
last years meeting with the
two-time defending national
champion. The biggest dif-
ference is the focus on their
captivating Heisman Trophy-
winning quarterback. Interest
in Manziel has reached such a
fever pitch that CBS will have
a camera focused solely on him
for the entirety of Saturdays
game, which theyve dubbed
the Johnny Cam.
Sumlin understands the extra
attention paid to Manziel. But
he certainly doesnt like it.
Everything that we do
here at Texas A&M is about
team and its about building
our team, building our pro-
gram and not the individual,
Sumlin said. Saturday after-
noon youre going to have two
football teams, and I just dont
understand why theres got to
be one guy singled out with a
camera.
Manziel spoke after
Saturdays win over Sam
Houston State for the rst time
since SEC media day. Many
expected him to talk about
Alabama on Tuesday, but he
was not made available. The
reason, according to Sumlin,
was out of his hands.
He and his family and his
advisors and lawyers have
advised him not to talk and
Ill respect his wishes on that,
Sumlin said.
UP NEXT
Alabama at
Texas A&M
3:30 p.m.
Saturday
CBS
Despite Kellys big talk in preseason,
Irish still having problems scoring touchdowns
AP photo
Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees talks with head coach Brian Kelly on the sideline during a break in the first
quarter of a college football game with Michigan, in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Saturday.
ND struggling in the red zone
SOUTH BEND, Ind.
Notre Dame is still struggling
to get from the red zone to the
end zone.
Coach Brian Kelly thought
the No. 21 Fighting Irish (1-1)
would improve, saying con-
dently during the preseason
that Tommy Rees would do a
better job of making decisions
that would make them more
efcient in the red zone. Last
season, they were a disappoint-
ing 70th in the nation, convert-
ing on 80 percent of their scor-
ing chances.
Two games into this season,
though, the Irish are tied for
111th in red zone offense, con-
verting on just four of seven
chances and only three were
touchdowns. Kelly said during
his weekly news conference
Tuesday that the problem is
players executing plays.
It comes down to perfor-
mance. It comes down to prac-
tice and preparation. We have
to continue to work on those
things, he said.
Kelly was clearly displeased
with Rees decision to try
to force a throw to running
back Amir Carlisle, who was
covered, late in the Michigan
game on rst-and-goal from the
6-yard line. The ball glanced
off Carlisles hands, ricocheted
off of Michigan cornerback
Raymon Taylors leg and was
intercepted in the end zone by
cornerback Blake Countess.
Earlier in the quarter, Notre
Dame receiver DaVaris Daniels
was hit by Taylor the moment a
quick pass landed in his hands,
tackled for a 2-yard loss on
third-and-2 from the Wolverine
15. Kelly decided to go for it
on fourth-and-4, but the pass
by Rees was out of reach for
the diving TJ Jones in the end
zone.
All three failed attempts
came on passes, as the Irish
called 12 passing plays in the
13 plays they had in the red
zone. Overall, the Irish passed
on 74 percent of their offensive
plays against the Wolverines.
Kelly said it was because
Michigan was forcing the Irish
to throw by placing eight men
or more near the line of scrim-
mage.
I want balance just like
everybody else in America
wants balance. But look, we
have to throw the ball effec-
tively when we are called upon
to throw the ball, and we have
to run the ball effectively when
we are called upon to run effec-
tively, he said.
Kelly said hes not worried
that other teams will try to fol-
low Michigans model and try
to force the Irish to depend on
the pass.
I wouldnt say that were
that far away from being very
efcient at it. I would welcome
it every single week. I think
were close, if not right there,
he said. I mean, were a step
away here; were an alignment
away here or there. Were a
check away. Im very confdent
that if you want to play us that
way, were going to beat you.
Kelly got a bit testy during
the news conference as he kept
getting asked about what went
wrong at Michigan, instead
of about the upcoming game
against Purdue, saying at one
point: I would like to move on
here, sooner or later.
Kelly tread carefully when
asked if he regards Purdue as a
rivalry kind of game.
Kelly answered by saying the
Irish will be focused more on
themselves this week.
I dont want to minimize the
fact that were playing Purdue,
because I think that we clearly
understand who they are as a
Big Ten opponent, somebody
within our state, and the natu-
ral rivalry because weve played
so much, he said.
TOM COYNE
Associated Press
UP NEXT
Notre Dame at Purdue
8 p.m. Saturday
ABC
PAGE 2B Wednesday, September 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
AFC North
of to bad
start, 0-4
JOE KAY
APSports Writer
CINCINNATI Bengals
coach Marvin Lewis
watched a little video of
Pittsburghs season-opening
disaster and felt a kinship
with the failure.
I just watched the rst
half of their game and Im
sure they feel the same way
we do, Lewis said.
Not just them. Theyre all
feeling the blues this week
in the AFC North.
All four teams in the
NFLs most successful divi-
sion over the last ve years
have started the season at
0-1. Its only the second time
thats happened, according
to STATS LLC. The other
time? Way back in 2002,
when the league went to the
current division format.
And its not just that all
four lost, its how they lost:
The defending Super
Bowl-champion Baltimore
Ravens went back to Denver,
the scene of their improbable
playoff comeback last sea-
son, and had their revamped
defense get taken apart for
a record-seven touchdown
passes by Peyton Manning
in a 49-27 rout.
Over in Pittsburgh, the
towel-waving crowd at Heinz
Field put those towels away
and led out quietly near
the end of a shocking 16-9
loss to the Titans that was in
most ways the worst of the
divisions opening ops.
In Cleveland, the
Browns did their annual
looking-a-little-better tease
before falling apart and
losing to the Dolphins
23-10, dropping their ninth
straight opener and their
14th in the last 15 years.
Lewis team actually
looked the best of the bunch
before bungling one away
in Chicago, 24-21, with per-
sonal fouls, wasted timeouts
and turnovers.
None of them looked like
a playoff-caliber team for
very long.
Weve got a lot of work
to do, Steelers coach Mike
Tomlin said. Nobody cares
about our problems. Theyre
glad weve got them. We
need to understand that. We
need to stick together and
persevere.
The Steelers might have
the toughest go of it. They
missed out on the playoffs
last season by nishing 8-8,
unable to run the ball con-
sistently or protect quar-
terback Ben Roethlisberger.
They drafted LeVeon Bell
to boost the running game,
but he got hurt during
camp. Pittsburgh ran for
only 32 yards in the opener
and Roethlisberger was
sacked ve times.
Worse, Pro Bowl center
Maurkice Pouncey tore liga-
ments in his right knee and
linebacker Larry Foote rup-
tured his right biceps, end-
ing their seasons.
Up next: a Monday night
game in Cincinnati against
the Bengals and former
Steelers linebacker James
Harrison. Pittsburgh hasnt
opened a season 0-2 since
2002.
The Bengals looked good
in the rst half at Chicago
before reverting to their
old Bungles ways. The nal
ub was linebacker Rey
Mauaulga a team cap-
tain last season throwing
down a Bears defender after
the whistle for a penalty that
allowed Chicago to run out
the clock.
AP photo
Cleveland Browns quarterback
Brandon Weeden (3) walks off
the field with linebacker DQwell
Jackson after a 23-10 loss to
the Dolphins Sunday. Weeden
threw three interceptions.
Meyers rolls past Berwick
JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE It was just
the start the Mohawks were look-
ing for.
Meyers scored on its rst shot
and didnt look back in a 4-0 vic-
tory over Berwick in WVC eld
hockey Tuesday.
A sigh of relief, rst-year
Meyers coach Allison Banks said
of getting a quick lead. You know
your team is up and pushing hard.
You get that goal and you want
them to keep it up.
The game was just 58 seconds
old when Bri DiMaggio set up
Michelle Chavez for a shot from
the right wing that opened the
scoring. It was the perfect spark in
a battle of two unbeaten teams in
divisional play early in the season.
It was also the goal that allowed
the Mohawks (2-0 in WVC
Division 2) to continue an unbeat-
en streak against the Bulldogs that
goes back to when the current
players were in elementary school.
It wasnt Berwicks day, but
that was set before the team bus
arrived in the city. Bulldogs (2-1)
players are battling a bug, which
combined with the sudden onset
of summer weather, sapped much
of the energy that was evident in
wins over Elk Lake and GAR in
the seasons rst week.
Our girls were just not into it,
Berwick coach Brandi Bertollo
said. We have a lot of sickness
going around. It was unfortunate
were just riddled with illness
right now.
The Mohawks struggled to
solve Berwick keeper Lizzie Dyer
despite the advantage on the eld.
Meyers had nine of the 10 penalty
corners called in the rst half and
generated 10 of the games rst 13
shots.
Finally, on a corner as time
expired in the half, Sydney Rentsch
delivered a blast off the injection
pass from Allison Berman to give
Meyers a two-goal edge.
A goal like that is just momen-
tum so much momentum enter-
ing the second half, Banks said.
Youre up 2-0 at the half. You can
play defense. Everyone gets a lift
from it.
Berman tipped a shot by Rentsch
ve minutes into the second half
for the Mohawks third goal. And
DiMaggio added a marker with a
running drive that skipped under
Dyer as she came sliding out of
the cage to challenge the shot.
Meanwhile, Berwick did its
best to regroup at halftime. Allie
Katsock and Kylene Welsh had
good chances on corners turned
aside. Alexis Steeber tipped a
drive by Mady Readler just wide
and Kasey Rood had two shots
from in front stuffed by Meyers
keeper Sabrina Robertson, who
nished with four saves.
This is going to be a team to
be reckoned with, Bertollo said.
But you have to give credit to
Meyers. They played phenomenal-
ly. You cant take anything away
from how well they played.
At one point during the balmy
second half, Berwick had eight
players at mideld waiting to
enter play as both teams substi-
tuted liberally.
Patriots star Barber reaches milestone in soccer
The Times Leader staf
FREELAND In a
match against MMI Prep
Monday, Pittston Area girls
soccer player Allie Barber
scored her 100th career
goal.
Barber needed four goals
to accomplish the feat and
did just that to lead Pittston
Area to a 14-2 victory over
MMI Prep.
Barber will try to add to
her total Thursday against
Hanover Area.
H.S. GOLF
Holy Redeemer 146,
Wyoming Seminary 179
Mariano Medico,
Mike Boland and Chase
Makowski each shot
even par-36 to lead Holy
Redeemer to a victory over
Wyoming Seminary.
Andrew Crossin added
a round of 38 for Holy
Redeemer in the win.
Jon Zirnheld led
Wyoming Seminary with a
40, while Jarod Godlewski
added a 44 in the loss.
Pittston Area 179,
Hazleton Area 192
Tyler McGarry earned
medalist honors, shooting a
42, as Pittston Area defeat-
ed Hazleton Area.
Tyler Mooney added a 43
Pittston Area, while David
Zydko recorded a 46 in the
victory.
Rich Gawel led Hazleton
Area, shooting a 43 in the
loss.
Hanover Area 166, GAR 196
Matt Kuhl and Mike
Steve each shot 39s to lead
Hanover Area to a victory
over GAR.
Fred Schiel added 40 for
Hanover Area, while Shelby
Monk chipped in a 48 in the
win.
Michael Rowe led GAR,
recording a 45 in the loss.
H.S. GIRLS TENNIS
Pittston Area 4, GAR 1
Haleigh Zurek, Claudia
Shandra and Mykhaela
Moher won their singles
matches to lead Pittston
Area to a victory over GAR.
The Pittston Area team
of Sara OHop and Sarah
Velehoski added a straight-
set victory in doubles.
Diane Lopez and
Josmalyn Rivas teamed
up for GARs lone win in a
straight-set doubles victory.
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Crestwood 3, GAR 0
Nicole and Olivia
Jankowski combined for
32 service points, 13 aces
and 18 assists to lead
Crestwood to a victory over
GAR.
Emily Sipple added
11 service points, nine
aces and seven assists for
Crestwood.
Vanessa Florez led GAR
with ve assists and three
digs in the loss.
Delaware Valley 3,
Hanover Area 0
Taylor Brawagl logged 11
kills and 22 service points
to lead Delaware Valley to a
victory over Hanover Area.
Marisa Balcarel added 16
service points for Delaware
Valley, while Nicole
Simerson chipped in six
kills in the win.
Heather Grady, Cheyanne
Fine and Maddy McAnney
recored four digs apiece for
Hanover Area in the loss.
North Pocono 3,
Hazleton Area 0
Alvia Robuts recorded
six kills, while Kristie
Kashach added 11 assists
as Hazleton Area lost in
straight sets to North
Pocono.
Julia Ruderko logged
three blocks for Hazleton
Area, while Maggie Boro
chipped in ve digs in the
loss.
Amanda Hall had 23
assists and 17 service
points for North Pocono in
the victory.
Holy Redeemer 3,
Lake-Lehman 0
Lauren and Nicole
Slavoski combined for 18
kills and 23 service points
to lead Holy Redeemer to
a straight-set victory over
Lake-Lehman.
Courtney Kijek added 12
assists and one kill, while
Alyssa Platko chipped in six
kills.
Maria Chinikaylo led
Lake-Lehman with two
kills, two blocks and six
assists for Lake-Lehman in
the loss.
H.S. GOLF
Holy Redeemer 146, Wyoming Seminary 179
at Huntsville Golf Club, par 36
HR (146) Mariano Medico 36, Mike Boland
36, Chase Makowski 36, AndrewCrossin 38
SEM(179) Jon Zirnheld 40, Jarod Godlews-
ki 44, AndrewGolden 47, Marc Lafond 48
Pittston Area 179, Hazleton Area 192
at Fox Hill Golf Course, par 35
PITT (179) Tyler McGarry 42, Tyler Mooney
43, David Zydko 46, Tyler Mullin 48, Braulio Gar-
cia 48
HAZ (192) Rich Gawel 43, Josh Provost 46,
Geran Triano 50, Anthony Sidari 53
Hanover Area 166, GAR 196
at Hollenback Golf Course, par 33
HAN (166) Matt Kuhl 39, Mike Steve 39,
Fred Schiel Jr. 40, Shelby Monk 48
GAR (196) Michael Rowe 45, Eric Krzywicki
48, Sean Paul Williamson 51, Steven Tyson 52
H.S. TENNIS
Pittston Area 4, GAR 1
Singles: Haleigh Zurek (P) d. Leticia Izaguari
6-2, 6-1; Claudia Shandra (P) d. Raquel Sosa 6-3,
6-4; Mykhaela Moher (P) d. Vanessa Castillo 6-3,
2-6, 6-4. Doubles: Diane Lopez/Josmalyn Rivas
(G) d. Tatiana Supinski/Kari Scull 6-4, 6-4; Sara
OHop/Sarah Velehoski (P) d. Gisele Huertero/
Jessica Valencia 6-1, 6-2.
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Crestwood 3, GAR 0
Crestwood 25 25 25
GAR 14 8 10
CRE: Nicole Jankowski 21 service points, 10
aces; Emily Sipple 11 service points, 9 aces, 7 as-
sists; Olivia Jankowski 11 service points, 4 aces,
11 assists.
GAR: Vanessa Florez 5 assists, 3 digs; Aaron
Scafella 2 kills, 1 ace, 2 digs.
Delaware Valley 3, Hanover Area 0
Delaware Valley 25 25 25
Hanover Area 4 6 4
DEL: Marisa Balcarcel 16 service points;
Taylor Brawagl 11 kills, 22 service points; Nicole
Simerson 6 kills.
HAN: Heather Grady 4 digs; Cheyanne Fine 4
digs; Maddy McAnney 4 digs.
North Pocono 3, Hazleton Area 0
Hazleton Area 21 15 15
North Pocono 25 25 25
HAZ: Alvia Robuts 6 kills; Kristie Kashach 11
assists; Julia Ruderko 3 blocks; Maggie Boro 5
digs.
NP: Amanda Hall 23 assists, 17 service points;
Emily Cook 7 kills.
Holy Redeemer 3, Lake-Lehman 0
Lake-Lehman 18 11 21
Holy Redeemer 25 25 25
LEH: Danae Sutlif 3 kills, 4 service points;
Lexi Oplinger 2 kills, 5 service points, 1 dig; Maria
Chinikaylo 2 kills, 2 blocks, 6 assists.
HR: Lauren Slavoski 11 kills, 4blocks, 6service
points; Nicole Slavoski 7 kills, 17 service points,
6 aces; Courtney Kijek 12 assists, 1 kill; Alyssa
Platko 6 kills.
Late goal lifts Wyoming Area over Berwick
The Times Leader staf
EXETER A.J.
Lenkaitis scored the only
goal of the game to lead
Wyoming Area to a 1-0
victory over Berwick on
Monday in a Wyoming
Valley Conference Division
III boys soccer game.
Aaron Carter had six
saves in the shutout.
Lenkaitis goal came in the
64th minute and was unas-
sisted.
Erickson Vasquez
stopped 16 shots in goal
for Berwick in the loss.
Wyoming Seminary 5,
Hanover Area 2
Andiry Molchanov and
Andrew Drewchin scored
two goals apiece to lead
Wyoming Seminary to the
victory over Hanover Area.
Andrew Kim added
two assists in the win,
while Chris Kim chipped
in a goal for Wyoming
Seminary.
Hanover Area goalie Joe
Gagliardi highlighted the
game, scoring from the
opposite end of the eld on
a kick that bounced over
the opposing goalies head
and into the net. Gagliardi
added 15 saves in the loss.
Dallas 4, Hazleton Area 0
Zach Goodwin recorded
a goal and an assist to lead
Dallas to a shutout victory
over Hazleton Area.
Aleskey Gigelson added
two assists for Dallas, while
Brandon Scharff, Donald
Michilisin and Christian
Kimmerle chipped in a goal
apiece in the win.
Caleb Ancharski had 12
saves for Hazleton Area in
the loss.
Crestwood 7, Meyers 0
Freshman Kyle Gegaris
scored four goals and
dished out one assist to
lead Crestwood to a shut-
out victory over Meyers.
John Andrews added
one goal and two assists
for Crestwood, while Matt
Wimpfheimer and Alex
Buchholz chipped in one
goal apiece.
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Berwick keeper Erickson Vasquez blocks a shot by A.J. Lenkaitis of Wyoming Area.
Kachinko victorious in home return
TheTimes Leader staf
WILKES-BARRE In
Bernie Kachinkos return
to Scandlon Gymnasium,
Emily Heimbecker logged
12 kills, ve digs and one
ace to lead Kings College
to a straight-set victory
over Penn State-Hazleton
to remain undefeated on
the season.
Kachinko retired in 2009
after 21 years of coaching
the womens volleyball
team at Kings. The Lady
Monarchs didnt spoil his
rst game back in Scandlon
Gymnasium since Oct. 30,
2009, winning each set by
scores of 25-16, 25-13 and
25-18.
Mary Loughran dished
out 28 assists, three aces
and four digs for Kings,
while Jessica Carr added
six kills and one block in
the victory.
Susquehanna 3, Wilkes 0
Casey Bohan led Wilkes-
University with a team-high
eight kills and two blocks
as the Lady Colonels lost
25-18, 25-14 and 25-17 to
Susquehanna University.
Paige Trusty added ve
kills for Wilkes, while Erin
Nothstein chipped in nine
digs in the loss.
Misericordia
After his rst season with
the team, Shane McGrady
stepped down as head vol-
leyball coach citing personal
reasons.
SOCCER
PSU-Wilkes-Barre 4,
PSU-Worthington 0
Mark Bugelholl, David
Cavalieri, Raul Ortiz and
Zamir Vallecillo scored one
goal apiece to lead Penn
State Wilkes to a win at
home.
PSU Wilkes-Barre will
face off against Penn State
Brandywine at 1 p.m.
Saturday at home.
Misericordia
Erin McGreal, Maureen
Ciccosanti and Barry
Fitzgerald earned Freedom
Conference honors.
Erin McGreal earned
Womens Soccer Player of
the Week, while teammate
Maureen Ciccosanti was
named Goalkeeper of the
Week.
Barry Fitzgerald earned
Goalkeeper of the Week on
the mens side.
McGreal scored four
goals, including a hat
trick, while Ciccosanti
allowed just one goal in
an undefeated week for
Misericordia. Fitzgerald
recorded two shutouts to
lead the Cougars to two
victories.
Wilkes
After recording three
goals and one assist in
three games, Wilkes
junior Eric McAnena
earned Freedom
Conference Mens Soccer
Player of the Week.
McAnenas offen-
sive production led to
two Colonels victories,
including two goals in
comeback victory over
Stevenson.
FIELD HOCKEY
Alvernia 2, Misericordia 1 OT
Jenn ONeill scored the
lone goal for the Lady
Cougars. Hannah Harvey
added an assist in the loss.
TENNIS
Misericordia 9, Keystone 0
Emily Hullings earned
victories in her singles
and doubles match to lead
Misericordia.
Michelle Cameron,
Breanne Phillips, Emily
Gherghel, Bridget Boyle
and Megan Myers added
singles wins for the Lady
Cougars.
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Wyoming Area 1, Berwick 0
Berwick 0 0 0
Wyoming Area 0 1 1
Second half 1. WAA.J. Lenkaitis, 64th minute.
ShotsBER6; WA18. SavesBER16(Erickson
Vasquez); WA6 (Aaron Carter). Corners kicks
BER 3; WA5.
Wyoming Seminary 5, Hanover Area 2
Wyoming Seminary 3 2 5
Hanover Area 1 1 2
First half 1. HAN Matt Clemons, 38:05; 2.
SEM Andrew Drewchin (Andrew Kim), 35:54; 3.
SEM Chris Kim, 15:05; 4. SEM Andiry Molchanov
(Eduardo Luguna), 6:42. Second half 5. SEM
Drewchin (Andrew Schukrast), 16:20; 6. HANJoe
Gagliardi, 10:15; 7. SEMMolchanov (Kim), 9:07.
Shots SEM27; HAN13. Saves SEM8(Will
Kozar); HAN 15 (Joe Gagliardi). Corners kicks
SEM6; HAN4.
Dallas 4, Hazleton Area 0
Hazleton Area 0 0 0
Dallas 1 3 4
First half 1. DAL Brandon Scharf, 59th
minute; Second half 2. DAL Donald Michilisin
(Zach Goodwin), 39th minute; 3. DAL Goodwin
(Aleskey Gigelson), 11th minute; 4. DAL Christian
Kimmerle (Gigelson), 2nd minute.
Shots HAZ 6; DAL 34. Saves HAZ 12
(Caleb Ancharski); DAL 6 (Rory Mullin). Corners
kicks HAZ1; DAL9.
Crestwood 7, Meyers 0
Meyers 0 0 0
Crestwood 6 1 7
First half 1. CRE Kyle Gegaris (John An-
drews), 3:40; 2. CRE Gegaris (Sam Skonieczki),
7:00; 3. CRE Gegaris (Casey Ritsick), 18:00; 4.
Alex Buccholz (Andrews), 22:00; 5. Matt Wimp-
fheimer (Gegaris), 28:00; 6. Gegaris (Andrews),
35:00; Second half 7. Andrews (SamSkoniec-
zki), 50:00.
Shots MEY 10; CRE 35. Saves MEY 20;
CRE 7 (Lance Lysiak, Curtis Tokach). Corners
kicks MEY4; CRE 8.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Ashton Mensinger of Berwick, left, and Bri DiMaggio of Meyers battle for the ball at
midfield during Tuesdays WVC girls high school field hockey game in Wilkes-Barre.
Meyers 4, Berwick 0
Berwick 0 0 0
Meyers 2 2 4
First half 1. MEY, Michelle Chavez (Bri
DiMaggio), 29:02; 2. MEY, Sydney Rentsch,
:00. Second half 3. MEY, Allison Berman,
24:48; 4. MEY, DiMaggio, 11:03.
Shots BER 6; MEY 19. Saves BER 13
(Lizzie Dyer); MEY 4 (Sabrina Robertson 4,
Cameron Robertson 0). Defensive save: MEY,
Barbara Guirin. Penalty corners BER 4;
MEY 15.
Pittston Area 3, Hanover Area 1
The Patriots remained unbeaten in Division
2 play behind two goals and an assist by Dana
Maurizi. Alana Platukus added the game-win-
ning goal late in the first half.
Marissa Keegan scored for the Hawkeyes to
spoil the shutout.
Tunkhannock 3, GAR 2, OT
Maggie Johns scored the game-winning
goal in overtime to lead Tunkhannock to a vic-
tory over GAR.
Haley Toczko and Kailey Reposa added a
goal and an assist apiece for Tunkhannock in
the victory.
Brea Seabrook and Kristen Drozda led GAR,
each recording a goal and an assist in the loss.
Pittston Area 3, Hanover Area 1
Hanover Area 0 1 1
Pittston Area 2 1 3
First half 1. PIT, Dana Maurizi (Emily
Herron), 7:56; 2. PIT, Alana Platukus (Maurizi),
6:18. Second half 3. PIT, Maurizi, 21:39; 4.
HAN, Marissa Keegan, 3:36.
Shots HAN 6; PIT 18. Saves HAN 11
(Haylee Bobos, Regina Deno); PIT 5 (Lea
Garibaldi 3, Liz Baiera 2). Penalty corners
HAN 5; PIT 9.
Tunkhannock 3, GAR 2
Tunkhannock 1 1 1 3
GAR 0 2 0 2
First half 1. TUNK, Kailey Reposa (Haley
Toczko), 4:48. Second half 2. GAR, Kris-
ten Drozda (Brea Seabrook), 29:12; 3. TUNK,
Toczko (Reposa), 16:26; 4. GAR, Seabrook
(Drozda), 11:27. Overtime 5. TUNK, Maggie
Johns, 4:59.
Shots TUNK 14, GAR 10 Saves TUNK 7
(Mary Sickler); GAR 8 (Brittany Vital). Penalty
corners TUNK 13; GAR 6.
PAGE 7B Wednesday, September 11, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
WVC H.S. GirlS SoCCer CapSuleS
Berwick
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
15-0/WVCChampions
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost to
ScrantonPrep6-1 inDistrict 2
championship; Lost toTrinity
(CampHill) 2-0infrst roundof
PIAAs
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Paul DiPippa
Home feld: CrispinField/Salem
Elementary Field
players to watch: Senior - Allison
Rinehimer; Juniors- Brianna
Floryshak, Olivia Conklin, Olivia
Seeley, OliviaWatkins, Carly
Montecalvo, Priscilla Mitchell,
NicoleTaylor.
Coachs outlook: Nothinghas
changedas far as layout goes. We
expect tocompete for the district
title likewe have for the past four
years. These girls have beenplaying
together somuchsince theyve
beenyoung. They knowhowtoplay
together.
Coughlin
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
10-3-2/Fifth
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 6-0to
Dallas inquarters
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Joe Spagnuolo
Home feld: SolomonPlainsJunior
HighSchool
players to watch: Seniors -
Jasmine Barreto, KaitlynPearage,
Nora Fazzi, Katrina Kaeser,
StephanieYankoksi; Juniors - Julia
Miller, MeganLercara, Amber
Colleran; Sophomores- Breanne
Georgette, Hailee Dumont, Mary
Tona, Emma Sukowaski, Casey
Lello, Cassidy Steligo
outlook: After a rebuildingyear,
Coughlinbrings back some of the
topmidfelders andforwards inthe
league. They display speedandthe
ability tostrike fromoutside the
penalty box.
Crestwood
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
6-7-2/Ninth
Fall 2012 postseason: None
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Russ Kile
Home feld: Football stadium
players to watch: Seniors - Gabby
Termini, MegWhite, MorganKile,
Rachael Lackenmier, Autumn
Atkinson, Allie Kachel; Juniors -
OliviaTermini, Natalie Sulkowski
outlook: The Comets hadan
outstandingspringseasonbut feld
hockey andinjuries hamperedthem
more thanany other team. Look for
Crestwoodtoreboundandshake
the traditional soccer powers this
season. MorganKilewill juggle feld
hockey andsoccer andcouldbe a
diference maker.
Dallas
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
14-1/Second
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 4-1 to
ScrantonPrepindistrict semis
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Abe Lewis
Home feld: HighSchool, Michael
Cleary Field
players to watch: Juniors - Sydney
Emershaw, MF; Ruby Mattson,
MF; CourtneyWagner, D; Talia
Szatkowski, F; Ashley Strazdus, F;
Sophomore - TifanyZukosky, MF
Coachs outlook: We have a
youngbut talentedteam. We should
be one of the teams tocompete
for the league title. If we make
progress, we shouldhave a good
showingfor the district title.
Hanover area
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
4-9-2/11th
Fall 2012 postseason: None
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Brian Bannon
Home feld: Football stadium/
Hanover Area soccer feld
players to watch: Seniors - Caitlyn
Bogart, M; Junior - Larissa Bannon,
F
outlook: The Hawkeyes stumbled
down the stretch last year. Hanover
Area showed good movement of
the ball and could take some of the
positives last season, most notably
its midfeld play, and parlay it into a
winning season.
Hazletonarea
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
4-11/12th
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 8-0to
Wallenpaupack in district semis
Classifcation: 3A
Coach: JimPaisley
Home feld: Maple Manor Complex
(Bishop Hafey feld)
players to watch: Junior - Hayley
Wilkinson, GK; JosieZapotosky,
M; Emily Malone, D. Sophomore -
Madison Polumbo, M.
Coachs outlook: The teamis
taking formand are ready for this
newyears challenge. Our Goal is to
improve fromlast season, working
together through communication,
delivering an upset win over one of
the traditional powerhouse teams,
and going deeper into the District
2 playofs.
Holy redeemer
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
10-4-1/Sixth
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 2-1 to
ValleyViewin district play-in game
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Bob Hughes
Home feld: EddieWhite Field,
Parsons, Wilkes-Barre
players to watch: Senior -
Nina Paoloni, D. Juniors - Emily
Schramm, M; Olivia Gregorio,
M; Lauren Manganello, M;
Sophomores - Lydia Lawson, F;
LeeannWasiakowski, D; Alyson
Manley, D; GabbyTomasura, GK
Coachs outlook: We are looking
to build ofof a good season last
year, we are a young teamand
are having some good battles for
starting spots. We hope to build
teamchemistry and roster depth
early in the season and earn a
playofspot in districts.
lake-lehman
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
11-4/Fourth
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 1-0to
Berwick in district semis
Classifcation: 2A
Home feld: Football stadium
Coach: KellyAdamshick
players to watch: Seniors -
Shoshana Mahoney, Emily Sutton,
Kaylee Hillard
outlook: Lake-Lehman played in
a diferent element late in the year
compared to the beginning of the
season. Expect Sutton to become
one of the stronger players in the
conference. The teamhosts the
best wealth of senior experience
in the league, and Mahoney is a
nature-born forward.
Meyers
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:1-
14/15th
Fall 2012 postseason: None
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Thomas LeightonJr.
Home feld: GordonAvenue
players to watch: n/a
outlook: n/a
MMi prep
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
0-15/16th
Fall 2012 postseason: none
Classifcation: 1A
Coach: Nino Campagna
Home feld: MMI Prep feld,
Freeland
players to watch: Mikayla Dov
Nanticoke
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
3-12/14th
Fall 2012 postseason: none
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Rich Compton
Home feld: Football stadium
players to watch: n/a
outlook: n/a
pittstonarea
Fall 2012WVC record/Finish:
12-3/Third
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost to
Lake-Lehman 3-1 in frst round of
districts
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: NicoleTieso
Home feld: Primary Center, Rock
St., Hughestown
players to watch: Juniors - Allie
Barber, F; Katelyn Pugliese, D;
Megan Karuzie, D; LizWaleski,
M; Olivia Giambra, M; Carly
Filipski, M; Madison Cardinale, M;
Sophomores - Maddy Mimnaugh,
F; SamMayers, M; TifanyTubioli, D
Coachs outlook: We have been
working very hard this preseason.
We have a number of returning
players on ofense and defense
which gives us more experience on
the feld. We are looking to improve
on our season last year, andwe
hope to make it back to district
playofs.dd
Tunkhannock
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
5-8-2/Tenth
Fall 2012 postseason: none
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: KaaronYablonski
Home feld: RoslundElementary,
Rte. 29
players to watch: Seniors -
Cheyenne Brown, F; Casey Madden,
M; Cassi Werner, F; Juniors - Jessie
Ide, D; Traci Kromko, GK; Lexi
Tinna, D; AlysonWilbur, M; Maegan
Wrubel, M
Coachs outlook: I look forward
toplayingthose teams that we had
close games withlast year. When
youonly get toplay eachteam
once, it makes it difcult totry and
eventhe score. We have a goodcore
groupreturningandwe hope to
buildonthe things that we didwell
onlast year.
Wyomingarea
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
8-7/Eighth
Fall 2012 postseason: None
Classifcation: 2A
Coach: Mike Sokolas
Home feld: 10thStreet, Wyoming
players to watch: n/a
outlook: n/a
Wyoming Seminary
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
3-10-2/12th
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 3-0to
Lakelandinthe district quarters
Classifcation: 1A
Coach: ErinGrifn
Home feld: Nesbitt Field
players to watch: Seniors -
ChristinaThomas, M/D; Jamila
Wemple, F. Juniors - Bethany
Carpenter, MF; Meera Patel, M/D
Coachs outlook: We have a
youngteam, andwe needtoput a
lot of practice intoall positions. The
girls have beendedicatedandare
workinghard, andtheyre all looking
forwardtogettingintogame shape.
WyomingValleyWest
Fall 2012WVCrecord/Finish:
8-6-1/Seventh
Fall 2012 postseason: Lost 3-0to
Williamsport indistrict quarters
Classifcation: 3A
Coach: Mike Davitt
Home feld: SpartanStadium
players to watch: Seniors - Caris
Bevan, F; ElizabethHofman, M;
Summer McDonnell, M; Juniors
- Paige Heckman, GK; Caitlin
Hargrave, D; Alexis Pileggi, M;
Rebecca Ritsick, D; Alyssa Shaver, F;
Holly Langley, D; AshlynFinnegan, D
Coachs outlook: We are ayear
older withmore experience. Our
teamis lookingtotake the next
stepandstart becomingmore
consistent.
11 assists for 45 points.
Takes aggressive approach
to the ball and can be a
game-changer late in the
season.
*Talia Szatkowski, junior
midelder, Dallas - The
Mountaineers will depend
much more on Szatkowski
on offense with the gradu-
ation of Ashley Dunbar.
Played defense last season
with 14 goals and an assist
to her name.
*Mary Tona, sopho-
more forward, Coughlin
- Quickly established her-
self as a player with nesse
and goal-scoring ability for
a team that lost much of
its offense to graduation.
Netted 14 goals, eight
assists and 36 points as a
freshman.
*Tiffany Tubioli, sopho-
more sweeper, Pittston
Area - Boasts a strong
leg that creates fast-break
opportunities for the
Patriots high-scoring
offense. Generates sup-
port for Barber and Madde
Mimnaugh.
*Hayley Wilkinson,
junior goalkeeper,
Hazleton Area - Showcased
herself as the conferences
top keeper in the fall.
Made nine saves leading
to an upset victory over
Delaware Valley in the
District 2 Class 3A tour-
nament. Finished with an
average of 11.6 stops per
game, including 27 against
Lake-Lehman.
Scouting the WVC
Graduation deplet-
ed much of defending
WVC champion Berwick
Bulldogs, and they are
left without the likes of
last years player of the
year Kelly Sheptock. The
Bulldogs are still intact
with experience, led by
junior Brianna Floryshak
and a defense that let up
three goals in 15 regular
season games a 0.2
goals-against average.
Berwick did not trail for
its rst 17 games.
Dallas is without its lead-
ing scorer but still brings a
number of scoring options
in Talia Szatkowski,
Wendy Greenwood and
Ashley Strazdus.
Pittston Area and Lake-
Lehman generated an
interesting rivalry last
season. The Black Knights
rebounded from an early-
season blowout to surprise
the Patriots 3-1 in the rst
round of districts. Lake-
Lehman gave Berwick
its biggest scare of the
season in a seminal loss
and bring the most lead-
ership in Hillard, Sutton
and Mahoney. Pittston
Area brings a high-octane
offense and will have to
depend on other sources
of offense besides Barber
to leapfrog to the top of
the division.
Coughlin and Holy
Redeemer could be dark
horses this season after
squeaking into the play-
offs last season. The
Crusaders will benet
from a healthy (2012
spring all-star) Nora Fazzi
who will surely comple-
ment Lercara and Tona
with strong mideld work.
The Royals have a very
deep team that is skilled
in the mideld.
Crestwood will be an
interesting team to watch
out for in 2013. Off-
season injuries crushed
the Comets, and their ros-
ter showcases a number
of names that made them
a playoff team in spring
2012. Morgan Kile will
juggle eld hockey and
soccer, potentially making
a strong impact down the
stretch.
Look for Tunkhannock,
Hanover Area, Hazleton
Area and Wyoming
Seminary to have strong
showings and be in the
running for district play-
off slots.
From page 1B
Soccer
Pete G. Wilcock/The Times Leader File Photo
allie Barber (1) of pittston area was second in the WVC in scoring
last year as a sophomore with 44 goals, 11 assists and 99 points.
She is shown here in a game against North pocono.
percent Hull will be in
time for the game, but his
return would be a boost
to a thin linebacker corps.
Penn State coaches elected
to play Brandon Bell last
week, forgoing a redshirt
for the true freshman
because both Hull and Ben
Kline were sidelined.
OBrien said Hull, Kline
(shoulder), LB Nyeem
Wartman (shoulder), OT
Adam Gress (knee) and RB
Bill Belton (undisclosed)
are all banged up but con-
sidered probable to play.
Safety Ryan Keiser is the
lone player OBrien called
questionable after being
knocked out of the Eastern
Michigan game in the rst
half. If Hull and Kline are
both available to play for
most of Saturdays game,
it could free up safety
Stephen Obeng-Agyapong
to play more at his natural
position after lling in at
linebacker for the rst two
weeks.
I think, if Hull can go,
it would be Hull, (Glenn)
Carson, and Wartman
(starting), more than like-
ly, OBrien said. If Hull
has some issues through-
out the week, well go with
whoever we have there,
whether its Obeng or
somebody else.
But Obeng will play, and
hell have a role in the game
just like hes had the past
two weeks.
Tight end Matt Lehman
had successful knee sur-
gery on Tuesday morning.
He will miss the rest of the
season along with DE Brad
Bars and WR DaeSean
Hamilton. Tight end Brent
Wilkerson remains out
indenitely following back
surgery.
eagles excitement
OBrien doesnt get too
much time to watch NFL
games with his busy sched-
ule. But he certainly made
note of what Chip Kelly and
the Philadelphia Eagles did
Monday night.
Kelly, the former Oregon
Ducks coach who consult-
ed OBrien and the New
England Patriots staff in
the past about running a
no-huddle offense, led the
Eagles to a 33-27 win in
Washington in his NFL
debut.
The Eagles ran out of
steam late but had been on
pace to set an NFL record
after running 53 plays on
offense in the rst half.
It was unbelievable. It
was great, OBrien said.
Its kind of a ne line that
you walk with your tempo.
Youre trying to control the
tempo of the game. A lot of
it has to do with how your
defense is playing.
With the way our
defense has been playing
in the last couple games, it
was probably appropriate
for us to be in more fast-
tempo because our defense
was playing pretty well. I
think you have to get the
ow of the game to see how
the games going.
OBrien doesnt run his
offense at the same break-
neck pace as Kelly, but he
enjoys it just the same.
I love to play at a fast
pace, OBrien said. I
think its a lot of fun for the
kids. Its fun in practice.
They enjoy it. They have
a lot of condence in it. So
well try to keep mixing it
in there.
Knights note
UCF hasnt had to break
much of a sweat this sea-
son. The Knights are 2-0
and have outscored oppo-
nents 76-7, including a
shutout of lowly Akron last
week.
The teams biggest con-
cern on its trip north may
be the health of starting left
tackle Torrian Wilson, who
injured a knee late in last
Fridays blowout.
Knights coach George
OLeary did not provide
an update on Wilson at
his weekly press confer-
ence on Monday. Wilson
would likely be the one to
match up with reigning
Big Ten Freshman of the
Year Deion Barnes, who is
looking for his rst sack of
the season.
From page 1B
Hull
helped put together Saturdays
game at Beaver Stadium and next
Septembers opener in Ireland.
OLeary, 67, has seen plenty of
former assistants have success at all
levels, and OBrien is now one of the
top examples.
All those coaches that Ive had
that have moved on to bigger jobs,
they had the one thing that you need
to have, OLeary said. Great work
habits. Theres no hours in the day
that you couldnt give them enough
information to make them better
coaches.
Theyre lm jockeys. Theyre
always watching lm and trying
to get better. And not just in their
position, but all positions. The good
coaches can coach em all. Because
its a team game and you need to
know the whole gamut.
The Yellow Jackets staff in the
mid-to-late 90s also included cur-
rent Penn State assistants Stan
Hixon and Mac McWhorter, as well
former Maryland head coach Ralph
Friedgen and newBuffalo Bills coach
Doug Marrone, one of OBriens best
friends in the business.
How all of those talented coach-
es and diverse personalities
meshed together in Atlanta under
OLeary provided a blueprint for
OBrien when it came time to pick
his own staff.
We had a laundry list of some
really good, top-notch coaches, many
of whom went on to become head
coaches, OBrien said. I learned
a lot from them. And I contributed
what I contributed to that staff, but
I think we all learned from Coach
OLeary.
And I think every one of those
guys would say we owe a lot to
Coach OLeary because he taught us
about tough, physical football, great
organization. Things like that.
This week, the two men will put
all that aside before the 6 p.m. kick-
off. Just football.
But OLeary remains proud of his
former protegee all the same.
From page 1B
oBrien
point saying, I bet its hot in
there. Itch it.
NASCAR said they could not
prove Bowyers spin was inten-
tional.
Newman said he accepted
Bowyers apology and the two will
move on they have a previously
scheduled hunting trip together
next week. But while Bowyer dis-
cussed the spin in Monday nights
phone call, Newman told AP
Bowyer never said it was inten-
tional.
I could tell by the sound of his
voice, I really feel he was genu-
ine with his remorse, Newman
said. He said it was a heat of the
moment thing, and he told me
the biggest thing was he was glad
NASCAR did what they did and
took the action they did to get
me in the Chase. I believed him
and that made me feel good about
what he was saying. But, no, he
did not say with the exact words
that he spun on purpose.
Still, Newman said he has no
doubt that MWR manipulated
the ending of the race through
a series of different actions that
only began with the Bowyer
spin. NASCAR could only prove
one action radio communica-
tion between Norris and Vickers
in which a confused Vickers was
told to pit as the eld went green
with three laps to go. The call
was an effort to give Joey Logano
position on the track to pass Jeff
Gordon in the standings and
knock Gordon out of the Chase
so that Truex could gain the wild
card.
Newman had been leading at
the time of Bowyers spin with
seven laps to go, and the victory
would have given him the wild-
card berth. He lost the race and
the nal spot in the Chase.
From page 1B
NaSCar
continue to work on.
That should be bad news
for other teams.
People wondered for eight
months how Kelly would
fare at the pro level after
having tremendous success
at Oregon. When he nally
unveiled his high-octane
philosophy, Kelly showed off
the play designs that earned
him a reputation for being an
offensive innovator.
The Eagles used numerous
formations in Kellys read-
zone attack, including some
that surely have defensive
coordinators bafed. Kelly
lined up both of his offensive
tackles wide for one play and
put them on the same side for
another. Its not just the plays
that are unique, but also the
signals for some of them.
Kelly has coaches putting
up ash cards to relay signs
to the offense. One placard
has a picture of the Phillie
Phanatic and another has
Sylvester Stallones Rocky
character.
We dont always run the
same play. We dont always
have the same options. I
think thats what makes the
defense have to be very hon-
est in terms of how they
play, Kelly said. If theres
always one way to do it,
theres always going to be
one way to defend it.
We have a wide variety in
terms of how we can do it.
Vick was outstanding,
throwing for 203 yards and
two touchdowns. He also
ran for 54 yards and another
score. LeSean McCoy had
184 of the teams 263 yards
rushing along with one TD.
DeSean Jackson caught
seven passes for 104 yards
and one touchdown.
They were having a hard
time lining up, McCoy said
of the Redskins defense. You
can denitely know when a
defense is tired, as theyre
going down youre hiking
the ball. The tempo really
worked. I dont think anyone
has seen it that fast.
AP photo
philadelphia eagles head coach Chip Kelly winks as he watches the action on the field during the
second half of Mondays game against the redskins.
From page 1B
eagles
Wal-Mart to take
smartphone trades
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is launching
a smartphone trade-in program later
this month that will help consumers
trade up to the newest phones avail-
able.
The worlds biggest retailer said
Tuesday that consumers will receive
a credit from $50 to $300 when they
trade in their working, undamaged
phone. The credit can be used toward
the purchase of a new phone, with a
selection of more than 100 devices
to choose from. This includes some
smartphones with prepaid plans.
Phones can be traded in at the
electronics departments of more than
3,600 participating Walmart stores
and Sams Club locations in the U.S.
Consumers will need to enter a two-
year contract for the new phone with
AT&T, Verizon Wireless or Sprint.
FDA seeks stronger
pain med warning
The Food and Drug Administration
is requiring stronger warning labels on
prescription painkillers like OxyContin,
in the governments latest attempt to
reduce overdose deaths caused by the
long-acting medications.
The changes announced Tuesday are
designed to remind doctors and patients
about the fatal risks of misusing and
abusing long-acting opioid pain reliev-
ers, which include forms of oxycodone,
morphine and other narcotic medica-
tions. The new label emphasizes the
drugs are only for patients with around-
the-clock pain.
Internet puppy
sellers targeted
The Agriculture Department is crack-
ing down on dog breeders who sell
puppies over the Internet, issuing new
regulations that will force them to apply
for federal licenses.
The rules announced Tuesday would
subject dog owners who breed more
than four females and sell the puppies
online, by mail or over the phone to
the same oversight faced by wholesale
animal breeders.
Many breeders who run their busi-
nesses online have skirted federal
oversight by classifying themselves as
retail pet stores, which are exempt from
licensing requirements. Commercial pet
stores arent required to have licenses
because buyers can see the animals
before they buy them and decide
whether they appear healthy and cared
for. But thats not the case when buying
over the Internet.
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HiIncOppB m 4.54 ... +3.2
NatlMuniA m 8.80 +.01 -11.4
NatlMuniB m 8.80 +.01 -11.8
PAMuniA m 8.59 +.01 -4.1
FPA
Cres d 32.06 +.17 +14.4
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.29 +.02 +2.1
Bal 22.36 +.10 +11.6
BlChGrow 58.04 +.37 +25.2
Contra 92.11 +.62 +19.8
DivrIntl d 33.93 +.45 +13.3
ExpMulNat d 25.24 +.16 +15.3
Free2020 15.22 +.05 +7.1
Free2030 15.64 +.07 +10.2
GrowCo 117.65+1.01 +26.2
LatinAm d 39.46 +.25 -14.8
LowPriStk d 46.23 +.37 +22.9
Magellan 88.84 +.59 +21.8
Overseas d 37.03 +.44 +14.6
Puritan 21.48 +.09 +11.6
TotalBd 10.40 -.02 -3.2
Value 94.76 +.79 +24.1
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 35.04 +.31 +19.1
Fidelity Select
Gold d 22.36 -.98 -39.5
Pharm d 18.39 +.12 +24.3
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 59.91 +.44 +19.8
500IdxInstl 59.91 +.43 +19.8
500IdxInv 59.90 +.43 +19.7
TotMktIdAg d 49.68 +.38 +20.8
First Eagle
GlbA m 53.30 +.16 +9.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.78 +.01 -7.2
Income C m 2.34 +.01 +7.6
IncomeA m 2.32 +.01 +8.1
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.57 +.29 +17.8
Euro Z 24.87 +.32 +17.8
Shares Z 26.69 +.15 +19.2
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.96 +.04 -0.8
GlBondAdv 12.92 +.04 -0.6
GrowthA m 23.16 +.29 +19.2
GMO
IntItVlIV 23.72 +.28 +14.2
Harbor
CapApInst 51.50 +.44 +21.1
IntlInstl 68.06 +.83 +9.6
INVESCO
ConstellB m 25.76 +.14 +21.4
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.61+.11 +19.6
PacGrowB m 21.58 +.22 +6.4
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 59.92 +.87 +12.8
AT&T Inc 33.97 +.34 +.8
AbtLab s 34.09 +.29 +8.8
AMD 3.87 +.18 +61.3
AlaskaAir 61.42 +2.89 +42.5
Alcoa 8.06 -.03 -7.2
Allstate 49.44 +.26 +23.1
Altria 34.98 +.39 +11.3
AEP 42.89 +.22 +.5
AmExp 74.60 +.94 +30.2
AmIntlGrp 49.42 +.33 +40.0
Amgen 111.16 -.51 +29.0
Anadarko 93.40 -.62 +25.7
Annaly 11.48 -.25 -18.2
Apple Inc 494.64 -11.53 -7.1
AutoData 73.74 -.05 +29.5
AveryD 44.75 +.94 +28.2
Avnet 41.66 +.80 +36.1
Avon 20.50 +.44 +42.8
BP PLC 42.02 +.13 +.9
BakrHu 50.22 +.09 +22.9
BallardPw 1.58 -.07+158.6
BarnesNob 13.78 +.46 -8.7
Baxter 71.43 +.73 +7.2
Beam Inc 64.96 +.53 +6.3
BerkH B 113.59 +.92 +26.6
BigLots 35.62 +.35 +25.2
BlockHR 27.24 +.17 +46.7
Boeing 108.17 +.98 +43.5
BrMySq 42.52 +.22 +31.9
Brunswick 39.66 +.65 +36.3
Buckeye 66.77 +.21 +47.0
CBS B 54.05 +.47 +42.0
CMS Eng 26.11 +.17 +7.1
CSX 26.06 +.40 +32.1
CampSp 41.24 -.75 +18.2
Carnival 37.19 +.76 +1.1
Caterpillar 86.61 +1.02 -3.3
CenterPnt 23.11 +.09 +20.1
CntryLink 32.62 +.60 -16.6
Chevron 123.01 +.79 +13.8
Cisco 24.16 +.24 +22.9
Citigroup 51.09 +1.00 +29.1
Clorox 83.58 +.26 +14.1
ColgPalm s 58.59 +.02 +12.1
ConAgra 31.54 -2.02 +6.9
ConocoPhil 68.66 -.21 +18.4
ConEd 55.90 +.07 +.6
Corning 14.86 +.23 +17.7
CrownHold 44.46 +.38 +20.8
Cummins 131.75 +2.37 +21.6
DTE 66.71 +.61 +11.1
Deere 84.18 +.30 -2.6
Diebold 29.43 +.25 -3.9
Disney 62.83 +1.24 +26.2
DomRescs 58.41 +.39 +12.8
Dover 89.54 +1.39 +36.3
DowChm 39.98 +1.17 +23.7
DryShips 2.97 -.12 +85.3
DuPont 58.04 +.54 +29.0
DukeEngy 65.95 +.38 +3.4
EMC Cp 26.97 +.24 +6.6
Eaton 67.88 +1.13 +25.3
EdisonInt 45.63 +.16 +1.0
EmersonEl 63.66 +1.16 +20.2
EnbrdgEPt 29.52 -.68 +5.8
Energen 69.53 -.39 +54.2
Entergy 63.27 +.24 -.8
EntPrPt 59.96 +.81 +19.7
Ericsson 13.40 +.01 +32.6
Exelon 30.73 +.48 +3.3
ExxonMbl 87.82 -.22 +1.5
FMC Corp 69.28 +.65 +18.4
Fastenal 50.26 +1.19 +7.7
FedExCp 110.59 +1.49 +20.6
Fifth&Pac 24.97 +.16+100.6
FirstEngy 37.87 +.70 -9.3
Fonar 5.48 ... +26.6
FootLockr 33.31 +.17 +3.7
FordM 17.55 +.24 +35.5
Gannett 25.40 +.36 +41.0
Gap 41.34 +.20 +33.2
GenDynam 86.74 +1.46 +25.2
GenElec 23.87 +.48 +13.7
GenMills 48.71 -.35 +20.5
GileadSci s 62.86 +.20 +71.2
GlaxoSKln 50.42 -.04 +16.0
Hallibrtn 50.32 +.06 +45.1
HarleyD 63.52 +.82 +30.1
HarrisCorp 58.07 +.33 +18.6
HartfdFn 31.75 +.11 +41.5
HawaiiEl 25.01 +.32 -.5
HeclaM 3.25 -.10 -44.3
Heico 64.37 +1.16 +43.8
Hess 77.79 -.54 +46.9
HewlettP 22.27 -.09 +56.3
HomeDp 74.60 +1.02 +20.6
HonwllIntl 84.13 +1.70 +32.6
Hormel 42.44 +.19 +36.0
Humana 97.09 +1.65 +41.5
INTL FCSt 20.16 +.21 +15.8
ITT Corp 35.46 +.75 +51.2
ITW 74.43 +.87 +22.4
IngerRd 64.81 +2.45 +35.1
IBM 186.60 +1.62 -2.6
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 106.20 +.46 +26.4
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.95 +.52 +7.6
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 42.22 +.23 +9.0
28.12 19.25 AquaAm s WTR .61 24.54 +.11 +20.7
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.08 -.03 +31.7
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 419.92 +3.42 +18.5
15.03 8.53 BkofAm BAC .04 14.61 +.13 +25.8
32.36 22.42 BkNYMel BK .60 31.28 +.49 +21.7
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.74 +.64 -3.4
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 59.22 +.45 +22.5
81.75 45.80 Cigna CI .04 81.69 +1.02 +52.8
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.63 +.11 +6.6
46.33 34.03 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.84 +.55 +14.7
34.85 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.12 33.98 +.37 +24.2
51.29 26.33 CmtyHlt CYH .25 39.03 +1.04 +27.0
68.00 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 66.05 -.22 +39.5
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 63.66 +1.16 +20.2
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 64.04 -.51 +40.8
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.49 +.13 +21.6
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 13.30 +.29 -7.6
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.33 -.01 +1.1
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.47 -.03 +25.6
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.45 +.05 +43.2
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 91.49 +.29 +26.7
47.51 28.09 Lowes LOW .72 47.15 +.52 +32.7
119.54 89.35 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 113.15 +.01 +14.9
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 96.89 +.44 +9.8
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 31.04 -.07 +22.0
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.93 +.11 +8.2
39.75 8.99 NexstarB NXST .48 35.29 +.85 +233.2
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 73.65 +.70 +26.3
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.34 +.07 +6.0
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 18.01 -.15 +2.1
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 79.43 +.05 +16.1
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 84.23 -.28 +.7
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 77.95 -.21 +14.8
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 80.60 +1.88 +51.1
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.68 +.10 +170.6
26.17 15.56 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.76 +.07 +44.5
74.46 46.87 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 70.50 ... +33.0
54.66 40.08 TJX TJX .58 53.92 -.03 +27.0
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 38.85 +.56 +18.8
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 46.47 +.56 +7.4
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 73.96 +.45 +8.4
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 48.59 +.50 +24.0
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 42.45 +.73 +24.2
USD per British Pound 1.5731 +.0030 +.19% 1.4936 1.5998
Canadian Dollar 1.0349 -.0019 -.18% 1.0287 .9776
USD per Euro 1.3267 +.0008 +.06% 1.3005 1.2769
Japanese Yen 100.36 +.76 +.76% 95.82 78.28
Mexican Peso 13.1070 -.0007 -.01% 12.6246 13.0684
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.26 3.28 -0.43 -6.59 -12.20
Gold 1364.10 1386.80 -1.64 -13.48 -21.23
Platinum 1474.10 1483.00 -0.60 -8.09 -8.27
Silver 22.97 23.67 -2.97 -20.56 -31.46
Palladium 691.05 681.40 +1.42 -11.48 +2.47
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.48 -.03 -3.2
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.74 +.07 +9.5
LifGr1 b 15.33 +.11 +13.8
RegBankA m 17.79 +.11 +25.3
SovInvA m 18.27 +.15 +14.7
TaxFBdA m 9.43 ... -7.5
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.86 +.29 -3.5
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.92 +.02 +1.8
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.54 ... +0.1
MFS
MAInvA m 25.56 +.22 +19.2
MAInvC m 24.62 +.21 +18.6
ValueI 30.92 +.28 +22.6
Merger
Merger b 16.13 +.01 +1.9
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.45 -.03 -1.9
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.85 +.08 +19.7
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 25.37 +.30 +32.0
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.86 +.22 +15.3
Intl I 25.51 +.38 +21.9
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 48.94 +.32 +15.6
DevMktA m 36.39 +.65 +3.1
DevMktY 36.04 +.64 +3.3
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.06 ... -2.6
AllAuthIn 10.15 ... -6.9
ComRlRStI 5.67 -.06 -13.6
HiYldIs 9.42 ... +1.8
LowDrIs 10.19 -.02 -1.7
TotRetA m 10.59 -.02 -4.3
TotRetAdm b 10.59 -.02 -4.3
TotRetIs 10.59 -.02 -4.1
TotRetrnD b 10.59 -.02 -4.3
Permanent
Portfolio 47.49 -.16 -2.4
Principal
SAMConGrB m16.25+.12 +12.8
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 36.77 +.28 +17.7
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.81 +.12 +21.4
BlendA m 22.55 +.19 +22.3
EqOppA m 19.64 +.15 +23.8
HiYieldA m 5.60 ... +2.5
IntlEqtyA m 7.00 +.07 +11.5
IntlValA m 22.15 +.29 +11.2
JennGrA m 25.21 +.21 +20.7
NaturResA m 48.60 +.08 +7.8
SmallCoA m 27.43 +.25 +22.3
UtilityA m 13.43 +.10 +15.1
ValueA m 19.43 +.20 +24.5
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.80 ... +22.1
IncomeA m 7.04 -.01 -1.0
Royce
LowStkSer m 15.16 +.08 +9.5
OpportInv d 15.32 +.14 +28.2
ValPlSvc m 16.80 +.16 +21.5
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.57 +.19 +19.7
Scout
Interntl 35.39 +.38 +7.1
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 56.26 +.50 +23.3
CapApprec 25.53 +.14 +14.7
DivGrow 31.07 +.29 +18.8
DivrSmCap d 22.64 +.22 +29.8
EmMktStk d 31.94 +.56 -6.2
EqIndex d 45.53 +.33 +19.6
EqtyInc 31.36 +.26 +19.6
FinSer 18.63 +.23 +24.7
GrowStk 46.13 +.46 +22.1
HealthSci 56.87 +.25 +38.0
HiYield d 6.97 +.01 +4.2
IntlDisc d 52.24 +.52 +13.3
IntlStk d 15.50 +.19 +7.6
IntlStkAd m 15.42 +.19 +7.5
LatinAm d 33.12 +.24 -12.9
MediaTele 66.37 +.62 +24.5
MidCpGr 71.19 +.72 +26.1
NewAmGro 43.58 +.36 +21.3
NewAsia d 16.09 +.31 -4.3
NewEra 45.90 +.11 +9.5
NewHoriz 44.97 +.51 +35.6
NewIncome 9.27 -.02 -4.1
Rtmt2020 19.73 +.13 +10.3
Rtmt2030 21.51 +.17 +13.7
ShTmBond 4.77 -.01 -0.6
SmCpVal d 46.47 +.42 +18.6
TaxFHiYld d 10.67 ... -7.8
Value 32.88 +.33 +24.6
ValueAd b 32.50 +.32 +24.4
Thornburg
IntlValI 30.47 +.43 +9.6
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.41 +.18 +13.6
Vanguard
500Adml 155.86+1.13 +19.8
500Inv 155.83+1.14 +19.7
CapOp 44.36 +.40 +31.9
CapVal 14.58 +.10 +31.5
Convrt 14.27 +.05 +13.9
DevMktIdx 11.04 +.12 +13.2
DivGr 19.72 +.14 +19.7
EnergyInv 65.99 ... +11.7
EurIdxAdm 66.90 +.87 +13.2
Explr 103.57+1.10 +30.3
GNMA 10.32 -.04 -3.9
GNMAAdml 10.32 -.04 -3.8
GlbEq 21.71 +.23 +16.3
GrowthEq 14.79 +.10 +20.4
HYCor 5.89 ... +0.3
HYCorAdml 5.89 ... +0.4
HltCrAdml 75.75 +.49 +28.5
HlthCare 179.50+1.15 +28.4
ITGradeAd 9.62 -.03 -3.9
InfPrtAdm 25.69 -.03 -9.5
InflaPro 13.08 -.02 -9.6
InstIdxI 154.84+1.13 +19.8
InstPlus 154.85+1.13 +19.8
InstTStPl 38.71 +.30 +21.0
IntlExpIn 17.43 +.18 +18.5
IntlGrAdm 69.12+1.08 +12.8
IntlStkIdxAdm 26.69 +.30 +8.2
IntlStkIdxIPls 106.74+1.19 +8.3
LTInvGr 9.44 -.05 -9.8
MidCapGr 25.07 +.21 +23.1
MidCp 27.81 +.26 +23.8
MidCpAdml 126.28+1.16 +23.9
MidCpIst 27.90 +.26 +23.9
MuIntAdml 13.51 ... -4.0
MuLtdAdml 10.95 -.01 -0.6
PrecMtls 11.41 -.02 -28.4
Prmcp 87.02 +.75 +25.2
PrmcpAdml 90.31 +.77 +25.3
PrmcpCorI 18.58 +.15 +24.4
REITIdx 21.97 ... +2.2
REITIdxAd 93.75 -.02 +2.3
STCor 10.63 -.01 -0.5
STGradeAd 10.63 -.01 -0.4
SelValu 26.86 +.30 +28.0
SmGthIdx 31.74 +.30 +26.8
SmGthIst 31.82 +.30 +26.9
StSmCpEq 27.34 +.26 +25.9
Star 22.72 +.12 +10.0
StratgcEq 26.90 +.28 +25.4
TgtRe2015 14.34 +.06 +7.2
TgtRe2020 25.99 +.12 +9.1
TgtRe2030 26.23 +.16 +12.2
TgtRe2035 16.03 +.11 +13.8
TgtRe2040 26.60 +.20 +14.8
TgtRe2045 16.70 +.13 +14.8
Tgtet2025 15.03 +.08 +10.6
TotBdAdml 10.49 -.03 -3.7
TotBdInst 10.49 -.03 -3.7
TotBdMkSig 10.49 -.03 -3.7
TotIntl 15.95 +.17 +8.1
TotStIAdm 42.71 +.32 +20.9
TotStIIns 42.72 +.33 +20.9
TotStISig 41.22 +.31 +20.9
TotStIdx 42.69 +.32 +20.8
TxMIntlAdm 12.53 +.15 +13.5
TxMSCAdm 39.20 +.36 +25.8
USGro 25.62 +.18 +20.5
USValue 14.47 +.11 +22.0
WellsI 24.68 +.03 +3.9
WellsIAdm 59.81 +.10 +4.0
Welltn 37.38 +.19 +11.9
WelltnAdm 64.56 +.31 +11.9
WndsIIAdm 61.89 +.54 +20.0
WndsrII 34.87 +.30 +19.9
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.87 +.04 +13.2
DOW
15,191.06
+127.94
NASDAQ
3,729.02
+22.84
S&P 500
1,683.99
+12.28
RUSSELL 2000
1,055.72
+9.64
6-MO T-BILLS
.04%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
2.97%
+.06
CRUDE OIL
$107.39
-2.13
p p n n q q q q
p p p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.58
-.03
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
PAGE 8B Wednesday, September 11, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
WASHINGTON The
income gap between the rich-
est 1 percent and the rest of
America last year reached
the widest point since the
Roaring Twenties.
The top 1 percent of U.S.
earners collected 19.3 percent
of household income in 2012,
their largest share since 1928.
And the share held by the top
10 percent of earners last year
reached a record 48.2 percent.
U.S. income inequality
has been growing for almost
three decades. But it grew
again last year, according to
an analysis of IRS gures dat-
ing to 1913 by economists at
the University of California,
Berkeley, the Paris School
of Economics and Oxford
University.
One of them, Emmanuel
Saez of the University of
California, Berkeley, said
the incomes of the richest
Americans might have surged
last year in part because
they cashed in stock hold-
ings to avoid higher capital
gains taxes that took effect in
January.
Last year, the incomes of
the top 1 percent rose nearly
20 percent compared with
a 1 percent increase for the
remaining 99 percent.
The richest Americans
were hit hard by the nan-
cial crisis. Their incomes fell
more than 36 percent in the
Great Recession of 2007 to
2009 as stock prices plum-
meted. Incomes for the bot-
tom 99 percent fell just 11.6
percent, according to the
analysis.
But since the recession of-
cially ended in June 2009, the
top 1 percent have enjoyed the
benets of rising corporate
prots and stock prices: 95
percent of the income gains
reported since 2009 have gone
to the top 1 percent.
That compares with a 45
percent share for the top
1 percent in the economic
expansion of the 1990s and
a 65 percent share from the
expansion that followed the
2001 recession.
The top 10 percent havent
done badly, either. Last year,
they captured 48.2 percent of
income, up from the previous
record, 46.6 percent, in 2011.
The top 1 percent of
American households had
income above $394,000 last
year. The top 10 percent had
income exceeding $114,000.
The income gures include
wages, pension payments,
dividends and capital gains
from the sale of stocks and
other assets. They do not
include so-called transfer pay-
ments from government pro-
grams such as unemployment
benets and Social Security.
Income gap widest since 1920s
PAUL WISEMAN
AP Economics Writer
Craig Federighi, senior vice president of Software Engineering at Apple, speaks Tuesday during the new
product release in Cupertino, Calif. Apples latest iPhones will come in a bevy of colors and two distinct
designs, one made of plastic and the other that aims to be the gold standard of smartphones and reads
your fingerprint. The fingerprint can be used to unlock the phone and, perhaps, even be tied to making
payments on the phone.
AP photo
Apple unveils two newiPhones
WASHINGTON Major
contractors hooking up
the internal plumbing of
President Barack Obamas
health care law projected
confidence Tuesday that they
will be ready to go by an Oct.
1 deadline, even though the
system is still being tested.
With only three weeks to
go before new state health
insurance markets launch,
efforts are ongoing to reli-
ably link up government
agencies, the markets them-
selves and private health
plans.
The congressional
Government Accountability
Office warned this summer
that with so much work
left for the last minute, the
timely and smooth launch
of the markets could not be
guaranteed. Still, with the
presidents image at stake,
his administration is work-
ing all out to deliver.
But the administration
got a boost this week when
California officials said their
marketplace the nations
largest would start enroll-
ing uninsured people Oct. 1
as scheduled, through a mix
of online access, call cen-
ter support and community
helpers.
Representatives of four
big contractors testified
in a rare joint appearance
Tuesday before the House
Energy and Commerce com-
mittee. Republicans who run
the panel billed the hear-
ing as a pulse check on
Obamas law. The contrac-
tors have routinely ignored
media requests to explain
their work, but they could
not rebuff Congress.
A private consulting firm
that is advising states also
separately said it expects a
rocky launch, due in part to
the sheer scope of technicali-
ties in the system.
Obamas health care law
will provide subsidized pri-
vate coverage for middle-
class people who dont
get health insurance from
employers. Low-income
people will be steered to
an expanded version of
Medicaid in states that
accepted it.
The insurance market-
places that launch Oct. 1 are
supposed to be the gateway
to the new system. People
can apply online, through a
call center, in person or on
paper. Thirty percent are
expected to use paper.
Coverage takes effect Jan
1. At that time, insurers will
be forbidden from turning
away people in poor health
and virtually all Americans
will be required to carry
health insurance or face
fines. Two recent indepen-
dent studies of rates already
filed by insurers indicate
plenty of low-premium plans
will be available, but con-
sumers who pick them will
face high deductibles and
copayments.
The four contractors each
said they would be ready,
and said they have strong
safeguards in place to pro-
tect the privacy of personal
data an issue Republicans
have lately raised as a poten-
tial vulnerability.
Obamacare contractors
say theywill be ready
RICARDOALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
System still being
tested prior to
Oct. 1 deadline
NEW YORK The Dow
Jones industrial average will
have three new members in
Goldman Sachs Group Inc.,
Visa Inc. and Nike Inc., while
Bank of America Corp.,
Hewlett-Packard Co. and Alcoa
Inc. have been shown the door.
S&P Dow Jones Indices
announced the shakeup before
the open on Tuesday, saying it
represents the rst three-for-
three change to the blue-chip
index since April 2004.
Goldman will replace Bank
of America, Visa will replace
HP, and Nike will replace Alcoa.
The adjustment to the Dow
industrials will happen after
the close of trading Sept. 20,
and it will be effective at the
open of trading the following
Monday.
S&P Dow Jones Indices,
the company behind the
index, said it made the change
because of the low stock prices
of the three departing compo-
nents, and because the compa-
nys index committee wants to
diversify the sector and indus-
try group representation.
The three stocks on the way
out are the Dows three lowest-
priced components, said David
Blitzer, managing director and
chairman of the index commit-
tee at S&P Dow Jones Indices.
That means they have relatively
little impact on the Dow, since
its a price-weighted index
unlike other popular bench-
marks, such as the Standard
& Poors 500 index, that are
weighted by market capitaliza-
tion.
Blitzer said additions and
removals to the index shouldnt
be seen as investment rec-
ommendations. Theres no
intention to pick winners, he
said during a conference call
Tuesday.
With Goldman supplanting
Bank of America, the blue-
chip index is exchanging one
nancial rm for another.
S&P Dow Jones Indices views
swapping out ailing PC maker
HP for credit-card giant Visa
as exchanging one informa-
tion-technology company for
another.
DowIndex ousts 3, adds 3
VICTOR REKLAITIS
MarketWatch
$3.61 $3.56 $3.86
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
www.timesleader.com
TASTE
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 1C THE TIMES LEADER
PHILADELPHIA If youre
planning to bake a cake for your
childs upcoming birthday party,
you might want to ask yourself one
question: What would the Cake
Boss do?
Because if you think a basic sheet
cake and candles are all you need,
you clearly havent been paying
attention. Extreme caking has come
to the home cook, fueled partly by
TV shows showcasing crazy confec-
tions and partly by boastful amateur
bakers eager to strut their sugary
stuff on social media.
Shows like Ace of Cakes, Cake
Boss and various spinoffs tempt
viewers with stunning visions of
creations closer to art than dessert.
They build cityscapes, sea monsters
and dragons all sculpted like stat-
ues in three dimensions. Amateurs
follow suit, posting photos of their
creations to Twitter and Reddit, and
the more elaborate the cakes are,
the more popular they become.
This helps explain why once eso-
teric pro-grade tools and ingredients
for creating elaborately embellished
cakes not to mention classes on
how to use all those toys are big
sellers today.
In Philadelphias Italian Market,
kitchen supply store Fantes has
been teaching cake decorating to
amateurs for at least 30 years. The
supplies they sell and classes they
offer are constant indicators of cake
trends. During the early 80s it was
marzipan and fancy owers; today
its 3-D and fondant, an icing that
can be sculpted.
There was a huge shift as soon as
the TV shows came out, says Nina
Rose Pelc, an instructor at Fantes.
Ive seen some three-tiered, ve-
tiered cakes that could be wed-
ding cakes for 3-year-olds birth-
day parties.
According to Lynn Sorensen, co-
owner of Kitchen Krafts, a website
that sells baking tools and materi-
als, the number of vendors selling
specialty tools and ingredients for
building these cakes has increased
as demand for them has risen.
She says the cakes people want
to build can change by the week,
depending on popular movies or
events. When the royal baby was
born, for example, Sorensen said
people wanted decorative crowns.
The Cake Boss himself, Buddy
Valastro, said in a phone interview
that hes happy to have raised the
cake-decorating bar.
Im a proponent of people mak-
ing those kinds of cakes, trying
to make the cakes that I make,
Valastro says. At the end of the day,
the reason I became a baker is that
when you nish a cake and you step
away, theres a feeling inside. Youre
like, Wow! And I want to give that
feeling to other people.
When Joshua Orvis, a research
scientist from Tulsa, Okla., started
getting into extreme caking along
with his wife, it was for their sons
third birthday.
He said, I want an Angry Birds
cake and we thought, Well, how do
we do that? Orvis says.
He searched Google Images for
Angry Birds cakes, unsure of what
would turn up. Hundreds of color-
ful cakes tiled his screen depicting
the games scenes and characters in
varying levels of complexity.
Then we found out you can get
fondant and just make whatever you
want to make, Orvis says. Like a
kid with Play-Doh, we just sculpted
shapes out of it.
The Angry Birds cake was a suc-
cess. The Orvises have since sculpted
a variety of special cakes for their four
young children: one of Pingu, the clay-
mation Swiss-British penguin, one of
Extreme caking
Amateurs hooked on elaborate confections
Photo coutesy of www.extreme-sandwiches.com
A pink Sweet 16 cake is a marvel in intricate layers.
Photo courtesy of parade.com
Whats in this Tiffany box? Lots of sugar, for starters.
KEITH COLLINS
Associated Press
As satisfying as it is
to eat freshly picked
apples straight up and
unadorned, the chill of fall
makes it equally tempting
to head back to the kitch-
en and bake them into a
pie.
But thats where most
people get tripped up.
They fear a fussy pie
crust. They loathe a long
baking time or a persnick-
ety lling. So we decided
to come up with an easy
apple tart that uses a
fuss-free crust and comes
together in under an hour.
Even better because
the lling is only gently
cooked on the stovetop,
the apples retain more
of their crisp, fresh, just-
picked avor.
EASY AUTUMN
APPLE TART
Start to nish: 1 hour
Servings: 12
14 tablespoons (1 3/4
sticks) unsalted butter,
room temperature
1/2 cup granulated
sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt,
divided
1 3/4 cups all-purpose
our
4 apples, peeled, cored
and sliced
2 tablespoons cider vin-
egar
1/4 cup packed brown
sugar
1/4 cup apple cider
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon water
Heat the oven to
400 F. Coat an 11-inch
removable bottom tart
pan with baking spray.
Apple pie in an hour? As easy as it is delicious
AP Photos
This autumn apple tart uses a fuss-free crust that comes together in under an hour.
This easy apple tarts filling is gently cooked on the stovetop, so
the apples retain more of their crisp, fresh, just-picked flavor.
PATTI GRAZIANO
Pantry Chef, Vanderlyns Restaurant
Summer may be winding down, but I enjoy grilling
year round. This week I am sharing an awesome recipe,
which is an upgrade to your everyday burger. By adding
delicious crab meat, your burger is taken to a new level
of sophisticated grilling yet done simply.
I used a claw-meat variety of crab
and further enhanced this elegant
sandwich by topping it off with an Old
Bay infused mayonnaise. It adds the
right amount of seasoning to the crab
meat and a savory component to the
burger. When put on your favorite roll
I used a brioche, soft roll this
half-pound burger will be a hearty treat
for you and your guests. It is truly a
great combination of surf and turf.
I have paired this burger with home-
made coleslaw and a crispy dill pickle, both prepared
from locally grown ingredients. My garden cooperated
this year, so I was able to make my family-recipe crispy
dill pickles to enjoy later in the year.
You may make this outstanding burger yourself at
home or if you would rather sit back, relax and have
Vanderlyns culinary team prepare it for you, we will
offer the Surf & Turf Burger at Vanderlyns Restaurant
beginning today for lunch service. For reservations or
additional features call Vanderlyns at 283-6260. Check
out our website at www.vanderlyns.com to see our new
lunch and dinner menus.
SURF & TURF BURGER
Yield: 4
Ingredients for Old Bay Mayonnaise
1 cup mayonnaise
cup nely chopped onion
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
teaspoon hot pepper sauce
teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning
Method of preparation:
1. In a small bowl, combine all ingredients and mix
thoroughly.
2. Put in squeeze bottle and refrigerate until ready to use.
Ingredients for coleslaw
8 cups nely chopped cabbage
cup carrot, shredded
1/3 cup sugar
teaspoon salt
teaspoon black pepper, ground
cup milk
cup buttermilk
cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoons white vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Method of preparation:
1. In a large bowl, mix all ingredients except cabbage
and carrots. When mixed well add cabbage and carrots.
Cover and refrigerate.
Ingredients for Surf & Turf Burger
2 pounds ground beef (85 pcrcent lean is great)
teaspoon onion powder
teaspoon salt
teaspoon course ground black pepper
8 ounces crab claw meat
4 soft burger rolls
Method of preparation:
1. In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients except
crab and mix until spices are evenly distributed.
2. Form into four equal-size burgers.
3. Cover and refrigerate along with crab meat until
ready to use.
4. Grill burgers until almost the desired tempera-
tures, add 2 ounces crab atop each burger and cook an
additional minute with grill lid closed. Remove from
grill and put on halved soft roll, top with Old Bay may-
onnaise. Serve with coleslaw and a dill pickle. Enjoy.
EDITORS NOTE: If you are a chef who would like to contribute a recipe to
Chefs Corner, contact Mary Therese Biebel at 570-829-7283 or mbiebel@
timesleader.com.
Surf and turf
team up in the
form of a burger
Aimee Dilger Photo/The Times Leader
Patti Graziano prepared this Surf & Turf Burger at Vanderlyns
Restaurant in Kingston, where she is the pantry chef.
CHEFS CORNER
Patti Graziano
In a food processor,
combine the butter, sugar
and 1/4 teaspoon of the
salt. Pulse several times.
Add the our and pulse to
combine, scraping down
the sides of the work
bowl as needed. Transfer
the dough to the prepared
pan. Press the dough
evenly across the bottom
and up the sides of the
pan. Poke the bottom all
over with a fork. Bake for
15 to 20 minutes, or until
golden brown.
While the crust bakes,
make the lling. In a large
skillet over medium-high
heat, combine the apples,
vinegar, brown sugar,
cider, cinnamon and the
remaining 1/4 teaspoon
salt. Cook, gently stirring
to promote even cooking
but without breaking the
apples, until just tender,
about 10 to 12 minutes.
In a small glass, mix
together the cornstarch
and water. Add to the
apples and cook, stirring
gently, for 2 minutes, or
until thickened.
When the crust and
apples are cooked, spoon
the apples into the crust,
arranging them in con-
centric circles if desired.
Pour any extra juices over
the surface of the apples.
Serve warm or room tem-
perature.
Nutrition information
per serving: 270 calo-
ries; 120 calories from fat
(44 percent of total calo-
ries); 14 g fat (9 g satu-
rated; 0 g trans fats); 35
mg cholesterol; 36 g car-
bohydrate; 2 g ber; 19 g
sugar; 2 g protein; 85 mg
sodium.
ALISON LADMAN
Associated Press
See cake | 2C
READY TO GO
GUARANTEEDO
O
MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, MEDICAL, OFFICE...
PAGE 2C Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TASTE www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
a Star Wars scene, and
two of cars. The most
recent cake was a Pagani
Zonda R race car for
which Orvis used tradi-
tional cake, Rice Krispies
Treats, and fondant
for the body paneling.
The Orvises nd the
cake-making process
rewarding, not just for the
joy it brings their children
but also for the creative
outlet.
Both of our jobs are not
very artistic, but we both
think that were relatively
artistic people, Orvis
says. Its a fun thing to do
together.
Unfortunately, not every
foray into elaborate cake
making goes so well. Katie
Lewis, a 32-year-old web
designer from Washington,
D.C., has given it up entirely.
When a friend asked
her to make a cake for his
wedding, Lewis had a few
elaborate cakes under her
belt. There was a gory
fondant chest cavity with
a red velvet heart for one
Halloween, and a tasty
alien head for another.
But now shed entered the
big leagues: a three-tiered,
three-dimensional, Mario
Brothers-themed wedding
cake.
Lewis started preparing
Cake
From page 1C
AP Photo
Justin Clark made this Mario Brothers-themed square cake. Clark,
an amateur baker, typically uses a layer of fondant to cover a
simple round cake and gets creative from there.
the cake the night before
the wedding, and it wasnt
working out. As the hours
went by, she realized that
shed taken on something
too big. She didnt have
the right tools or the right
training.
At one point I was lying
on the oor just covered in
confectioners sugar, she
said.
By morning, Lewis
managed to put together
something that kind of
appeared to be some sort
of cake but has never
looked back. She doesnt
watch shows like Cake
Boss anymore.
Its not possible, and it
makes you cry, she says.
There is, however, a mid-
dle ground between baking
a work of art and produc-
ing a boring, traditional
cake. Some amateurs sim-
ply use a layer of fondant
to cover a traditional round
cake and get creative from
there.
And at Fantes, Pelc
says the classes that focus
on baking basics remain
among the most popular.
We will always have
an interest in using the
traditional butter-cream
approach, Pelc says.
Those are fundamentals
people will always want to
learn.
Have a taste for cornbread?
Heres a corn-fed recipe
MCT Photo
Using only cornmeal makes this cornbread gluten-free. Adding pureed fresh sweet corn boosts the
corn flavor while ensuring a moist bread.
KIM ODE
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Cornbread may not
have been front and cen-
ter, but we suspect it also
was a source of contention
during the Civil War. Or
as it is also known: The
War Between the Recipes.
Even today, Southerners
maintain that not even a
smidgen of sugar should
besmirch their beloved
cornbread. Northerners,
ever girding themselves
for winter, like their corn-
bread a little sweet.
Southerners call
for bacon fat, while
Northerners think butter
is just ne. There are but-
termilk camps and plain-
milk camps. Then there
are the doctorers, who
cant help but stir in some
diced jalapeos, shredded
Cheddar cheese, crum-
bled bacon, corn kernels,
even dollops of jam.
In the end, though, it all
comes down to the corni-
ness of the cornbread.
Todays recipe combines
the best parts of two great
recipes, one from Cooks
Illustrated and the other
from Cooks Country
both under the umbrella
of Americas Test Kitchen
(although perhaps not on
speaking terms?).
In any case, the result-
LAUREN CHATTMAN
Newsday
The abundance of late-summer
tomatoes is a mixed blessing. It is
wonderful to be able to enjoy them
in massive quantities, but theres
also the sad realization the sup-
ply wont last. If you are not up to
the task of canning your surplus,
is there anything you can you do
to preserve your gardens tomato
bounty for a snowy day?
The simplest and most avor-
ful solution is oven roasting. Slice
your extra tomatoes in half and
place them, cut-sides up, on a wire
rack set on a baking sheet. Drizzle
with a little olive oil, sprinkle with
salt and bake. Ive seen recipes that
call for roasting at 225 degrees for
3 hours and others that specify 400
degrees for 30 minutes. Any tem-
perature will work. Just keep an
eye on your tomatoes and pull them
out when they are shriveled but not
completely dry.
This method works best on toma-
toes without a lot of seeds and
juice. Plum tomatoes and cherry
tomatoes are both good choices.
Oven-roasted tomatoes will keep in
an airtight container in the refrig-
erator for up to ve days and can
be frozen for up to 6 months. Roast
some today and you can enjoy them
in the dark days of February.
Roasted tomatoes have a concen-
trated avor and sweetness simi-
lar to sun-dried tomatoes. But in
texture they are entirely different.
While commercial sun-dried toma-
toes are practically dehydrated, giv-
ing them a chewy and sometimes
leathery consistency, roasted toma-
toes are tender and yielding. And
unlike commercially available sun-
dried tomatoes, homemade roasted
tomatoes are all-natural and preser-
vative-free.
A few ideas for using your toma-
toes, now or later:
On sandwiches and pizza
Roasted tomatoes add moisture
to sandwiches without making
bread soggy. Try grilled Cheddar
cheese with roasted tomatoes, or
a BL and roasted T. Roast beef,
roasted tomatoes and rosemary-a-
vored mayonnaise is another favor-
ite. They also are great on pizzas,
adding avor without drenching
the dough. Roasted tomatoes and
ricotta cheese are a good combina-
tion, as are roasted tomatoes, fen-
nel sausage and Fontina cheese.
In salads
Add defrosted roasted tomatoes
to a green salad in the middle of
the winter, when avorless super-
market tomatoes are the only other
option. They also are good in heart-
ier salads made with grains. Toss
couscous, roasted tomatoes, olives
and feta cheese for a quick vegetar-
ian main dish. Another good com-
bination: bulgur, roasted tomatoes,
sauteed onions, spinach and chick-
peas. Dont be shy with the spices.
The robust avor of roasted toma-
toes stands up well to salad dress-
ings containing cumin, smoked
paprika and chili powder.
With pasta
Perhaps the most obvious way to
Roast tomatoes to preserve the late-summer bounty
MCT Photo
Roasted tomatoes bring an intense sweetness to this simple spaghetti dish. A salty mixture of bread-
crumbs and anchovies provides flavor contrast and crunch.
ing cornbread uses 100
percent cornmeal (mak-
ing it gluten-free) that
gets a brief soak in but-
termilk. It makes a good
cornbread. But then we
added the kernels from
a couple of ears of sweet
corn, pured and cooked
down just a bit into a
sort of corn butter. Its
an extra step, but vaults
this good cornbread into
the territory of great,
and makes savvy use of
this seasons sweet corn.
The Cooks Country
recipe works because
the cornmeal softens in
the buttermilk, making
a moist bread with no
graininess. The Cooks
Illustrated recipe works
because pureing the ker-
nels avoids those weird
chewy pockets in the
bread, or corn that grows
tough in the ovens heat.
The recipes split on the
sugar question, but we
sided with leaving out the
sweetener. Thats what
a drizzle of honey is for,
right?
If you have a cast-iron
or other ovenproof skil-
let, please use that. But
a regular 9- by 9-inch
metal pan works well, too.
Preheating either pan cre-
ates the crispiest crust.
And if you want to swap
in bacon fat for the butter,
yall go ahead.
After all, the idea is to
ensure that a nation of
cornbread of the people,
by the people, for the peo-
ple, shall not perish from
the Earth. Nor from our
plates.
FRESH CORN
SKILLET
CORNBREAD
Serves 9 to 12.
Note: This recipe is
adapted from recipes
by Cooks Country and
Cooks Illustrated. If mak-
ing this with frozen corn,
the small shoepeg vari-
ety works particularly
well. Thaw before pure-
ing.
2 c. ne-ground corn-
meal
2 c. buttermilk
2 ears of sweet corn,
kernels cut from cobs
(about 1 to 1 c.)
c. canola or vegetable
oil
4 tbsp. unsalted butter,
cut in 4 pieces
2 eggs, beaten
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
Directions: Preheat
oven to 450 degrees.
Place rack in middle posi-
tion. Place 10-inch cast-
iron or ovenproof skillet
or 9- by 9-inch metal pan
in oven to preheat for 10
minutes.
In a large bowl, whisk
together cornmeal and
buttermilk. Set aside.
Process the corn ker-
nels in a blender until
very smooth, about 1 min-
ute. Transfer to a medium
saucepan and cook over
medium heat, stirring
constantly, until thick and
deep yellow, about 5 min-
utes. Remove from heat
and set aside.
Carefully add the oil to
the hot skillet and contin-
ue to bake until oil is just
smoking, about 5 min-
utes. Remove from oven
and add butter, carefully
swirling pan until butter
is melted. Pour all but 1
tablespoon of oil mixture
into the cornmeal, leaving
remaining oil mixture in
pan. Whisk corn pure,
beaten eggs, baking pow-
der, baking soda and salt
into cornmeal mixture
until well-combined.
Pour mixture into the
hot skillet and bake until
top begins to crack and
edges are golden brown,
20 to 22 minutes. Let
cornbread cool in pan
for 5 minutes. Place a
plate over the top of corn-
bread, then carefully turn
over the skillet until the
cornbread releases. Then
cover cornbread with a
serving plate and ip it
so its right-side up. Serve
warm.
Variations: Stir in
cup chopped jalapeos,
cup shredded Cheddar
or pepper jack cheese,
or 3 to 4 slices cooked
and crumbled bacon just
before baking.
Nutrition information
per each of 12 servings:
Calories: 230; Fat: 10
g; Sodium: 400 mg
Carbohydrates: 29
g; Saturated fat: 3 g;
Calcium: 77 mg
Protein: 5 g;
Cholesterol: 43 mg;
Dietary ber: 2 g
Diabetic exchanges
per serving: 2 bread/
starch, 2 fat.
See tomato | 6C
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 3C
Photographs and information
must be received two full
weeks before your childs
birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-gen-
erated. Include your name
and your relationship to the
child (parent, grandparent or
legal guardians only, please),
your childs name, age and
birthday, parents, grandpar-
ents and great-grandparents
names and their towns of
residence, any siblings and
their ages. Dont forget to
include a daytime contact
phone number. Without one,
we may be unable to publish
a birthday announcement
on time.
We cannot guarantee return
of birthday or occasions
photos and do not return
community-news or publicity
photos. Please do not submit
precious or original profes-
sional photographs that
require return because such
photos can become dam-
aged, or occasionally lost, in
the production process.
Email your birthday
announcement to people@
timesleader.comor send it
to: Times Leader Birthdays,
15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711-0250. You
also may use the formunder
the People tab on www.
timesleader.com.
Childrens
birthdays (ages
1-16) will be
published free
Austin Dennis
Austin Dennis, son of
Robin and Sean Dennis,
Waverly, N.Y., is celebrat-
ing his ninth birthday
today, Sept. 11. Austin
is a grandson of Barbara
Dennis and Paul Noonan,
Wilkes-Barre, and Mr.
and Mrs. George Young,
Apalachin, N.Y. He is a
great-grandson of the
late Mr. and Mrs. Alfred
Perlowski. Austin has a
brother, Devan, 11, and
two sisters, Faith, 6, and
Elissa, 11 months.
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY!
ColbyA. Meck
Colby Alexander Meck,
son of Paul Meck and Kala
Cartmill, Las Vegas, Nev.,
is celebrating his third
birthday today, Sept. 11.
Colby is a grandson of J.P.
and Denise Meck, Plains
Township, and Michael
and Jean Cartmill,
Kentucky. He has a broth-
er, Toby, 5 months.
Lana R. Burns
Lana Rose Burns,
daughter of Mariah
Webb and Robert Burns,
Kingston, celebrated her
third birthday Sept. 2.
Lana is a granddaughter
of James Burns, Kingston;
Mary Ellen Burns,
Swoyersville; and Thomas
Webb, Pittston. She is a
great-granddaughter of
Elizabeth Webb, Pittston,
and Peg Dubaskas,
Kingston.
Editors note: Please
send news for this
space by noon Friday
to people@timesleader.
com or by mail to
Good Eats, The Times
Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.
To ensure accuracy,
information must be
typed or computer
generated.
THIS WEEK: Sept. 11 to
Sept. 17
Pierogie Sale, 2-5 p.m.,
pick up Tuesday, St.
Michaels Church, Church
and Winter streets,
church hall, Old Forge.
$6 per dozen. Order by
Thursday. Sandra at 457-
9280 or the church at
457-2875.
Roast Turkey Dinner
and Bake Sale, 4:30-
6:30 p.m. Saturday,
Loyalville United
Methodist Church,
Loyalville Road, Noxen.
$9 adults; $3.50 children
younger than 12. Take
outs available. Call 477-
3521 with name, phone
number, number of
dinners and pick-up time.
Next hoagie sale is Oct.
8. $5 each.
Chicken Dinner, 4-7
p.m. Saturday, Wyoming
Lodge 468, 821 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming. $9
adults; $4.50 children 12
and younger. Take outs
available.
Spaghetti Dinner, 4-7
p.m. Saturday, Huntsville
Christian Church, 1160
Church Road, Dallas.
Benefits the Hope Center.
Spaghetti, bread, salad,
dessert and beverages.
Take outs available. $5
adults; $3 children 10
and younger. 675-0611.
Pig Roast, 5-8 p.m.
Saturday, Elk Lodge 109,
39 Evans St., Pringle.
$13, includes beverages.
Tickets can be purhased
at the lodge from 5:30-11
p.m. Wednesday through
Friday or reservations
can be made by calling
570-313-1693 or 570-
714-2616, leave message.
No tickets at the door
without reservations.
LCB rules apply.
Roast Beef Dinner,
noon-4 p.m. Sunday, The
Knights of Columbus,
St. Dennis Home
Association, Main Street,
Glen Lyon. $9 adults; $5
children; free for children
younger than 6. Roast
beef with gravy, mashed
potatoes, vegetables,
coleslaw, roll and butter,
desserts, refreshments.
See members for tickets
or purchase at the door.
Take outs, noon-1 p.m.
only.
Chicken Barbecue, Flea
Market and Craft Sale,
noon-4 p.m. Sunday,
Exaltation of the Holy
Cross Church, 420 Main
Road, Buttonwood,
Hanover Township. Half
chicken, baked potato,
coleslaw, applesauce,
roll, dessert and drink.
$9. Additional flea
market times are 8 a.m.-
2 p.m. Sept. 20, 8 a.m.-
noon and 6-7 p.m. Sept.
21 and 10 a.m.-noon
Sept. 22. 823-6242.
Vegetarian Soup and
Mini Homemade Bread
Fundraiser, pick up 1-3
p.m. Sept. 23 or 4-6 p.m.
Sept. 24, Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 17
Second Ave, Kingston.
The Abundant Life
Ministry in conjunction
with the Kingston
Seventh-day Adventist
Church is supporting its
Christian radio station;
WHMN-LP 107.3 FM.
Mini loaves of rye or oat
raisin bread, $1.50 each;
soup, 32 oz. containers,
$7.50 each. Vegetarian
soup varieties include
butternut squash, cream
of broccoli, cream
of mushroom, lentil,
split pea, tortilla-taco,
vegetable and veggie
turkey noodle. Order by
Monday. 570-736-3014 or
570-379-1177. Designate
preferred pick-up day.
Free Dinner, 5-6:30
p.m., every Monday, for
those in need, Christian
and Missionary Alliance
Church, 317 Luzerne Ave.,
West Pittston.
FUTURE:
Homemade Soups, 11
a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 20,
Noxen United Methodist
Church, Route 29, Noxen.
Served with bread,
butter, beverage and
dessert.
Pastie Sale, 8 a.m.-noon
Sept. 26, The Lehman-
Idetown United Methodist
Church Women. $5 each.
Pre-order by calling Bob
at 477-5219 or the church
office at 675-1216 by
Sept. 20. Leave name,
amount of order and
phone number.
Welsh Cookie Bake
Sale, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Sept. 21, Bennett-Derr
United Methodist Church,
Chapel and New Grant
streets, Wilkes-Barre.
$4 dozen. Pre-order at
amy35mm@yahoo.com
or 823-1469 by Sept. 18.
Chicken Barbeque, 4-7
p.m. Sept. 21, The Holy
Name Society at St.
Ignatius Church, 339 N.
Maple Ave., Kingston $9.
Eat in or take out. Half
chicken, baked potato,
corn salad, roll, dessert.
Call 288-6446 during
regular business hours,
any Holy Name Society
member, or Tom Havrilak
at 287-7768.
Yard Sale and Ethnic
Food and Bake Sale,
9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 28,
St. Michaels Orthodox
Church Hall, Church and
Winter streets, Old Forge.
Rain or shine.
Stuffed Chicken Breast
Dinner, 4-6 p.m. Sept.
28, St. Leos/Holy Rosary
Church, church hall, 33
Manhattan St., Ashley.
$9.50. Includes chicken
breast, potato, green
beans, coleslaw and
dessert. Take outs, 1-3
p.m. Call 825-6669 to
reserve tickets.
Family-Style Ham
Dinner, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Sept. 28, Sweet Valley
Volunteer Fire Company,
5383 Main Road. Take
outs at 4 p.m. $9 adults;
$5 children 6-11; and
free for children younger
than 6.
Chicken Barbecue,
noon-5 p.m. Sept. 28,
Exeter Borough Building,
1101 Wyoming Avenue,
Exeter. $9 per person.
Take outs available. 602-
0739.
Ham Dinner, noon-5
p.m., Sept. 29, Jenkins
Township Fire Hall,
Second Street, Port
Griffith. Adults, $8,
children, $4. Takeouts
available. Call for tickets,
Stephen, 655-5307;
Jack, 654-4977, or Bob,
655-1632; and at the
door. Asking for canned
goods donations. Brooms
available.
Crab Fest, 6-10 p.m. Oct.
4, The Rotary Club of
Wyoming , West Wyoming
Fire Hall, 926 Shoemaker
Ave., West Wyoming. $40
per person. All-you-can-
eat Baltimore hard-shell
crabs, clam chowder, hot
dogs, snacks, beer and
soda. For reservations
call Mark at 570-760-
1644 or Mike at 570-
237-5063. Full payment
required. Mail checks
to Mark Sobeck, 2327
Lakeside Drive, Harveys
Lake, PA 18618. Proceeds
benefit local and
international charities.
GOOD EATS!
TODAY
PLYMOUTH: The
Shawnee Cemetery
P r e s e r v a t i o n
Association, 6 p.m.,
at the the Dan Flood
Apartment Building
Social Room, Main
Street.
Planning commit-
tees for upcoming
events will be cho-
sen.
All are welcome.
For more informa-
tion, call Johanna
Lambert at 570-
779-1608 or Tom or
Ruth Jesso at 570-
333-4230.
SHICKSHINNY:
The Mocanaqua
Ladies Auxiliary
VFW Memorial
Post 6434, 6 p.m.,
at the Shickshinny
Senior Center.
The Irem Shrine Ladies are hosting an arts and crafts show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 22 at the
Irem Shrine Pavilion, Irem Country Club, Dallas. The show will feature more than 40 vendors with
all forms of crafts, arts, baked goods and collectibles. Food and refreshments will be available for
purchase. The event is free to the public, handicapped accessible and parking is free. Members of
the craft show committee, from left, first row: Sandy McAndrew; Hannah Lazarus; Kathleen Detwiler,
chairwoman; Charlotte Rukstalis; and Lynn Kolaski. Second row: Mary Ann Stelma, Mary Jo Sadvary,
Sharon Baloga, Carolee Aycock, Georgette Austin and Bernice Richards.
Irem Shrine Ladies hosting craft show
MEETINGS
The Kingston Township Board of Supervisors recently presented plaques to Chris Mathers, wife of
the late Supervisor Gary Mathers, daughter Nina Mathers Van Mater and granddaughters Mia and
Clair Van Mater, in memory and in honor of Gary Mathers service to the township as a a supervisor
fromJanuary 2012 to December 2012. At the presentation, fromleft: SamBarbose; Nina Mathers Van
Mater; Mia and Clair Van Mater; Shirley Moyer, vice chair; Chris Mathers; Jeffrey Box, chairman; and
Jim Reino, supervisor.
Kingston Township honors family of late supervisor
SEPTEMBER 13 TO15, 20 TO22, 27 TO29
DINNER ANDSHOW: $34 SHOW-ONLY: $16
CALL 283-2195 OR 800-698-PLAY
PRESENTS
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST. SWOYERSVILLE, PA
80022469
Cover up
because you
want to...
...not because
you feel you
have to.
You may be interested in learning about a clinical research study of an
investigational study medication for symptoms associated with
plaque psoriasis.
The purpose of this clinical research study is to determine the safety and
efectiveness of an investigational study medication for the symptoms
associated with plaque psoriasis.
You may qualify if you:
Are 18 years of age or older
Have been diagnosed with moderate-tosevere plaque psoriasis
for at least 6 months
have not previously taken etanercept (Enbrel

)
In order to qualify, there are other requirements that must be met.
Qualifed participants will receive all study-related medical care
and study medication at no charge
All appointments will be at a clinical research center near you.
570-582-7180
80025548
NEW YORK Tina Fey
cant seem to stay away
from 30 Rockefeller Plaza.
The funny lady, whose
Emmy-nominated 30
Rock had its series na-
le on NBC earlier this
year and has already sold
another female-centered
sitcom to the network last
month, will return to her
old stamping grounds once
again on Sept. 28, when
she will host the 39th sea-
son premiere of Saturday
Night Live.
Fey, of course, got her
start on the long-running
comedy series, on which
she was the shows rst
female head writer as
well as the co-anchor of
Weekend Update, rst
with Jimmy Fallon and
later with Amy Poehler.
She left Saturday Night
Live in 2006 to develop
the Emmy-winning 30
Rock but has returned
repeatedly over the years,
most notably in 2008,
when she appeared several
times to perform an imper-
sonation of vice presiden-
tial candidate Sarah Palin.
She also has hosted three
times.
Fey will return to the
show just as her successor,
Seth Meyers, prepares to
leave SNL to take over
for Jimmy Fallon as host of
Late Night in early 2014.
The current Weekend
Update anchor and head
writer will stay on board at
SNL until December.
Fey will be joined by
musical guest Arcade Fire.
Other talent lined up for
the fall includes host and
musical guest Miley Cyrus
on Oct. 5 (Taran Killam
should start honing that
Robin Thicke impression
right about now) and
Bruce Willis, who will host
on Oct. 12 with musical
guest Katy Perry.
PAGE 4C Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 11 L = TIME WARNER (LIMA) W= WATCH TV
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(8.2) LIMA 9 25 The Office Met Mother Friends Friends X Factor 'Auditions #1' (SP) Chef 'Winner Chosen' (SF) News Numb3rs
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A&E 27 411 The First 48 Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dynasty Duck Dy Duck Dy Dads (N)
AMC 16 320
CSI: Miami 'Target Specific'
(TV14)
CSI: Miami 'Wolfe in
Sheep's Clothing' (TV14)
<+++The Mummy (1999, Adventure) Rachel Weisz, John Hannah,
Brendan Fraser. Adventurers resurrect an Egyptian mummy. (TV14)
:45 <The
Mummy R...
APL 44 412 RivMon 'Silent Assassin' Monsters 'Asian Slayer' River Monsters 'Face Ripper' (TVPG) Monsters 'American Killers'
BET 55 - 106 & Park (N) (TVPG) The Game Real Husbands (TVPG) Scandal 'The Trail' (TV14) Scandal
BIG10 51 117 BTN Live (L) Big Ten Elite NCAA Football Classic Ohio State vs. Illinois 2002 (TVG) Big Ten Elite
BRAVO 50 - Tamra's OC Wedding Housewives/NewJersey Listing 'It's Personal' (TV14) Listing 'Trouble in Paradise' Top Chef 'Lucha Vavoom'
CMT 19 556 Reba Reba Reba Reba <++Twister (96, Act) Helen Hunt. Stormchasers pursue several tornadoes. (TV14)
CNN 32 202 (5:00) The Situation (TVG) OutFront A. Cooper 360 (TVG) CNN Films 'The Flag' CNN Films
COM 65 - South Park Tosh.O Colbert Daily Show Key & Peele South Park South Park South Park South Park KeyPeele (N)
CW+ 3 6 King-Queens '70s Show Seinfeld Rules of Eng Arrow 'The Undertaking' Super. 'Clip Show' (TV14) Cops Seinfeld
DISC 14 401 The 9/11 Tapes (TV14) The 9/11 Surfer (TVPG) 9/11 Firehouse (N) (TV14) The Presidents' Gatekeepers (N) (TV14)
DISN 70 512 GoodLuck Jessie Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally <Radio Rebel (12, Dra) (TVPG) (:40) Jessie (:05) GoodLk Mickey
E! 36 - Modern Family (TV14) E! News (TVG) The Kardashians The Kardashians The Soup (N) Hello Ross
ESPN 33 2 SportsCenter (TVG) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox vs. Tampa Bay Rays Site: Tropicana Field (L) (TVG) MLB Baseball (L) (TVG)
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FOOD 61 410 Diners Diners Rest. 'Mama Lee's' (TVG) Rest. 'Drowning in Debt' Restaurant Stakeout Diners (N) Thieves (SP)
FSO 42 106 Reds Weekly Blue J (N) NHL Hockey Classics Columbus vs Colorado (TVG) Slap Shots Blue Jackets Gridiron LIVE! (L) (TVG)
FX 52 765 4:30 <The Incredible Hulk <+++X-Men: First Class (11, Act) (TVPG) The Bridge 'Old Friends' (N)
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HALL 62 758 Little House on the Prairie Little House 'Troublemaker' <++See Jane Date (03, Rom) (TV14) Frasier Frasier
HGTV 57 402 House Hunt. House Hunt. House Hunt. House Hunt. Buying and Selling 'David' Property 'Marla and Adam' HouseH (N) House (N)
HIST 41 413 Earth Made The 4.5 billion year story of Earth. (TVPG) Predicted 9/11 (TVPG) 102 Minutes/ Changed (TV14) (:40) Witness
LIFE 26 760 Unsolved Mysteries (TVPG) Unsolved Mysteries (TVPG) <+++A Walk to Remember (02, Rom) (TVPG) <Nights in Rodanthe
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TBS 15 719 Seinfeld Seinf. 1/2 Seinf. 2/2 Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang
TCM 59 310
(5:30) <++Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (68, Mus) An
inventor and his family travel to a magical land. (TVG)
<++++The More the Merrier (43, Com) People
who do not like each other share an apartment. (TVPG)
<+++Splendor in the
Grass (61, Dra) (TVPG)
TLC 38 - Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey (N) Here Comes Honey Cheer 'Learning to Trust'
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Cobie Smulders faces fnal season
of HowI Met Your Mother
LOS ANGELES Fifty nine
series will start their new sea-
sons on the ve networks this
fall to go along with the 26 new
programs getting added to the
lineups. All but one of those
shows will start the year hoping
to have a good enough year to
get brought back next season.
The cast and crew of How I
Met Your Mother start their
ninth season on Sept. 23 know-
ing that this is the last year.
After being teased for nearly a
decade, viewers will nally get to
nd out how Ted (Josh Radnor)
met the woman he would wed.
How that plays out through the
nal episodes isnt clear, but it
will all take place in whats sup-
posed to be the weekend leading
up to the marriage of Barney
(Neil Patrick Harris) and Robin
(Cobie Smulders).
If thats the case, Smulders had
better like the wedding dress
her character will be wearing
because shell be in it for a big
part of the year. The only break
will come, as has become the
norm with the Monday night
CBS comedy, during episodes
that will include ashbacks.
The end of How I Met Your
Mother is bittersweet for the
Canadian actress. Shes excited
about the opportunity to move
on to other projects, but shes
been on the show for so many
years that it feels like home. The
reality is that this is the end.
Just like fans of the show,
Smulders got to see the Mother
when Cristin Milioti appeared in
the last moments of the season
eight nale. There have been a
lot of different candidates for the
mother job over the years.
In the rst year, I thought I
was going to end up being the
mother, Smulders says. But
that went away in seasons two
or three. There still have been a
lot of people who wanted to offer
their theory. For me, all I cared
about was what I was doing.
Smulders is glad Milioti will
be on the series all season and
get to interact with the cast.
Her greatest fear was that the
character would be revealed in
the last scene of the very last
episode with Bob Saget whos
been the narrator as the voice of
future Ted since the start say-
ing and thats how I met your
mother and the screen going
black.
After this season, the cast will
go their separate ways. Smulders
has been thinking about future
work that could include stage
or even another series, though
shes leaning more toward work
in lms.
Right nowImexcited because
since we know this is the last
year, I have time to choose what
I want to do, she says.
Smulders is going to reprise
her role of Agent Maria Hill
rst seen in the feature lm
The Avengers in Captain
America: The Winter Soldier
that will be released in 2014.
Shes hoping to be part of the
Avengers sequel when it starts
lming.
Smulders will make guest
appearance as Hill in the rst
episode of the new ABC series
Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D,
which airs Sept. 24.
RICK BENTLEY
The Fresno Bee
Cobie Smulders, a.k.a. Robin Scherbatsky, will not be revealed as the mother in the
final season of How I Met Your Mother. That job, which also includes wife of Ted
Mosby (Josh Radnor, left) will go to a character played by Cristin Milioti.
Back where she began: Tina Fey will host season premiere of SNL
MEREDITH BLAKE
Los Angeles Times
Tina Fey will return to her old stamping grounds on Sept. 28 to
host the season premiere of Saturday Night Live.
Riddick (xd) (R)
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BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
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12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
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ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
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12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
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(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
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(DIgItal)
(Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM
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WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
10:30PM
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12:20PM 3:10PM 6:05PM 8:50PM
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**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday September 6th - Thursday September 12th
Advance Ticketing Available Nowfor :
The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo Sat, Sep. 14
Clean Guys of Comedy Thu, Sep. 19
UNSTOPPABLE A Live Event with Kirk Cameron
Tue, Sep. 24
The 2013-2014 Metropolitan Opera Series
Riddick in DBox Motion Code Reserved
Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
10:05p
One Direction: This Is Us 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min
2:00p 3:00p 4:00p 5:00p 5:55p 7:00p 8:00p
9:00p 10:00p
Getaway PG13, 1 hr 30 min - 2:40p 5:00p
7:15p 9:25p
The Worlds End R, 1 hr 49 min - 1:45p 4:20p
7:15p 9:50p
Youre Next R, 1 hr 34 min - 2:10p 4:30p
7:20p 9:40p
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
PG-13, 2 hr 10 min - 1:40p 4:20p 7:00p 9:50p
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13, 2 hr 12 min
1:55p 4:30p 7:10p 9:50p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min - 2:15p 4:25p 7:10p
9:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters PG, 1 hr 46
min - 2:05p 1:20p 4:30p 3:50p 7:05p 9:30p
Were the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min - 1:40p
4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
This Is The End R, 1 hr 47 min - 2:20p 4:40p
7:25p 9:45p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min - 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 40 min - 7:40p
10:10p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min - 2:00p
4:15p
The Smurfs 2 PG, 1 hr 45 min - 1:40p1:40p
4:10p
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: My
13-year-old son,
Wiley, was play-
ing a game on my
cellphone. I stupidly
forgot to delete a
short video of myself
engaged in a sex act
with my ex-husband, Cliff. Wiley
didnt confront me or mention it, but
given his sudden change in behavior,
Im almost certain he saw it.
The next morning I mentioned
it and apologized, hoping we could
get past the awkwardness, but Wiley
wouldnt admit this is whats bother-
ing him. He wont talk to me.
I divorced Cliff because he and my
son didnt get along, but in the last
six months we have been secretly
having an affair and we ultimately
want to get back together when Wiley
is 18. My son doesnt approve of him
and hes angry about it.
Im worried and embarrassed that
he saw me doing what I was doing in
that few seconds of video, and I dont
want to scar him or have him think
differently of me. I tried therapy for
Wiley it didnt help. Do you have
any suggestions?
Mortified in Arizona
Dear Mortified: Im printing your
letter because, once again, it illus-
trates the danger of putting videos of
a sexual nature on cellphones. I can
think of few people of any age who
dont prefer to think of themselves as
products of immaculate conception,
and your son is no exception.
Because Cliff and Wileys relation-
ship was so poor the three of you
couldnt coexist under one roof, dis-
covering that you are once more in-
timately involved with your ex must
have been traumatic and threatening
to Wiley. It might reassure him to
know that your seeing Cliff does not
mean you will be living together any-
time soon.
In the meantime, I recommend that
YOU talk with a therapist to help you
cope with the changed relationship
you now have with your son. Di-
vorced couples MUST remember that
they have to love their child more
than they hate each other.
Dear Abby: A year and a half ago, I
reconnected with Paul. We were in
grade school together and hadnt seen
each other for many years. We have
been extremely happy and want to
spend our remaining years together.
Because of our ages (were both
seniors) and separate families and
incomes, we feel marriage is not what
wed like to do. But we would like to
move in together.
Would it be ridiculous for us to do
that without being married? Will the
world condemn us? Will our children
understand or ostracize us? How do
we handle questions about why we
have chosen not to marry?
In Love in Louisiana
Dear In Love: Many older couples
do what you are considering because
being married would negatively affect
their retirement income. If your chil-
dren like Paul and his children like
you I doubt you will be ostracized.
Most adult children want their par-
ents to be happy.
If youre worried about how the
community will react, consider talk-
ing to a clergyperson about being
married in the eyes of God. As to
questions about why you have chosen
not to marry, apart from your family,
it is nobodys business and you are
not obligated to discuss it.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Moms brief cellphone video has lingering consequences for her son
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Friends
ask a lot of you, but dont feel
obligated. Give whats easy
for you to give, and do as you
please. Taking care of yourself
and being happy will be the best
thing for your friendship.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Easy
and effective solutions may be
right in front of you, but for
some reason you may be unable
to see them. So take it easy. Go
slowly into the days events.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). The apple
from the Garden of Eden was
supposedly delicious before Eve
and Adam took a bite, and poi-
sonous thereafter. Similarly, the
juicy knowledge you get at the
start of the day may be tainted
by days end.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). You
can avoid misfortune by being
silent. The talkative parrot is
shut up in a cage. Other birds,
without speech, fly freely about.
Saskya Pandita
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). No matter
how much you liked an endeavor
the first dozen or few hundred
times you did it, eventually youll
tire of it. Launch the search for
whats next.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You want
to make a difference. Getting
too deep into the minutia will
burn you out before you have a
chance to do any real work. Start
with broad strokes.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You are
part of a human chain. Your
positioning does depend on
the links before and after you.
Understand where this chain is
anchored, and youll know better
the direction in which you need
to stretch.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Sometimes you have to open
your eyes to see, and other
times you have to close them.
Both kinds of observational
opportunities will be present
today.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
The Internet is rife with bizarre
ideas. Youre susceptible now,
so beware: If you read enough
about people who want to cook
in their dishwashers or grow
tails, you may entertain a few
strange notions, too.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Is
it wrong to spend so much time
and energy questing for new
experiences? Not wrong, exactly
more like misguided. An expe-
rience doesnt have to be sought
after.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Every
relationship is different. They
each have their own color and
tone. Dont be afraid of making
new connections or watching
your friends make new
connections.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Can a
day of happiness be enough to
make someone entirely happy?
According to Aristotle, the
answer is no. However, you could
prove the philosopher wrong
today.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept. 11).
You wont fully understand the
big picture, and thats OK. As
long as you can see whats in
front of you and take the next
step, youll do remarkable things
October brings a happy reunion.
November ends a financial issue.
Family expands in February. Your
lucky numbers are: 13, 40, 50, 47
and 25.
PAGE 6C Wednesday, September 11, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS/TASTE www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MCT Photo
Whether theyre Sun Golds or Tumbling Toms or heirlooms named
yellow pear or black plum, cherry tomatoes can play multiple roles
beyond the salad bowl.
to enjoy roasted tomatoes is together with pasta. Some
possibilities: Penne, roasted tomatoes and white beans;
spaghetti, roasted tomatoes, feta and garlicky shrimp;
roasted tomatoes, avocado and chilies; roasted toma-
toes, artichoke hearts, olives and lemon zest.
SPAGHETTI WITH ROASTED TOMATOES AND
ANCHOVY-GARLIC BREAD CRUMBS
2 pounds plum tomatoes, halved
cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
4 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
2 cups stale country bread or baguette, torn into
pieces
4 anchovy llets, coarsely chopped
12 ounces spaghetti
1 tablespoon nely chopped fresh parsley leaves
1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Arrange a wire rack
on top of a rimmed baking sheet. Place the tomatoes
on the rack, cut-sides up. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons
olive oil and sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. Bake
until the tomatoes are shriveled but still a little juicy,
1hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes.
2. Heat cup of olive oil and the garlic in a small
skillet over medium-low heat until just fragrant, about
2 minutes. Do not let the garlic brown. Remove from
the heat and set aside.
3. Combine bread and anchovies in the workbowl of a
food processor and process until nely chopped.
4. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the
spaghetti and cook until al dente.
5. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil over medium
heat and add the bread crumb mixture. Cook, stirring
occasionally, until toasted. Remove from heat, stir in
parsley, and set aside.
6. Drain pasta, leaving some water clinging to it.
Return pasta to pot and toss with tomatoes and gar-
lic oil. Season with salt. Divide among pasta bowls,
sprinkle each portion with bread crumbs, and serve
immediately. Makes 4 servings.
Tomato
From page 2C
St. Mary Antiochian Orthodox Church, 905 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, will begin the 21st year of its
spaghetti dinner from 4-6:30 p.m. on Thursday in the church hall. Dinner includes pasta, salad, bread,
dessert and beverage. Cost is $7 per ticket. Price for children ages 6-10 is $5. Patrons can choose from
six different pastas and five different sauces. Participants, from left, first row, are Nancy Tenneriello,
Mary Mamary, Lorraine George, Dallal Neddoff, Peggy Malta and Roberta Grish. Second row: Deacon
John Karam, Liz Kuhl, George Morrash, Leo Solomon, the Very Rev. Dr. David Hester, Deanie Moses,
Lillian Bonomo, Bertie Molnar, Corinne Censulla, Joanne Tenneriello and Gloria Attar.
St. Mary Antiochian Church
resumes Thursday spaghetti dinner
Brooks and Co. Salon, 75 S. Wyoming
Ave., Edwardsville, is hosting a fun-
draiser event from noon to 4 p.m.
on Sunday. Through the help of the
Fallen Officers Remembered orga-
nization, the business would like to
purchase two bullet-proof vests for
two local police officers. There will
be a cut-a-thon, raffles, give-aways,
ribbons for purchase, face painting
and some light refreshments. All of
the money raised will be donated to
Fallen Officers Remembered to pur-
chase the vests. Visit www.fallenof-
ficersremembered.org. Participants,
from left: Colleen Murphy Blasi,
manicurist; Ashlee Balent, stylist;
Mary Ann Brooks, owner and stylist;
Bianca Rubino, stylist; and Kristen
McDermott, stylist.
Brooks and Co. hosting fundraiser
The Lutheran Brotherhood and St. Pauls Lutheran Church, Route 118, Dallas, will hold its first family-style
roast beef dinner for the fall from 4-6:30 p.m. on Sept. 21. Take outs from 3:30 p.m. Cost is $9 for adults
and $4 for children. Tickets are available at the door. Building is wheelchair accessible. Committee mem-
bers, from left, first row, are Don Carey, Vernon Crispell, Joe Hardisky, Lee Fett and Bob McGuire. Second
row: Brad Ide, Howard Shafer, Dave Kowalek, Bill Peiffer, Mark Walters and Larry Corpus.
Roast beef dinner planned
Holy Family Parish, Sugar Notch, recently conducted vacation Bible school. The Kingdom Rock
program focused on daily interactive Bible stories, skits, songs, crafts and tasty treats. Each child
received a T-shirt and personal photo as a remembrance of their community and faith-filled experi-
ences. Participants, from left, first row, are Cael Ropietski; Eli Ropietski; Ally George; Skya Ropietski;
Alexus Kuklewicz; the Rev. Joseph Kakareka, pastor; Jacob Slatko; and Alivia Kuklewicz. Second row:
Mary Ann Bodzio, teacher; Emma George; Hunter Pearson; and Anne Richards, teacher. Third row: Fran
Romanowski, co-ordinator; Bonnie Balakier, teacher; Madelyn Grilz; Auggie George; Alley Quin; and
Marcia Panetta, teacher. Also attending were John Koss and Sean Quin.
Holy Family Parish holds vacation Bible school
Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs is sponsoring a trip
for two, fall foliage tour of
New England rafe in con-
junction with the Osterhout
Free Library Fall Gala.
The gala will be held
at 6 p.m. on Oct. 4 at
the Westmoreland Club
and the winner will be
announced that night. The
trip includes eight days and
seven nights at rst class
hotels with daily breakfast,
a tour of Boston, Plymouth
Rock, Hyannis, Marthas
Vineyard, Rhode Island,
Connecticut, Vermont, New
Hampshire and Portland
and Kennebunkport,
Maine, and has a value of
up to $3,500.
Rafe tickets are $20
each and are available at the
Osterhout Main Library,
71 S. Franklin St., or any
of its three branches. The
winner need not be present
at the gala but must be 21
years old. For more infor-
mation on the rafe or the
gala, contact Chris Kelly at
570-823-0156 ext. 218 or
ckelly@osterhout.lib.pa.us.
Mohegan Sun sponsors rafe for Osterhout
The General Federation of Womens Clubs
(GFWC) Northeastern recently donated baskets
of bath linens to the Manna House Traditional
Living Program, a transitional living facility for
adults 18-25 years of age who are struggling with
self sufficiency. The GFWC holds meetings on
the fourth Monday of the month at the Kingston
Fire Hall. Anyone interested in joining can call
Chris Baron at 655-2475. Presenting the bas-
kets, from left: Peggy Sosnak, president, GFWC
Northeastern; Stefanie Wolownik, program
supervisor; and Joan Basham, club treasurer.
GFWC Northeastern donates to Manna House
Some of the participants, from left: Pat Finan Castellano, co-chair, Gala; Glenn Lawless, director
of guests relations, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs; Rick Miller, executive director, Osterhout Free
Library; and Molly Hoegen, co-chair.
HELLER
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Fresh Made Cider Unpasteurized, Fresh Milk, Fresh Eggs and More!
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80011205
NEW YORK Tina Fey
cant seem to stay away
from 30 Rockefeller Plaza.
The funny lady, whose
Emmy-nominated 30
Rock had its series na-
le on NBC earlier this
year and has already sold
another female-centered
sitcom to the network last
month, will return to her
old stamping grounds once
again on Sept. 28, when
she will host the 39th sea-
son premiere of Saturday
Night Live.
Fey, of course, got her
start on the long-running
comedy series, on which
she was the shows rst
female head writer as
well as the co-anchor of
Weekend Update, rst
with Jimmy Fallon and
later with Amy Poehler.
She left Saturday Night
Live in 2006 to develop
the Emmy-winning 30
Rock but has returned
repeatedly over the years,
most notably in 2008,
when she appeared several
times to perform an imper-
sonation of vice presiden-
tial candidate Sarah Palin.
She also has hosted three
times.
Fey will return to the
show just as her successor,
Seth Meyers, prepares to
leave SNL to take over
for Jimmy Fallon as host of
Late Night in early 2014.
The current Weekend
Update anchor and head
writer will stay on board at
SNL until December.
Fey will be joined by
musical guest Arcade Fire.
Other talent lined up for
the fall includes host and
musical guest Miley Cyrus
on Oct. 5 (Taran Killam
should start honing that
Robin Thicke impression
right about now) and
Bruce Willis, who will host
on Oct. 12 with musical
guest Katy Perry.
PAGE 4C Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 11 L = TIME WARNER (LIMA) W= WATCH TV
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Mummy R...
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BIG10 51 117 BTN Live (L) Big Ten Elite NCAA Football Classic Ohio State vs. Illinois 2002 (TVG) Big Ten Elite
BRAVO 50 - Tamra's OC Wedding Housewives/NewJersey Listing 'It's Personal' (TV14) Listing 'Trouble in Paradise' Top Chef 'Lucha Vavoom'
CMT 19 556 Reba Reba Reba Reba <++Twister (96, Act) Helen Hunt. Stormchasers pursue several tornadoes. (TV14)
CNN 32 202 (5:00) The Situation (TVG) OutFront A. Cooper 360 (TVG) CNN Films 'The Flag' CNN Films
COM 65 - South Park Tosh.O Colbert Daily Show Key & Peele South Park South Park South Park South Park KeyPeele (N)
CW+ 3 6 King-Queens '70s Show Seinfeld Rules of Eng Arrow 'The Undertaking' Super. 'Clip Show' (TV14) Cops Seinfeld
DISC 14 401 The 9/11 Tapes (TV14) The 9/11 Surfer (TVPG) 9/11 Firehouse (N) (TV14) The Presidents' Gatekeepers (N) (TV14)
DISN 70 512 GoodLuck Jessie Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally <Radio Rebel (12, Dra) (TVPG) (:40) Jessie (:05) GoodLk Mickey
E! 36 - Modern Family (TV14) E! News (TVG) The Kardashians The Kardashians The Soup (N) Hello Ross
ESPN 33 2 SportsCenter (TVG) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox vs. Tampa Bay Rays Site: Tropicana Field (L) (TVG) MLB Baseball (L) (TVG)
ESPN2 34 4 Horn (N) Interrupt (N) NFL Live (N) (TVG) WNBA Basketball Phoenix vs Chicago (L) (TVG) FIBA Basketball (TVG)
EWTN - 560 EWTN News Teresa Daily Mass (TVG) EWTN Live (TVG) EWTN News Holy Rosary Catalogue Vaticano
FAM 17 729 Home Videos (TVPG) <++Bringing Down the House (03, Com) (TV14) Spell-Mageddon Home Videos (TVPG)
FNC 46 201 Special Report (TVG) FOX Report (TVG) The O'Reilly Factor (TVG) Hannity On the Record
FOOD 61 410 Diners Diners Rest. 'Mama Lee's' (TVG) Rest. 'Drowning in Debt' Restaurant Stakeout Diners (N) Thieves (SP)
FSO 42 106 Reds Weekly Blue J (N) NHL Hockey Classics Columbus vs Colorado (TVG) Slap Shots Blue Jackets Gridiron LIVE! (L) (TVG)
FX 52 765 4:30 <The Incredible Hulk <+++X-Men: First Class (11, Act) (TVPG) The Bridge 'Old Friends' (N)
GOLF 58 111 Golf Central Road to School (N) Academy On the Range PGA Golf On the Range
HALL 62 758 Little House on the Prairie Little House 'Troublemaker' <++See Jane Date (03, Rom) (TV14) Frasier Frasier
HGTV 57 402 House Hunt. House Hunt. House Hunt. House Hunt. Buying and Selling 'David' Property 'Marla and Adam' HouseH (N) House (N)
HIST 41 413 Earth Made The 4.5 billion year story of Earth. (TVPG) Predicted 9/11 (TVPG) 102 Minutes/ Changed (TV14) (:40) Witness
LIFE 26 760 Unsolved Mysteries (TVPG) Unsolved Mysteries (TVPG) <+++A Walk to Remember (02, Rom) (TVPG) <Nights in Rodanthe
LMN 68 - <++Dead at 17 (08, Dra) (TV14) <++Accused at 17 (10, Dra) (TV14) <A Girl Like Me: The G...
MSNBC 40 - PoliticsNation (TVPG) Hardball (TVG) All in With C. Hayes (TVG) Rachel Maddow (TVPG) The Last Word (TVG)
NGEO 48 - Aryan Brotherhood (TV14) 9/11 'Voices fromthe Air' Bush on 9/ 11 (TV14) 9/11 'Where Were You?' Witness 'DC 9/11' (TV14)
NICK 23 501 SpongeBob SpongeBob Sam & Cat SpongeBob Full House Full House Full House Full House Full House Full House
OXY 63 - 5:30 I'm Havi I'm Having Their Baby <++The Back-Up Plan (10, Rom) (TV14) Too Young to Marry?
SPIKE 21 523 (5:00) <+++Man on Fire (04, Act) (TVMA) <++Remember the Titans (00, Dra) (TVPG) Movie
STO 25 104 3:30 All Bets Tribe Report MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals vs. Cleveland Indians Site: Progressive Field (TVG) Sunday S. Tee Up
SYFY 39 762 Ghost Mine Ghost Mine Paranormal Witness Witness 'A Ghostly Affair' G.Mine 'The Lost Chamber'
TBS 15 719 Seinfeld Seinf. 1/2 Seinf. 2/2 Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang
TCM 59 310
(5:30) <++Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (68, Mus) An
inventor and his family travel to a magical land. (TVG)
<++++The More the Merrier (43, Com) People
who do not like each other share an apartment. (TVPG)
<+++Splendor in the
Grass (61, Dra) (TVPG)
TLC 38 - Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey Boo Honey (N) Here Comes Honey Cheer 'Learning to Trust'
TNT 31 738 Castle 'A Rose for Everafter' Castle 'Sucker Punch' Castle 'The Third Man' Castle 'Suicide Squeeze' Castle
TRAV 49 416 Foods 'Chengdu' (TVPG) Man v. Food Man v. Food Digfellas (N) Digfellas (N) Toy Hunter Toy Hunter Food Paradise
TRU 37 - South Beach South Beach Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
TVL 47 - M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Boston Legal (TVPG) Boston Legal (TVPG) Loves Ray Loves Ray Hot/ Cleve. Hot/ Cleve.
USA 18 718 NCIS 'Royals and Loyals' NCIS 'Worst Nightmare' NCIS 'Kill Screen' (TV14) Royal P 'Bones to Pick' (N) NCIS 'The Good Son' (TV14)
WE 60 766 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Tamar/Vince 'It's a Herbert' Tamar/Vince 'It's a Herbert' Tamar/Vince 'It's a Herbert'
WGN - 9 Home Videos (TVPG) Home Videos (TVPG) Rules of Eng Rules of Eng Rules of Eng Parks/Rec Parks/Rec Parks/Rec
Cobie Smulders faces fnal season
of HowI Met Your Mother
LOS ANGELES Fifty nine
series will start their new sea-
sons on the ve networks this
fall to go along with the 26 new
programs getting added to the
lineups. All but one of those
shows will start the year hoping
to have a good enough year to
get brought back next season.
The cast and crew of How I
Met Your Mother start their
ninth season on Sept. 23 know-
ing that this is the last year.
After being teased for nearly a
decade, viewers will nally get to
nd out how Ted (Josh Radnor)
met the woman he would wed.
How that plays out through the
nal episodes isnt clear, but it
will all take place in whats sup-
posed to be the weekend leading
up to the marriage of Barney
(Neil Patrick Harris) and Robin
(Cobie Smulders).
If thats the case, Smulders had
better like the wedding dress
her character will be wearing
because shell be in it for a big
part of the year. The only break
will come, as has become the
norm with the Monday night
CBS comedy, during episodes
that will include ashbacks.
The end of How I Met Your
Mother is bittersweet for the
Canadian actress. Shes excited
about the opportunity to move
on to other projects, but shes
been on the show for so many
years that it feels like home. The
reality is that this is the end.
Just like fans of the show,
Smulders got to see the Mother
when Cristin Milioti appeared in
the last moments of the season
eight nale. There have been a
lot of different candidates for the
mother job over the years.
In the rst year, I thought I
was going to end up being the
mother, Smulders says. But
that went away in seasons two
or three. There still have been a
lot of people who wanted to offer
their theory. For me, all I cared
about was what I was doing.
Smulders is glad Milioti will
be on the series all season and
get to interact with the cast.
Her greatest fear was that the
character would be revealed in
the last scene of the very last
episode with Bob Saget whos
been the narrator as the voice of
future Ted since the start say-
ing and thats how I met your
mother and the screen going
black.
After this season, the cast will
go their separate ways. Smulders
has been thinking about future
work that could include stage
or even another series, though
shes leaning more toward work
in lms.
Right nowImexcited because
since we know this is the last
year, I have time to choose what
I want to do, she says.
Smulders is going to reprise
her role of Agent Maria Hill
rst seen in the feature lm
The Avengers in Captain
America: The Winter Soldier
that will be released in 2014.
Shes hoping to be part of the
Avengers sequel when it starts
lming.
Smulders will make guest
appearance as Hill in the rst
episode of the new ABC series
Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D,
which airs Sept. 24.
RICK BENTLEY
The Fresno Bee
Cobie Smulders, a.k.a. Robin Scherbatsky, will not be revealed as the mother in the
final season of How I Met Your Mother. That job, which also includes wife of Ted
Mosby (Josh Radnor, left) will go to a character played by Cristin Milioti.
Back where she began: Tina Fey will host season premiere of SNL
MEREDITH BLAKE
Los Angeles Times
Tina Fey will return to her old stamping grounds on Sept. 28 to
host the season premiere of Saturday Night Live.
Riddick (xd) (R)
1:30PM 4:25PM 7:25PM
10:10PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
8
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2 guns (digital) (R)
10:20PM
Blue Jasmine (digital) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
closed ciRcuit (digital) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM 10:15PM
conJuRing, the (digital) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
elysium (digital) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
getaway, the (digital) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM 9:15PM
kick-ass 2 (digital) (R)
9:20PM
Lee DanieLs ButLer, the (DigitaL)
(Pg-13)
12:30PM 3:40PM 7:05PM 10:05PM
moRtal instRuments (digital)
(Pg-13)
12:25PM 3:45PM 6:45PM 9:45PM
one diRection: this is us (3d) (Pg)
11:55AM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM 7:10PM
8:25PM 9:40PM
one diRection: this is us (digital)
(Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PeRcy Jackson: sea of monsteRs
(3d) (Pg)
1:25PM 6:55PM
PeRcy Jackson: sea of monsteRs
(digital) (Pg)
4:05PM 9:50PM
Planes (3d) (Pg)
2:30PM 7:10PM
Planes (digital) (Pg)
12:10PM 4:50PM 9:35PM
Riddick (digital) (R)
12:20PM 3:10PM 6:05PM 8:50PM
Riddick (xd) (R)
1:30PM 4:25PM 7:25PM 10:10PM
smuRfs 2 (3d) (Pg)
4:00PM
smuRfs 2 (digital) (Pg)
12:50PM 6:50PM
some like it hot (1959) (digital) (nR)
2:00PM 7:00PM
this is the end (digital) (R)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
ultimate life, the (digital) (Pg)
11:50AM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM 10:10PM
Were the MiLLers (DigitaL) (r)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WorLDs enD, the (DigitaL) (r)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM 10:20PM
Youre next (DigitaL) (r)
12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM 10:30PM
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MOVIE 1:30PM 4:25PM
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Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating. 8
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2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal)
(Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM
10:10PM
WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
10:30PM
RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (DIgItal) (R)
12:20PM 3:10PM 6:05PM 8:50PM
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Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
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***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
(12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday September 6th - Thursday September 12th
Advance Ticketing Available Nowfor :
The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo Sat, Sep. 14
Clean Guys of Comedy Thu, Sep. 19
UNSTOPPABLE A Live Event with Kirk Cameron
Tue, Sep. 24
The 2013-2014 Metropolitan Opera Series
Riddick in DBox Motion Code Reserved
Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
10:05p
One Direction: This Is Us 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min
2:00p 3:00p 4:00p 5:00p 5:55p 7:00p 8:00p
9:00p 10:00p
Getaway PG13, 1 hr 30 min - 2:40p 5:00p
7:15p 9:25p
The Worlds End R, 1 hr 49 min - 1:45p 4:20p
7:15p 9:50p
Youre Next R, 1 hr 34 min - 2:10p 4:30p
7:20p 9:40p
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
PG-13, 2 hr 10 min - 1:40p 4:20p 7:00p 9:50p
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13, 2 hr 12 min
1:55p 4:30p 7:10p 9:50p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min - 2:15p 4:25p 7:10p
9:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters PG, 1 hr 46
min - 2:05p 1:20p 4:30p 3:50p 7:05p 9:30p
Were the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min - 1:40p
4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
This Is The End R, 1 hr 47 min - 2:20p 4:40p
7:25p 9:45p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min - 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 40 min - 7:40p
10:10p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min - 2:00p
4:15p
The Smurfs 2 PG, 1 hr 45 min - 1:40p1:40p
4:10p
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 1D
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
NOTICE TO THE TAXPAYERS AND RESIDENTS OF NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT
LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of School Directors of Northwest Area School Dis-
trict, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania (the "School District"), proposes to adopt at a meeting of the
Board of School Directors that is to be held not more than thirty (30) days nor less than three (3)
days from the date of advertisement of this Notice a resolution (the "Resolution") authorizing,
among other things, the incurrence of nonelectoral indebtedness of the School District to be evid-
enced by certain bonds of the School District.
The caption and summary of the Resolution to be considered by the Board of School Directors
of the School District at such meeting is as follows:
A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS OF NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOL
DISTRICT, LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, SETTING FORTH ITS INTENT TO ISSUE A
SERIES OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS, SERIES OF 2013, OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT
IN THE AGGREGATE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF THREE MILLION TWO HUNDRED FORTY
THOUSAND DOLLARS ($3,240,000) PURSUANT TO THE ACT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, KNOWN AS THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT
UNIT DEBT ACT, 53 PA.C.S., CHAPTERS 80-82, AS AMENDED AND SUPPLEMENTED (THE
"ACT"); FINDING THAT A PRIVATE SALE BY NEGOTIATION IS IN THE BEST FINANCIAL IN-
TERESTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; DETERMINING THAT SUCH BONDS SHALL EVID-
ENCE NONELECTORAL DEBT OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; SPECIFYING THAT SUCH IN-
DEBTEDNESS IS TO BE INCURRED TO PROVIDE FUNDS FOR A CERTAIN PROJECT OF
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT WHICH CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING: (1) PLANNING, DESIGN-
ING, ACQUIRING, CONSTRUCTING, INSTALLING, FURNISHING AND EQUIPPING OF IM-
PROVEMENTS AND RENOVATIONS TO FACILITIES OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; (2) PUR-
CHASING CAPITAL EQUIPMENT FOR USE BY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT; (3) ADDITIONAL
CAPITAL PROJECTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO THE EXTENT APPROVED BY THE
BOARD; AND (4) PAYING THE COSTS AND EXPENSES OF ISSUANCE OF THE BONDS; SET-
TING FORTH THE REASONABLE ESTIMATED USEFUL LIVES OF THE CAPITAL PROJECTS
THAT ARE TO BE FINANCED BY THE BONDS; ACCEPTING A PROPOSAL FOR THE PUR-
CHASE OF SUCH BONDS AT PRIVATE SALE BY NEGOTIATION; PROVIDING THAT SUCH
BONDS, WHEN ISSUED, SHALL CONSTITUTE A GENERAL OBLIGATION OF THE SCHOOL
DISTRICT; FIXING THE DENOMINATIONS, DATED DATE, INTEREST PAYMENT DATES, MA-
TURITY DATES, INTEREST RATES AND REDEMPTION PROVISIONS (IF APPLICABLE) AND
PLACE OF PAYMENT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF AND INTEREST ON SUCH BONDS; AUTHORIZ-
ING SPECIFIED OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO CONTRACT WITH THE PAYING
AGENT FOR ITS SERVICES IN CONNECTION WITH THE BONDS; SETTING FORTH THE SUB-
STANTIAL FORM OF THE BONDS EVIDENCING THE DEBT; AUTHORIZING EXECUTION AND
ATTESTATION OF SUCH BONDS; PROVIDING COVENANTS RELATED TO DEBT SERVICE
APPLICABLE TO SUCH BONDS TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT AND PLEDGING
THE FULL FAITH, CREDIT AND TAXING POWER OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN SUPPORT
THEREOF; CREATING A SINKING FUND IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH BONDS, TO THE EX-
TENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT; DESIGNATING THE PAYING AGENT TO BE THE SINKING
FUND DEPOSITARY; DESIGNATING THE BONDS AS "QUALIFIED TAX-EXEMPT OBLIGA-
TIONS" UNDER SECTION 265(b) OF THE CODE; PROVIDING A COVENANT TO INSURE
PROMPT AND FULL PAYMENT FOR SUCH BONDS WHEN DUE; SETTING FORTH REGIS-
TRATION AND TRANSFER PROVISIONS WITH RESPECT TO SUCH BONDS; AUTHORIZING
THE EXECUTION OF ONE OR MORE INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS BY SPECIFIED OF-
FICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT (IF APPLICABLE) AND THE PURCHASE OF CERTAIN
U.S. TREASURY OBLIGATIONS OR ANY OTHER SECURITIES OR INVESTMENTS IN CON-
NECTION WITH THE PROJECT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING SPECIFIED OFFICERS OF
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO DO, TO TAKE AND TO PERFORM CERTAIN SPECIFIED, RE-
QUIRED, NECESSARY OR APPROPRIATE ACTS TO EFFECT THE ISSUANCE OF THE
BONDS, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE PREPARATION OF A DEBT STATEMENT
AND BORROWING BASE CERTIFICATE, AND THE FILING OF SPECIFIED DOCUMENTS WITH
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, ALL AS REQUIRED
BY THE ACT; DECLARING THAT THE DEBT TO BE EVIDENCED BY SUCH BONDS, TOGETH-
ER WITH ALL OTHER INDEBTEDNESS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT, WILL NOT BE IN EX-
CESS OF ANY APPLICABLE LIMITATION IMPOSED BY THE ACT; AUTHORIZING PROPER
OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT TO DELIVER THE BONDS UPON THE APPROVAL OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; SETTING FORTH
CERTAIN COVENANTS PRECLUDING THE SCHOOL DISTRICT FROM TAKING ACTIONS
WHICH WOULD CAUSE THE BONDS TO BECOME "ARBITRAGE BONDS" OR "PRIVATE
ACTIVITY BONDS," AS THOSE TERMS ARE USED IN THE INTERNAL REVENUE CODE OF
1986, AS AMENDED (THE "CODE"), AND APPLICABLE REGULATIONS PROMULGATED
THEREUNDER; AUTHORIZING THE PURCHASE OF BOND INSURANCE (IF APPLICABLE)
AND SETTING FORTH THE PROVISIONS, IF ANY, REQUIRED TO BE INCLUDED BY THE
BOND INSURER; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION OF A CONTINUING DISCLOSURE CERTI-
FICATE AND COVENANTING TO COMPLY WITH THE PROVISIONS THEREOF; APPROVING
THE FORM OF AND RATIFYING THE PREPARATION, USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF A PRE-
LIMINARY OFFICIAL STATEMENT AND AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT BY THE PURCHASER IN
CONNECTION WITH THE MARKETING OF THE BONDS; PROVIDING WHEN THIS RESOLU-
TION SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE PREPARATION, EX-
ECUTION AND DELIVERY OF ALL OTHER REQUIRED DOCUMENTS AND THE TAKING OF
ALL OTHER REQUIRED ACTION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY OF PROVISIONS;
PROVIDING FOR THE REPEALING OF ALL RESOLUTIONS OR PARTS OF RESOLUTIONS IN-
SOFAR AS THE SAME SHALL BE INCONSISTENT HEREWITH.
A copy of the full proposed text of the Resolution described above, which includes a copy of the
substantial form of the Bonds evidencing the nonelectoral indebtedness to be incurred by the
School District, may be examined by any citizen at the office of the Secretary of the Board of
School Directors of the School District located at the Business Office of the School District, 243
Thorne Hill Road, Shickshinny, Pennsylvania 18655, on regular business days (Monday through
Friday) between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., prevailing time.
The Resolution currently on file will be completed by insertion of certain information and will be
amended prior to adoption by the Board of School Directors to reflect the details of the proposal for
the purchase of such indebtedness (the "Purchase Proposal") presented to the Board of School
Directors of the School District at such meeting by the Purchaser of the Bonds (the "Purchaser").
The Resolution may be amended in any other respect upon final adoption by the Board of School
Directors of the School District as the Board of School Directors of the School District may deem
necessary or appropriate or as may be required by the Purchase Proposal of the Purchaser
presented at such meeting.
THE RESOLUTION CURRENTLY ON FILE, AMONG OTHER THINGS, ESTIMATES THE
PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF THE NONELECTORAL INDEBTEDNESS TO BE INCURRED BY THE
SCHOOL DISTRICT TO BE $3,240,000; HOWEVER, SUCH AMOUNT MAY BE INCREASED OR
DECREASED PRIOR TO FINAL ADOPTION.
If the Resolution is adopted, a notice of adoption, including a summary of any omitted details
(including the amount of indebtedness to be incurred and the principal amount of the Bonds to be
issued, the purchase price for the Bonds, the interest rates to be borne by the Bonds, the maturity
dates and redemption provisions of the Bonds, and a summary of any other amendments made on
final adoption) will be advertised after adoption and posted in accordance with the provisions of the
Local Government Unit Debt Act.
This Notice is published in compliance with the Local Government Unit Debt Act of the Com-
monwealth of Pennsylvania.
Board of School Directors of Northwest Area School District
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing of the West
Pittston Zoning Hearing Board will be held on WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 25, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M. at the West Pittston Bor-
ough Building, 555 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, PA 18643, for
the purpose of considering applications for Variance from the
Flood Plain Management provisions of the West Pittston Bor-
ough Zoning Ordinance, as enacted and effective as of Septem-
ber, 2011. The applications to be considered are set forth below:
1. Mr. Joseph Agolino, Jr. for a property located at 308-310 Race
Street;
2. Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Agolino for a property located at 225-227
Wyoming Avenue;
3. Ms. Marijo Paulus for a property located at 19-21 Luzerne Av-
enue;
4. Ms. Marijo Paulus for a property located at 1010 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
5. Mr. Charles Barone for a property located at 714 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
6. Mr. Charles Barone for a property located at 716-718 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
7. Ms. Berdena Beatty for a property located at 8 North Street;
8. Mr. William G. Bell for a property located at 8 Montgomery Av-
enue;
9. Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Berry for a property located at 2 Phil-
adelphia Avenue;
10. Ms. Sara Bertocki for a property located at 10 North Street;
11. Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Bonomo for a property located at 9 Phil-
adelphia Avenue;
12. Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Burke, Jr. for a property located at 910
Susquehanna Avenue;
13. Ms. Marion A. Carver for a property located at 702 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
14. Mr. Christian Cavalieri for a property located at 712 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
15. Mr. & Mrs. Carl S. Coates for a property located at 1112
Susquehanna Avenue;
16. Mr. Anthony DalSanto for a property located at 314-316 Race
Street;
17. Mr. Nestor DeQueredo for a property located at 10 Delaware
Avenue; and
18. Mr. Carmen Donato for a property located at 19 Philadelphia
Avenue.
A copy of the Zoning Permit Application is on file and available
for public inspection at the Borough Secretary's Office, 555 Ex-
eter Avenue, West Pittston, PA 18643.
Any person with a disability requiring special accommodation to
attend this hearing should notify the Borough Secretary's Office
at 570-655-7782 as early as possible prior to this meeting.
All interested parties wishing to present testimony are encour-
aged to attend this hearing.
Issued by: Joseph D. Burke, Esquire, Solicitor
West Pittston Zoning Hearing Board
Auctions
MULTI-ESTATE AUCTION
Chuck's Auction Service
Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, 5:00 PM
1144 Exeter Avenue, Exeter
Beautiful 9 piece oak dining room set, curio cabinet, Bedroom
sets, corner table with wrought iron benches, Living room set,
computer desks, wrought iron patio set, pine cabinets, office
chair, and more. 100+ pieces Pfalzgraft- never used some
NIB and collectors club. Waterford, Depression and more.
Diecast trucks & cars-NIB, linens, Household, Jazzy scooter,
2 jet heaters, Metro shelving, bikes, tools, box lots and more.
See web sites for detailed list and pictures Information:
570-693-0372, chucksauction.com,
auctionzip.com #4156, AU001433
Special Notices
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
CRAFTERS
WANTED
For Pittston Marching Patriots
Craft Fair Sat., Nov. 23.
Fair is 9am to 4pm.
For info & contract Call Kristen
570-499-4957 or email
marchingpatriotscraftshow
@gmail.com
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
Chocolate wedding cakes
with delectable chocolate
icing are trending right now.
Try a new twist on tradition!
bridezella.net
6 different oysters -less than
$2.50 each!
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
Adopt-Loving couple will
cherish your baby, offering
security, endless love
and opportunities.
Expenses Paid.
Lori & Jeff
1-888-642-9650
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been issued to Kris Taylor-
Moore of Mount Pl easant ,
South Carolina, Executrix of
t he Est at e of Margaret E.
Olenik, Deceased, who died on
December 11, 2012, late of
Dal l as, Luzer ne Count y,
Pennsylvania. All creditors are
requested to present thei r
cl ai ms and al l persons i n-
debted to the decedent will
make payment to the afore-
mentioned Executrix or her at-
torney.
ROSENN, JENKINS &
GREENWALD, LLP
15 South Franklin Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0075
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
LEGAL NOTICE
E&M Real ty dba Fl at Rate
Storage 213 East Luzerne
Ave. Larksvi l l e, PA hereby
gives notice of it's intent to sell
at auction on September 21,
2013, at 10:00am, as per Sec.
1905 and Sec. 1907 of the PA
Self Storage Assoc., the con-
tents of the following units un-
less payment is received in full
before September 20, 2013.
#109
#113
#116
#128
#205
#218
LEGAL NOTICE
Frontier provides flat-rate res-
idential service for $16.32-
$19.89 and business service
f or $16. 53- $31. 72. Ot her
taxes, fees, and surcharges
may appl y. Fronti er offers
si ngl e party servi ce, touch
tone, toll blocking, access to
long distance, emergency ser-
vices, operator assistance, and
directory assistance. Use of
these services may result in
additional charges. Budget or
economy services may also be
avai l abl e. If you have any
questions regarding Frontier's
rates or services, please call
us at 1-800-921-8101 for fur-
ther information or visit us at
www.Frontier.com.
LEGAL NOTICE
The Wyoming Area Board of
Education will hold a work ses-
sion on Tuesday, September
17, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. The reg-
ular meeting will be held on
Tuesday, September 24, 2013
at 7:00 p.m. A non-public exec-
utive session will precede the
meetings. Meetings will be
held at Wyoming Area Second-
ar y Cent er , 20 Memor i al
St r eet , Exet er .
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
WANDA WANKO, late of Ed-
wardsville, Pennsylvania, who
died August 4, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to said estate
are required to make payment
and those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to John Wanko,
Executor. Basil G. Russin, Es-
quire, 1575 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort, PA 18704.
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
LOST CAMERA: Wyoming
County Fair, pocket/video/still
camera. Sentimental photos.
REWARD 607-625-3276
Notices
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Experi enced 24 hour mal e
caregi ver. Speaks Sl ovak.
$800 monthly with 2 days off.
570-814-9880
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
CINDERELLA
WED., NOV 6TH
$159 (ORCHESTRA SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
Travel Entertainment
FUN GETAWAYS!
Giants/Eagles 10/6
Yankees vs
SF Giants 9/22
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
Salem & Boston
Halloween, Oct. 18-21
1-800-432-8069
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
timesleaderautos.com
Find Your Next
Vehicle Online.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
PAGE 2D Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Administrative / Professional
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
is now accepting applications for
FULL TIME ADMINISTRATOR
OFFICE OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Requirements: Minimum Bachelors Degree in HR or related
fields, with at least three (3) years HR experience or at least
eight (8) years HR experience in a related field.
Knowledge of the Pennsylvania School Code, certification,
employment and education law, labor law, labor relations and
HR management. Salary to commensurate with experience.
Send letter of interest, resume and credentials by 4:00 PM,
September 18, 2013 to:
Dr. Bernard S. Prevuznak,
Superintendent
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
730 S. Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
An equal opportunity employer
M/FH/V
Building / Construction / Skilled
ESTIMATOR
Local Commercial General Contractor is seeking an
experienced Full Time Estimator. Candidate will work with
management & be responsible for attending pre-bid meetings,
entire bid process including blue print take offs, solicitation of
pricing, job site visits & pictures. Marketing experience is a
plus. Salary based upon experience. Company has been in
business for over 25 years and offers competitive wages, paid
vacation and holiday time off, health benefits and 401 (k) profit
sharing plan. Please forward your resume in confidence to:
Human Resource Dept.
Champion Builders, Inc.
239 Pringle Street, Kingston, PA 18704
www.championbuildersinc.com
Education
HEAD START CURRENTLY HIRING
We are looking for DEDICATED individuals to join the HEAD START TEAM!
Full Time TEACHERS and Part Time ASSISTANT TEACHER positions
available in Wilkes-Barre, Edwardsville, Plymouth, Nanticoke and Hazleton
Centers; Classroom Substitutes needed for all locations. Visit our website at
www.lchs.hsweb.org for details and additional employment opportunities.
Extensive Fringe Benefit package includes Paid Holidays/Sick time/Training
and more; FT positions are eligible for health insurance or cash out option.
Submit/Fax resume/cover letter/copy of degree and transcripts and 3
Written Letters of Reference to:
LCHS, ATTN: Human Resources, PO Box 540, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18703-0540. Fax: #570-829-6580; Email: lchshumanresources@hsweb.org
Applicants must possess current ACT 34 State Police Clearance and ACT
151 Child Abuse Clearance/FBI Fingerprints (via DPW) as conditions of
employment. Due to the volume of responses anticipated, only qualified
candidates will be contacted. E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS.
Medical/Health
The Institute for Human
Resources and Services, Inc. is seeking candidates for
the following position:
Residential Program Worker
The primary responsibility is to assist adults with intellectual
disabilities in their homes. Applicants must be available to work
evenings and every other weekend and must possess a valid
PA drivers license and a high school diploma or
equivalency. The base rate is $9.20/hr.
during the training period and $10.00/hr. after the
completion of the training period.
Apply in person or email
resume to adeeds@ihrser.com
The Institute for Human
Resources and Services, Inc.
250 Pierce Street, Suite 301
Kingston, PA 18704
(Fax) 570-288-9112 EOE
Sales / Business Development
Keystone Automotive
Operations, Inc.
44 Tunkhannock Ave
Exeter, Pa 18643
Inside Sales Representative RV Parts & Accessories
Looking for candidates with customer service/ sales back-
ground. Automotive/ RV experience preferred but not
necessary. Interested candidates should have good
communication skills, be able to meet deadlines, be organized,
detail oriented and have experience in building
customer relationships.
Position will be located in our Exeter, Pa location, and we offer
attractive benefits including medical, 401 k, holidays
and vacation time.
Resumes can be submitted:
in person at 44 Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter Pa
or emailed to Jamie.panusky@key-stone.com EOE
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Travel Entertainment
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
CALL NOW LIMITED
SEATING AVAILABLE
F.L. Wright's
Fallingwater /Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains,
Lyndhurst Castle,
Tarrytown
Empire City Casino, Yonkers
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Building / Construction / Skilled
Equipment Operators
& Off Road Drivers
Local Construction company
is looking for experience full
time equipment operators and
articulated truck drivers.
Minimum of 3 years of experi-
ence. Competitive pay and
benefits package.
Email resumes:
latonainc@comcast.net
or send to Human Resources,
620 S Main St, Pittston, PA
18640. EOE.
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
CHILD CARE AIDE
Part time position for after
school program avai l abl e.
Pl ease cal l 570-735-9290
Clerical
Automotive
Claims
Assistant
The Claims Team Leader is
responsible for directing a
team of claims assistants.
The Team Lead delegates
and distributes claims to the
team. They provide guid-
ance and training to assist-
ants during the claims pro-
cess. They assist with escal-
ated calls and customer is-
sues and works to resolve
problem situations. The posi-
tion requires extensive auto-
motive service experience
and superior customer ser-
vice skills.
Applicant must be well or-
gani zed, have excel l ent
phone skills, able to commu-
nicate effectively. Basic typ-
ing skills preferable. Full
time position Monday Fri-
day. E-mail resumes to
jennifer.davailus@
pennwarrantycorp.com
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVERS
New Higher Pay!
Local Hazleton Runs!
CDL-A, 1 yr Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics
Apply: www.goelc.com
1-866-213-1065
Drivers & Delivery
CORE-MARK
HERE WE GROW
AGAIN!!
As we continue to add NEW
customers at our
Pennsylvania Division, we
continue to add MORE
drivers!
We are a National
Convenience Store
Distribution Company
Accepting applications
Sunday Saturday
8 am until 4pm
We are looking to fill the
following Full-Time Positions:
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
CLASS A DRIVER
HELPERS for our Helper to
Driver training program.
(Must have valid Class A CDL
to qualify for this program)
Competitive Salary,
Generous benefit package to
include Medical/Dental
Vision/STD/LTD and 401k.
$4,000 sign on bonus for
Class A drivers as well as At-
tendance/Safety and Perform-
ance Bonus programs avail-
able. Annual and merit in-
creases. Designed Route
Deliveries with great
equipment and Company
provided uniform and work
boots.
Drivers - Guaranteed
40 hours per week
RECENT GRADS
WELCOME!!
We also have Part-Time
opportunities available for
drivers, if you are looking to
supplement your income.
Apply @
100 West End Rd
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE!!! SHOW UP AND
BE INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants subject to
pre-employment
drug and background
check.
E O E
Electrical / Plumbing
ELECTRICIANS
Experienced electricians
wanted. Minimum 5 years
commercial construction
experience.
Fax/email resume to
570- 639-5383
jthomas813@excite.com
Help Wanted General
TAX
PREPARER
Free Tax School. Earn extra
income after taking course.
Flexible schedules. Small fee
for books & supplies.
LIBERTY TAX
Edwardsville & West Pittston
570-288-4007
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas 570-675-2240
Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp
570-208-1096
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OUTDOOR
POWER
EQUIPMENT
(OPE)
TECHNICIAN/
MECHANIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
IT/Software Development
WORDPRESS
WEB
DESIGNER
PRM, Inc. l ocated i n Ol d
Forge, PA is looking for a
qualified individual to assist
in Web Design and creation
using Wordpress. This indi-
vidual will create 5-10 page
websites for clients using a
Wordpress template or cus-
tom design. Full-Time with
benefits. Please e-mail re-
sume to Sherry@positiveres-
ultsmarketing.com.
Logistics/Transportation
ASSISTANT
DISPATCHER
Trucking Company with 24/7
operation seeks individual to
assist Dispatch office in fast
paced environment with
scheduling assignments,
drivers, etc. Exprience help-
ful, but will train the right can-
didate. Health & Life Insur-
ance, 401(k), plus. Reply to
hr@nichlostrucking.com
DRIVERS
NEEDED
CDL CLASS A
Full time. Home Daily.
Monday-Friday, night work.
Must have clean MVR & back-
ground with minimum of 1 year
experience. Must have doubles
endorsement. Benefits
available. Call Todd
570-991-0316
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible on-call
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS
Looking for compassionate
people to assist the elderly in
their homes. Personal care
and transportation required.
All shifts and flexible hours
available. Call 338-2681
or visit homeinstead.com/494
to apply.
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
Full time Medical
Receptionist for Mountain
Top office. Send resume:
The Times Leader
Position #4520
15 N. main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Village at Greenbriar
Assisted Living
Personal Care Aides
2nd and 3rd shifts
Good Starting Wages!
Will Train!!
APPLY WITHIN:
4244 Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd, Pitt-
ston, PA 18640
Cemetery Plots
DENNISON CEMETARY
Forty Fort
5 lots, good location
along road.
$2,000 for all.
717-695-9740
Commercial
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307, ex. 2772
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
Commercial
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage on
1.09 acre. Finished basement with
laundry room. Hardwood floors
and carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located on a
quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
DALLAS/LEHMAN
2 bedroom, 1 bath, New
Windows, Roof, porches and
siding. Remodeled kitchen.
5 Acres. $159,000 NEG.
570-675-0498
Houses For Sale
COURTDALE
Corby Road
NEW ON THE MARKET!
TRANQUILITY!
Scenic wooded lot with beautiful
view in the Fall & Winter. Private
and secluded great for building
your dream, camping and has ac-
cess for hunting .Seller Negoti-
able.
MLS#13-3739
$ 15,000
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Please call Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
TO SETTLE ESTATE
Two family, with garage, large
fenced yard, needs some
updating, new boiler,
water heaters & roof.
570-735-1058
570-704-8099
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year young ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
timesleader.com
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Provide preventative maintenance and repairs on all Walmart equipment
Performdiagnostics on the components of tractor engines, drive trains, HVAC systems and communication
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under an agreement with
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Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
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South Wilkes-Barre
Medical/Health
Join our teamat Heinz Rehab
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package including medical,
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401Kandmore.
Apply online at alliedservices.org
Bilingual individuals encouragedto apply.
AlliedServices is andEqual Opportunity Employer.
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
move-in ready. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Beautifully decorated, open
floor plan, excellent location,
this home features gorgeous
Amish wood floors, tile floors
in kitchen & baths, huge fam-
ily room built for entertaining,
inviting deck & yard.
MLS #13-3665
$299,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
New Price!!!
$58,900
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and
work in the same building, or
keep current tenant and use
the storefront for your busi-
ness. Former storefront fea-
tures open concept w/original
wood floors. Spacious resid-
ence features 3 bedrooms,
back porch and yard.
Call Christine
for a showing!
(570)332-88832
570-613-9080
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
REDUCED 10K!
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $135,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
PRICE
REDUCED!
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features. Lower level remodeled in
2009 is A-1 grade including family
room with fantastic gas fireplace,
wet bar, 3/4 bath & additional 4th
bedroom. Home also includes
new on demand tank less water
heater, securi ty system & i n
ground lawn sprinkler. Owners
have enjoyed this home for many
years, now it's your turn. Come &
take a look!
MLS# 13-2335
$259,900
Call Jim Banos
Call or text 570-991-1883
For appointment
jim.banos@
coldwellbanker.com
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
KINGSTON
Roomy, bright & cheery de-
scribes this 3 story home with
traditional charm. 5 BR, 2.5
BA, 2 stairways , wood fire-
place, solid wood doors, 3rd
fl. would make a great in-law
suite. One Year Home War-
ranty Included!
MLS 13-3669
$229,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
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Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo lovely large
rear yard garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY!
PRICE REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$89,900
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Theres an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25 LL Rec Room with
bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCED!!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
centl y pai nted & move-i n
r eady. Thi s 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
l evel l ot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
t o s o n l i n e , g o t o .
www.prudenti al real estate.
com & enter PRU7R4L5 in
the Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$139,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
PITTSTON
80 Rear Parsonage Street
Move right into this 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
Pergo floors. New plumbing,
new wiring & new replace-
ment wi ndows. di recti ons:
Main St, Pittston to parson-
age St; left on Miller St; right
on Rear Parsonage St.; home
is on the right.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3689
$47,900
Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
76 Rear Parsonage Street
Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom
home with large yard. Direc-
tions: Main St, Pittston to Par-
sonage St.; left on Miller St;
r i ght on Rear par sonage
St reet ; home i s on ri ght .
MLS 13-3690
$37,900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto Gir-
ard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Vieve 570-474-6307, ext.
2772
474-6307
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $46,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 5D
Apartments /Townhouses
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
This is a great investment op-
p o r t u n i t y . . . s e p a r a t e
utilities...very motivated seller.
MLS #13-1473
$75,000
Call Maria Huggler
570-586-3575
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
570-586-9636
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kings College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street.
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
WYOMING
Room for your business & 2
incomes from the apartments
upstairs. first floor commer-
cial space is updated beauti-
ful l y wi th 4-5 offi ces, ki t-
chenette & lower level confer-
ence room. Plenty of parking.
MLS #13-3565
$135.900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lots
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$600/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, newly
remodeled. Refrigerator &
stove. Big yard.
$700 month + utilities.
570-842-0740 before 8 pm
EDWARDSVILLE
2 Bedroom, recently
remodeled, hardwood floors
throughout, microwave, dish-
washer, washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator. Water included.
No Pets. $550/month.
570-709-5178. Bit Keller LLC
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated. Great neigh-
borhood. Non-smoking. Oak
composite floors, new wall to
wall carpeting in bedrooms,
new windows. 3 paddle fans,
bath with shower. Stove, refri-
gerator, dishwasher. OSP.
Coin-op laundry. $600/mo. +
gas, electric & water. Refer-
ences required. No pets.
Available Oct. 1st!
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor +
attic, new stove & refrigerator,
wash/dryer hook-up, off-street
parking. Water & heat in-
cluded. No pets. No Smoking.
1 year lease, $485/mo + secur-
ity, credit & background check.
570-947-8097
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
PAGE 6D Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Commercial
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovation Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Apartments /Townhouses
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
Pierce Street
3rd floor, 1-2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Newly remodeled building, off
street parking, all appliances,
including washer/dryer. $575 +
utilities. No pets, no smoking.
570-814-3281
KINGSTON
Spacious 2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Newly re-
modeled building, Living room,
Dining room, eat-in Kitchen,
private front balcony, off street
parking, all appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Available
now. $675+ utilities. No pets,
no smoking. 570-814-3281
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom. Off
street parking, freshly
painted, new carpet, bath-
room & kitchen. Water &
Sewer included. No pets.
$650/month, 1st month &
security. 570-332-4400
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, 1.5
baths & office. All appliances,
washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, kit-
chen, living room, bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$525 + Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MINERSMILLS
2 bedroom, 1st floor, $550/
month plus $550 security. Pay
your own utilities. Gas heat.
Fridge & stove. background &
credit check. NO PETS.
570-825-2306
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Large 1 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full kitchen, large dining
room. No pets, no smoking.
$465. Water, sewer & trash in-
cluded. 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Nice, clean 1 bedroom. heat,
hot water, electricity, fridge,
st ove, ai r condi t i oni ng,
washer/dryer availability all in-
cluded. Close to town. No pets
o r s mo k i n g . S e c u r i t y
$525/month. 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly renovated,
off street parking, washer/
dryer hook up. $700 heat, wa-
ter and sewer included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PITTSTON
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment on 2nd floor. Over-
size bay windows, hardwood
floors, granite counters, stain-
less appliances. All tile &
stone showers. Central air,
gas heat. Washer & dryer.
Water & garbage included. No
dogs. $1,250/month.
570-760-7326
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $500/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors.
$650/mo. 570-760-0511
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
Apartments /Townhouses
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
$595 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $650/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, 2nd floor apartment. 1
bedroom. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. No smoking. No pets.
$500 + security.
Call 570-823-6829
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
ASHLEY
2 bedroom. Water included.
$550 + utilities,
security & lease. No pets.
570-472-9494
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO-Short Term Available
Excellent Wilkes University
neighborhood, wood floors, park-
ing. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
KIDDER STREET
2 bedroom balcony apt., living
room, kitchen, bath, new car-
peting, freshly painted. $600
month + uti l i ti es. Cl ose to
Home Depot. 570-540-5312.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Apartments /Townhouses
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
WYOMING
BLANDINA APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utilities by ten-
ant. No pets. Non-smoking.
El derl y Communi ty. Qui et ,
safe. Off street parki ng.
570-693-2850
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
Houses For Rent
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
KINGSTON
1/2 DOUBLE
63 North Thomas Ave.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, new car-
peting, all appliances, includ-
ing washer and dryer, fenced
in yard, attic, basement and
storage. Cats and dogs OK.
$750+security and utilities.
570-639-5777
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$700/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
696-1195
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
PITTSTON
Available Oct. 1st. very nice
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Move in
condition. Gas range, fridge,
dishwasher, washer &dryer
included. Large yard. Beauti-
ful front porch. Corner lot with
2 car driveway parking. Nice
neighborhood. No pets. No
Smoking. $800/mo plus utilit-
ies, security & references.
570-655-4950
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
80 River Street
Newly remodeled two story,
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove & dryer,
washer hookup, two car
driveway, fenced yard, no
pets. $775/month + utilities.
1st, last & security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarredjs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
PLAINS
Single Home
Nice Yard, off-street parking,
plus garage. 3 bedrooms plus
small office, 1.5 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, gas
heat, air conditioning. Newly
renovated. No Pets.
$1,100+utilities. 570-655-4915
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013 PAGE 7D
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Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
4BR, 1 BA, fridge & stove,
washer/dryer hook up. Shared
yard. Non smokers. $950 +
utilities, security, references &
credit check. Available 10/1/13.
570-751-1600
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
HANOVER
LYNDWOOD AREA
1/2 double, very spacious, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths with all
neutral decor, large eat-in kit-
chen with oak cabinets, new
countertop & all appliances,
ample closets, full walk out
basement f or st orage, of f
street parking, spacious back
yard deck. $750/mo + utilities,
security & lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
SPRAGUE AVE. 2 bedroom, 1
bath, 1st floor duplex. New car-
peting & hardwood floors. Con-
veni ent t o Wyomi ng Ave.
B a s e m e n t s t o r a g e .
Washer/dryer hookup. $525
month + uti l i ti es, securi ty,
l ease. NO PETS.
EAST BENNET ST. Charm-
i ng 3 bedroom, hardwood
floors, new carpeting in bed-
rooms, laundry room off spa-
cious kitchen, stained glass
windows, off street parking,
convenient to Cross Valley.
$650. + ut i l i t i es, securi t y,
l ease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
LARKSVILLE
2 BR, refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher, washer/dryer hook
up. Private driveway. No pets,
$650 + utilities & security.
570-954-5903
NANTICOKE
185 W. Church St,
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, oil heat,
washer/dryer hookup. Small
yard. $550 + utilities & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 10/1/13.
570-270-3139
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON
ELIZABETH STREET
1 bedroom with neutral decor,
t i l e bat h, ampl e cl oset s,
screened in porch and private
yard. $350 month + utilities,
security, lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $13,000.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
KITTENS free Persian mix, 8
weeks old, 2 females, 1 male
All eating kitten chow, litter
trained, ready to go. 855-1232
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY '99
PRISM LSI
137,000 HYW miles, adult
owned, green/grey. Clean,
very good condition, depend-
able, excellent mileage. 4
speed automatic, A/C, all
power, rear window defroster,
tachometer, tilt steering wheel,
cruise control, am/fm/CD ste-
reo, air bags, ABS brakes, al-
loy wheels. $2,200. OBO 570-
417-7671 or 570-474-9828.
DODGE '03
GRAND
CARAVAN
AWD, $1,500. 570-262-1996
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
MERCURY SABLE 2002'
150K. $700
215-932-5690
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE
Brown tan leather, 85k miles
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS
Bluem V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
FORD F150 04'
4X2. Nice Truck!
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA ACCORD
EXL 10' 31,000K
Leather and well Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Autos For Sale
HONDA CRV 10'
Low Miles, AWD.
2 Available, starting at
$17,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
PONTIAC GRAND AM
02' $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
SUBARU OUTBACK 11'
Station Wagon, AWD.
43K Miles!
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
TOYOTA COROLLA 03'
5-Speed. $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Motorcycles
STRATUS 17'
Pleasure/
Fishing Boat
150HP Johnson motor, new
canopy Trolling motor, also.
Moving , Must Sell! $4,995.
570-498-9599
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02
SILVERADO XCAB
4X4 Sharp, Sharp truck!
$6,995
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4495. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AI R CONDI TI ONER 6000
BTUs EER 9. 9 $35.
570-574-6416
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU.
$50. 570-693-1454
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL/football cards '90
Fleer baseball $3. '91 Score
Baseball $3. '92 Topps base-
ball $5. '92 Pinnacle football
$3. '90 Fleer football $3. '90
pr oset f oot bal l $3. 570-
3135214 or 570-3123-3859
COCA COLA holiday caravan
truck $20. Linden hump back
clock Westminster chimes $75.
Hess '02 truck $20. Sight vise
for sighting guns USA $35.
Brown jug 2 gal. $30. Bolt cut-
ters $25. Humble toy gas truck
boxed $15. 571-735-1589
MATCH BOX models Yester
years 6 items $91. Days Gone
By 2 items $22. 571-287-6912
NASCAR variety 1.24 scale
cars 10 for $30. 15 trailers
$7.50 each. Bobby Labonte &
Rusty Wallace autographed
cars $75. each. Bud steins '93
- '03 $10. each. 570-239-2266
SUPER BOWL Memoriabilia
Jan. 6, 2003. Game seat cush-
ion, super bowl ticket, game
program, game duffle bag, vis-
itors guide all for $50. 2 night
st ands mahogany f i ni sh
24" wx20" h $100. bot h.
570-489-2675
Appliances
DISHWASHER Kenmore Model
665-13743K601 stainless steel, 3
years old, energy star $250.
570-868-6018
GAS FRYER, commerci al
heavy duty, like new, Cecil-
ware 43lb. Asking $400.
570-574-2967
HD TV (32" Sony Vega) in per-
fect condition - $50.00.
570-406-7607
REFRIGERATOR white, top
freezer G.E. 18.1 cu. ft. 6
months ol d $500. Hotpoi nt
electric dryer, white 6.8 cu. ft. 6
months old with little use $300.
570-675-0667
STOVE, gas Tappan, still us-
ing, white with black oven door
L o o k s & wo r k s g r e a t !
Nanticoke. $125. 831-5778
Baby Items
CRIB BEDDING by Pottery
Barns, boys blue, includes,
sheets, dust ruffle, bumpers,
seldom used, like new $70.
Also included 3 crib rail pro-
tectors. 570-287-9701.
Building Materials
DECORATI VE STONE 6
boxes. Fl at s. $500.
570-709-5178
FLOORING 20 sq. ft. 3/4" pre-
finished red oak flooring, short
lengths, tongue & groove 4
sides, 3 1/4 wide Bruce Dun-
dee. $50. CARPET PADDING
14'x14' room $45. 570-403-
0494
LADDERS aluminum extension
ladders. 32' $25. 36' $50., 40' $60.
24' 25. Pressure Washer Sand
Blasting Kit $20. Set of aluminum
ladder jacks $20. Wood extension
ladder FREE. 570-510-2436
Clothing
COAT men' s wi nt er coat ,
Dockers XXL wool blend, char-
coal grey,plaid scarf, like new
$30. 570-287-6155
Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE MACHINE. Pro-
Form PF 803030. Like new.
Paid $650, selling for $350.
570-498-9599
GYM Impex Tech rod gym,
similar to Bow Flex. Great con-
dition $99. 570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-569
Furniture & Accessories
BED, Craftmatic, single, com-
plete, motor, lifts & vibrator.
Excellent condition. $275.
474-6947
BEDROOM SET 4 pc. by Bas-
sett, double bed, maple finish
$550. DINING ROOM table, 4
chairs, solid pine, very good
condition $200. LOVESEAT
$50. Pecan COFFEE TABLE
with matching end tables $150.
570-735-6527
BEDROOM SET sol i d oak,
Pi er wal l uni t wi t h mi rror,
queen size bed & 12 drawers,
cabi net has 2 encl osed
shelves. Excellent condition
$400. 570-675-0502
CHAIRS 4 highback kitchen
chairs $25. George Forman
grilling machine $10. Call Bill
570-825-8256
CHAIRS, 4 High back, wooden
kitchen, $25 for all 4. Call Bill
825-8256
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, very good condition.
$500. 570-690-6451
PAGE 8D Wednesday, September 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
MATT BURNE Honda PRE-OWNED CENTER
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-Honda
570-341-1400
MATT BURNE Honda
MATT BURNE Honda MATT BURNE Honda
Call: 1-800-NEXTHonda View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
08 PILOT EX Gray, 48K ......................................NOW $18,532
09PILOTTOURINGBlack,48K.............................NOW$25,170
11 PILOT EXL Red, 44K .....................................NOW $25,581
11PILOTEXL Silver, 23K......................................NOW$27,309
PILOT 4WD
09 CRV LX TITANIUM, 44K.................................NOW $16,896
08 CRV EX Silver, 56K......................................NOW $16,969
11 CRV LX WHITE, 37K......................................NOW $17,682
10CRVEX Titanium, 56K......................................NOW$17,738
10 CRV LX GREEN, 24K ......................................NOW $18,289
10 CRV EX SILVER, 40K ......................................NOW $18,319
11 CRV SE titanium, 31K....................................NOW $18,793
10 CRV EXLBLACK, 38K............................................... NOW$19,499
11 CRV EX Silver, 29K.........................................NOW $19,533
10 CRV EXL Red, 43K ........................................NOW $19,993
11CRVEXTitanium, 35K......................................NOW$20,564
10CRVEXL Black, 23K........................................NOW$20,677
11 CRV EXL Gray, 28K.........................................NOW$21,965
12 CRVEX Gray, 17K...........................................NOW$22,932
CRV 4WD
08ACCORDEX SDNGrey,53K..............................NOW$14,221
09ACCORDEXSDNBlack,64K..............................NOW$14,749
09 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 53K ...........................NOW $14,982
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 35K......................NOW $16,528
11 ACCORD LX SDNGray, 30K ...........................NOW $16,717
12ACCORDLXSDNBlack,36K..............................NOW$16,728
12ACCORDLXPSDNBlack,20K............................NOW$17,871
10 ACCORD EX SDN Black, 21K .........................NOW $18,168
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 21K..................NOW $18,989
12 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 9K............................NOW $19,720
ACCORDS
10 ODYSSEY EX Blue, 47K ...............................NOW $19,477
10 ODYSSEY TOURING NAV-DVD Gray, 42K...NOW $25,978
11ODYSSEY EXL Black, 36K ...............................NOW$25,779
ODYSSEY
08 CIVIC LX 5SPD SDNBLACK, 78K......................NOW $9,789
11 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 25K ..............................NOW $14,461
11 CIVIC LX SDN BLUE, 36K .............................NOW $14,490
10 CIVIC LX SDNWhite, 33K ..............................NOW$14,584
10 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 9K ..............................NOW $15,364
12CIVICLXSDNTitanium,20K..............................NOW$15,870
12 CIVIC EX-NAVI Crimson, 31K...................NOW $17,932
12 CIVIC EXL-NAVI SDNWhite, 10K...................NOW$18,804
CIVICS
Call: 1-800-NextHoNda View: www.mattburnehonda.com
10INSIGHTEXGray, 38K....................................NOW$13,487
INSIGHT
$5,260
04 TOYOTA COROLLAS SDN
NOW
Gray, 132K
Was
$7,250
$19,862
NOW
07 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4WD
Navy, 95K
Was
$20,950
$13,594
10 JEEP PATRIOT 4WD
NOW
Gray, 51 K
Was
$13,950
NOW
$23,925
10 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL 4WD
Red, 42K,
Was
$25,950
$22,227
NOW
09 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD
Brown, 57K
$19,191
09 HONDA RIDGELINE TRL 4WD
NOW
Gray, 63K
Was
$19,950
$3,999
01 DODGE NEON SE SDN
AS TRADED
Burgundy, 88K
NOW
$15,247
07 HONDA PILOT LX 4WD
White, 61K
Was
$16,950
NOW
$15,641
07 FORD EDGE AWD
Cream, 54K,
Was
$16,950
$16,300
NOW
06 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER LTD 4WD
Navy, 33K
Was
$17,950
$14,535
08 NISSAN XTERRA S 4WD
NOW
Red, 53K
Was
$15,750
$7,590
01 HONDA CRV SE 4WD
NOW
Silver, 101K
$8,715
NOW
10 CHEVY AVEO
LT SEDAN
Blue, 56K
Was
$9,950
$7,438
04 TOTYOTA CAMRY LE SDN
NOW
Gold, 114K
Was
$8,350
$9,271
02 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
NOW
Navy, 76K
Was
$9,750
$10,456
06 PONTIAC G6 GTP CPE
NOW
V6, Black, 64K
Was
$11,500
$10,796
07 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD
NOW
Silver, 67K
Was
$12,500
$14,567
10 FORD FUSION SE SDN
NOW
Black, 9K
Was
$16,950
15,801
09 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING R-DVD
NOW
red, 57K
07 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL NAV/DVD, SLATE 54K $16,872
EXL DVD, BLUE, 26K $18,478
Due to the success of our , we are extending i t one more week!
WHAT YOU SEE
IS WHAT YOU PAY!
WHITE, 89K
03 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4WD
$7,795
NOW
12 FIT SPORT Silver, 2K .....................................NOW$17,288
FIT
HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
05 EX, GOLD, 89K $9,746
04 EXL V6, RED, 81K $9,898
08 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER
$12,666
NAVY, 48K
NOW
Was
$12,950
04 PONTIAC VIBE
$8,308
SILVER, 70K
NOW
Was
$8,950
09 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
SEDAN
$12,438
BEIGE, 68K
NOW
Was
$12,950
06 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN
NOW
Silver, 54K
$12,867
Was
$13,250
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
NOW
Silver, 9K
$13,759
Was
$15,750
07 LX, BLUE, 61K $11,011
07 EX, CARBON, 27K $14,582
$9,999
NOW
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
SEDAN
Brown, 58K
Was
$10,950
07 JEEP COMPASS AWD
$10,492
Blue, 46K
NOW
Was
$11,950
$10,970
NOW
08 HYUNDAI TIBURON
CPE 5SP
Silver, 44K
Was
$11,950
Furniture & Accessories
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, glass doors & shelves,
2 drawers & 2 doors on bot-
tom, solid oak, excellent condi-
tion $500. 570-239-5363
DESK Broyhill wood student desk,
4-drawers, dark wood tain, $65
Padded wood desk chair $25. Both
pieces in Excellent Condition. $75
for both. BUBNK BEDS twin over
twin 4299. 570-696-6986 after 3pm
or leave message$299.
DESK/COMPUTER & swivel
chair $50. Antique Cavalier ce-
dar chest $300. Used Compaq
computer, keyboard, speakers
$25. Accent table & matching
mirror $40. Oak coffee table
$50. Sony hand held Playsta-
tion $50. 570-829-2599
DESKS Sauder - desk with
hutch $25. Desk with side door
$15. Desk with drop leaf $15.
Desk wi t h 2 shel ves $15.
Bookcase $8. 570-654-2967
DINETTE SET Raymour &
Flanagan, drop leaf table, 4
upholstered chairs, like new
condition. Paid $660. sell for
$325. 570-287-6327
DI NI NG ROOM HUTCH
Cherry finish. Good condition.
78" tall by 32" wide. $125. for
details 570-868-5683
DINING ROOM SET table, 6
chai r s, br eakf r ont $150.
Double bed frame $50. Twin
bed frame $50. Microwavw
stand $25. 3 TVs 29" color
$25, 5 drawer oak dresser $35.
570-823-8442
DINING ROOM SET, dark
wood with 4 chairs & 2 exten-
sions, $60. Piano, Henry Miller
upright $250. 406-5661
DINING ROOM SUITE pecan,
lighted hutch, glass shelves &
doors, 4 door base with cut-
l ery drawers, oval tabe, 6
chairs $450. Vintage square
end table, 2 levels 30"h $30.
Bedsi de chrome commode,
like new $25. 570-287-1644
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
oak $40. Keyboard $25. pro-
jection TV $75. 570-824-0938
FUTON complete metal frame,
floral cover, excellent condi-
tion $200. 570-287-3056
LAMPS with shades, $30. Dry
sink, oak, $50. Dining room
oak, with hutch, $100. Book
case, 3 tier with bottom doors,
$25. 954-4715
LIFT CHAIR electric, good
condition, works gret, bl ue
$200. COUCH l i ght green,
sturdy, good condition $50.
570-823-9635
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $400, Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
RECLINERS 2 matching wing
back recliners, claw feet, cran-
berry color $50. for both. 1
mauve swivel rocker recliner
$35. 1 dark green recliner $35.
570-740-2892
Furniture & Accessories
LOGAN HALL TREE, Ethan
Allen part of new country col-
l ect i on #339407 current l y
priced at $1,599. color cotton,
brand new, perfect condition
44.5"wx78"hx18.35"d, 2 stor-
age drawers & beveled mirror
$725. 570-387-8375
MATTRESS PAD magnetic,
Visco Medic, provides thera-
peutic benefts $1200. new sell
$200. 570-474-5643
SECTIONAL taupe l eather
double hideabed, recliner &
chai se l ounge. Measur es
14'wx11' like new $900 OBO,
West Bend muffin toaster, 4
wide slots + egg cooker, warm-
er $45. Belgique stainless steel
skiller 6 quart $30. 852-9029
SOFA & love seat, beige floral
colors, very good condition
$100. 570-674-9716
SOFA & love seat, dark green,
gold & ivory $100. Gold swivel
rocking chair $40. Small end
tables with glass tops, white
wash wood (3) $60. Custom
drapes tan with gold tassels &
tie backs $100. Microwave
$25. 570-819-4951
SOFA 97" Bernhardt wi t h
down & 4 pillow, made in USA,
medium sage khaki color, ex-
cellent condition, like new, can
help with delivery $750.
570-905-7427
SOFA BED queen, very good
condition. $500 OBO.
570-655-0103 10am-4pm
SOFA floral 81" $110. Sharp
audio system, 4 features re-
mote & speakers $55. Polar-
oi d retro 60' s camera $20.
Juicer veg & fruit Omega $30.
Wesl o treadmi l l heart rate
sensor, $135. 570-740-1392
STOVE, gas Hotpoint $250. Gas
Dryer, Maytag $150. 4 pc. bed-
room solid wood, $300 Sofa hide a
bed, matching Loveseat & 2 end
tables. $225. 570-905-6574
TABLE solid oak, high pub
style 60" round with 2 swivel
high oak chairs.paid $650. sell
$200 firm. Excellent condition.
570-262-6283
TV Flat Screen 19"50; Entertain-
ment Center $10; Pi nk Wi cker
Chest $20; Black area rug $20; Mi-
crowave $30; Tiled kitchen table
w/2 chairs $50; Bed 2/frame, dress-
er, night table and mirrored dress-
er $40; 2 small dressers $25 each;
Queen size futon/bed $150; Roper
Washer $135 570-709-7076.
WOW! Beautiful Sealy & Serta
Mattress box-spring sets
W/Warranty in plastic bags,
cost over $900 each sell for
only $75 for full, All Sizes avail-
able. Pillow tops just $25 extra,
We Deliver
570-614-3877
Landscaping & Gardening
WEED WACKER, gas, needs
primer $25. 570-693-1454
Miscellaneous
FISH TANK 25 gal. with wood cab-
inet stand $50. Hamilton Beach
food processr FP03 Model 70212
$25. 570-868-6018
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
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Avoid market risk & get guar-
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Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
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AQUARI UM 35 gal . f i l t er,
hood, some accessories $50.
570-823-8157
BAR 5' entertainment bar, sol-
id wood $200. Washer/dryer
set good condition $300.
570-574-0028
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP,
good condi ti on. Runs wel l
$350. 570-696-1501
BIKE Vintage 1977 Schwinn
Varsity 10 speed, lime green,
excellent condition $265. 8'
fluorescent light fixture, 2 bulbs
& extra ballast $15. OBO.
Jake 570-829-7859
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CHAIR Queen Ann green $40.
Wooden snack bar stools $30.
End table with cane top $5.
Radio, under couter $20. TV
11" Not HD novelty $20. Other
misc items buy all for one price
$100. 570-881-0877
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x35 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
CUB CADET, motor SRC621
propel , $100. BATHROOM
SINK, white porcelain, with
mirror and medicine cabinet,
still in box, $90. 570-331-8183
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
DVD/ VCR/ CD pl ayer $75.
TREADMILL Li festyl er Ex-
panse $100.
Call 5710-654-5141
EXERCISE machine ski/rower,
$10. Barbie books with book
bag $10. Lil Bratz comforter
$8. Melanie's mall sets $10.
Sponge Bob basketball game
$10. Pink bunny chair $5. Jazz
shoes size 5 + 6.5 $10 each.
570-696-3368
HANDHELD ORGANI ZER
Palm Pilot Vx with extras $29.
Cordless telephone, new bat-
tery $15. Call 570-283-2552
rick@wyomingvlley.net
Miscellaneous
FI LE CABI NET 5 drawer,
beige side to side file, worth
$700 sel l $250. Si x 40x80
wooden doors $50 ea. 28" col-
or TV, 2 remotes, old type $70
570-280-2472
FLEA MARKET/Yard Sal e
items. Moving must go $50.
takes all 570-824-8586
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GAZEBO 11x13 2 canvas
tops, decorative metal railing, 2
sets zippered mosquito netting
$70. 570-479-3707
GRILL George Forman holds 4
burgers $6. 2xl mens j ean
jacket $4. Purses 42. each.
VCR tapes $1. each. Box flea
market items $5.
570-735-0821
GRILLS (2) 1 with side burner
%50. 1 smoker $75, 24" moun-
tain bike $30. 570-239-2266
GYM LOCKER 7', 6 sections
each 18"Dx12"Hx10"W solid,
no dent s, $100. MOWER
Craf t sman sel f propel l ed,
needs simple minor repair $25.
40+ skeins of assorted colors,
weights & sizes, includes some
needles $35 for all. 735-5916
INSULATION, 6x23, 4 rolls; $25
roll. Curio cabinet $75. Plastic chair
mat $30. Sofa, chair, & ottoman
$75. BF Goodrich tire, 215 /75/R14
$20. Stone laundry tub 445. Metal
tool box for truck$45. Oak coffee
table $75. Single bed complete
$20.. Mountain bike $40. 20" Flip
400 bicycle $50. 868-4444
J OGGI NG S T ROL L E R
Schwinn $90. Lawnmower self
propel l ed, Toro, si de di s-
charge runs good $80. Poulan
mower, side discharge, runs
good $60. After 3 pm call
570-655-3197
LAWN FURNI TURE round
glass table, 4 chairs, umbrella
$40. Ladies peacoat, black,
size L new $30. ladies long fox
coat, size L $200. 823-1732
LCI AB 2000 pro series laser
with tripod, ro & receiver. $500.
570-388-6812
Miscellaneous
SUITCASES Samsonite, cran-
berry color, garment bag & me-
dium bag, wheeled fldable lug-
gage cart $50. 693-1454
MAGAZINES, National Geo-
graphic, 200, up to 8/13 $25,
OBO. 474-6947
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MUFFLER '88 Chevy Berretta
$25. Tilted trailer handmade
49.5wx8'l, lights, new rims &
tires & spare $200. 740-1081
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
PICK YOUR OWN
RASPBERRIES
Limited number of PYO
Blackberries available
8 am to 1 pm
Closed Mon. & Thurs.
Rt. 29, Noxen
Call for availability 298-0962
WhistlePigPumpkin.com
POTTY CHAIR boys $5. Adult
handicap walker $5. Mini robot
sweeper- sweeps & mops $20.
Dresser with mirror 4' long $20.
32x37 gold framed interior pic-
ture scene $15. 570-851-8500
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pi eces, $10. 570-693-1454
PUNCH BOWL beaut i f ul l y
carved with 10 matching gob-
lets & ladle. Like new. $20.
570-332-3341
RADIATORS 3 cast iron &
hoods. Different sizes. $ 25-
$30 each. CANES & WALK-
ING STICKS 20 avai l abl e.
Made from Sl i ppery Mapl e
trees. Different sizes, shapes &
heights. $5 and $6. each.
570-735-2081.
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
Miscellaneous
RECORD PLAYER Detrol a
combo record player, am/fm
radio, cassette player & DVD
player,like new asking $45.
Sauder light brown TV stand
47x28.5wx15deep $20.
570-287-1913
RIMS 4 16" alloy Toyota rims
$140. 570-945-2302
SEWING MACHINE Si nger
Vintage, cast iron, has cabinet,
works well $100.
570-862-2919
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
TONNEAU COVER 1 tri-fold
for 2012-2013 pick up truk, 6.5
box $350. 570-735-4788
TOTE metal hitch tote expand-
able $50. Karaoke singing ma-
chine $50. White TV tray $10.
570-592-2549
XBOX 360 Rockband 1 & 2
games with drum set, 2 gui-
tars & microphone, $60. Sony
17" flat screen monitor LCD
1xDVI/1AGP port $25. HP
Photo Smart C4280 all in one
printer/scanner/copier, $25.
406-5661
Musical Instruments
SPEAKER CAB Mar shal l
1960A $399. AMPEG 412
speaker cabinet $249. Call
570-283-2552 ri ck@wyom-
i ngvl l ey.net
Photo Equipment
C A M C O R D E R C a n o n
mini/DVD recorder with ac-
cessories $79. Digital camera
Kodak 3x zoom with telephoto
wide angle & close up lenses
$59. Cal l 570- 283- 2552
r i ck@wyomi ngvl l ey. net
Pools & Spas
POOL 24' round compl ete
wedding cake steps, solar cov-
er hangars ,Hayward sand fil-
ter, 3 yrs old, 1 1/2 HP Hay-
ward pump power flo 1 yr old,
Hercules pool wall & liner heat-
er, lighthouse 100,000 BTUs 7
yrs old. $650. 570-574-6953
Sporting Goods
BICYCLE boys 20" orange X
Factor Rampage $40. Very
good condition 570-675-1277
BOW PSE Stinger compound
bow, 6 new arows, hard case
& extras. Valued over $500.
Used one season asking $300.
570-823-5063
GOLF CLUBS Pi ng G15
graphite iron set, 7 clubs new
$450. 2 Ti tl ei st 60 degree
wedges $20. each. 1 Adams
sandwedge $25. Call Frank
570-262-7318
MOTORCADDI E Model
EC1000 series, electric hand-
cart with portable battery char-
ger & caddy basket $250.
570-735-3886
Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE 8' oak Wind-
song, 2 pc. slate, ball return in-
cludes ping pong removable
top 2 pc. paid over $2,000. sell
for $475. 570-954-1882
ROLLER BLADES 1 pair mens
Europa mondel 1-221 size 12
$20. 1 pair women's Europa
size 8 $20. 570-735-1225
SLEEPING BAGS 2 person
$35. 1 person air mattress in-
sert $30. both $60. 6 gun cab-
inet $125. Books 3 boxes $15.
Box of comforter sets, queen
sz $15 ea. or 2 for $25. Jr. girl
hoodi es med & l g Vi ctori a
secrets 8 ea. 570-474-6028
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Televisions /Accessories
TV 65" Olivia LCD 5 years old;
$500. 570-256-3983
Tools
LADDER, Gorilla Fiberglass
professional 4 in. 1,300 lb.
working load, 3' to 6' exten-
sion, like new $100.00.
570-696-2008
SNOWBLOWER sel f pr o-
pelled, used once, has bent
blade Paid $529 asking $150.
Suwanee river G scale train in
orig. box asking $200.
570-824-1031
TAPPING HEAD ATTACH-
MENT reversible, $100. 40
used & resharpened end mills
$80. 40 new taps 6/32, to 1/2
$80. 570-899-1910
Toys & Games
BARBIE JEEP battery oper-
ated, pink, $175. 10" Dora bike
with training wheels $10. 2
Princess 3 wheel scooters $5.
ea. 12" Power Puff Schwinn
12" bike $15. 3 wheel Sponge
Bob scooter $5. 570-823-7176
Stereo /TV /Electronics
SONY TV 27" Wega Trinitron
flat screen $60. retailed for
$625. excellent condition.
570-819-4951
Want To Buy
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-2914
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Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all brands.
All repairs guaranteed
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
By E-mailing Office Manager:
officemanager@bianepa.com
Or Call:
570-287-3331
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran. Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION &
ROOF REPAIRS
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
Handyman
DO IT ALL
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics,
cellar, garage, one piece or whole
Estate, also available 10 & 20
yard dumpsters.
655-0695, 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from
Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc.
826-1883 704-8846
Hauling & Trucking
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups, landscaping, mow-
ing, mulching, trimming, plant-
ing. Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
JOHNS PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Pressure Washing
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
F U N N I E S WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
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PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
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MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA