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Can you identify the literary techniques?

(Similes, Metaphors and Personification)


"Her kimono was a brocade in shades of brown and gold. Below her waist, deer in their rich brown coloring of autumn nuzzled one another, with golds and rust behind them in a patter like fallen leaves on a forest floor." -Arthur Golden, "Memoirs of a Geisha" "The moon was a thin, bright machete cutting its way through patches of clouds" -p. 27 A Thousand Splendid Suns "In November, a cold unseen stranger whom the doctors called Pneumonia, stalked about the city touching one victim here and another there with his icy fingers" - O. Henry, "The Last Leaf"in Twists page 17 "But my dad loved to cook big breakfasts on Sunday. He said that was his form of worship, and the kitchen was his church, his offering eggs and bacon and biscuits and..." "Waffles," Wes finished for me." Sarah Dessen's The truth about forever pg 212 My hair is bold like the chestnut burr; and my eyes, like the sherry in the glass that the guest leaves -Emily Dickinson, The Poetry "The palm trees waved their arms wildly in the sea wind, a gesture of desperation ignored by all. " -Barbara Kingsolver, La Lacuna "He turned his stereo up as loud as it would go and let the music massage him."

-Romiette and Julio by Sharen Draper page 168

"She could make out the minarets in the distance, like the dusty fingers of giants...." minaret |minret| noun a tall slender tower, typically part of a mosque, with a balcony from which a muezzin calls Muslims to prayer

- In the Time of the Butterflies, by Julia Alvarez, Page 89. Like two giants they crashed against each other. They rose high in the air, bending first one way and then the other. There was a roar as if great spears were breaking in battle and in the red light of the sun the spray that flew around them looked like blood. Slowly the second wave forced the first one backward, rolled slowly over it, and then as the victor drags the vanquished, moved in toward the

island. --Scott O'Dell's Island of the Blue Dolphins ALLITERATION Alliteration is one of the poet's most important sound techniques. It makes particular words stand out. It also connects the words to be emphasized. Look for the repeated consonant sounds in this poem: Then up and spake an old sailor, Had sailed to the Spanish Main, "I pray thee, put into yonder port, For I fear a hurricane." --Henry W. Longfellow, "The Wreck of Hesperus" Often the sounds and meanings of the words combine to create a mood. Here, repetition of b and t stresses a feeling of urgency. Hear the loud alarum bells-Brazen bells! What a tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells! --Edgar Allen Poe, "The Bells" Alliteration used in combination with onomatopoeia? The wave struck the cliff. It sent long tongues streaming around me so that I could neither see nor hear. The tongues of water licked into all the crevices, dragged at my hand and at my bare feet gripping the ledge. They rose high above me on the face of the rock, up and up, and then spent themselves against the sky and fell back, hissing past me to join the water rushing on toward the cove. --Scott O'Dell's Island of the Blue Dolphins

Now try this! Is alliteration used here? The Dance of the Thirteen Skeletons! By: Jack Prelutsky In a snow-enshrouded graveyard gripped by winters bitter chill, not a single soul is stirring, all is silent, all is still till a distant bell tolls midnight and the spirits work their will. For emerging from their coffins buried deep beneath the snow, thirteen bony apparitions now commence their spectral show, and they gather in the moonlight undulating as they go. And theyll dance in their bones, in their bare bare bones, with the click and the clack and the chitter and the chack and the clatter and the chatter

of their bare bare bones. They snake their flimsy shoulders and they flex their fleshless knees and they nod their skulls in greeting in the penetrating breeze as they form an eerie circle near the gnarled and twisted trees. They link their spindly fingers as they promenade around casting otherworldly shadows on the silver-mantled ground and their footfalls in the snowdrift And they dance in their bones, in their bare bare bones, with the click and the clack and chitter and the chack and the clatter and the chatter of their bare bare bones. The thirteen grinning skeleton continue on their way as to strains of soundless music

they begin to swing and sway and they circle even faster in their ghastly roundelay. Faster, faster ever faster and yet faster now they race, winding, whirling, ever swirling in the frenzy of their pace and they shimmer in the moonlight as they spin themselves through space. And they dance in their bones, in their bare bare bones with the click and the clack and the chitter and the chack and the clatter and the chatter of their bare bare bones. Then as quickly as it started their nocturnal dance is done for the bell that is their signal loudly tolls the hour of one and they bow to one another in the bony unison.

Then they vanish to their coffins by their ghostly thoroughfare and the emptiness of silence once more fills the frosted air and the snows that mask their footprints show no sign that they were there. But they danced in their bones, in their bare bare bones, with the click and the clack and the chitter and the chack and the clatter and the chatter of their bare bare bones.