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BMW Magazine

THE NEW 3 SERIES CONVERTIBLE

INNOVATIONS THAT DELIGHT 365 DAYS A YEAR

TRAVEL

TECHNOLOGY Looking into Adaptive Headlights

ARCHITECTURE

Sweden’s storybook islands

Rem Koolhaas retrospective

1 | 2007 $ 5.00 bmwusa.com
1 | 2007
$ 5.00
bmwusa.com

PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S.

PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the
PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the
PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the
PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the

PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the
PHOTO: JIM SULLEY – NEWSCAST U.S. MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the

MESSAGE FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC

Letter from the Chairman

FROM BMW OF NORTH AMERICA, LLC Letter from the Chairman Tom Purves, Chairman, BMW (US) Holding

Tom Purves, Chairman, BMW (US) Holding Corp.

Dear Reader, I welcome you to the first issue of BMW Magazine for 2007. Reviewing this issue’s various articles on our newest offerings and what it takes to bring them to market, reminds me of the phrase, “With power comes responsibility.” Take the “power” half of this saying – especially as it applies to the new 3 Series Convertible, the subject of our cover story. Propelled by BMW’s potent twin-turbo engine with direct fuel injectors, the 300-hp 335i can accelerate from 0 to 60 in just 5.5 seconds – that’s 1.4 seconds faster than its predecessor. Yet even more amazing is that it accomplishes this without sacrificing fuel efficiency. That’s the “responsibility” part. In our story on the development of the 6 Series Coupe and Convertible, we show how prototypes were subjected to grueling tests in extreme ice and heat, at high speeds and in stop-and-go traffic. For over 100,000 miles, they were tested not just for their power, but for their grace and grit under pressure. After all, it is our responsibility to create vehicles that are not only thoroughly enjoyable to drive, but reliable to own. Responsibility often means taking a leadership position. BMW is a key benefactor in Clemson University’s new International Center for Automotive Research, or ICAR. Offering Masters and Ph.D. programs, this innovative school will advance the future of automotive engineering, ultimately benefitting not just BMW, but the entire automotive industry. Meanwhile, current BMW engineers are also learning new concepts – not just on land, but at sea. By developing more dynamic sailboats for BMW ORACLE Racing, they are also learning how to create more aerodynamic cars. You can read about both these programs in this issue. Of course, all this effort spent learning and innovating is useless if it doesn’t result in a vehicle that is immensely gratifying to drive. That’s why you’ll find an article on our amazing Adaptive Headlights technology, as well as “Favorite Roads” – a new feature in which BMW drivers tell us about local fun-to-drive routes that reveal the beauty of our country.

Sincerely,

routes that reveal the beauty of our country. Sincerely, Tom Purves, Chairman BMW (US) Holding Corp.

Tom Purves, Chairman BMW (US) Holding Corp.

BMW Magazine

PHOTOS: SIMON PUSCHMANN; PHILIPPE RUAULT; MAREIKE FOECKING

1|2007

CONTENTS

PUSCHMANN; PHILIPPE RUAULT; MAREIKE FOECKING 1|2007 CONTENTS BMW Magazine Cover photo: BMW 335i Convertible.
PUSCHMANN; PHILIPPE RUAULT; MAREIKE FOECKING 1|2007 CONTENTS BMW Magazine Cover photo: BMW 335i Convertible.
PUSCHMANN; PHILIPPE RUAULT; MAREIKE FOECKING 1|2007 CONTENTS BMW Magazine Cover photo: BMW 335i Convertible.

BMW Magazine

Cover photo:

BMW 335i Convertible. Photographed by Emir Haveric.

COVER STORY

8

3 SERIES CONVERTIBLE

The new 3 Series Convertible visits the BMW ORACLE yacht

in

Valencia, Spain. With an innovative hardtop and twin-turbo

engine, it is just as high-tech as the America’s Cup contender.

FEATURES

14

HOW DO ADAPTIVE HEADLIGHTS REALLY WORK?

A

look at this fascinating technology that projects light

along the contours of the road.

16

DREAM JOBS: A DAY WITH…

Carlos Prátola, driver of the M6 safety car at the motorcycle world championships.

17

KEEP YOUR NERVES IN THE CURVES

Advanced BMW Driver Training on the infamous Nordschleife

of

Germany’s legendary Nürburgring racetrack.

21

THE FIVE SERIES: SUBTLY SUPERB

The 2008 BMW 5 Series is a subtle yet stunning example

of

automotive innovation and balance.

24

DELIRIUM BY DESIGN

A

retrospective on the famous Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas.

28

BMW ALPINA B7 – A BLUE STREAK FROM BAVARIA

ALPINA, the performance-tuning experts, create an even more high-powered and luxurious 7 Series Sedan.

an even more high-powered and luxurious 7 Series Sedan.   REGULARS 31 TRIED, TESTED AND TORTURED
an even more high-powered and luxurious 7 Series Sedan.   REGULARS 31 TRIED, TESTED AND TORTURED
 

REGULARS

31

TRIED, TESTED AND TORTURED

2

LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Deep chill at the Arctic circle, blistering heat in the desert, stop-and-go traffic in gridlocked Tokyo: how BMW put its 6 Series prototypes through the most extreme tests.

CALL OF THE ROAD: FAVORITE DRIVES

4

NEWS

36

Renovating BMW’s famous “Four Cylinders” tower in Munich / Interview with Peter P. Schweger / Market Leader in Sales / Ski Training / iPod your BMW / BMW at the 100-year-old Detroit Auto Show / BMW ORACLE Racing Trip / Art Basel Art Cars Retrospective / Awards / Figures / BMW Clubs / Groundbreaking at Woodcliff Lake / Five New BMW Motorcycles / BMW Donates Robots for Training

Just north of San Francisco lies a beautiful stretch of scenic coastal land. A look at Karen A. Jones’ favorite drive.

39

BMW’S SPORTY SIDE

There’s good reason why BMW sponsors sporting events from motorsports to golf and even sailing for the America’s Cup.

30

DRIVING SKILLS

 

Winter challenges: some tips for driving on slippery slopes.

40

FIELD OF DREAMS

Clemson University’s International Center for Automotive Research (ICAR) is building the technology campus of the future in Greenville, SC.

35

I LOVE MY BMW

Brenden Bartol has a long (500,000 miles) and meaningful relationship with his 740i.

42

BMW AT YOUR SERVICE

35

LETTERS

More than a dealership, your local authorized BMW center is literally the center for all things BMW.

38

PRESS

43

THE PEAK OF PERFORMANCE

44

WHO BUT BMW COULD…

The BMW Mountain Driving Experience puts you behind the wheel of a BMW with xDrive all-wheel-drive system.

Build its 20,000th award-winning V-10 engine?

 

50

CALENDAR

45

ISLAND-HOPPING FOR YOUNG AND OLD

Touring Sweden with kids in tow – from the fashion center

of Stockholm to the magical

offshore islands.

fashion center of Stockholm to the magical offshore islands. B M W M a g a

BMW Magazine is printed on recycled paper

BMW Magazine

News

Q1/07

MAKEOVER

Relaunching an Icon

Recently, 130 companies spent 28 months remodeling the world-famous “four cylinders” tower of the BMW Group’s headquarters in Munich. Fire prevention has been updated; the office environment has been improved; and measures have been taken to reduce future energy costs.

The tower was gutted. The air conditioning, elec- trical network, ceiling liners and floor coverings were completely removed. Some 14,000 tons of material were hauled away for “green” disposal, and all 2,302 windows were replaced. Under the direction of Hamburg architectural firm ASP Schweger, the entire inside of BMW’s “four cylinders” tower were ripped out and replaced. Only the façade was left unchanged. Its aluminum skin was manually scrubbed with soap and brushes. Now the building – a registered trademark – gleams as brightly as when it first opened 33 years ago.

gleams as brightly as when it first opened 33 years ago. The creation of Austrian architect

The creation of Austrian architect Karl Schwanzer, the “four cylinders” still ranks among the most innovative buildings in the world. Its 18 floors of offices do not rest on a conventional foundation; they are instead suspended from a vast load-bearing cross at the top. The tower is now state-of-the-art: one in three windows opens electrically, and shimmering silver aluminum blinds direct the outside light across the ceilings and into the office spaces. A heating/cooling system that is integrated with the ceilings provides a comfortable work environment. As a result of this major renovation, energy costs will also be significantly reduced.

BMW Magazine

The huge bearer cross, from which the 18 office floors are suspended, resembles a spacecraft.
The huge bearer cross, from which the 18 office
floors are suspended, resembles a spacecraft. It
has been clad in aluminum for weather protection.
PHOTOS: FRANK AUSSIEKER/VISUM (1); ANDREAS HEDDERGOTT/SV BILDERDIENST
AUSSIEKER/VISUM (1); ANDREAS HEDDERGOTT/SV BILDERDIENST INTERVIEW Enhanced Safety and Well-being Professor Peter P.

INTERVIEW

Enhanced Safety and Well-being

Professor Peter P. Schweger on the remodeling of the “four-cylinders”

The BMW Tower by Karl Schwanzer is a

landmark structure and only 33 years old.

Why the renovation now?

Many things were no longer in compliance with today’s health and safety regulations. The fire prevention measures, for example, were quite outdated. An important failing was the lack of a separate fire-service elevator. Our technical installations were also completely altered over the last three decades. Today, they occupy only a third of their original space and, of course, that affected the fire prevention arrangements.

What were the parameters of the renovation?

The main limitation was to leave the façade unchanged, and we complied with that. Now we can open the windows, but that isn’t visible from the outside.

So there wasn’t much scope for creativity?

On the contrary. The whole interior was redesigned from the bottom up. There is an innovative double floor for all the cables, and we have replaced the air conditioning system with heating and cooling elements housed in the ceilings. A daylight-guidance system also brings the offices more light.

But the circular offices have remained?

Yes, that arrangement has proved to be a very efficient layout for team communications over the decades. Previously, though, we worked mainly in artificial light, and air came filtered through an air conditioning system. The increase in natural daylight and fresh air makes for a far more pleasant and healthy office environment.

BMW Magazine

News

Q1/07

News Q1/07 2006 SALES Market Leader The BMW Group increased its sales in 2006 by 3.5

2006 SALES

Market Leader

The BMW Group increased its sales in 2006 by 3.5 percent. Throughout the world, almost 1,374,000 vehicles were delivered to customers. This includes BMW, MINI and Rolls-Royce. Dr. Norbert Reithofer, Chairman of the Board of Management of BMW AG, said at the BMW Group’s press conference at the North American International Auto Show, “The outstanding sales results mean that each of our three brands is the market leader in its own segment.” The top- selling BMW Group model series, by far, is still the BMW 3 Series in its four variants: Sedan, Sports Wagon, Coupe and Convertible. The BMW Group in the U.S. (BMW and MINI brands combined) reported its best-ever annual sales of 313,603 vehicles, an increase of 2.1 percent. BMW brand sales jumped 17 percent in December alone, for a total of 30,945 vehicles.

SKI TRAINING

Posturing in the Tunnel

The less air resistance, the greater the speed. Skiers from the Austrian Skiing Association used BMW’s aero-acoustic wind tunnel in Munich to prepare for the new season. Among other things, they practiced the best stance for downhill runs at wind speeds of up to 75 mph. The photo shows skiing ace Fritz Strobl working to get it just right. Most important: avoid air turbulence, which cuts speed.

Most important: avoid air turbulence, which cuts speed. BMW Magazine LIFESTYLE iPod your BMW CD changers

BMW Magazine

LIFESTYLE

iPod your BMW

CD changers are so last millennium! Almost all the new

BMW models have optional connections for Apple iPods in the glove compartment. The MP3 player is controlled by buttons on the steering wheel, or via the radio, or

the iDrive Controller. Tracks can be selected according to

artist, album, playlist or music genre. Now you can plug in and play your favorite music through your BMW’s excellent sound system.

favorite music through your BMW’s excellent sound system. bmwusa.com/search/accessories AUTO SHOW BMW at the 2007

bmwusa.com/search/accessories

AUTO SHOW

BMW at the 2007 Detroit NAIAS

Happy birthday, NAIAS! From January 7-21, the Detroit Auto Show celebrated its 100th anniversary, and some 800,000 visitors came to be part of the centenary. BMW began 2007 with a treat for lovers of outstanding cars: the all-new 3 Series Convertible (see story on page 14). The all-new BMW X5 was also presented. Like its predecessor, the X5 Sports Activity Vehicle® is built for the world market in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The BMW Hydrogen 7 – the world’s first hydrogen-powered luxury sedan for everyday use – joined these two siblings, providing show-goers with a glimpse of what individ- ual mobility will be like in years to come.

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News

Q1/07

News Q1/07 EVENTS BMW ORACLE Racing Trip Fly to Spain and experience the thrills of the

EVENTS

BMW ORACLE Racing Trip

Fly to Spain and experience the thrills of the 2007 America’s Cup! BMW’s exclusive “Experience” packages include two nights in a hotel, an exciting day of sailing competition, two gourmet dinners, complimentary gifts and VIP shuttle service. The following Experience packages are available:

• Louis Vuitton Cup Semi-Finals (May 14-24, 2007)

• Louis Vuitton Cup Finals (June 1-11, 2007)

• America’s Cup Finals (June 23-July 4, 2007)

Other BMW activity packages worth looking into: “Special Experience,” which provides access to spectator boats, from which you can follow the competition close-up; various “Driving Experiences,” including an exciting drive in a Formula BMW racecar; “Sport Experiences,” which feature sailing, golf, pelota and more; and “Cultural Experiences,” which take you on archi- tectural, musical and culinary adventures. Spaces are limited. For more information, or to reserve a space, call toll-free: 1-800-605-9BMW (9269).

to reserve a space, call toll-free: 1-800-605-9BMW (9269). CULTURE BMW and Art Basel Miami Beach Many
to reserve a space, call toll-free: 1-800-605-9BMW (9269). CULTURE BMW and Art Basel Miami Beach Many

CULTURE

BMW and Art Basel Miami Beach

Many art lovers attending the Art Basel Miami Beach last December also enjoyed the convenience and comfort of a fleet of BMW 7 Series Sedans. For the fifth year, BMW provided the luxury cars to shuttle VIPs between the show’s locations. In the Art Collectors Lounge, BMW showed a small-scale model, photographs and films of the new BMW Museum in Munich that will open at the end of this year. In the BMW Lounge, the company also presented a retrospective on the 15 vehicles that comprise its Art Car Collection.

AWARDS

Still among the Best

For the 16th consecutive year, Car and Driver included the BMW 3 Series in its “10Best” list. Plant Engineering magazine named BMW Manufacturing in South Carolina a 2006 “Top Plant,” and made it the cover of their December 2006 issue. The award is presented to U.S. plants for excellence in productivity, safety and innovation. The BMW 5 Series headed the Luxury Vehicle category in Kelley Blue Book’s 2006 “Best Resale Value Awards,” and was also an “Overall Top 10” leader in projected resale value.

FIGURES

It takes 0.00025

seconds after tee-off for a golf ball to acceler- ate from 0 - 62 mph. The K1200R motorcycle hits that speed in 2.8 seconds; the BMW M5

in 4.7. These numbers are the result of an

unusual contest between a golf ball, a car and

a bike. Golfing pro Ian Poulter hit the little

white ball a distance of 841.5 feet. While it was in flight, race driver Hans-Joachim Stuck covered 422 feet in the M5, and world cham- pion stunt rider Chris Pfeiffer managed an impressive 818.4 feet on the K1200R.

BMW Magazine

WAHRE

an impressive 818.4 feet on the K1200R. BMW Magazine WAHRE WERTE Wellendorff THE FINEST GERMAN JEWELLERY

WERTE

Wellendorff

THE FINEST GERMAN JEWELLERY SINCE 1893

Rings Apricot, Red Poppy, Aubergine, Olive, Blueberry, Diamondkiss, in 18 ct. gold with diamonds

New York: Cellini, Madison Ave. 212-888.0505 . Greenwich: Betteridge 203-869.0124 . Boston: Royal, 978-475-3330 . Naples: Yamron 239-592.7707 Puerto Rico: Reinhold 787-754.0528 . St. Maarten: Artistic 059-954.23456 . Newport Beach: Traditional 949-721.9010 Pittsburgh: Hardy & Hayes 412-281.4344 . Las Vegas: Ca’d’oro 702-696.0080 . Bellevue: Alvin Goldfarb 425-454.9393 . Maui: Huttons 808.669-5755 Canton: John Gasser & Son 330-452.3204 . Salt Lake City: O.C. Tanner 801-532.3222 . Hilton Head: Geiss & Sons 843-842.2198 . Carmel: Hesselbein’s 831-625.2522 . Greensboro: Schiffman’s 336-294.4885 . Dallas: Bachendorf’s 972-392.9900 . Burlingame: Kerns 650-348.7557 . Vail: Betteridge 970-476.1778 . Calgary, Canada: J. Vair Anderson 403-266.1669 . Palo Alto: Shreve & Co. 650-327.2211 . San Francisco: Shreve & Co. 415-421.2600

Wellendorff, Tel. (+49) 7231-28.40.10 – www.wellendorff.com

graphic studiofunk

News

Q1/07

ANNIVERSARY

25 Years of the International Council of BMW Clubs

The first BMW Club was founded in 1928 by a group of BMW motorcycle enthusiasts in Düsseldorf, Germany. There are now 600 clubs worldwide, with more than 200,000 members who regard themselves as stewards of the BMW heritage and ambassadors of the brand. In 1981, the International Council of BMW Clubs was

founded as an umbrella organization for the activities of the clubs. Last October, at its annual general meeting in Pretoria, South Africa, the International Council of BMW Clubs celebrated its 25th anniversary. The BMW Car Club of America was established in Boston in 1969 and is one of the largest. Asia, South- and Central America currently have the fastest membership

growth rates.

bmw-clubs-international.com

NEW BMW MOTORCYCLES
NEW BMW MOTORCYCLES

Gimme Five

BMW Motorrad is sending five new models onto the roads in 2007. For the G650X series, available in three variants, it will be world debut. The Hardenduro G650Xchallenge comes with masses of off-road potential; the Streetmoto G650Xmoto is designed for maximum riding pleasure; and the Scrambler G650Xcountry promises riding fun on and off the beaten track. All bikes are driven by a single-cylinder engine with 53 horsepower. The K Series welcomes the K1200 Sport with half- fairing, and the high-powered HP2 Enduro will be joined by the even more powerful HP2 Megamoto (pictured) with a flat-twin Boxer engine. This is a no-compromises riding machine for the road. bmw-motorrad.com

GROUND BREAKING

BMW NA Campus

After more than two years of planning and prep- aration, groundwork is underway for the con- struction of two new buildings that will add almost 200,000 square feet of space for offices, training facilities and Automotive Engineering to BMW’s headquarters campus in Woodcliff Lake, NJ. The two new buildings will allow BMW to bring together all the departments and functions currently housed in rented office space. When complete, BMW’s U.S. headquarters will have about 550,000 square feet of office space, occu- pying 80 acres. The architectural design will reinforce BMW’s corporate identity, while har- monizing with the natural beauty of the site, whose wetlands and existing fruit orchard will be preserved.

BMW Magazine

and existing fruit orchard will be preserved. BMW Magazine TRAINING Spartanburg BMW Manufacturing has donated 20

TRAINING

Spartanburg

BMW Manufacturing has donated 20 robots to South Carolina’s Center for Accelerated Technology Training (CATT). The robots, valued at about $2 million, were previously used in BMW’s Spartanburg Body Shop to weld parts for the X5 Sports Activity Vehicle. ® The Center will distribute the robots to 10 technical colleges in the state to help train South Carolina’s future workforce. This is not the first time that BMW Manufacturing has donated robots to South Carolina: some 42 robots and robot controllers were presented to the Department of Education in 2002, and they are still in use in vocational schools throughout the state.

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BMW Magazine

Cover Story 3 Series Convertible

A HARDTOP YOU CAN STOW AND GO

The new twin-turbo 3 Series Convertible calls on the BMW ORACLE Racing yacht in Valencia, Spain – and demonstrates BMW’s first-ever retractable hardtop.

yacht in Valencia, Spain – and demonstrates BMW’s first-ever retractable hardtop. Photos: Emir Haveric BMW Magazine
yacht in Valencia, Spain – and demonstrates BMW’s first-ever retractable hardtop. Photos: Emir Haveric BMW Magazine

Photos:

Emir

Haveric

BMW Magazine

“BOAT AGAINST BOAT – IT’S LIKE PLAYING CHESS ON THE WATER!” – MATCH SPECIALIST STAN

“BOAT AGAINST BOAT – IT’S LIKE PLAYING CHESS ON THE WATER!”

– MATCH SPECIALIST STAN MOHR

BMW Magazine

Valencia Port America’s Cup
Valencia
Port America’s Cup

BMW ORACLE Homebase

Beauty by the sea: the 3 Series Convertible in Valencia. Integrating aerodynamic lines and eye-catching contours, it demonstrates elegant BMW style; a short overhang in front, stretched hood and long wheelbase signal its focus on ready power and agile handling.

BMW Magazine

WIND… OR

WIND… OR WINDOWS? Compared to its predecessor, the all-new 3 Series Convertible’s large rear side windows

WINDOWS?

Compared to its predecessor, the all-new 3 Series Convertible’s large rear side windows provide 30 percent more visibility. So raising the roof no longer means losing the view.

So raising the roof no longer means losing the view. BMW Magazine USA 87 BMW ORACLE

BMW Magazine

USA 87 BMW ORACLE Racing Team

losing the view. BMW Magazine USA 87 BMW ORACLE Racing Team 18 Knots THE BMW ORACLE

18 Knots

THE BMW ORACLE BOAT TOOK THREE YEARS OF HARD WORK TO PERFECT.
THE BMW ORACLE BOAT TOOK THREE
YEARS OF HARD WORK TO PERFECT.

BMW Magazine

Even in the hot sun, the Dakota Leather seats stay cool – thanks to BMW’s new Sun-Reflective Technology, which can hold seating surface temperatures to as low as 68 degrees.

hold seating surface temperatures to as low as 68 degrees. THE UNVEILING: A SECOND, ENTIRELY NEW
hold seating surface temperatures to as low as 68 degrees. THE UNVEILING: A SECOND, ENTIRELY NEW
hold seating surface temperatures to as low as 68 degrees. THE UNVEILING: A SECOND, ENTIRELY NEW
hold seating surface temperatures to as low as 68 degrees. THE UNVEILING: A SECOND, ENTIRELY NEW

THE UNVEILING:

A SECOND, ENTIRELY NEW BOAT WILL BE LAUNCHED.

BMW Magazine

The low windshield enhances the open-air feeling. With BMW’s new retractable three-part hardtop, the new
The low windshield enhances the open-air feeling. With BMW’s new retractable three-part hardtop, the new

The low windshield enhances the open-air feeling.

With BMW’s new retractable three-part hardtop, the new 3 Series Convert- ible delivers a joyful driving experience all year round. And the immense

appeal of a convertible, combined with your choice of two potent new engines – including a twin-turbo with direct injection – makes this car totally irresistible. The three-part retractable hardtop was developed especially for this new model. Lowering it takes just about 22 seconds; raising it, about 23. Driving with the hardtop up, there is no annoying outside noise, even at highway speeds. In areas where winters are harsh, this practical innovation eliminates the need to install an optional hardtop. The new roof design also allows BMW to add larger windows. The rear side panes are 30 percent larger than before – which, together with the slim roof pillars, makes for better peripheral vision. Not only does this help during parking and turning maneuvers, but the larger windows also let more sunlight into the cabin. The Convertible’s low, light design emphasizes the car’s distinctive shoulder line. With the top down, this low shoulder line – as well as a low windshield and a seating position moved further to the rear – enhance the feeling of openness. And lowering the hardtop is as easy as pressing a button. Want it lowered? Hold the button down, and the three roof parts stack, then stow in the trunk. Going shopping but want to leave the top down? With the optional Comfort Access,

which includes a convenient opening and closing loading feature, the hardtop stack can be raised up and out of the trunk, far enough for you to stow your gear – then low- ered back down. With the 3 Series Convertible, BMW is the first car- maker in the world to use Sun-Reflective Technology – a special process developed for the leather upholstery and interior lining. Modified, “cool” color pigments embedded in the leather help reflect the infrared radia- tion in sunlight, effectively preventing the buildup of excessive temperatures. And when the mercury climbs, Sun-Reflective Technology can hold seating surface tem- peratures to as low as 68°F! The new BMW 3 Series Convertible combines its unmistakable appearance with an equally unique driving experience. Fitted with the standard 6-speed manual, the 300-horsepower 335i with 3.0-liter, fuel-injected twin-turbo inline six can whisk you from stop to 60 in just 5.5 seconds. 1 The 328i Convertible delivers 230 hp at 6500 rpm and 200 lb-ft of torque at just 2750 rpm, for satisfyingly muscular acceleration. With either engine, the new BMW 3 Series Convert-

With either engine, the new BMW 3 Series Convert- FAST CHANGE: Above: with its lightweight aluminum
FAST CHANGE: Above: with its lightweight aluminum suspension and innovative technology that delivers agile yet
FAST CHANGE:
Above: with its lightweight aluminum suspension and innovative technology that delivers agile yet stable handling,
the 3 Series Convertible is a joy – even when the weather isn’t.
FROM HARDTOP
TO CONVERTIBLE
IN SECONDS
ible delivers smooth, fast-revving response and
refined power – and fun – at all times.
Below: in just 22 seconds, the three-part hardtop retracts, stacks and disappears into the trunk, revealing a sleek,
sun-loving convertible.
1 5.7 seconds with STEPTRONIC automatic transmission. BMW AG test
results. Obey local speed laws and always wear safety belts.
228 sec.sec.

BMW Magazine

BMW Magazine

BMW Magazine

BMW 335i Convertible

 

Specs

Engine

liter/type

3.0/inline 6

Displacement

cc

2979

Nom. output@rpm

hp

300@5800

 

300@

Max. torque@rpm

lb-ft

1400-5000

Top speed 1

mph

130

Acceleration 2

0-60 mph

sec

5.5

1 Top speed limited electronically; 150 mph with optional Sport Package. 2 BMW AG test results, manual transmission; 5.7 seconds with automatic transmission.

BMW Magazine

Technology Adaptive Headlights

PHOTO: HERIBERT SCHINDLER
PHOTO: HERIBERT SCHINDLER

BMW Magazine

HOW DO

ADAPTIVE

HEADLIGHTS

ACTUALLY WORK?

Adaptive Headlights are designed to follow the contours of a road and light up curves. They make nighttime driving more illuminating – and more enjoyable.

Text:

Michael

Seitz

Many people avoid driving in the dark. At night, visibility is diminished, and drivers are dazzled by oncoming headlights.

This calls for extra concentration, and so fatigue sets in more quickly. Small wonder that accidents occur more frequently at night! BMW has always given high priority to improving safety through better lighting. For this reason, BMW introduced bright Xenon headlights in 1991 and, 10 years later, Xenon lights for both high and low beams. The year 2003 marked the arrival of Adaptive Head- light technology; with the introduction of the all-new 3 Series Coupe and X5 models and the redesigned X3 came a light for tight curves and corkscrew roads. Each of these developments helped improve visibility. The safety benefits have been so clear that the number of vehicles equipped with Xenon lights has grown steadily. Today, almost half of all BMW vehicles are delivered with Xenon headlights. Many customers also choose the Adaptive Headlights option, since this technology further improves visibility, particularly when taking curves quickly. Thanks to precise and responsive swivel technology, dynamic curve-lighting systems are able to follow the twists and turns of the road ahead at all times. Whereas conventional headlights direct the beams straight ahead, and thus leave a significant part of the road dark in the curves, BMW’s Adaptive Headlight technology improves visibility up to 90 percent. These mobile headlights have a

BMW Magazine

PHOTO: ULI HECKMANN; ILLUSTRATION: TECHNICAL ART/ SCHÄFER

www.girard-perregaux.com

The headlights illuminate the road ahead and through the curve (Illustration left) by means of
The headlights illuminate the road ahead and through the curve (Illustration left) by means of the swiveling motion shown above.

swiveling range of approximately 15 degrees, and are synchronized with the vehicle’s speed. Supplementing this feature is Cornering Lights, which come on gradually when taking tight curves at lower speeds. Additional projectors, integrated with the foglights or the double headlights, are directed at the inside of the curve. This feature is offered in the all-new X5, 3 Series Coupe and redesigned X3. The BMW headlights move by means of precision step motors. In just a fraction of a second, these motors smoothly rotate the bearing-mounted reflectors to a precisely calculated position. Although the mechanical aspects are hardly new, the sophisti- cated intelligent control unit represents a considerable investment of time by BMW engineers. Frank Bilz, the specialist responsible for in-house software development, knows more than anyone about the

ELIMINATING THE UNPLEASANT ASPECTS OF NIGHTTIME DRIVING

system’s finer points. “Unlike other manufacturers, we use not just steering wheel movements to control the swiveling reflectors. We also link these to data measuring the actual driving speed and yaw rate.” “Yaw rate” refers to the car’s rotary movement about the vertical axis. It precisely describes the actual vehicle dynamics, making it possible to calculate, in advance, the radius of a curve for speeds over 18 mph. Steering angle, yaw rate and vehicle speed are transmitted by BMW’s Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) systems to a specially developed control unit that operates the step motors in the head- lights. With this, BMW has created even, reliable lighting that is also pleasing to the human eye. Frank Bilz describes a couple of driving situations in which the BMW system is in a class of its own. “Our system is designed to recognize minor steering corrections when driving at highway speeds, so the headlights don’t swivel from side to side unnecessarily. The same applies if the driver makes continuous minor adjustments

BMW Magazine

to the steering angle when taking a curve. Occasionally, in more extreme driving situations, the actual position of the steering wheel does not indicate the desired direction of travel. But our high-quality data make it possible to avoid system malfunctions that would distract the driver.” Thanks to the control unit, the software devel- oped in-house, and the quality of processed data, BMW engineers have also been able to adjust the Adaptive Headlight system to suit individual vehicle models. After all, there’s a significant difference in driving styles between a Z4 Roadster and a 7 Series Sedan. In years to come, BMW engineers hope to create a system that not only recognizes the driving situation, but will also be able to look one or two curves ahead. This is an area of research in which Frank Bilz and his colleague, Johannes Aulbach, are already involved. “It should be possible to integrate data from the navigation system and image-processing camera sensors in order to develop the system even more,” says Aulbach.

In any case, local information supplied by the Navigation system will soon support headlight control systems. Dynamic headlights

will then provide illumination on urban and country roads and highways. Depending on the traffic situation, the reach of the beams would be wider and shorter in urban areas (like low beams on the country roads), and on highways they would also illuminate the neighboring lane. But that’s not all. BMW engineers and their development part- ners have set their long-term sights even higher. With “pixel light,” they expect to be able to either illuminate – or eliminate – all indi- vidual objects within range of the headlights. For example, using information from cameras and other data sources, the technology will be able to cancel out light from oncoming traffic that comes into a driver’s line of vision, as well as cast a bright, focused beam on

the immediate surroundings, especially on pedestrians and road signs.

surroundings, especially on pedestrians and road signs. Girard-Perregaux for BMW ORACLE Racing SEA HAWK PRO 1000m
surroundings, especially on pedestrians and road signs. Girard-Perregaux for BMW ORACLE Racing SEA HAWK PRO 1000m

Girard-Perregaux for BMW ORACLE Racing

and road signs. Girard-Perregaux for BMW ORACLE Racing SEA HAWK PRO 1000m – Golden Gate Yacht
and road signs. Girard-Perregaux for BMW ORACLE Racing SEA HAWK PRO 1000m – Golden Gate Yacht

SEA HAWK PRO 1000m – Golden Gate Yacht Club

Exclusive model dedicated to BMW ORACLE Racing Team’s home Club. Water resistant to 1,000 metres. Equipped with a screw-down back and a helium relief valve, Girard-Perregaux GP033R0 mechanical movement, with automatic winding, vulcanized rubber strap with folding buckle. Limited and numbered edition to 1,000 pieces.

with automatic winding, vulcanized rubber strap with folding buckle. Limited and numbered edition to 1,000 pieces.

TEXT: WOLFGANG SCHNEIDER; PHOTOS: MICHAEL KAMMETER

Dream job Safety car driver

A DAY WITH

CARLOS

PRÁTOLA,

MOTOGP SAFETY CAR DRIVER

Helmet on, gloves on, eyes forward. It’s shortly before two o’clock on Sunday afternoon. In about a minute

the MotoGP race at the Automotodrom Brno, Czech Republic, will begin. Carlos Prátola focuses on the group of motor- cycles 100 yards in front of his BMW M6. Two, one, go: the 19 bikes, each with the strength of 240 horses, jump to life and propel their riders into the first curve. Prátola hits the accelerator and the M6 shoots off behind the pack. He is the official BMW safety car driver for the 17 races of the motorcycle world championship. The Argentinean always follows the competitors on the opening lap of each race. “The first lap is the most dangerous,” he says.“The riders are still tightly bunched and just a small mistake can result in a mass pileup.” In the event of an accident, the for- mer rally driver has to decide within seconds whether to radio the stewards and recommend they stop the race, or allow it to continue. In an emergency, he requests immediate medical assistance and, with the help of co-driver Albert Vilaró, secures the area of the accident.

Driving almost at top speed, Prátola takes the white M6 through the 14 curves of the 1.33-mile track. The

BMW’s 500 hp makes it twice as power- ful as the bikes, but the two-wheelers still have the edge in the curves. It’s a matter of weight: at 4,000 lbs., the safety car is 12 times heavier than the MotoGP machines. After about two and a half minutes, Prátola rolls back into the pit lane. Everything has gone smoothly so far, but the car and its driver remain on standby for the rest of the race. The race day starts early for Prátola. At 8:00 a.m., in the BMW, he is the first man out on the track checking that it is safe for the race to proceed. No dirt, no leaves, no patches of oil. Before each practice session and race, he checks the precision of the timing systems in the M6 one last time; the car is fitted with the same transponders as the bikes themselves. Shortly after 3:00 p.m., the presenta- tion ceremony marks the end of Carlos Prátola’s day. Now he can step out of his overalls. The next races for the MotoGP will be in Malaysia, Australia and Japan. The teams and equipment hit the road again. “I like driving fast. I have a great car to work with, get to see the world, and I’m paid to do it. That’s pretty special,” Prátola says, but neglects to mention the responsibility and stress involved. While Prátola relaxes with his family in Barcelona before the next race, the M6 is given a thorough inspection

by BMW engineers, and made ready for its next performance.

by BMW engineers, and made ready for its next performance. BMW Magazine THE FIRST LAP OF

BMW Magazine

and made ready for its next performance. BMW Magazine THE FIRST LAP OF A MOTORCYCLE RACE

THE FIRST LAP OF A MOTORCYCLE RACE IS THE MOST DANGEROUS. THE SAFETY CAR FOLLOWS THE BIKES SO THAT IT CAN BE ON THE SCENE IMMEDIATELY IF AN ACCIDENT OCCURS.

IT CAN BE ON THE SCENE IMMEDIATELY IF AN ACCIDENT OCCURS. Ready for action: driver Carlos
IT CAN BE ON THE SCENE IMMEDIATELY IF AN ACCIDENT OCCURS. Ready for action: driver Carlos
IT CAN BE ON THE SCENE IMMEDIATELY IF AN ACCIDENT OCCURS. Ready for action: driver Carlos

Ready for action: driver Carlos Prátola and co-driver Albert Vilaró with the BMW M6 safety car at the MotoGP race in the Czech Republic (above and far left). Their job is to ensure maximum safety in all 17 races of the motorcycle world championship.

Republic (above and far left). Their job is to ensure maximum safety in all 17 races

Safety Driver Training

KEEP YOUR NERVES IN THE CURVES

BMW Magazine

The BMW Z4 M Coupe at the Galgenkopf segment of the Nürburgring Nordschleife.

The Nordschleife of the Nürburgring is one of the best known race stretches in the world. BMW Driver Training teaches motorsport fans how to enjoy its thrills safely.

BMW Magazine

Text:

Henri

Lesewitz

Photos:

Steffen

Jagenburg

He has been projecting images onto the screen for two hours:

steering angles, curve radii, brake points. Yet the most important

concept cannot be explained by pictures or words, Karl-Heinz Müller says. Humility is something you have to feel. Now, strapped in behind the wheel, the instructor is in radio contact with the four cars in his seminar group. “The Nordschleife is a beast, just waiting for the slightest loss of concentration,” he tells the students. He adjusts his dark aviator glasses, turns the ignition key and the 343-hp engine under the hood of the dark-blue Z4 M Coupe springs to life. The convoy slowly winds its way to the starting point of the first lap. Müller leads in the pace car, the students follow in line behind him. A few seconds later, the speedometer needles quiver at the 80-mph mark. Through the Tiergarten Passage, the twists and turns of the Hatzenbach, then up the long, left curve to Schwedenkreuz.

BMW Magazine

As the cars tear over the asphalt, the trees in the fields dissolve into

a green blur. This is just the warm-up.“OK – now into the crest from the right; step on the gas. Approaching from the left gives you a tighter angle. It would send you flying,” Müller warns. He has just enough time

to give the warning. It is a bad idea to open your mouth in the Fuchs- röhre gully – the compression won’t let you close it again. Here’s the Bergwerk, where Niki Lauda had that terrible crash. They take it with

a tug on the steering wheel. Next, the Mutkurve – definitely not the

place to lose your nerves. Thrills are part of the package in BMW Driver Training on the Nordschleife. This 13-mile rollercoaster ride is the oldest part of the Nürburgring – and a legend in itself. A total of 73 curves mark this historic winding stretch through the Eifel mountains. The experts

“THE SAFETY TRAINING SAVED ME.”

mountains. The experts “THE SAFETY TRAINING SAVED ME.” Facing page: Hatzenbach. Course participants drive back
mountains. The experts “THE SAFETY TRAINING SAVED ME.” Facing page: Hatzenbach. Course participants drive back

Facing page: Hatzenbach. Course participants drive back leisurely and then race through the segment again. Right: back to Galgenkopf. To test their own limits, the drivers run through the last right curve before the Döttinger Höhe several times.

count over 30 different asphalt surfaces along the way. The track is narrower than most country roads, and you go into most of the curves blind. The Nordschleife was carved out of the mountains 79 years ago and was quickly recognized as one of the most unpre- dictable, twisting and treacherous tracks anywhere. Over the decades, hundreds of thousand of fans have flocked to this part of the track, which drivers know as the “Green Hell.” Lauda’s crash in the 1976 Grand Prix, in which the world champion almost burned to death, brought about the end of the Formula 1 era at the Nordschleife. Today, the course is used only for testing and driver training pro- grams. But the mystique remains. BMW Driver Training courses for various levels of ability take place here several times a year. The two-day Nordschleife seminar is sold out quickest of all. A total of 86 enthusiasts from all over the world turned up at the track early last September to get behind the wheel of the new Z4 M Coupe, which was making its debut at a BMW Driver Training course. A road-going car with a 6-speed manual transmission and racetrack technology, the Z4 M Coupe does 0 to 60 in 4.9 seconds. The watchful eye of the DSC driver-assist system helps recognize unstable situations right at the outset and makes the necessary cor- rections. With the warm-up safely concluded, Müller draws to a halt before the Galgenkopf segment, which the group will practice on for

BMW Magazine

Above: the BMW paddock at the Nürburgring. Tire walls separate the old Grand Prix track
Above: the BMW paddock at the Nürburgring. Tire walls separate the old Grand Prix track

Above: the BMW paddock at the Nürburgring. Tire walls separate the old Grand Prix track from the Nordschleife. Top right: racing fans leave their words of encouragement on the asphalt. Right: conference at Metzgesfeld.

the next hour – at first on foot. “What can you tell from the tire marks here?” asks Müller, pointing to the rubber streaks leading into the grass at the end of the left-hand curve. A collective shoulder shrug. Thomas Just, a tax consultant who has completed all the Nordschleife seminars so far this year, raises his hand: “A lot of drivers shoot off to the left here because they turn in too late.” “A good deduction,” says Müller, w ho is actually a police inspector in daily life. The BMW driving courses fill in his free time. Now and then he takes motorsport tourists on a tour of the track in the famous BMW M5 Ringtaxi. Müller has 20 years of experience on the Nordschleife and knows every foot of the Green Hell, including the key Galgenkopf segment. “Take a look at the barriers,” he tells his students, pointing to the rusty metal fence with fading graffiti on the right. “Obviously no one ever crashes here. Now look over to the left.” Gleaming silver for about 100 yards. “They’re always replacing the barrier here, even though it’s a left-hander. You have to make sure you’re going straight again when you come out of the curve.” Precision pays.

Now into the cars. The students pass through the Galgenkopf

one by one. The brutal acceleration force punches them back into their seats; hit the brakes briefly, pull the wheel, brace the neck mus- cles against the pressure, countersteer, rev the engine up to 7000 rpm, shift into high – and back to the starting position. Again and again, until the perfect driving line is programmed in their minds. Once you’ve wrestled with the laws of physics on the Nord- schleife, you’ll never be free of motorsport fever. Müller’s group is known as “Ten plus.” These are the drivers who have attended at least 10 seminars. Rüdiger Gier has completed 13. He gives himself one as a birthday present each year. Tomorrow he will be 63. “I’m impressed by what a car like this is capable of. You shoot into the curve with the throttle wide open and, by rights, you should wind up like scrambled eggs – but the car sticks to the road like glue,” he beams. In order not to have to alternate behind the wheel with one of the other

BMW Magazine

“WE’RE GOING TO BLAST UP TO THE SCHWEDENKREUZ AT 135 TO 140 MPH AND STEER SMOOTHLY AROUND THE CURVE.”

BMW Magazine

Left: the BMW Z4 M Coupe at the Nürburgring – 343 hp, and 0 to

Left: the BMW Z4 M Coupe at the Nürburgring – 343 hp, and 0 to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds. Below: Instructor Karl-Heinz Müller explains how to take the curve. His protégés pay close attention.

how to take the curve. His protégés pay close attention. “EASY ON THE STEERING WHEEL –

“EASY ON THE STEERING WHEEL – NO WHITE KNUCKLES!”

participants, Gier actually booked two slots in the seminar. Twice the cost, double the fun. And double the mental strain. But that barely registers with Gier, a building contractor who shuttles 120,000 miles each year between construction sites. Software developer Helmut Bründl has lost track of how many driver training courses he’s been on. For him, it’s a sport. “During the two days of the seminar, I’ll only eat light meals and go to bed early. You have to be 100 percent physically and mentally fit for the Nord- schleife,” he says, and then describes how the safety skills he has picked up helped him to avoid an accident. One day, a deer suddenly appeared on the road in front of him. He braked briefly and hard – as he had learned during BMW safety training – and darted around the animal. It was a close call. “The training saved me – and the deer,” he recalls.

The Nordschleife’s fame extends throughout the world. Apart

from Germans, American and Japanese visitors are the largest national groups participating in the BMW Driver Training courses at the Nürburgring. On this occasion, there is even a group of Russians with their own interpreter, although they show no particular need to make small talk. Bradleigh Boshoff has had the longest journey, though. The BMW tire developer from South Africa has come to the Nordschleife to work on his driving technique prior to testing ses- sions back home. Boshoff says he’s driven the Nordschleife hundreds of times in virtual form in the video game GT4. “It’s very realistic, but the most important thing doesn’t really come across in your living room – the immense centrifugal force and the compression,” he remarks. This is also where an attempt by Japanese engineers to build a replica of the

Nordschleife came up short. The topography of the Eifel mountains just cannot be replicated. Müller’s students have worked through four of the Nürburgring’s segments in the last few hours. They’ve checked the barriers, tested road-grip with their shoe soles and pushed themselves further and further towards their own limits. Now the moment they’ve been waiting for has come: the Ring itself. Müller steps on the gas and pushes the rev counter needle into the 6000-rpm zone. The centrifu- gal force has the tires squealing. Clutch, accelerate, brake. Traveling in a line, no one in the group has trouble keeping up. Quite the opposite, in fact. “OK,” says the instructor. His students hear the calmly spoken words over the radio. “Now we’re going to blast up to the Schwedenkreuz at 135, 140 mph, fly right over the crest and steer smoothly through the curve. Easy on the steering wheel – I don’t want to see any white knuckles. And Rüdiger, leave a bit more of a gap.” Segment by segment, he guides the group around the Nord- schleife. Ten minutes later the cars shoot into the finishing straight at 150 mph.

The groups mix easily with each other at beer time that evening as the drivers swap stories of their flirts with the laws of physics and discuss how best to find the ideal driving line. Tomorrow is the second day of the seminar, with four timed runs followed by laps behind the pace car. The day’s activities could keep them talking into the night, but Müller knows the value of sleep. His watch says

10 o’clock – late enough. Tomorrow, the beast will be lurking around

one of the 73 curves and humility is the best form of defense. “That’s

something you have to keep telling yourself,” says Müller. It’s a

mantra that has allowed him to challenge the Green Hell for

20 years now without a single accident. bmw.com/drivertraining

w . c o m / d r i v e r t r a i

BMW Magazine

The Patravi Tonneaugraph in stainless steel with chronograph, big date and power reserve display is a perfect example of Carl F. Bucherer’s unique philosophy. As an independent family business in Lucerne since 1919, our passion for perfection and love of detail have never changed.

www.carl-f-bucherer.com

info@cfbnorthamerica.com

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Daniel Bernhardt, Hollywood. Doesn’t need a life coach.

Daniel Bernhardt, Hollywood. Doesn’t need a life coach. PRIME TIME SWISS WATCH Company Since 1984 #31

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SWISS WATCH Company Since 1984

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THE 5 SERIES

SUBTLY

SUPER

With the new 2008 5 Series, BMW did what it does best:

refine, enhance and improve – until they produced a stunning example of innovation and balance.

they produced a stunning example of innovation and balance. AERODYNAMIC KIT complements the 550i Sport Package’s

AERODYNAMIC KIT complements the 550i Sport Package’s 19-inch wheels and M Sport suspension – helping it sprint from 0-60 in 5.4 seconds.

BMW Magazine

BMW facelift BMW 5 Series

in 5.4 seconds. BMW Magazine BMW facelift BMW 5 Series HEADLIGHT CLUSTER gets a cleaner look

HEADLIGHT CLUSTER gets a cleaner look by moving the orange reflectors off to the side – and a brighter outlook, thanks to new optical headlight lenses.

a brighter outlook, thanks to new optical headlight lenses. FRONT AIR DAM now has upturned edges,

FRONT AIR DAM now has

upturned edges, like a smile – does it know it’s going to accelerate a lot faster?

BMW Magazine

VISUAL ACCELERATION – gleaming wood trim and elegant Dakota Leather stream back from the dash in a stylized flow.

BMW Magazine

EVERYTHING ABOUT THE 5 SERIES, INSIDE AND OUT, REFLECTS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO FORM AND FUNCTION.

Text:

Eli

Musser

At first glance, differentiating the 2007 5 Series from the 2008 5 Series is a bit of a challenge. Sure, you’ll find the

redesigned air dam here, a newly striated taillight cluster there – nice touches, but not exactly the stuff to inspire double-takes from other drivers. But don’t be fooled: the BMW gods of precision engineering have imbued the new 5 Series with innovations galore, from potent new engines to innovative technologies. The interior also benefits from luxurious cues and a palette of personalizing options. From the dashboard back, along the doors and center console, its curvaceous lines are delineated in gleaming wood trim and artfully stitched Dakota Leather. Silver Titanium trim adds a jeweler’s touch to the redesigned steering wheel, as well as numerous con- trols and knobs. Even the doors have large storage areas that hold maps, tissues, sunglasses, travel books, magazines and more with ease. Everything is plusher, richer, more inviting. Which brings us to the driver’s seat. Slide your key fob into the slot, and (while pressing down on the brake pedal, of course) hit the Start button. You’ll notice something dear to BMW fans: the sound of the exhaust – that familiar metallic growl that lets you know something thrilling is about to happen. Then get in gear (hey, the automatic trans- mission gearshifter is different) and take off. It feels like these new 5s have been to the gym. The power comes on early, flinging you past the 60 mark very quickly. You’re not just dreaming. The 535i/535xi is the lucky recipient of BMW’s vaunted, new twin-turbo inline six- cylinder engine. This 300-horsepower dynamo, which made its debut last year in the 3 Series Coupe, marks BMW’s welcome return to turbocharged technology. Its stellar per- formance and fuel efficiency make it a natural fit for 5 Series owners seeking both speed and savings at the pump. Compliments are also in order for the new 528i/528xi engine: a Valvetronic six-cylinder that calls up 230 galloping horses and 200 lb-ft of rubber-burning torque. And while

BMW Magazine

PHOTOS: MIERSWA-KLUSKA (1)

the 550i retains the same award-winning 4.8-liter, 360- horsepower V-8 as its predecessor, it’s always exhilarating to experience its 0-60 time: a mere 5.4 seconds. 1

Another 5 Series highlight: the transmission. Smooth

and accurate, it’s six forward speeds of pure driving pleasure – and BMW offers some excellent choices when

it comes to goosing the gears. For those driving purists,

a slick-shifting manual transmission is standard in all

5 Series models. BMW’s STEPTRONIC automatic transmis- sion gives you the freedom to alternate between automatic, sport and clutch-free manual modes – and it’s now a no-cost

option, to boot. But for the truly shifting-obsessed, adding

a Sport Package to either the 535i or the 550i lets you

choose an optional über-inspiring Sport Automatic trans- mission, complete with a set of paddle shifters 2 on the steering wheel, for faster upshifting, downshifting and throttle blipping. Once the performance perma-grin has worn off, you’ll notice the 5 Series’ interior changes are thorough and well- conceived. Not just a “reskinning,” BMW designers took careful stock of every element within the cabin – and the result is superb, even in the smallest detail. From leather- wrapped door-pull handles to the refined center console with a new iDrive Controller, the 5 Series exudes a more premium personality than ever before. Fitting, since that same spirit is mirrored in the available comfort and con- venience features. Optional HD Radio™ gives you free access to more digital AM and FM stations, all with clear, static-free sound, as well as multicasting with innovative data services. The optional Cold Weather Package adds a heated steering wheel, 2 as well as heated front and rear seats. And speaking of rear seats, you’ll find separate read- ing lights and climate controls for both sides, with enough

legroom to keep long-limbed passengers happy. A spacious trunk easily hauls luggage and other cargo. Now this is smooth traveling.

In addition to myriad functional and aesthetic changes, the 5 Series is available with brilliant new features and options that cater to the driver’s senses – and sense of secur- ity. Standard in the 528xi and 535xi, BMW’s xDrive all- wheel-drive system knows where and when to distribute power optimally for each individual wheel, resulting in outstanding traction regardless of the road or weather conditions. Then there’s optional Active Steering, which intelligently adjusts steering ratio. At low speeds, it’s easier to maneuver; at high speeds, handling is more stable. Optional Active Cruise Control uses radar measurements to help maintain a pre-set distance between your car and the one ahead while the cruise control feature is in use. If your vehicle begins to drift across lanes without first signaling, BMW’s optional new Lane Departure feature discreetly alerts you by gently vibrating the steering wheel. The optional Head-up Display projects vital driving information in a small yet easy-to-read area above the driver’s-side dash. The 5 Series even offers optional NightVision, which uses long-distance infrared technology to give you a better look at the road ahead, in the dark – up to 300 yards away. Even without dramatic exterior changes, the new 5 Series is more desirable than ever, inside and out… which is exactly

as the engineers at BMW intended.

out… which is exactly as the engineers at BMW intended. bmwusa.com 1 Manual transmission; 5.5 seconds,

bmwusa.com

1 Manual transmission; 5.5 seconds, STEPTRONIC transmission. 2 Available as of June 2007 production.

AN EXAMPLE OF DYNAMIC BMW THINKING THE 550i SPORT PACKAGE with Active Roll Stabilization reveals
AN EXAMPLE
OF DYNAMIC BMW THINKING
THE 550i SPORT PACKAGE with Active Roll Stabilization reveals the high-performance soul of the 5 Series.
The suspension is tighter; the performance tires on 19-inch alloy wheels, larger. An Aerodynamic body kit,
Shadowline trim and exclusive Carbon Black Metallic paint complete the athletic, purposeful look.
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Architecture Rem Koolhaas

DELIRIOUS

Rem Koolhaas is a prophet of modernism. The award-winning architect has given his profession new dimensions.

Text:

Niklas

Maak

Casa da Musica, Porto, 2005: wave glass with a kaleidoscopic effect.

BMW Magazine

DESIGNS

Public Library, Seattle, 2004: like no other building, it blurs inside-out boundaries. If you happen

Public Library, Seattle, 2004: like no other building, it blurs inside-out boundaries.

If you happen to bump into Rem Koolhaas, perhaps at an art biennial in Venice, or a gallery opening in London or in front of his Amsterdam office, it’s a

sure bet that he’ll have a mobile phone glued to his ear. A moment later he’ll be rushing off. Koolhaas seldom stays in the same place more than one day. At one time he was circling the globe on a regular basis, from his Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in Rotterdam to Seattle, for which he designed a spectacular library, from there to China, where he’s building new headquarters for the CCTV television network, back to Europe, then to New York City to

television network, back to Europe, then to New York City to hold a lecture, after that

hold a lecture, after that to visit a client in St. Peters- burg, or attend a convention in Berlin. Born in Rot- terdam in 1944, the restless Koolhaas participates in so many different panel discussions, research trips and professional events that it’s hard to shake the impres- sion that there are at least two of him. There are few other architects as mobile as Koolhaas – and not only in the geographic sense. Even when relaxing, Koolhaas has to be in motion: he goes swimming every day (they say his office maintains a list of addresses and the opening hours of hundreds of swimming pools all over the world), and he loves driving. Koolhaas used to drive an old Maserati, but ever since its engine died with a loud bang on a Dutch autobahn, he’s been driving a BMW 840i. Koolhaas is currently considered the world’s most important and influential living architect. Few others, over the past decade, have so profoundly influenced the field with their buildings and theories on the foun- dations of architecture. Other fields have also felt his impact. It’s no surprise that fashion mogul Miucca Prada, for whom he designed several stores, counts herself among his friends. Koolhaas’ career path has been far from predictable. He grew up in Indonesia, worked for a time as a journalist and even wrote

Public Library, Seattle, 2004:

a lemon-yellow escalator leads to the information desk and internet terminals.

BMW Magazine

PUBLIC LIFE CENTERS ON THE ROOF, WHICH RETRACTS IN SUMMER SO EMPLOYEES CAN EAT OUTSIDE.

movie scripts. In 1978, when he was 34, he published a literary manifesto that today has cult status for many architects. Delirious New York is a mix of surrealist imagery, cultural analysis, architectural and urban his- tory, and wild utopian fantasies portraying Koolhaas’ view of the the Big Apple. Demonstrating the road that an alternative mod- ernism might take has been a goal for Koolhaas and the OMA architecture firm he founded with friends in 1975. The group’s first creations went up in the 1980s, and included the Nederlands Dans Theater in The Hague. Rotterdam’s art museum followed the Villa Dall’Ava in St. Cloud, near Paris, a building that cavorts playfully on stilts and has a pool on the roof. The spectacular rooftop landscaped gardens of the Nexus House Project in Tukwoka, Japan came next. In 1998, the villa that cemented Koolhaas’ fame appeared. Commissioned to build a house in Bor- deaux, France by the proprietor of the newspaper Sud Ouest, Koolhaas designed the entire structure around a platform capable of moving up and down to meet the paralyzed owner’s needs. While confined to his wheelchair, the owner can access different levels of the house from the platform. Two years later, Koolhaas was awarded the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s equiva- lent of the Nobel Prize. Koolhaas asks basic questions: how else could a house look? How might the city of the future be organized? What do concepts like private sphere, com- munication, individual and collective identity really mean, and how are they expressed in buildings? To explore such issues, Koolhaas has created his own think tank in Rotterdam. Named AMO, the reverse of OMA, his office’s name, this group researches the basic assumptions underlying architecture and soci- ety, the overarching social, aesthetic and political framework in which the building industry functions. How does this affect his own designs? The interesting thing about building a new Prada store in Manhattan, for example, says Koolhaas, is the chance to “create a new definition of what a store is, what it can be. It is also a public space. A stage. In SoHo we created a space which can be used culturally as well as commer- cially: the store’s merchandise hangs on rails dropped from the ceiling, but they can be pushed aside to make way for a collapsible stage, and the wide staircases double as amphitheater seating. The whole store then becomes a stage.” Koolhaas is attempting to invent a new kind of public space and his work is probably impossible to

Netherlands Embassy, Berlin, 2003:

like a worm winding through a magic cube.

truly understand without a visit to Seattle, where his revolutionary library building has given the city a new center. “Washington – The Evergreen State.” The main reason why it is “evergreen” here is because it never stops raining. When the sun shines, it isn’t for long. Especially in autumn, the fog can hang for days on end over the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the passage connecting Seattle with the open ocean. As the rain clouds move into Puget Sound from the nearby Pacific Ocean, the Cape Flattery and Lower Elwaha Indian reservation all the way up to Seattle, it’s impossible to set foot outdoors without getting soaked to the bone. One needs to be aware of this in order to fully appreciate the new library. It lights up the block between 4th and 5th Avenues like a great multifaceted gemstone. Dur- ing the day, when the gray skies are reflected from its glassy surface, it appears like a brooding monolithic sculpture over which someone has pulled a brightly colored fishnet stocking. But after dark the library turns transparent and lights up from within, revealing its inner framework and becoming a sparkling center of vitality in this quiet section of a city jam-packed with skyscrapers. Like San Francisco, the streets plunge straight down to the harbor and Elliot Bay. No sidewalk cafés, no crowds were found in this part of

plunge straight down to the harbor and Elliot Bay. No sidewalk cafés, no crowds were found

BMW Magazine

BMW Magazine

50

BMW Magazine

Seattle before Koolhaas erected his new interpretation of public space there. The new $165 million library leaps back from the rigid street line, creating space for a public plaza – as does Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building in New York City. But in Seattle, the plaza is a patch of wild vegetation. The untamed garden, designed by Petra Blaisse, serves as a surrealistic reminder of the day when the first settlers laid eyes on forest-encircled Elliot Bay. The first surprising aspect of Koolhaas’ creation is how it blurs the boundary between the building’s interior and the outside surroundings. A visitor entering from 5th Avenue immediately arrives at a public square complete with coffee stand, the ambiance of a train station, and a view of the street and the passing traffic. The whole square is sheltered by the façade, which arches overhead like a giant transparent umbrella, very necessary in rainy Seattle. The space is a combination waiting room, abstract garden and oversized living room. It’s a loggia that brings in city life, erasing the distinction between public and private space. Adding to the interplay is the light blue- and turquoise-glazed steel frame of the façade itself. Twisting and folding from inside to out, it manages to morph into a wall, a floor and then a ceiling. At the back of the 425-seat auditorium is an esca- lator whose gleaming lemon-yellow color sets you blinking uncontrollably. It leads to the so-called “Mix- ing Chamber,” and across a brushed metal floor to the information desk. Since a library without internet access would be unthinkable in the hometown of

REM KOOLHAAS Rem Koolhaas, 62, is one of the most gifted architects of our day

REM KOOLHAAS

Rem Koolhaas, 62, is one of the most gifted architects of our day and a leading theoretician in the field. Originally a film scriptwriter and journalist, he went on to study architecture with friends, and established the Office of Metropolitan Archi- tecture (OMA) in 1975. In the early 1980s, Koolhaas began turning his ideas into buildings; the Nederlands Dans Theater in The Hague brought him world acclaim. He is currently working on the headquarters for Chinese Television, which is scheduled for completion in 2008, in time for the Beijing Olympics.

Maison à Bordeaux, Bordeaux, 1998: three floors linked by a lift platform that transforms into a bathroom, office and dining room.

BMW Magazine

PHOTOS: CHRISTIAN RICHTERS (2); ARTUR/CHRISTIAN RICHTERS (2); HANS WERLEMANN (2); SIPA/CASEY KEVIN; MICHAEL MORAN; JOHN OFFENBACH; OSTKREUZ/THOMAS MEYER; ESTO/PETER AARON

KOOLHAAS HAS THEM ALL: THE PRITZKER PRIZE, THE MIES VAN DER ROHE AWARD, AND MANY MORE.

Microsoft and Amazon, this level has a free internet café with 132 terminals. Beyond this electronic window to the world beck- ons a panorama of Elliot Bay, from which small boats leave for Victoria and Vancouver. Beneath the Mixing Chamber, within a bright red and astoundingly – for Koolhaas – biomorphic labyrinth, are conference rooms and underneath them, the Children’s Center, with a collection of over 80,000 children’s books. Another shocking-yellow escalator leads to the heart of the library, a spiral that winds upwards through rows of bookshelves containing 750,000 volumes right up to the glass roof, and 400 chairs and reading areas with a view of the city and the bay. The spiral can be expanded to hold 1.4 million volumes. There has never been a library like this. When the rain outside drums endlessly on the glass, the library serves as an innovative fusion of the private and the public – a gigantic, collective living room. Vis- itors spend hours on couches reading newspapers, magazines and books, many of them waiting for friends who work in neighboring office towers. Koolhaas has put up buildings in three cities over the past two years. Each maximizes the spiral design, which has generated unexpected spaces. Besides Seat- tle, there is the Casa da Musica in Porto, Portugal. Located on the Plaza Rotunda da Boavista, the build-

Prada Store, New York, 2001:

redefined public space.

build- Prada Store, New York, 2001: redefined public space. 5 2 B M W M a

52 BMW Magazine

ing resembles a futuristic crustacean deposited on the Avenida da Boavista by the waves of the Atlantic Ocean. Visitors enter it as if boarding a spaceship: by way of a glowing neon staircase jutting from its belly, which leads to a deep slit in the façade. A last look at the city’s quietly proud middle-class houses with their bright red roofs – and then it’s on into this combina- tion concrete cathedral, giant futuristic snail shell, and ship’s hull. A staircase, wide as a room, leads up to the huge concert hall in the upper levels. If we take the architect at his word, the Casa da Musica is only an enlarged version of a private residence. Koolhaas is not only trying to direct our angle of vision to the vertical, he actually conceives of a ver- tically organized city. Berlin presents an example. Its new Netherlands Embassy there is a freestanding magic cube, which appears to twist and pulsate as if someone were trying to pull it apart. Glass ramps pushing through the metal walls make it seem like an organ inside the silver block which is about to explode. When Porto, Spain, was designated the Cultural Capital of 2001, Koolhaas wanted to build a concert hall with a glass façade on both sides. Flat surfaces, however, have poor acoustic properties. Together with engineers Cecil Balmond and Renz von Luxemburg, Koolhaas developed a huge sheet of waved glass to sep- arate the concert hall from the city. The glass wall’s undulations are adapted from a sine wave, which makes the wall so sturdy that it doesn’t need steel or concrete reinforcement. At the same time, the wall provides bet- ter acoustics than any other type of glass pane. “I’m interested in the idea of congestion,” says Koolhaas. “When you can’t build infinitely upwards anymore, things have to be organized in new and more precise ways, compacted, radicalized.” The inte- rior of the embassy is radically new: there are no stairs or even floors anymore. A shiny aluminum-clad corri- dor, stair-like in places, ramp-like in others, winds like a crazy worm through no less than 20 levels. Here and there, the corridor opens into sitting areas or pushes past the walls onto a green glass floor through which the street below is visible. The “worm” bores through the building right up to the roof. Meeting rooms and offices branch off from the corridors. Koolhaas’ embassy replaces the traditional office building with a work landscape: the 200-yard-long walk seems more like a stroll through a mountain village than a normal office. The public side of this miniature city centers on the roof, where a gym and cafeteria are located. In the summer the roof is opened so that the employees can enjoy eating in the open air. To a small extent, this is a realization of Koolhaas’ “culture of congestion,” and the dream of the vertical city with which the 34-year-

old began his career in Delirious New York.

the 34-year- old began his career in Delirious New York . www.oma.nl Nederlands Dans Theater, The

www.oma.nl

Nederlands Dans Theater, The Hague, 1967: one of the first projects by the OMA architecture group.

BMW Magazine 53

New: BMW ALPINA B7

BMW ALPINA B7:

A BLUE STREAK FROM BAVARIA

Automotive specialty firm ALPINA takes the BMW 7 Series Sedan and creates horsepower of a different color.

Text:

Victoria

List

BMW Magazine

Forget taking the plane. The BMW ALPINA B7 is so fast and so luxurious, you’ll want to drive there instead. (And you’ll probably arrive sooner.)

BMW ALPINA B7 is so fast and so luxurious, you’ll want to drive there instead. (And

If Germany were the face of a clock, Buchloe would mark the “6.” Located at the bottom of Bavaria, with the Alps

as a backdrop, this small town of just over 12,000 is impor- tant to driving enthusiasts the world over for one reason: it’s home to the automotive tuning company, ALPINA. Less than 50 miles away lies Munich, the Bavarian capital and home of BMW – which has been ALPINA’s sole client since it was established in 1964. Since then, ALPINA has made its name by taking production BMWs, retooling their engines for added power, and refitting their interiors with exclusive, luxe materials. ALPINA creations can be always identified by their special badging and 20-spoke alloy wheels. The latest BMW to receive the ALPINA touch is the 7 Series Sedan. Dubbed the BMW ALPINA B7, this unique 500-horsepower luxury sedan is available exclusively through BMW of North America. The transformation begins with the engine, BMW’s 4.4- liter V-8. All the main parts destined for a BMW ALPINA B7 are given extra heat treatments at the BMW engine plant in Steyr, Austria. These parts are then shipped to Buchloe, where ALPINA assembles them into V-8 engines, but with a difference:

the addition of a Nautilus-style radial compressor and a fully remapped engine management system (ECU). Supercharging BMW’s V-8, together with Valvetronic engine “breathing” tech- nology results in fearsome power with excellent fuel efficiency. The completed engines, along with special six-part cooling units, are then forwarded to the 7 Series plant in Dingolfing, where BMW ALPINA B7 assembly continues by hand. In addi-

tion to a selection of paints, upholstery colors and wood trims, purchasers can also choose the signature ALPINA Blue exterior paint and Cream Beige Leather upholstery, warmed by hand- some Burl-Maple Wood trim. Each vehicle is carefully assem- bled on the 7 Series production line, but customized by ALPINA with special ALPINA parts, ECU software uploading, airbags and more. The finished vehicles are sent back to Buchloe for final inspection, and then shipped to the U.S.

Outside, numerous clues give away the BMW ALPINA B7’s not-so-secret identity as a serious performer – such as

massive 21-inch alloy wheels (quickly slowed down by equally sizeable 14.7-inch front, 14.6-inch rear brakes), and a deep front air dam with large air intakes. At the back sits a rear-deck spoiler whose small size is a sharp contrast to its uncanny ability to help keep the rear of the vehicle stable and firmly grounded as the speedometer needle swings toward faster speeds. In lesser vehicles, the need for a spoiler may seem gratuitous; however, in the BMW ALPINA B7, it’s a necessity. Courtesy of that supercharged V-8, it’s disconcertingly easy to find yourself on the far side of 60 mph in just 4.8 seconds. From the moment

WHILE THE BMW ALPINA B7’S BLISTERING PERFORMANCE MAY HEAT YOUR BLOOD, THE COCKPIT REMAINS A SOOTHING ENVIRONMENT.

YOUR BLOOD, THE COCKPIT REMAINS A SOOTHING ENVIRONMENT. 56 BMW Magazine you press the accelerator pedal,
YOUR BLOOD, THE COCKPIT REMAINS A SOOTHING ENVIRONMENT. 56 BMW Magazine you press the accelerator pedal,
YOUR BLOOD, THE COCKPIT REMAINS A SOOTHING ENVIRONMENT. 56 BMW Magazine you press the accelerator pedal,

56

BMW Magazine

COCKPIT REMAINS A SOOTHING ENVIRONMENT. 56 BMW Magazine you press the accelerator pedal, to the point

you press the accelerator pedal, to the point where it nearly reaches the plushly carpeted floor, it unleashes a smooth and constant torrent of torque while busily spooling the supercharger. And should you find yourself on a racetrack where it’s legal to break the sound barrier, with your safety belt fastened and your lunch completely digested – floor it. With a lusty howl, the BMW ALPINA B7 lunges for the horizon at what seems to be warp speed. Yet the most amazing numbers of all can be found at – of all places – the gas pump: 15 mpg city, 23 highway. The BMW ALPINA B7’s handling is as eye-opening as its raw acceleration. Endowed with BMW’s near-perfect 50/50 weight distribution, Active Roll Stabilization feature, and unique ALPINA sport-suspension setting, and shod with 245/35ZR-21 front, 285/30ZR-21 rear performance tires, this full-size sedan eagerly attacks curves with a degree of grace, composure and ferocity that is truly exhilarating to behold.

A vehicle capable of such near-effortless high perform- ance requires instrumentation to match. So the leather-

wrapped, three-spoke ALPINA sport steering wheel offers SWITCH-TRONIC shift buttons on the back for those who like their driving style on the Formula 1 side. For those times when you prefer a more laid-back experience, there’s the smooth-as- silk 6-speed automatic. And while the BMW ALPINA B7’s blistering performance may heat your blood, the cockpit remains a soothing environ- ment, with dash gauges bathed in a cool ALPINA blue. Of course, all this show-stopping performance in a vehicle that is the epitome of sporty style and elegance does not come cheap. But if you are in the financial neighborhood, you’d have to look far and wide to find a vehicle that could make you feel so

blessed to be in possession of a driver’s license.

feel so blessed to be in possession of a driver’s license. alpina-automobiles.com Above: the BMW ALPINA

alpina-automobiles.com

Above: the BMW ALPINA B7 shows off its wind-cheating form. Special ground effects and a rakish rear spoiler not only give it a more athletic look, but help keep this sprinter glued to the ground – even at its top speed of 186 mph.

Left: high-gloss, reddish-brown Burl-Maple Wood trim enhances the BMW ALPINA B7’s beautiful interior.

BMW Magazine 57

ILLUSTRATIONS: PETER STEMMLER

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contact: Tutima USA, Inc., T: 888-462-7888, info@tutima.com Freezing temperatures, snow and ice make driving difficult
contact: Tutima USA, Inc., T: 888-462-7888, info@tutima.com Freezing temperatures, snow and ice make driving difficult

Freezing temperatures, snow and ice make driving difficult in winter. It’s hard

going uphill on snow-covered roads, unless you’re properly equipped and know a few little tricks. First of all, BMW recommends winter tires at all four wheels – not just for higher altitudes, but even in lowland areas that see little snow. It gets icy there, too, and if you still have summer “performance” tires, braking distances are longer and road- grip in curves is reduced. When you are about to go up a hill in snowy conditions, BMW’s driving experts suggest that you do it with a running start. On icy roads it is virtually impossible to take steep slopes in low gear. Drivers with man- ual gearboxes should stay in a high gear as long as possible. Also, a quick jab on the Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) button before starting the climb activates Dynamic Traction Control (DTC). This system allows the drive wheels to spin slightly, which actu- ally improves your uphill thrust.

Driving skills Snow conditions

SAFETY TIPS FOR THE SNOW

Winter holds challenges in store. You should be properly equipped and know the right driving techniques. Here are some tips for slippery slopes.

driving techniques. Here are some tips for slippery slopes. When driving downhill on slippery roads, it

When driving downhill on slippery roads, it is essential that Dynamic Stability Con- trol (DSC) is once again engaged. It’s best

to take descents slowly and in a low gear. Depending on the speed, you should either brake gently or accelerate cautiously. With automatic transmission, the stability control system recognizes the specific situation and selects the appropriate gear setting. Even if you are driving carefully with the help of DSC, things can get tricky on down- hill curves. The car may understeer, where the front wheels skid towards the outside of the curve. If that happens, try to keep the vehicle on the road by maintaining the nor- mal steering wheel position in the curve – and do not steer harder into the curve until you have regained directional control.

into the curve until you have regained directional control. Vehicles with BMW’s xDrive have an eas-
into the curve until you have regained directional control. Vehicles with BMW’s xDrive have an eas-
into the curve until you have regained directional control. Vehicles with BMW’s xDrive have an eas-

Vehicles with BMW’s xDrive have an eas-

ier time in winter. Thanks to this intelligent all-wheel-drive system, they have outstand- ing traction going uphill. On downhill runs, you can keep the vehicle to a slow, steady speed without riding the brake by pushing the Hill Descent Control (HDC) button. Here too, DSC picks the best possible trac- tion for all four wheels to help take the vehicle to the bottom. All xDrive vehicles are now equipped with DTC for better running starts and ascents with slightly spinning wheels. And to make maneuvering out of snowy or tight parking spaces easier, don’t forget to turn the DSC off to activate the DTC system. In extreme conditions, experts advise the use of snow chains, even if your vehicle is equipped with xDrive all-wheel drive. BMW recommends that these should always

be attached to the rear wheels.

drive. BMW recommends that these should always be attached to the rear wheels. bmw.com/drivertraining BMW Magazine

bmw.com/drivertraining

BMW Magazine

Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes
Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes
Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes DUST TRAP During the first tests on BMW’s track in Miramas,
Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes DUST TRAP During the first tests on BMW’s track in Miramas,
Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes DUST TRAP During the first tests on BMW’s track in Miramas,
Vehicle testing 6 Series prototypes DUST TRAP During the first tests on BMW’s track in Miramas,

DUST TRAP

During the first tests on BMW’s track in Miramas, the prototype learned to eat dust. The track was strewn with chalk dust, which left its marks all over the car. Water tanks on the rear seats simulated the weight of passengers (far right, top).

BMW Magazine

the weight of passengers (far right, top). BMW Magazine T R I E D , TESTED,
the weight of passengers (far right, top). BMW Magazine T R I E D , TESTED,

TRIED,

TESTED,

AND

KNOCKED

ABOUT

In debugging the BMW 6 Series, the prototypes were treated horribly. Relentless testing under extreme conditions in all parts of the globe.

testing under extreme conditions in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT
testing under extreme conditions in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT
testing under extreme conditions in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT

IT STARTS WITH

DUST

AND DIRT

in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT
in all parts of the globe. IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT

DANCING ON

ICE AT

-13°F

IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a
IT STARTS WITH DUST AND DIRT DANCING ON ICE AT - 13°F POLAR PIROUETTES On a

POLAR PIROUETTES

On a frozen lake in northern Sweden, the BMW 6 Series prototypes drive in circles to test the anti-skid control system. At night with the temperature at minus 40°F, testing was done for cold engine starts, the effectiveness of the heating system, and the winter performance of all individual components. Parts of the BMW test track were heated for uphill traction tests so that, for example, the car’s left wheels were riding on asphalt while the right wheels were on snow (next page).

so that, for example, the car’s left wheels were riding on asphalt while the right wheels
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures

118°F

IN THE

FURNACE

OF DEATH VALLEY

118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching
118°F IN THE FURNACE OF DEATH VALLEY MARATHON THROUGH HELL California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching

MARATHON THROUGH HELL

California’s Death Valley, with temperatures reaching 122ºF, is the hottest place in the U.S. Prior to testing, the prototypes stand for hours in the grueling sun. The temperature in the pas- senger compartment can go as high as 176ºF. That makes the mountain-valley tests a torture for both driver and car. All 30,000 components have to be able to survive the inferno.

the mountain-valley tests a torture for both driver and car. All 30,000 components have to be
the mountain-valley tests a torture for both driver and car. All 30,000 components have to be
the mountain-valley tests a torture for both driver and car. All 30,000 components have to be
the mountain-valley tests a torture for both driver and car. All 30,000 components have to be
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of
ROAD MAP

ROAD MAP

TO

PERFECTION

ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the
ROAD MAP TO PERFECTION MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA Driving on selected roads, members of the

MID-TERM REPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA

Driving on selected roads, members of the BMW Board of Management get a firsthand impression of the new sports car’s performance. They are the most rigorous examiners – which is all the better for the customer. The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The new BMW 6 Series receives a glowing report.

The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The
The aim is not to find out what is good, but what could be better. The

Text:

Wolfgang

Schneider

The most important thing about a proto- type is the tape – black, waterproof tape.

It makes the features unrecognizable – at least the crucial ones. Two years before the production launch, prototypes and pre- production models of the BMW 6 Series Coupe and Convertible embarked on a world tour. Well camouflaged, these under- cover models traveled from northern Sweden to South Africa, and from the U.S. to Japan. They crunched over rough gravel tracks, endured blistering-hot deserts, and drifted through icy Arctic landscapes. No form of torture was omitted. The test manual prescribes well over 1,000 gruesome trials. The test engineers were merciless and the measuring devices incorruptible. The mis- sion was to identify defects and eliminate them. The cars were mishandled, tormented and abused until there was no more room for improvement. A BMW must never show the slightest sign of weakness.

Miramas, France. From the word “go,” the first 6 Series prototypes get a dirty deal. No sooner are they up and running, when the prototypes are sent to BMW’s Miramas test track in southern France and chased down a section of road covered with chalk dust. The aim is to find out the extent to which the front, rear and sides pick up dirt. If it exceeds a certain limit, the car’s design can still be slightly modified at this early stage. During the trial period, the prototypes fre- quently come to Miramas for test drives on Mont Ventoux. They carry water canisters in the rear seats to simulate the weight of passengers, or rack up miles on the facility’s high-speed section: 24,000 miles, traveling non-stop with throttle wide open, equals 120,000 miles of normal highway driving.

Arjeplog, Sweden. Hour after hour, the 6 Series Coupe and Convertible prototypes flit back and forth on frozen Kakel Lake. Extended power drifts on clear ice at minus 13°F are common maneuvers at this facility, which lies just 30 miles south of the Arctic Circle. The cars act as rolling laboratories, bristling with sensors and packed to the roof with measuring devices. This is where the stability control systems are tested, ad- justed and fine-tuned. These systems have to function with absolute precision, yet not influence driving pleasure: not too soon, but not a split-second too late, either. It’s a deli- cate balancing act. For 30 years now, BMW cars have been carrying out intensive winter testing on artificial hills, sharp turns and pitched ramps in the deep freeze around the Arctic Circle. Up to 200 BMW engineers are involved.

BMW Magazine

Circle. Up to 200 BMW engineers are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO

MORE

STOP THAN GO

IN

TOKYO

are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
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are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A
are involved. BMW Magazine MORE STOP THAN GO IN TOKYO INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A

INTO THE TRAFFIC TURMOIL OF A MEGACITY

The conurbation of Tokyo is the world’s largest metropolitan area. Its narrow streets, millions of cars and endless traffic jams, as well as intolerable heat and humidity in summer, pose extreme challenges for the lubrication and cooling of the engine. After the racetrack, the desert and the Arctic ice, the final major test for the new BMW 6 Series is carried out at a walking pace. Part of the Tokyo trials was to check whether the sports car would fit onto the local vehicle transporters.

PHOTOS: JÜRGEN KORINTH
PHOTOS: JÜRGEN KORINTH

Death Valley, California. 118°F in the shade.

Except that there is no shade. The BMW 6 Series Coupes and Convertibles are left standing in the merciless midday desert sun for hours. Death Valley, the hottest place in the U.S., is where the cars are tested for heat stability. None of the 30,000 or so components is allowed to wilt. The black sheetmetal almost hits the 212°F mark, and inside it is a roasting 176°F. The test drivers step into a sauna on wheels and, although the air conditioning begins pumping cold air in just 10 seconds, it takes a minute before the cooling effect becomes notice- able. That’s because the air ducts are the first to absorb the cold. From Bad Water – at 284 feet below sea level, the lowest point on earth – the route leads to a 15 percent gradient, ending at Dante’s View, a lookout point 5,000 feet above sea level. Road signs caution drivers to switch off the air condi- tioning while climbing the mountain. It may seem paradoxical, but it makes good sense. Some car engines suffer heatstroke in such extreme conditions. In the 6 Series Coupe and Convertible prototypes, the air condi- tioning is left running full blast – but the engines are undaunted. All the numbers fall well within the acceptable limits. This is just one of myriad tests carried out in the Cali- fornia furnace. Bottom line: the 6 Series is fit for desert duty.

Nürburgring, Germany. 13 miles, 73 turns,

gradients of up to 17 percent – the Nürburg- ring’s Nordschleife ranks as the most chal- lenging racetrack in the world. Covering 620 miles of the Nürburgring at racing speeds is the equivalent of around 12,400 miles of normal driving. Here, the slightest weakness in handling, ride comfort or dynamics is ruthlessly exposed. Every new BMW model is tested and tweaked here. Fine-tuning the suspension is like seasoning a gourmet dish:

you just have to keep trying it. Drive, feel, observe. Analyze data, modify components, adjust settings. Drive, feel, observe again. Always at the limit, but never beyond it, until everything is balanced, harmonious, just right. Thousands of miles on the road to perfection.

South Africa. Board members on board. On selected routes, BMW executives get a firsthand impression of the strengths and

weaknesses of the new BMW 6 Series. All that counts is the driver’s impressions; the rest is theoretical. You have to get behind the wheel to know what the car can really do. BMW’s board members are the most critical judges – in the interests of the customers as well as the company and its employees. “It’s a bit like a mid-term report in school,” says Michael Reger, project manager for vehicle integration during the 6 Series testing per- iod. “You think you’ve done well, but you can’t help feeling nervous.” But that’s short- lived: straight A’s for the 6.

Munich, Germany. Up, down, up, down, up, down. A gearshift robot tirelessly works the 6-speed transmission. Again and again it shifts through the gears. Around the clock, without a break, for two whole weeks. A total of 320,000 times. Meanwhile the horn has to sound 50,000 times at temperatures ranging from 40°F below zero to over 221°F, while a mechanical finger pushes the button to release the safety belt 15,000 times in suc- cession. The list goes on. While the BMW 6 Series prototypes are doing their job out in the big, wide world, their components and parts – from axles to softtop – are tested for precision and durability at BMW’s Research and Technology Center (FIZ). The loads to which they are subjected are generally higher than what they would endure over the entire lifetime of the car.

Tokyo, Japan. Different country, different road conditions, different fuel. How does the engine in the BMW 6 Series cope with the high-boiling-point fuel used in Japan? And what about Tokyo’s chaotic traffic con- ditions? Rush-hour traffic from morning to night. Great heat, high humidity. High demands on motor oil and engine cooling. For days on end, the test vehicles crawl in more or less permanent stop-go traffic. The average driving speed in downtown Tokyo is approximately 6 mph.

End of the road. All torments endured and survived. Series production can begin. Hav- ing done their duty and reached the end of their martyrdom, the test cars are uncere- moniously carted off to the scrapheap. No leftover parts as souvenirs. The purpose of

prototypes is to satisfy the customer at the wheel of the production model.

satisfy the customer at the wheel of the production model. Development of the 6 Series on

Development of the 6 Series on DVD A camera team from the Discovery Channel followed the development of the BMW 6 Series for three years. The three-part documentary A Car is Born (3 DVDs) can be ordered online at amazon.com | discovery.com

BMW Magazine

PHOTO: FACILIS COMPEX

TEXT: BOB ROEMER

I love my BMW

PHOTO: FACILIS COMPEX TEXT: BOB ROEMER I love my BMW BRENDEN BARTOL, USA BMW 740i FROM

BRENDEN BARTOL, USA

BMW 740i

FROM 1995

68

BMW Magazine

“I decided I would need to drive it at least 300,000 miles to justify my investment,” Mr.

Bartol said. A long-time BMW owner, he never doubted that the car would be up to the task. After all, the 535i he traded in was a 225,000- mile veteran. However, despite his confidence, he didn’t expect the relationship to last as long as it has. Eleven years later, he and his 7 are still together and celebrating a true automotive milestone. Recently the 740i’s odometer recorded 500,000 miles – the equivalent of 20 equatorial laps around the planet. An orthopedic sales representative for Zim- mer, Inc., Mr. Bartol said most of this remark- able journey has been business miles. Legendary BMW reliability did not disap- point him. Thus far, the only repairs the BMW flagship sedan has required, aside from routine maintenance, were replacing the fuel pump at 300,000 miles, and changing the air condition- ing compressor 100,000 miles later. Mr. Bartol purchased his first BMW, a

When he purchased a new 1995 BMW 740i Sedan, Brenden Bartol knew he was entering a long and meaningful relationship.

red 325is, in 1989. “Man, I loved that car,” he enthused. Next came the 535i and, two years ago, a 2003 745Li Sedan. An affinity for BMWs runs in the family; his brother, Brian, owns a 545i, and Brian’s wife drives an X5. To celebrate the occasion, the 740i received a brand new windshield and a complete detail- ing treatment. “At the risk of sounding like someone who has won an Academy Award, I would like to rec- ognize a few of the BMW personnel at Tomkin- son BMW in Fort Wayne, Indiana, who have participated in this milestone,” Mr. Bartol said. “My thanks go to Service Manager Scott High, Service Advisor Doug Bontrager, and Service Technician Dudley Hattaway. Dudley has serviced my 7 for nearly 12 years. He and his co-workers are topnotch.” So, how much further does Mr. Bartol plan on driving his car? “Ask me again when we reach 600,000 miles,” he laughed, adding, “I enjoy

BMWs and will continue to be a proud BMW owner.”

enjoy BMWs and will continue to be a proud BMW owner.” Write to: BMW Magazine 300
Write to: BMW Magazine 300 Chestnut Ridge Road Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey 07677 … or

Write to:

BMW Magazine 300 Chestnut Ridge Road Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey 07677

… or contact us online! Visit us at bmwusa.com/magazine to renew your subscription, request information, read selected articles from this issue, and more.

The Editor reserves the right to edit mail selected for publication.

reserves the right to edit mail selected for publication. BMW biker “head over heels” in more
reserves the right to edit mail selected for publication. BMW biker “head over heels” in more

BMW biker “head over heels” in more ways than one

Dear BMW Magazine, Though my wife has had BMW automobiles for some time, my first BMW was a beauti- ful 2005 R 1100 S Boxer Cup. I’m a 46-year- old Civil Engineer, and the desire for a BMW (I first looked at the R 1000 when it debuted in 1986), combined with my love of the fully faired race-bike look, led me directly to the R 1100 S. Though I initially thought the graphics and such were a bit much for my age (my problem, not the bike’s!), the salesman at California BMW kept me looking at it… and I fell for the whole

package. I really enjoyed riding it, whether just

to work, or along Route 35 and down the

Pacific Coast Highway. I appreciated the looks the bike got from almost everyone… especially Ducati owners. I never grew tired of hearing, “THAT’S a BMW?!!!” Four days before Christmas in 2004, I was

waiting at a traffic light. I don’t lane-split, and so I sat, absent-mindedly watching the driver in front of me fidget with her hair. All of a sudden, I heard things breaking, felt my legs moving, and thought “D%#! – someone’s hit me!” The next thing I knew, I was looking up at the sky.

A meat-delivery truck had rear-ended me. The

top of the truck’s bumper had hit just below the exhaust pipes, broke and rotated the sub- frame up and to the right, and drove my front wheel into the back of the vehicle in front of me.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE ROAD THAT YOU LOVE TO DRIVE?

If you do, please tell us about it! Starting with this issue of BMW Magazine, we will be featuring some of the ultimate roads across America that make driving a BMW so enjoyable. Whether you drive a two-wheel or four-wheel BMW, we would like to hear from you. Perhaps it’s miles of stunning scenery. Maybe it’s a road that twists and turns, each hairpin turn eliciting a grin as it reveals your BMW’s agile performance. Or, if your BMW is equipped with the xDrive all-wheel-drive system, a stretch of terrain that might stymie any two-wheel drive vehicle – but not your BMW. Every corner of the United States has great roads. We invite you to share yours with all the readers of BMW Magazine! Please mail or e-mail your submission to the address above. Include your name, address and phone number, the road name and location, why it’s your favorite road, photographs and (if possible) a photo of you and your BMW. All entries will become the property of BMW of North America and will not be returned. We look forward to hearing from you!

BMW Letters

I was thrown over her trunk, and landed on my

back, next to her passenger door. Fortunately, a compression fracture of a lower vertebra was the extent of my injuries. My loving wife allowed me to replace the bike, stating that the accident could well have been a pedestrian accident, as my feet were on the ground when I was hit. I called my dealer to find out if another Boxer Cup model was available. He laughed, and asked if I was collecting them. However, when he found out what had happened, his concern for my well-being was overwhelming. He was extremely helpful in replacing the bike quickly. When I sent him a couple of photos of the wreck, I told him that he had neglected to advise me of an important feature on the bike:

the ejection seat! Peter Grossman Millbrae, CA

An X5 owner’s loyalty to BMW extends to an F 650 GS

Dear BMW Magazine, I’m a BMW CCA member, and although I subscribe to and enjoy my monthly issues of Bimmer and Roundel, I look forward to your quarterly publication and its coverage of all the many aspects of BMW production. In 2003 I bought an X5 3.0i, and when I announced earlier this year that I wanted a motorcycle, my partner was very supportive. Over the years when visiting friends in Europe, I’d been just a passenger. But riding and owning a bike of my own was a surprise to most everyone who knew me. Our friends made a point of teasing me about my “brand loyalty.” But, I ask, what’s not to like about your well-engineered products? So, despite the hot weather and rain this past summer, I have been enjoying riding my 2006

F 650 GS. Thanks again for such a great read. And something tells me that a BMW F 800 S and/ or an X3 will make it onto my holiday gift list – sooner rather than later. Christopher Bianchi Morris, NY

BMW Magazine 69

Favorite U.S. Roads California’s northern coast

CALL OF THE ROAD The Potter Schoolhouse in Bodega was featured prominently in the 1963
CALL OF THE ROAD
The Potter Schoolhouse in Bodega was featured prominently in the 1963 Hitchcock film,
The Birds. At one time a B&B, it is now a private residence.
Just north of San Francisco lies more beautiful undeveloped coastal land than
anywhere else in the state. It also features some of the most entertaining roads.
This drive is one of my favorites.
most entertaining roads. This drive is one of my favorites. Above: the Sonoma Coast State Beach

Above: the Sonoma Coast State Beach runs for 17 miles along the Pacific Ocean. Left: we stop our Z4 Coupe along Coleman Valley Road to take in this majestic view of the Pacific.

Valley Road to take in this majestic view of the Pacific. Far left: blazing sunsets are
Valley Road to take in this majestic view of the Pacific. Far left: blazing sunsets are

Far left: blazing sunsets are not unusual along the coastal range. Left: Highway 1 runs directly along the San Andreas Fault. Above: Point Reyes Station is an interesting little town with much to enjoy.

Andreas Fault. Above: Point Reyes Station is an interesting little town with much to enjoy. BMW

BMW Magazine

BMW Magazine

MAPS: MERIAN KARTOGRAPHIE

By

Photos

Karen

D.

A.

Jones

Randy

as

Riggs

told

to

D.

Randy

Riggs

Having lived locally for the last decade, I’ve grown to know and love most of the San Francisco Bay Area’s

back roads, frequenting them as often as possible. Of late, I’ve wrung the most out of my driving pleasure in a BMW Z4 Coupe, a car so deliciously full of soul and spirit that it’s hard to resist the temptation to head out of the driveway as often as possible – to answer the Call of the Road. One of my favorite drives is one that takes about half a day – just 130 miles round trip. But there’s so much along this route to soak in that one can easily spend a day enjoying nature’s bounty and the interesting little towns along the way. Adventuresome tourists and driving enthusiasts who are visiting San Francisco will find it worthwhile to try this route for themselves. Just head north across the Golden Gate Bridge on U.S. 101, passing the towns of Sausalito and Mill Valley, and take the Sir Francis Drake exit in Larkspur. Follow Sir Francis Drake west to the town of Fairfax and its central shopping area. Look for Fairfax-Bolinas Road. It’s not well marked, so it might be advisable to ask one of the local mer- chants while enjoying a stroll through this interesting little hamlet, known as the birthplace of the mountain bike.

Leaving Fairfax, the tiny suburban sprawl disappears in the rear-view mirror and you’re headed into the hills. Soon

enough you find yourself snaking through majestic red- woods, where even in the middle of the day headlights are a good idea, because the giant trees filter out much of the light. The curves come one after the other – there’s a left, another left and then a splattering of rights – and all the while the narrow road keeps climbing and climbing. We’re headed west over the Bolinas Ridge, which eventually breaks out into the open a few miles after crossing the Alpine Dam. Finally, after traversing hundreds of turns, the Pacific Ocean pops into view and, if the day is clear enough, the Farallon Islands can be seen about 27 miles off the coast. Fairfax-Bolinas Road ends at the world-famous Highway 1 near Bolinas, and we turn north. This stretch of Highway 1 runs inland rather than directly along the water, and tracks through western Marin County, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Point Reyes National Seashore. Trail- heads are easy to spot if you love to hike. Don’t be surprised

are easy to spot if you love to hike. Don’t be surprised BMW Magazine to see

BMW Magazine

to see Tule elk grazing along the oak-studded grasslands or lingering in the redwood and Bishop Pine forests. And it’s interesting to note that here you’re driving straight up the rift zone of the San Andreas Fault – welcome to earthquake country. The tiny town of Olema features a couple of restaurants and a small hotel as well as a few scattered B&Bs. There’s also

a turnoff for those who wish to visit some beautiful stretches of mostly deserted beach along Drakes Bay. Just follow the signs. Three miles north make sure to stop in Point Reyes

Station – just like Prince Charles and his wife Camilla did in 2005 to learn more about organic farming. The local produce

is wonderful at the farmer’s market here.

Don’t miss having a breakfast bun at the Bovine Bakery or watching the creation of award-winning cheese at the Cowgirl Creamery. A stroll up and down the main drag will reveal a number of interesting shops and local characters and some friendly dogs. The relaxed pace is refreshing and I always feel uplifted after spending time here.

Highway 1 heads north from town, and after some won-

derful sweeping curves, the road begins to parallel the shallow coastal estuary of Tomales Bay. This body of water is renowned for its oyster and abalone farms, and great for canoeing and kayaking. I often make a stop at the Tomales Bay Oyster Company to bring home fresh oysters for barbe- quing. I also enjoy a meal at funky and rustic Tony’s Seafood Shack in Marshall. When the road again bends inland, it’ll keep you busy with its many curves until you reach Tomales (population 200), then straightens out until it intersects with Valley Ford Road, just over the Sonoma County line. Turn left and you’ll remain on Highway 1. In a little more than four miles there’s a turn-off for the tiny town of Bodega, an interesting side-trip to see the old

tiny town of Bodega, an interesting side-trip to see the old A word to the wise
tiny town of Bodega, an interesting side-trip to see the old A word to the wise
tiny town of Bodega, an interesting side-trip to see the old A word to the wise

A word to the wise as you prepare for this drive: First, top off your fuel tank. There are very few stations along the route. Also, please be aware that many of these roads are popular with motorcyclists and bicyclists and there are few roads with shoulders, so prepare to share the road. Around every blind corner there might be a bicycle rider in your lane; therefore, proceed with that in mind at all times. Wildlife, too, is abundant in the area, and deer are an everyday hazard. Cell phone service is spotty or non-existent, and most of these roads show little mercy for driving mistakes. Summertime temperatures can vary in just a few miles from inland temperatures of 100°F to ocean-side temperatures of 50°F.

Potter Schoolhouse that was used in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1963 film, The Birds. Other parts of the movie were filmed in Bodega Bay and at the movie studios. From here we reverse direction and drive back to northbound Highway 1. Bodega Bay itself has a number of restaurants specializing in seafood, and offers many choices in lodging and spas. We’ve enjoyed meals at the Seaweed Café, Lucas Wharf and the Tides Wharf. In season, Dungeness crabs are a specialty. You can watch fisherman bring in their daily catch or enjoy the sea lions as they frolic nearby. That wonderful seashore aroma wafts through the air wherever you are, and the area is popular with surfers, birdwatchers and everyone who loves the sea. We point north out of town as Highway 1 finally hugs the shoreline and the rocky coast is broken by long stretches of sandy beach. Sometimes I stop just to take a walk on the hard packed sand and other times I just keep enjoying my BMW – like today.

The next turn-off is a bit difficult to see and not well

marked. We’re looking for Coleman Valley Road. Its about two miles north of Bodega Bay, and marked by a long row of tall eucalyptus trees on the east side of Highway 1. You know you’re on the right road because a sign warns that it is not suitable for campers or trucks. Just a single lane in places, the road climbs sharply up the mountain and, from the top, the views in all directions are spectacular. The road winds many miles across open grazing land and through woodsy areas until it reaches the tiny village of Occidental, where the fun part of our drive draws to a close. Check out the wonderful menu at the Union Hotel (circa 1879), or dine on the sunny porch at Howard’s Café, or just take a walking tour of Main Street with its mix of Victorian houses and antique buildings. From Occidental we follow the Bohemian Highway back

to Highway 12, which leads to U.S. 101, ending our jour- ney – a perfect trip for the Ultimate Driving Machine.®

Far left: eclectic houses dot the countryside in western Marin County. Left: Coleman Valley Road’s warning signs portend a fun drive ahead while our Z4 Coupe zips through a redwood forest on the Fairfax-Bolinas Road.

BMW Magazine

Press

Press OCTOBER 2006 2007 335i Coupe From “First Drive” – BMW 335i Coupe “Instead of turbo

OCTOBER 2006

2007 335i Coupe

From “First Drive” – BMW 335i Coupe “Instead of turbo lag followed by a high-end rush, the 335i feels like a large- displacement, normally aspirated engine… but there’s no denying it’s an extremely user-friendly piece, with plenty of sauce for attacking mountain roads and enough reserve to complete ‘iffy’ passing maneuvers.”

SEPTEMBER 2006

2007 Z4 M Coupe

From “Classic Confrontation” article Road & Track commented that it feels almost like ‘a German Viper.’ They added, ‘It’s smaller and more refined than that, but still with that aggressive, powerful nature. We’re also reminded of the Cobra Daytona Coupe.’”

We’re also reminded of the Cobra Daytona Coupe.’” NOVEMBER 6, 2006 From the “2006 Readers’ Choice

NOVEMBER 6, 2006 From the “2006 Readers’ Choice Awards” Best Sedan – BMW 3 Series “If forced to settle for only one car, most of us would pick a sedan – something to carry friends and stuff. It must be fun, too.… If it has been the target for every other car company for a decade or more, it doesn’t hurt, either.”

Best Coupe/Convertible – BMW 6 Series “… You expressed a strong preference for cars with performance as exceptional as their looks.”

“Turbo lag is not an issue, the motor pulls cleanly with as little as 1200 rpm showing, and throttle response feels instantaneous throughout the rev range.”

OCTOBER 25, 2006 From the “’07 Buyers Guide” BMW X3 SAV ® “Its refreshing to find a manual in a small SUV.”

BMW 3 SERIES – “Improving on the 3 Series is a tall order, but BMW pulls it off.”

BMW Magazine

BMW 5 SERIES – “The benchmark at which all sports sedans should aim.”

BMW 6 SERIES – “Among the best; the growl from the M6’s V-10 is addicting.”

BMW 7 SERIES – “A comforting and worth- while technological cruise ship.”

BMW X5 SAV ® “One of the best-handling SUVs on the market.”

– “One of the best-handling SUVs on the market.” NOVEMBER 2006 From the “Consumers’ Most Wanted

NOVEMBER 2006 From the “Consumers’ Most Wanted Vehicles for 2006” Sedan Under $35,000: BMW 3 Series “The redesigned BMW 3 Series snatched top honors with 19 percent of the votes…”

Sedan Under $45,000: BMW 5 Series “BMW’s 5 Series Sedan still owns this category with 25 percent [of the vote].”

Sedan Over $45,000: BMW 7 Series “This year the BMW 7 Series managed to edge out last year’s victor, the Audi A8.”

Sedan Under $35,000: BMW 3 Series “It took the all-new, all-wonderful BMW 3 Series to finally overthrow the Audi A4 dynasty this year.”

Sedan Over $35,000: BMW 5 Series “For years there were only a handful of entrants in this category, but the increas- ingly popular luxury wagon field now includes six models, all European.”

Convertible Under $35,000: BMW Z4 “Proof that more and more people are warm- ing up to the Z4’s controversial styling and discovering the joy under the skin.”

From the “Editors’ Most Wanted Vehicles for 2007” Sedan Under $35,000: BMW 3 Series “Last year’s redesign of this entry-luxury vehicle makes it hard to budge it from the top spot.”

Sedan Under $60,000: BMW 5 Series “2006’s winner comes back strong, with its perfect combination of luxury and per- formance.”

with its perfect combination of luxury and per- formance.” JANUARY 2007 BMW 3 Series From “All-Stars

JANUARY 2007 BMW 3 Series From “All-Stars 2007” Selected as one of the 10 most desirable cars available in the 2007 model year “Why are 3 Series BMWs so well loved?… they are better than all others at doing everything extremely well, because they’ve been honed over the years to provide the absolute best combination of all pertinent characteristics, making them wonderfully agreeable to drive and own.”

“The 3.0-liter six [twin-turbo] delivers the power and torque of a 4.0-liter and the fuel economy of a four-cylinder.”

“If you owned all ten of our All-Stars, we think your BMW 3-Series would rack up the most mileage in four seasons. It really is a great car.”

X5 SAV ® From “BMW X5 – The second generation carries the flag” “What makes the new X5 stand out in the crossover community is the way it performs, handles, and holds the road.”

“Because of adaptive drive, body roll is never an issue, nor are squat and dive under acceleration and braking.”

nor are squat and dive under acceleration and braking.” JANUARY 2007 BMW 3 Series From Car

JANUARY 2007 BMW 3 Series From Car and Driver’s annual “10Best” awards “Each year, the 3-series has gotten a bit more power, an upgraded suspension, a stiffer structure, or a new body style to keep it fresh and current. These constant upgrades have kept the 3-series on our 10Best list for a record 16 consecutive years.”

“…the 3-series remains the definitive sports sedan, delivering the driving satisfaction of a sports car in the body of a practical machine.”

of a sports car in the body of a practical machine.” BMW ORACLE Racing bmwusa.com 1-800-605-9BMW

BMW ORACLE

BMW ORACLE

Racing

bmwusa.com

1-800-605-9BMW

The Ultimate Driving Machine ®

Experience America’s Cup Racing as few others can.

Come enjoy America’s Cup Racing excitement off the Spanish coast. There’s no better way to appreciate the thrills of the 32nd America’s Cup than with the BMW ORACLE Racing experience package.

This exclusive package includes two nights of hotel accommodations; admission to one exciting race day of sailing; two gourmet dinners; merchandise gifts; and V.I.P. shuttle service.

Experience packages are available for the following race dates:

• Louis Vuitton Cup Semi-Finals (May 15, 2007)

• Louis Vuitton Cup Finals (June 3, 2007)

• America’s Cup Finals (June 29, 2007)

For even more thrills, you can also take advantage of special experiences, offered in addition to the cost of your BMW ORACLE Racing experience package.

Special experiences include: access to the Spectator boats, where you can catch all the competitive sailing action up-close; various Driving experiences, such as an exciting drive in a Formula BMW racecar; Sport experiences, featuring sailing, golf, pelota, and more; and Cultural experiences that take you on architectural, musical and culinary adventures.

Reservations are limited. For more information, or to reserve your place today, call toll-free, 1-800-605-9BMW (9269).

Package details are tentative and subject to change. ©2007 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name and logo are registered trademarks.

are tentative and subject to change. ©2007 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name and

PHOTOS: FACILIS COMPEX

BMW activities BMW Sports Philosophy

BMW’S SPORTY SIDE

For decades, BMW has patiently been building its reputation as a creative sponsor and trusted partner of sporting events.

Text:

Linda

Uetzfeld

Seventy-eight years ago, in March 1929, BMW presented its first

automobile. Before then, the Munich-based company had been turning out two-wheel vehicles for a decade. The high quality of these motorcycles won BMW the allegiance of the fastest, most determined racer of the day – Ernst Jakob Henne, the “White Phan- tom.” He won a world record that year, and in the years to follow, he proceeded to break his own records several times, always on BMW bikes. Henne was not only the fastest man on a bike; in June 1936, he entered and won a race on the Nürburgring piloting BMW’s new sports car, the 328. Four years later, the now legendary 328 came in first in Italy’s Mille Miglia race. Ever since those early days, BMW vehicles have continuously appeared in all major car racing events, including Le Mans, Monza and Goodwood in Europe, and Grand Prix races in China, Malaysia, Japan and Brazil. With experience spanning over three-quarters of a century, it is hardly surprising that BMW feels very much at home in the world of motorsport. Yet this is only one of the three sports areas in which BMW has a stake. Ralf Hussmann, General Manager of Sports Mar- keting for the BMW marque, is proud of the company’s broad sports involvement. “We believe our sports strategy perfectly supports the emotional experiences for our target group,” he says.“The motorsport activities dynamically burnish our image; the sailing side presents us with a challenge in team spirit and high-tech competition; and then there’s golf, which we see as an opportunity for extending brand value. We believe that our involvement in sports makes sense only when BMW’s considerable know-how and core competencies are able to make a contribution to the sport itself.” Regarded in this light, the value of BMW’s motorsport activities is almost self-evident. For decades, BMW has achieved outstanding results in motorsports of all kinds: motorcycles, touring cars, race- cars and Formula 1. The latter puts the spotlight on BMW’s core expertise in technology and the development of vehicles with sporty

BMW Magazine

GOLF

ORACLE RACING
ORACLE RACING

FORMULA 1

handling characteristics. The fact that BMW is a leading developer of engines establishes the basis for the mutual exchange of technology between F1 racers and BMW series production cars. When Nelson Piquet won the F1 World Championship in 1983 – only one year after BMW’s entry into the king of motorsport competitions – it was a powerful statement about BMW’s expertise in building engines. In 2000, after an absence of 12 years, BMW returned to Formula 1 racing in partnership with Williams F1. That very same year, the partnership took third place in the Constructor Championship and, with that feat, pulled off the best world championship debut of an engine manufacturer in 33 years.

BMW’s auto racing successes are not very surprising, but one could well ask, “What does BMW have to do with sailing?” Let’s

hear Ralf Hussmann again. “We bring our very considerable experi- ence in lightweight construction and the building of car bodies to

this sport. From a technical point of view, a car’s body is not much different from a boat’s hull – and, of course, the boat’s speed in the water strongly depends on the hull.” As an example of BMW’s hands- on involvement in the new America’s Cup yacht, Hussmann points to the 45-inch keel fin made of ultra-high-strength steel, which was developed and built in BMW’s factory in Eisenach, Germany. Following its successful America’s Cup debut in

2002, BMW is again taking aim at the Cup itself – the sports world’s oldest trophy. The America’s Cup (the Formula 1 of sailing) calls for the highest level of performance in teamwork and tactics, as well as flaw- less technology. Join these with the grace and beauty of sailing, and you have a truly exhilarating spectacle. Building on this concept, BMW has gone on to estab- lish sailing competitions for its customers in six

are organized in Munich by BMW Sports Marketing. The PGA Golf tournaments are jointly executed in teamwork with the respective BMW subsidiaries. And naturally, we encourage our country affili- ates to make use of these sports opportunities. We also have numer- ous country-specific events, sponsored by BMW affiliates. These are suitable for smaller budgets, for example, when BMW becomes an ‘Official Car’ partner.”

BMW has also taken steps to bring sports into its retail network.

An example that Ralf Hussmann likes to cite is BMW’s involvement

in the biggest amateur golf competition of the last 20 years. “We now

have about 100,000 BMW owners who annually compete in golf tournaments sponsored by local dealerships. The tournament starts locally; the winners then meet in national play-offs, which are organ- ized by the BMW national headquarters. The winners of the national tournaments then compete in the World Championship match, organized by the Munich headquarters. We also arrange for the finalists to compete in a tournament with professionals.” This year, for the first time, the BMW Championship tour- nament will take place at the famous Cog Hill Golf & Country Club in Chicago from September 6-9. This new BMW initiative is the third tournament of the new U.S. PGA Tour Championship

“WE BELIEVE THAT OUR INVOLVEMENT IN SPORTS MAKES SENSE ONLY WHEN BMW’S CONSIDERABLE KNOW-HOW AND CORE COMPETENCIES ARE ABLE TO MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO THE SPORT ITSELF.”

countries, and plans to introduce the BMW Sailing Cup in other countries, as well. The vision for the BMW Sailing Cup is to develop in a way that it becomes an exciting international competition for customers. And now we come to golf. “That’s on a different page,” Ralf Huss- mann says. “Golf is a sport that interests a high percentage of our customers worldwide. Golf is especially popular in the UK and the U.S. By sponsoring select golf competitions, we associate ourselves

Series. The BMW International Open, one of golf’s most prestigious competitions, is eagerly awaited every year. In September 2006, top professionals from 24 countries competed in the 18th occurrence of this event in Munich. For the past two years, BMW has also been the main partner of the most prestigious golf tournament in Wentworth, London. The BMW Championship – the former PGA Championship

with the kind of prestigious events that are consistent with our brand image. It’s true that you see a good many other brands represented at

is the players’ flagship of the European PGA Tour schedule. And to complete this sketch of BMW’s involvement in sports,

these golf competitions. Nonetheless, we believe that our marketing experience can still be a plus here. In the professional tournaments

we return full circle to a particularly successful experiment in motor- sport. Last year, BMW introduced Pit Lane Park to Formula 1 events.

we’re associated with, we have either established ourselves, or they

A

brilliant idea: close-up Formula 1. Hussmann explains, “Formula 1

are the ones that we organize exclusively. Spectators at these events

is

very strict. Fans aren’t generally allowed in the pit lane. So we

are treated to an undiluted BMW experience. Market research tells us that in the areas of sailing and golf, the BMW brand has a very differ- ent position from the other sponsors, who conceive of these events mainly as exposure for their logos. There’s a wise saying: ‘One who only walks in another’s tracks will never overtake him.’ BMW has

thought about what we could do to provide our customers and fans with a more satisfying Formula 1 experience, such as the opportunity to see all the sophisticated technology close-up. Our answer was Pit Lane Park, a kind of replica of the pit lanes, with stalls in which fans can get a real close look at an array of Formula 1 technology.

always tried to blaze its own trail.”

The center is a small racetrack where a Formula 1 car accelerates just

Are the events that are held in different countries organized out

a

few yards from the spectators. It turned out to be a very popular

of Munich, or by local BMW representatives? Hussmann replies, “What we call ‘pinnacle events’ – Formula 1 and America’s Cup –

idea. We have already had some 141,000 visitors to our five Pit Lane Parks.”

idea. We have already had some 141,000 visitors to our five Pit Lane Parks.”

BMW Magazine

The graduate school is named for former governor Carroll A. Campbell Jr., who recruited BMW to South Carolina.

BMW Magazine

Education Clemson University

FIELD OF DREAMS

The International Center for Automotive Research, at Clemson University, is a visionary partnership between academia and the automotive industry – and home to the BMW Information Technology Research Center.

BMW Magazine

PHOTOS: CLEMSON UNIVERSITY; BMW MANUFACTURING CO.; FRED ROLLISON

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY; BMW MANUFACTURING CO.; FRED ROLLISON Text: Sarah Yarnell “If you build it, they will

Text:

Sarah

Yarnell

“If you build it, they will come.” This particular field of dreams sprawls

over 250 acres of meadows, woods and waterways near Greenville, SC. Bull- dozers are sensitively sculpting the red clay into a technology campus of the future – Clemson University’s International Center for Automotive Research

(CU-ICAR). Over the next 15-20 years, five “technology villages” will be built on the property’s natural hilltops – each about the size of four city blocks – and linked by conservation areas. CU-ICAR aims to be the premier automotive and motorsports research and educational facility in the world. Its vision is bold and its structure unique: car companies and high-tech firms collaborating with faculty and graduate students on a university research campus. Partners already include BMW, Michelin, Timken, Sun Microsystems and the Society for Automotive Engineers

– and more are being recruited. BMW’s Information Technology Research Cen-

ter (ITRC) is located at the entry to the first technology village, and was the first structure to be completed on the campus. “From our perspective BMW is a great leading partner. They’re going to play an important role as we continue to develop, and as we bring other partners in it will become a richer and richer relationship,” says Bob Geolas, CU-ICAR Executive Director. Still under construction next to the BMW ITRC, the Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Graduate Engineering Center will offer masters and doctoral programs.“There’s no other Ph.D. program in automotive engineering in this country,” says Dr. Chris Przirembel, Vice President for Research and Economic Development at Clemson. “The curriculum was developed with the faculty members sketch- ing out an initial template, and then we went to BMW, we went to Michelin and Timken and other automotive OEMs to help us craft this curriculum. The fundamental question we asked them was, ‘help us understand what knowledge and experience a Masters or Ph.D. graduate needs five to 10 years out, to provide

a competitive edge to that employer.’” BMW made the initial investment – a $10 million gift to help fund two endowed chairs. Dr. Tom Kurfess is the dynamic BMW Chair of Manufacturing, and recruitment is underway for the BMW Chair of Systems Integration. Ultimately, there will be 10 faculty and 50 graduate students at the Campbell Graduate Engineering Center.

BMW Magazine

at the Campbell Graduate Engineering Center. BMW Magazine Next door, the engineers at the BMW Information

Next door, the engineers at the BMW Information Technology Research Center are looking forward to the day in June 2007 when the graduate school opens. Like a winning team looking for first-round draft picks, they can hardly wait to sign a few rookies, grad students and interns, and hit several high-tech home runs. Whereas IT used to be primarily a support function, today it’s a hub of innovation. The engineers at the ITRC are researching new infrastructure solutions, software applications, and technologies in wireless communication and IT security. “The creative part is the fun side,” says Dr. Joachim Taiber, responsible for innovation and research. The ITRC operates like a consultant – when a depart- ment within the BMW Group needs an innovative IT solution, they become the “customer” and the ITRC uses its network to source the right partners. These currently include Microsoft, Intel, Cisco, CA, Sprint, Hewlett- Packard, IBM, Oracle, Apple and SAP.

BMW gets early access to new information technolo- gies, and the partners see benefits, too. “Most of these

IT companies only have sales functions in Germany,” says Taiber. “So it provides us with an opportunity to work closer with their R&D and product development groups in the U.S., and link them to our departments that want to do projects with their technology.” The most dynamic area from an innovation perspec- tive is the communication between the IT backend and the vehicle, also called B2V (business to vehicle). “From our perspective, a car becomes a laptop, a mobile client,” says Thomas Bonn, Vice President, BMW Group Data Center Americas (GDC-A) and ITRC. Taiber explains, “You have some favorite applications you are using on your laptop or personal devices, such as

you are using on your laptop or personal devices, such as an Outlook calendar or iTunes,

an Outlook calendar or iTunes, and you have an application in your BMW, which will likely be a navigation system, and then maybe you have an applica- tion that you use for your company – for example, a customer relationship management database. Some of those applications might require a Microsoft operating system; others, UNIX-based operating systems, such as LINUX or Mac OS. In the future, all these applications and operating systems could run on the same chip by using virtualization techniques. It just gives you more freedom. You can use applications in the car that you are always using outside of the car.” Security is high on the list of priorities, says Taiber. “If you connect the vehi- cle to a backend system or the BMW corporate network, there’s a risk that some- one from the car-as-mobile-client could intrude upon the BMW network, so we are working with Clemson on a project where we try to find the security holes and simulate server attacks and then actually come up with countermeasures.” Vehicle diagnostics is another project area, and a “service center of the future” will be built in the ITRC. “The more data in the vehicle you have to program, the more you have to analyze,” says Taiber. “Traditionally, data mining comes from marketing and sales, where you try to understand the customer’s behavior, but we can also use it in service and engineering.” The partners on the project are Oracle and IBM. The innovators at the ITRC also want to get into new broadband wireless communication standards and applications. BMW is working with Sprint on testing WiMAX as a new mobile broadband platform for on-campus commu- nication, as well as for communication between the vehicle and its IT-backend. WiMAX could enable new broadband applications in the car, such as video- conferencing. It could also be used to stream data from a prototype car to a server. “We need broadband because there is a lot of data to be sent out from cars during test cycles,” says Bonn. All these are research projects still, and will undergo huge changes as they are adapted into series production vehicles, or are considered in real business processes. “We are part of the future of BMW,” says Bonn. “We’re not only operating data centers; with our projects we provide the facility and the skills to be part of

future developments in the car in our entire production network, and this makes it very exciting here.”

network, and this makes it very exciting here.” From left to right: The BMW Information Technology

From left to right:

The BMW Information Technology Research Center (ITRC) combines open spaces with secure research areas.

The structure itself is a “green” building, incorporating bare engineering and environmentally friendly materials.

The BMW ITRC is the first non-academic tenant on the Clemson University ICAR campus. Reflected in the streamlined façade is the construction of the Graduate Engineering Center.

“WE ARE PART OF THE FUTURE OF BMW, AND THIS MAKES IT VERY EXCITING HERE.”
“WE ARE PART OF THE
FUTURE OF BMW,
AND THIS MAKES IT
VERY EXCITING
HERE.”

Dr. Joachim Taiber (left) is ITRC project manager, and Thomas Bonn heads BMW Group Data Center Americas.

BMW Magazine

BMW center One-Stop Shop

BMW, AT YOUR SERVICE

More than a dealership, your local authorized BMW center is literally the center for all things BMW.

COLLECTIBLES TO TREASURE

Scale model replicas of BMWs current and historic, in a variety of sizes, offer exquisitely accurate detail. That’s quite important to avid collectors, who know the only way to ensure they are getting an authentic BMW Miniature is to buy it from BMW. Naturally, your local authorized BMW center can procure any of the myriad BMW Miniatures currently available – including the popular Isetta, the sleek Z4 Roadster and the coveted BMW Art Cars.

Isetta, the sleek Z4 Roadster and the coveted BMW Art Cars. SERVICE WITH A SMILE Oil

SERVICE WITH A SMILE

Oil changes are just one of the services any BMW needs to run its best. Your BMW cen- ter has technicians trained to handle all of your service needs, great and small, without voiding your warranty. For BMWs no longer under warranty, this expertise is even more important to prevent unnecessary expenses.

your warranty. For BMWs no longer under warranty, this expertise is even more important to prevent

Text:

Denise

McVey

When it comes to creating The Ultimate Driving Machine, ® BMW’s

renowned engineers and revered designers collaborate to bring you a driving experience beyond compare. But there is even more to that experience than the brilliant performance housed inside beautiful lines. And it’s all available at your BMW center.

The team at your local BMW center is well versed in maintaining your BMW, inside and out. From oil changes to more intensive service procedures, your BMW center knows what to look for, what to do… and what not to do. Plus, they will only use Original BMW Parts for your repairs. The BMW SPA program for “specially pampered auto- mobiles” offers BMW-specific detailing services. Of course, in the unfortunate event of an accident, you wouldn’t trust your collision repair to anyone but the experts at a BMW Certified Collision Repair Center. It’s the best way to protect your investment. BMW center tech-

BMW Magazine

nicians are carefully trained to fix your BMW right, the first time. These passionate BMW “doctors” can help restore your BMW to its pre-accident glory – with BMW-exclusive tools that include high-tech systems analysis, Original BMW Parts, BMW’s unique color system paint matching and more. BMW centers also offer a wealth of accessories for BMWs and their fans. Those looking to personalize their vehicle – inside or out – will find a vast selection of the highest quality items in the Original BMW Accessories catalogs. While those seeking to wear their hearts on their sleeve will find a fabulous selection of BMW-inspired apparel (and gift items) in the latest BMW Lifestyle collection. From major collision repairs to oil changes and detailing – plus

extras for your vehicle and your wardrobe – only your local BMW center offers a “one-stop shop” for all of your BMW needs.

offers a “one-stop shop” for all of your BMW needs. EXPERTISE REQUIRES EXPERTS You wouldn’t trust

EXPERTISE REQUIRES EXPERTS

You wouldn’t trust your BMW to just anyone – and rightfully so. BMW technicians undergo extensive training on a regular basis, to properly service the complex technologies that drive your vehicle’s legendary performance.

that drive your vehicle’s legendary performance. GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES The BMW Lifestyle collection
that drive your vehicle’s legendary performance. GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES The BMW Lifestyle collection

GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES

The BMW Lifestyle collection features apparel, accessories and gift items designed with the BMW enthusiast in mind. Polo shirts and fleeces; golf apparel and accessories; key rings, watches and kids’ toys… the choices are seemingly endless. The same is true for vehicle accessories. Each BMW series

The same is true for vehicle accessories. Each BMW series has its own catalog of exterior,

has its own catalog of exterior, interior, technological and protective accessories – to truly personalize your BMW. For more information about these products, just go – where else? – to your local BMW center.

BMW Magazine

Events BMW Mountain Driving Experience

Events BMW Mountain Driving Experience THE PEAK OF PERFORMANCE Text: Eli Musser Snowy slopes navigated with

THE PEAK

OF PERFORMANCE

Text:

Eli

Musser

Snowy slopes navigated with ease. Icy patches that won’t slow you down. Sharp mountain turns taken with confidence.

This season, skiers and snowboarders will be experiencing the height of winter performance… in a BMW. Winter marks the return of BMW’s popular Mountain Driving Experience. This hands-on showcase of BMW models with xDrive all-wheel drive, happening at select ski resorts across the country, is the perfect opportunity to experience xDrive’s legendary snowmobility in action, courtesy of BMW. BMW partners with American Skiing Company to hold this event at various hotels throughout the U.S. You’ll notice Mountain Driving Experience desks in the hotel lobbies, and around each participating resort you’ll find various BMW models with xDrive, our intelligent all-wheel-drive system. A speedy sign-up will have you behind the wheel in no time. Some participants will want to see, firsthand, how well a BMW equipped with xDrive handles in snow and ice. Others will use their BMW to go on quick sightseeing excursions. Still others will want to take their BMW to a local hot spot or restaurant.

BMW Magazine

No matter how you put it through its paces, you’ll be amazed at how well a BMW with xDrive all-wheel drive grabs hold of the road. When the xDrive system detects slippage at any wheel, it automatically and undetectably transfers more power to the wheels that stick, so you have optimum traction on any driving surface. And in ideal driving conditions, when xDrive is not busy helping you tame the elements, it maintains the sporty, rear-wheel-drive feel and thrilling handling of The Ultimate Driving Machine. ® Best of all, should you decide to purchase or lease a BMW equipped with xDrive, you can choose from a wide selection of Sedans, Coupes, Sports Wagons and SAVs, ® each offering an unpar- alleled blend of traction and performance. The BMW Mountain Driving Experience runs through April 2007. Participating American Skiing Company resort locations include Steamboat in Colorado, The Canyons in Utah, and Mount Snow and Killington in Vermont. You needn’t be a hotel guest to participate – this complimentary program is open to the public.

Vacationers from all resorts in the area are welcome to take a test drive.

all resorts in the area are welcome to take a test drive. The BMW Mountain Driving

The BMW Mountain Driving Experience puts you behind the wheel of The Ultimate Driving Machine ® – and in control, in any conditions, thanks to the intelligent power of BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive system.

intelligent power of BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive system. The BMW X5 SAV ® with BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive
The BMW X5 SAV ® with BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive system. BMW Magazine
The BMW X5 SAV ® with BMW’s
xDrive all-wheel-drive system.
BMW Magazine

BMW Information Who but BMW could…

WHO

BUT BMW

COULD…

…BUILD ITS 20,000 TH AWARD-WINNING V-10 ENGINE?

Text:

Eli

Musser

20,000 T H AWARD-WINNING V-10 ENGINE? Text: Eli Musser BMW’s V-10 engine, voted “International Engine of

BMW’s V-10 engine, voted “International Engine of the Year” for two consecutive years, produces 500 horsepower at 7750 rpm.

BMW Magazine

It is the only engine to be named “International Engine of the Year” two years in a row. It is responsible for the pulse-racing propulsion in every BMW M5 and M6 built after 2005. And now,

as of this past November, this marvel of automotive engineering has reached yet another milestone: BMW has built its 20,000th 5.0-liter V-10 engine. BMW’s fastest high-performance production-line engine is assembled in Munich on the so-called Special Engine Line. “Special” hardly does the BMW V-10 justice: not many other powerplants, production or custom, are capable of delivering a staggering 500 horsepower at 7750 rpm, and 383 lb-ft of grin-inducing torque at 6100 rpm. So how fast is fast? The V-10 can catapult the M5 and M6 Coupe from 0-60 mph in just 4.5 breathtaking seconds. 1 While amazing performance can capture the respect of any driver, it’s the technology behind the thrills that has consistently earned the BMW V-10 engine high praise worldwide from automo- tive critics and journalists. The V-10 design was based on BMW’s 10-cylinder Formula 1 engine, which was acclaimed as the most pow- erful engine on the grid. Formula 1 engines are serviced or replaced after each race; by contrast, the BMW V-10 production engine is designed to last for the life of the vehicle. In fact, the innovative construction and long-term resilience of the BMW V-10 allow it to produce piston speeds that were previously regarded as impossible for serial production engines, due to the enormous amounts of stress to the materials. In keeping with its Formula 1 lineage – a V-10 with a 19,000 rpm redline – the crankshaft of the production V-10 rotates at 8000 rpm, resulting in piston speeds in each of the 10 cylinders of 65 feet per second – virtually the same as the smaller-displacement F1 engine. To combat element fatigue, BMW engineers fortified the V-10 with features like aluminum single-section cylinder heads, a cross-flow cooling system to ensure an even temperature throughout the cylinder heads, and a torsionally stiff bedplate construction. Then there’s the V-10 engine’s management system. Talk about high performance: its 32-bit processors are capable of overseeing more than 200 million individual operations per second.

RELEASE THE POTENTIAL.