Sie sind auf Seite 1von 40

THE MAGAZINE OF GOLDEN STATE BONSAI FEDERATION

GOLDEN STATEMENTS
Golden State Bonsai Federation
1038 33rd Street
Sacramento, CA 95816
www.gsbf-bonsai.org
Change Service Requested

1RQ3URW2UJ
US postage
PAID
Sacramento, CA
Permit No. 1453

V O L X X X III N O . 4

GOLDEN
STATEMENTS

Headliners:
5\DQ1HLO
3HWHU:DUUHQ
0LFKDHO+DJHGRUQ
.DWK\6KDQHU6HPLQDU

0HHWWKH9HQGRUVQLJKW
'LVWULFW6W\OLQJ&RPSHWLWLRQ
7RXUWKH*6%)%RQVDL
&ROOHFWLRQDW/DNH0HUULWW 
3ULYDWH%RQVDL*DUGHQV
6DQWD&ODUD0DUULRWW
0LVVLRQ&ROOHJH%OYG
6DQWD&ODUD&$

Convention
registration materials
are inside this issue!

The GSBF 2010 Convention Issue


California Bonsai Society Show
Repotting Mas Imazumi's legacy Japanese Black Pine

$ 7.50

J U LY / A U G

2 0 1 0

Dai Ichi Show


Photos by
Michael Jonas
7RNRQRPDGLVSOD\+DUU\+LUDR&$-XQLSHU7HG2ND-DSDQHVH%ODFN3LQH-RKQ9DQ'H:RXZ6DQ-RVH-XQLSHU

1<5,
96*/,:;,95,>@692
/0:;690*46596,*644<50;@/6:70;(3(<+0;690<4

6=,94<:,<48<(30;@)65:(0-964790=(;, 7<)30**633,*;065:
,?/0)0;065:765:69:

05;,95(;065(3)65:(0(9)69,;<4
0*/0)(54(:(2<50;663
4,*6)65:(0202<;663:
@6:/0)65:(0;663:
4(:(2<50;663*647(5@
*,9;9,
*6305:3,>0:
:;65,3(5;,957<)30:/05.
:(5*;<(9@)65:(0;6++/(5:,5
)65:(0)@;/,465(:;,9@
:,(53:40;/
(+(4:)65:(0
)65:(0-6*<:
(4,90*(5)65:(0:6*0,;@
205+(0)65:(0:/<77(5
(9;6-)65:(07961,*;

:<7769;05.69.(50A(;065:

)65:(0:6*0,;@6-<7:;(;,5,>@692
>693+)65:(0-90,5+:/07-,+,9(;065
507765)65:(0(::6*0(;065
)65:(0*3<):05;,95(;065(3
7<,9;690*6)65:(0-,+,9(;065
569;/(4,90*(5)65:(0-,+,9(;065
(4,90*(5)65:(0:6*0,;@
)65:(0:6*0,;0,:6--3690+(
256>3,+.,6-)65:(0-69<4

0DQXHO0DUWLQH]&KLQHVH(OP.HL,NDUL6DQ-RVH-XQLSHU3HWHU0DFDVLHE)LFXV+DUOH\1HZPDQ-DSDQHVH%ODFN3LQH

(++0;065(3/0./30./;:

:,3,*;:(3,:(9,(
*(:/(>(9+:
(>(9+*,9,465@)(58<,;

+,465:;9(;69:

2\UPV2VIH`HZOP
4HYJV0U]LYUPaaP
+Y(SPJL*OLU

+DUOH\1HZPDQ3URVWDWD-XQLSHU0DULR3LQHGD%RWWOHEUXVK'DYLG1JX\.RUHDQ+RUQEHDP6KLJ0L\D3\UDFDQWKD

Join Dai Ichi Bonsai Club the 3rd Friday


of each month at 7 p.m. at the
Ken Nakaoka Community Center
1670 W. 162nd Streeet
Gardena, CA

+0:73(@@6<9-05,:;)65:(0
0M`V\OH]LHX\HSP[`IVUZHPHUK^V\SKSPRLP[JVUZPKLYLKMVY[OLL_OPIP[PVUHUKPUJS\KLK
PU[OL*VTTLTVYH[P]L(SI\TZLUKHJ\YYLU[WOV[VMVY[OLZLSLJ[PVUWYVJLZZ[V!


3HWHU0DFDVLHEDFFHQW
&DURO8SVWRQDFFHQW

>T5=HSH]HUPZ76)V_ 9VJOLZ[LY5@ 
 -(? >5='PU[LYUH[PVUHSIVUZHPJVT
4VYL0UMVYTH[PVU!^^^PU[LYUH[PVUHSIVUZHPJVT

5+

.D]0XUDL%RXJDLQYLOOHD+DQN6XJLPRWR&RUN3LQH7RP&XOWRP)RHPLQD-XQLSHU*DU\/DL*LQNJR%LORED

Golden Statements Volume XXXlII No. 4


July/Aug 2010 - Table of Contents

GSBF Communications

3 GSBF Presidents Message


27 GSBF Website contest
35 Calendar of Events
Peter Adams, Bonsai Studio 3
Sketching a future state - pg. 20

Front Cover

Articles
5 Seasonal Suggestions

Marty Mann

6 GSBF Convention
Welcome Message

Gareth Sheperd
7

GSBF Headliners

Michael Hagedorn Ryan Neil Peter Warren

8 Convention Activities
9 Convention Excursions
9 - 12 Convention Workshops
13 Convention Anticipation

Don White
Leila Kusumis Prostrata juniper,
featured on the cover, was
purchased at Muranaka Nursery in
Nipomo, CA. It was about 5 yrs. old
at that time. Now 20 years in training by Leila, the tree is 25 yr old.
7 in wide base, 24 in w by 20 in h.
Ms. Kusumi is the founder of the
Dai Ichi and Ko Yu Kai, a shohin
bonsai club. - Photo by Michael Jonas

Exhibit Coverage

Bob Hilvers
Joe Byrd
Timm Johnson

25 Fresno Bonsai Exhibit



Mike Saul
26 Metal artist, Lee Roberts
Judy Glaister

Color Essays
15 Bonsai Bytes
16 Kusamura Bonsai Show

Jerry Carpenter
17 California Bonsai Society

Larry Ragle
18 May in Sacramento

Lucy Sakaishi-Judd
20 Bonsai Studio 3:
Peter Adams
22 Mas Imazumis Pine

Jerry Carpenter
Inside back: Dai Ichi show

Michael Jonas

28 Bonsai Club of Santa Barbara



Leroy Kubel
29 Ko Yu Kai - Shohin

Michael Jonas
35 Got Captions?

Operations

2 Golden Statements Policy

Fresno Bonsai Exhibit highlights, page 16


Story and photos by Mike Saul

GSBF Officers & Trustees

From the Editors Desk

30 List of Advertisers

CBS Exhibit entry. See more on page 19


with photos by Larry Ragle
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

Golden
Statements
July/Aug 2010

Vol.XXXIII no. 4

GOLDEN STATE BONSAI FEDERATION,


founded in 1978, is a nonprofit, educational
organization dedicated to historical,
scientific features and appreciation of
the art of bonsai. Visit our web site at:

www.gsbf-bonsai.org.

Editor: Kathleen ODonnell, koandh@surewest.net




Tel: 916-448-6727
Columnists:

Marty Mann, Joanie Berkwitz
Subscription Manager:
Cindy Peterson, jojoba53@comcast.net


7241 E. Rocky Ridge Drive Tucson, AZ 85750
Tel: 520-299-5952
Advertising Manager:

Michael Jonas, mjonas48@hotmail.com
Tel: 818-776-0813

Timm Johnson, BonsaiTimm@aol.com
Calendar of Events Manager:

Carl Morimoto, morimotoc@sbcglobal.net
Management Advisor:
Blue Moon Printing, www.blumoonprinting.com
Printer:
Dave McCoy, batmccoy@comcast.net
GS Web Designer:
Deadlines for ads, calendar of events, subscriptions, articles and photo submissions:
Jan/Feb issue deadline= Nov 20
July/Aug issue deadline= May 20
Mar/Apr issue deadline= Jan 20
Sept/Oct issue deadline= July 20
May/June issue deadline= Mar 20
Nov/Dec issue deadline= Sept 20
GOLDEN STATEMENTS is published 6 times a year by GSBF.
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATE:
Regular bulk mail within the States (US $20)
First Class- US, Canada, Mexico (US $35) International via Air Mail (US $55)
To subscribe provide your name, address and telephone number along with a check
made out to: Golden Statements
Mail to: Cindy Peterson, 7241 E. Rocky Ridge Dr., Tucson, AZ 85750

To avoid duplicate mailings, indicate Renewal. For an uninterrupted renewal


subscriptions, your check must be received 6 weeks before the expiration date
shown on the top line of the address label. Contact the Subscription Manager
for subscription requests, address changes and corrections. Print copies of
back issues are not available. There are plans to make back issues available
for a fee in the future as archived pdfs.
ADVERTISING - Pricing and Policies:
Send ad copy to Advertising Manager by posted deadlines.

1/8 page G 3.65x2.35 inches $30.00 add $5.00 for online color*
1/4 page G 3.65x4.90 inches $60.00 add $10.00 for online color*

1/2 page G Horizontal 7.50x4.90 inches $90.00 add $15.00 for online color*

1/2 page G Vertical 3.65x10.0 inches $90.00 add $15.00 for online color*
Full page G 7.50x10.0 inches $160.00 add $20.00 for online color*
Back Inside Cover C 7.50x10.0 inches $290.00
Front Inside Cover C 7.50x10.0 inches $320.00
Back Inside Cover 1/2 page C Horizontal 7.50x4.90 inches $155.00
Front Inside Cover 1/2 page C Horizontal 7.50x4.90 inches $170.00
Back Outside Cover C 6.85x5.85 inches $215.00
(G=grayscale C=color)

* Display of ads in color online magazine is free with a one-year, six-issue order.
All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners
CALENDAR OF EVENTS listings must reach the Calendar of Events Manager by

posted deadlines. Listing is free. Listing of non-GSBF member club events is


on a space available basis at the discretion of the Editor.
Non-GSBF clubs within the GSBF boundary may require a listing fee.

ARTICLES, announcements and photographs intended for publication in Golden

Statements must reach the Editor by deadline (above).


Golden Statements reserves the right to edit any material submitted for
publication. It is assumed that any submissions made to Golden Statements
may be published both on-line and in print.

TITLES such as Dr. are not used in by-lines. FOREIGN WORDS are used without diacritic marks or macrons for Japanese. UNSIGNED ARTICLES are by the Editor.

Golden State Bonsai Federation, GSBF, and


its logo are trademarks of Golden State Bonsai
Federation. 2009 GSBF All Rights Reserved. No
part of this publication may be reprinted, copied, or
otherwise reproduced without written permission
from the Editor. Contributed articles express the
opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect
the views of the GSBF Executive Board or the
Editor.
2

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

GOLDEN STATE BONSAI FEDERATION


President:
Bob Hilvers
1st Vice President:
Gareth Shepherd
2nd Vice President:
Abe Far
Corresponding Secretary:
Cary S.Valentine
Recording Secretary:
Randi Keppeler
Comptroller:
Bob Meyer
Treasurer:
Elizabeth Likes
Immediate Past Presidents:
Ted Matson
Dolly Fassio
A #1 Kirk Demarest
#2 Leo Martinez
B #3 Mike Haley
#4 Linda Soliven
C #5 Harold Mitchell
#6 Thomas Leonard
D #7 Jack Reynolds
#8 John Van de Wouw
E #9 Cary S.Valentine
#10 David Nguy
MEMBERS AT LARGE:
#11 Steve Valentine
#12 Lonnie McCormick
#13 Mel Ikeda
#14 Joe Byrd

OFFICERS
bonsaigui@comcast.net

559-909-1051

gareth.shepherd@sbcglobal.net 831-688-9696
abefar@cox.net

619-234-3434

caryme2@yahoo.com

760-445-2548

calshohin@yahoo.com

650-598-0127

pedrera@san.rr.com

858-450-3006

lizlikes@aol.com

818-352-3064

tmatson@earthlink.net
fdbonsai@onemail.com

626-398-8412
530-295-8398

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

kirk6363@comcast.net
530-680-8528
lrmartin@cebridge.net
530-273-2628
sfpsgmh@gmail.com
650-962-9336
bonsaigirl43@att.net
925-776-2342
mitchsgreenthumb@yahoo.com 559-297-8207
tomleonard1@comcast.net
831-423-6457
Jrbonsai@verizon.net
760-397-8292
gsbf-trustee-d8@hotmail.com 310-543-2849
caryme2@yahoo.com
760-445-2548
waimexport@aol.com
323-223-9125
lwmccormick@comcast.net
joembyrd@pacbell.net

COMMITTEES

760-445-2548
408-996-2954
714-957-3907
831-649-5934

Bonsai Basics:
Steve Valentine
760-445-2548
Bonsai Online Shopper: Michael Jonas
818-776-0813
Circle of Sensei:
Mel Ikeda
714-957-3907
GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt:
Gordon Deeg
gdeeg@comcast.net 650-341-8494
GSBF Collection at the Huntington:
Jim Barrett
626-445-4529
Convention Briefing: Bob Hilvers
559-732-9286
Elections:
Cary S. Valentine
760-445-2548
Giving Campaign:
Lauri Feetham
408-274-7073
Editor :
Kathleen ODonnell
916-448-6727
Grants & Scholarships: Al Keppler alkeppler@att.net
559-227-5689
Hotline:
Joe Byrd
831-649-5934
Insurance:
Abe Far
619-234-3434
GSBF Website Liaison: Joe Byrd
joembyrd@pacbell.net 831-649-5934
Kinshu Award:
Membership:
Timm Johnson bonsaitimm@aol.com 916-362-8147
Parliamentarian:
Art Tilles
dart@frontiernet.net 530-472-1533
Official Documents:
Cary S. Valentine
760-445-2548
Rules:
Art Tilles
530-472-1533
Workshops:

BONSAI COLLECTIONS
GSBF Collection at the Huntington
Huntington Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Rd, San Marino, CA 91108
Phone: 626-405-2100

GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt

666 Bellevue Ave., Oakland, CA


Mailing Address: P.O. Box 16176, Oakland, CA 94610-6176
Phone: 510-763-8409

GSBF Presidents Message, Bob Hilvers


This issue of Golden
Statements contains the
information regarding
the upcoming GSBF
convention. Since I never
miss an opportunity to
encourage participation in our conventions I can
hardly pass up this chance to say a few words about
the extraordinary experiences that await you at the
2010 convention in Santa Clara. As all conventions
are accompanied by promotional campaigns that use
lots of superlatives to extol the virtues and benefits
of attending the convention it is understandable that
you may have become somewhat jaded.
However I must say that the Santa Clara
convention truly will offer some very special and
unique learning experiences. It would be fair to say
that all GSBF conventions offer more value for your
bonsai dollar than any other venue on the planet
and I can truly say that the Santa Clara convention
will give you the most bang for the buck of any
convention to date.

all your favorite vendors, auctions of spectacular collected plant material, the Benefit Drawing..and
more. Well, you didnt think I was going to tell all
did you? Youll just have to come and join in the festivities to find out what else we have in store for you.
Simply put, if you are interested in bonsai,
nothing compares to a GSBF convention. Sure there
is lots of information on the internet and any number
of books, CDs and videos that will provide information on bonsai and most of us get the occasional
workshop through our clubs. You may even belong to
one of the California super-clubs that have the
resources to retain a Japanese master to teach you .
Still you cant match all the opportunities and
good times youll have at a GSBF convention. I
mean, which would you rather do, watch the big
game on the tube or go to the park and play with the
majors?
Photos by Michael
Jonas from the 2009
GSBF Convention

With Ryan Neil, Michael Hagedorn and Peter


Warren as headliners leading a hit-parade of demonstrations, lectures, seminars, critiques and workshops
any bonsai event anywhere could rightfully say they
had a superior program, and. they would be right.
However were going to do better yet. How about
some in depth seminars with Kathy Shaner and Boon
Manakitivipart? You got it!
Want to take a field trip to collect stones from the
Eel River? OK, youve got it! What else do we have
to offer? Never fear, Im just getting started.
Well have eighteen workshops featuring plant
material hand selected to be the best youve seen.
Well have garden tours to view fabulous public and
private bonsai collections, a Suiseki Panel Discussion,
the popular and entertaining District Styling Competition, a winery tour, the Bonsai and Suiseki Exhibit,
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

Editors Desk

by Kathleen ODonnell

Four of my friends and I made the trip to


Hanford, CA to see the second, and hopefully annual,
Toko-Kazari exhibit held at the courageous Clark
Center for Japanese Art & Culture. Wow!
The Toko-Kazari is the only bonsai display held
in a museum. There is a sense that you are entering
sacred space as you approach the large museum doors
where you are asked to remove your shoes. As you walk
through the exhibit youll likely pause at each display to
reflect on what you see. Then it dawns on you, you are
seeing Bonsai as Art, not bonsai as an art.
There are two reasons I called the Clark Center
courageous.
First of all, this museum, rather than caving to fears,
takes steps to minimize risk to their valuable artifacts
from plant pathogens. Funguses and such, could conceivably be carried in on trees and cause damage to the
delicate and very old fabrics and paper among the most
valuable pieces of art stored inside the museum.
But its the second act of courage that has me most
enamoured with the museum and the Toko-Kazari competition. They have excited huge controversy and taken
a risk that the bonsai community will support them in
an exploration.
Articles are in the planning stages from people
knowledgeable on making distinction between practicing the traditional art taught by the Keido School of
Display, for example, and the Western interpretation of
this Japanese Art. Therein lies much controversy.
There is validity and passion in both positions,
and baring witness to that passion at the show critique
stirred the senses, and intellect of all who attended.
On our way out of town we were placed in another
decade by Hanfords nostalgic downtown, with its central park and soda fountain. Sipping on chocolate malts
and strawberry sodas while emerged in Americana, our
conversation was singularly focused, rich with nuance of
viewpoint, as we spoke in excited tones advocating in all
directions about the future of bonsai display.
I predict that if you dont know what the heck Im
talking about now, you will soon. For your own enrichment and to support the Clark Centers big gamble on
the bonsai community, follow in Kathy Shaners footsteps and clear your schedule now so you can attend the
3rd annual Toko-Kazari that will be held on April 16th
and 17th, 2011. Youll kick yourself if you miss riding
this new wave.
In case you are curious, this years Toko-Kazari cash
prize winners were Katsumi Kinoshita, Al Keppler, and
Seiji Shiba. Judges Kathy Shaner, Larry, and Nina Ragle
are said to be collaborating on an article for next issue.
4

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Bonsai inside the Beltway:

English Bonsai artist Steve Tolley, whose


emphasis is on bonsai aesthetics and philosophy is
pictured lecturing at the Potomac Bonsai Festival at
the U.S. National Arboretum on May 1, 2010.

Photo by Fran Popadak


Thinking about going to DC? Use the following
link to check the Arboretums event schedule.
http://www.usna.usda.gov/Education/index.html

PerfectlyBuilt
-Custom-made
Bonsai stands.
-Your choice of
wood, size, style,
and finish.
-Care kit and
instructions
included.

-American Made

Brian Dupont
706.302.1180
www.perfectlybuiltonline.com

Seasonal Suggestions:
by Marty Mann
Summer Simmering

No. 124 - July/Aug 2010


Finally a month with no bonsai shows! Time now to
spend in your own yard touching up, pinching, trimming, applying fertilizer, insecticide, and fungicide. Still
no time to just sit back and enjoy. Bonsai enters a period
of dormancy during higher summer temperatures.
Watch for the threat of damage from hot summer
sun and drying winds. Remember how sensitive your
leafy deciduous trees such as Maple, Hornbean, Liquid
Amber, Zelcova, Beech and Elm can be as well as Wisteria and Willows. Feeding in the summertime means
low nitrogen. There is no point in encouraging heavy
green foliage growth. Use a formula low in nitrogen and
higher in phosphorus and potash to encourage good
rootage and better fall colors. Specifically, dont use too
much dry or cake fertilizers. Solid fertilizers usually do
not decompose into usable substances for several weeks
therefore they should not be applied late in the summertime. Use liquid Miracle Gro at this time. Yellow color
and leaf drop may indicate trees need some nitrogen or
iron. This condition may also suggest overwatering or
poor drainage.
The continuation of a regular feeding program is
also important. A change of your regular food can be
timely during these summer months when the general
growth is slower but the need for nutrients continues.
Potassium and Phosphorus hardens the woody parts and
induces the development of the fruit and flower buds
that have formed during the past few months. If your
plants appear to be stressed due to the heat then reduce
your feeding formula to half strength. Particular care
must be given to Pomegranates, Olives and other warm
climate tropical materials. Time now to spend in your
own yard touching up, pinching, trimming, applying
fertilizer, insecticide, and fungicide. Still no time to just
sit back and enjoy.
Summer weather, during the months of July and
August, brings on a period of slow growth and relatively
inactive changes in our bonsai. During this period the
growth of the foliage tends to slow down, however, it
should be remembered that the trunk and branches
continue to swell and develop. This is the time to watch
recent wiring to prevent unsightly and destructive wire
cuts. Its also the time to be attentive to the watering
and feeding requirements of the trees to maintain good
health during this stressful period.
Watering should not be neglected. Foliar spraying
is best done in the early morning or late afternoon to

avoid sun damage on leaves and needles. A fresh spray


each morning removes the impurities that have settled
during the night and discourages the infection of fungus and spider mites. Be sure to water thoroughly to
penetrate the root ball. This area of your potted trees
builds up considerable heat and the lack of moisture will
lead to fine root drying. During this period it is a good
practice to water less but more often to replace the expiration of moisture by drying winds on the leaf surfaces.
Try to resist the tendency to overwater when you see
the signs of distress in the form of wilt or needle drop.
Test your soil regularly to be sure it is actually drying out
before you arbitrarily soak it again.
Watch for the build up of ground cover thatch on
your potted material. Do not allow moss to grow up
on the trunks of the trees. Avoid a solid mass of cover
which may deflect your watering efforts. It is better to
have patches of color and texture.
Remove strands of wire on your trees during the
summer months. Copper or aluminum wire conduct
heat extremely well and may disfigure your tree. It is
preferable to remove wire rather than relocate sensitive
trees to shaded areas. Shade would cool the wire but
the trees will develop elongated internodes on branches.
This time of year is good for another application of
Lime Sulfur to the deadwood areas of Jin and Shari. Remember to moisten the deadwood well when applying
the chemical directly from the bottle. Heat and moisture will allow for excellent penetration.
While reviewing your trees for summer care be
reminded that this is a period of slow growth. A routine
rotation of each tree is important to provide a better
balance of light to all sides.
If you failed to achieve all your deciduous tree defoliation plans, early to mid July is still time enough to do
it. Defoliation is best done on Maples, Liquid Amber,
and Ginkgo to accomplish smaller, healthy secondary
growth.
There will still be a number of warm weather
months ahead to allow for the development of the
new leaf buds. Be particularly careful if you do it now.
Strong, hot sunlight can be a deadly to young leaves.
Keep defoliated trees well protected in a shady, cool area
of your yard until the new leaves develop and harden
off. Dont cut back on your branches too soon. Let the
shoots grow several leaves then pinch or cut back to two
or three leaves. If you cut a shoot that is immature it
may very likely die back.
This article has been extracted from a recently published
book called Bonsai Ideas. By Marty Mann. Material is not
to be copied without publishers or authors permission.
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

Invitation from the GSBF Convention Chairperson


Golden State Bonsai Federation Convention 2010 New Face of Bonsai

I would like to invite all bonsai enthusiasts to come to the Golden State Bonsai Federation Convention
in Santa Clara, California. This event has been arranged to provide all of the participants with a new view of
bonsai art for the year 2010 and for the future. Our theme of New Face of Bonsai expresses the renewal of
bonsai art by the young professionals that have been trained at the feet of the great Japanese Bonsai Masters.
These New Faces will bring us the teachings of their Japanese Bonsai Masters and more. These teachers have
a unique perspective of bonsai art due to their western culture combined with the Japanese teachings. This
will allow them to include the innovations of their Japanese Bonsai Masters and add more due to their perspective.
Our Convention program of Workshops, Seminars, Demonstrations and Exhibit Critiques provides a
wonderful venue for this learning opportunity and it allows all to understand the new bonsai art from the
perspective of the New Face.
The Convention has great opportunities for all to learn with a trip to one of the greatest Suiseki Stone
collecting areas and instructions on the collection and display by Californias great Suiseki teachers. We also
have trips planned to visit the Golden State Bonsai Federation Collection at Lake Merritt. The Lake Merritt trip
will include visits to two wonderful private bonsai collections. Gordon Deeg the Chairman of the Lake Merritt
collection and President of the California Shohin Society will show us his wonderful bonsai collection. Bonsai
Boon (Boon Manakitivipart) will also have his collection open for the viewing of the tour participants. This
bonsai collection will include Boons and his students trees.
I hope that all that can attend will come to the beautiful Silicon Valley and enjoy the New Face of Bonsai
convention. We have made arrangements with the Santa Clara Marriott Hotel for a special $99.00 convention
rate that will allow us to enjoy the New Face of Bonsai in this great location directly across the street from
Google, Yahoo and other well know high-tech companies and just down the street from the Great America
Theme Park.
I hope I will see you there,
Gareth Shepherd, Chairperson
New Face of Bonsai GSBF Convention 2010

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Meet the GSBF 2010 Convention


Headliners
Michael Hagedorn

Prior to his apprenticeship under Shinji Suzuki of Nagano, Japan, Michael Hagedorn
was well known for his bonsai
pottery.
His artistic background ranges from painting and drawing to ceramic
sculpture
and
installation.

He earned his Masters Degree


in ceramic art at the New York
State College of Ceramics at Alfred University after which
he made bonsai containers for nine years. Michaels bonsai work appeared in Kokufu during 2004, 2005, and 2006
while he was an apprentice under Mr. Suzuki. As an apprentice, he was honored to wire two trees. These trees won a
Kokufu Prize and a Prime Minister Award. Michael currently lives near Portland. Learn more at www.crataegus.com.

Ryan Neil
Ryan Neil was born and
raised in Colorado where he
was fascinated with the wild
and tortured nature of the
trees on the western slope of
the Rocky Mountains. So much
so that he decided to major in
horticulture and came to California to study at Cal Poly. His
introduction to bonsai came
during his studies when he was
given a copy of Bonsai Today which had an article on the
styling of a cascading juniper by Masahiko Kimura. He was
hooked. After learning much with bonsai people in Northern and Southern California, he knew he wanted to study
in Japan and make this his lifes work. He met Ben Oki and
through him was able to attain the chance of an apprenticeship with Mr. Kimura. He used a grant from GSBF to help
pursue his study and, upon graduation from Cal Poly, he
went to Japan to begin a journey of transformation in his
apprenticeship with the master. There was a tearing-down
before the building-up in his early time with Kimura. By persevering and accepting the humbling parts of his training he
began to build up not only his knowledge and technique in
bonsai but developed a mind set and disciplined approach
to both life and bonsai. He has completed his apprenticeship and says he will always be open to learning new ways
to improve his art form. He is now located just outside of

Portland, Oregon and is devoting himself to teaching and advancing the level and knowledge of art of bonsai in America.

Peter Warren
On a trip to Japan to watch
the World Cup, Peter went on
a bonsai tour where he fell in
love with the art of bonsai. For
4 1/2 years he lived and worked
as a traditional bonsai apprentice under renowned bonsai
master, Kunio Kobayashi, and
earned the honored position of
head apprentice. In 2007, Peter began working for himself,
writing articles for Bonsai Focus magazine and conducting
workshops and lectures across
the United Kingdom. His first trip to the United States also
occurred in 2007. Then in 2008, he served as one of the
judges for the 1st National Bonsai Exhibition in New York.
Over the last few years he has travelled in Europe, Japan
and the US which has allowed him the opportunity to
work on many wonderful trees. Peter has been known
to say that his favorite style of tree is one with a slender
old trunk that has lots of character and a natural feel to
it. He says the pot is a very important aspect of bonsai
for me and I have a great interest in antique containers.
Peter is located in the U.K.
You can learn
more at his website:
www.saruyama.co.uk.

This year logo is based on


Winter in the Licensed Quarter: Toiletteby
Kitano Tsunetomi, 1919.

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

We thank all the photographers who have shared images of workshop leaders that appear in the convention section of GS.

GSBF Convention Activities Menu:


Vendors Evening and
the District Styling
Competition

Join us Thursday evening from 6:00 to


9:00 p.m. for the Vendors Appreciation
Evening where you can shop and enjoy
beverages from a no-host bar. During this time, the District
Competition will begin when teams from each District of
GSBF will work on similar tree stock to showcase their talents and abilities. This is an annual event which requires
district teams to compete against each other for the prestige of being the best in the state for 2010. District Competition trees will be sold at auction during the Convention.

Critiques
Critiques are held in the Exhibit area, where the doors
are closed for an hour and attendees gain insights into the
exhibit trees from the point of view of the critique leader.
Listen as the leader points out the best aspects of the trees
as presented and suggests ideas for improvement. All critiques require registration and a fee to attend.

Listen and Learn


On Friday, Ryan Neil will discuss his training as an apprentice in Bonsai under Masahiko Kimura of Omiya, Japan
while attendees enjoy a tasty lunch. Only ticket holders
will be allowed into this event.

Panel Discussion
Join Michael Hagedorn, Ryan Neil, and Peter Warren
for a Panel Discussion on aspects of bonsai during lunch on
Saturday. Only participants who have a lunch ticket will be
allowed to attend this event.

Bonsai and Suiseki Exhibit


Selected by jury, a world class Bonsai and Suiseki Exhibit is being assembled from the finest trees and stones
in California. The exhibit will have items chosen for their
quality and beauty, leaving the viewer in awe. The Bonsai
and the Suiseki Exhibits have been assembled from a variety of collections with attention to the nuance and subtlety
of the arts.

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Seminars

Kathy Shaner:

GSBF is extremely
fortunate to welcome Ms. Shaner to
lead two seminars for this convention.
Kathy Shaner began bonsai in 1983 in
California. After ten years of study she
managed to obtain an apprenticeship
with Yasuo Mitsuya, highly regarded
Master of Gendai (contemporary form)
bonsai training. She is the first non-Japanese and the first
woman certified by the professional bonsai grower's
branch of Nippon Bonsai Association.
When Kathy was traveling as interpreter for her
teacher, many have been impressed by her grasp of the
Japanese culture. Mr. Yasuo Mitsuya made the comment
that the future of bonsai was not in Japan. Young people
there are not as interested in this ancient art. His generous nature in sharing his knowledge is carried on by his
most auspicious student here in the U.S. Ms. Shaner is
the curator of the Golden State Bonsai Garden at Lake
Merritt in Oakland. She maintains and designs private collections and teaches throughout the United States. She
adds, Ive been around so long, people have just started
to call me Mom.
The first seminar, Deadwood: Its in the Bones, will
discuss deadwood on various species how to create and
treat deadwood. Attendees are encouraged to bring any
troublesome trees for discussion.
Then, The Art of Display: What Are We Trying to Communicate? the second seminar, will lead the attendee to
better understanding of tokonoma and bonsai displays,
including the use of scrolls and accent plants. All attendees will develop a greater understanding of concepts to
improve their collections from either seminar.

Suiseki Panel Discussion


Premier suiseki artists and teachers of Northern California Jim Greaves, Hideko Metaxas, Mas Nakajima,
Larry Ragle, and Felix Rivera will lead a discussion on
how to find suiseki. They plan to answer the questions:
A) What is a suiseki and how do you find one in the field
or at the bazaar? B) How do you finish the stone as a
suiseki? This will cover such topics as suiban display, the
design of daiza (wood bases), and the perennial question
to cut or not to cut? C) How do you display the suiseki
at home or in a public exhibit? The panels expertise will
answer attendees questions and help to improve their
understanding of the art of suiseki.

Convention Excursions Menu:


Stone Collecting
Northern California is blessed with some of the finest
suiseki collecting sites in the world, and the Eel River is one
of the most famous. Here you can find serpentine, jasper,
and even jadeite if you know where and how to look. Find
out how on the GSBF 2010 Tanseki (stone hunting) trip. You
will have 2 days collecting on the Eel River with guidance
and coaching from experienced Northern California suiseki
artists and stone hunters.
The evening program will start with a short introduction to suiseki by Felix Rivera, followed by a
show-and-tell where participants can discuss and
receive advice on their collected stones. Join us for two
days of guided stone hunting with a sack lunch at the river.
The tour will begin in Willits, at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday,
October 27, at the Super 8 Motel (about 3 hours north of
Santa Clara on Hwy 101).
Participants must provide their own transportation.
Additional information will be sent to tour registrants. The
Stone collecting trip runs Wednesday, October 27th, 9:00
a.m. in Willits, CA through Thursday, October 28th

GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt and


Private Gardens Tour
Join other convention attendees for a tour that
includes stops at each of these very special gardens.


The GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt,


The private garden of Boon Manakitivipart
The private garden of Gordon Deeg

Many wonderful and inspiring bonsai are in each garden. Garden curator, Kathy Shaner, will lead a tour of the
grounds at the Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt, and Boon
and Gordon will be available to discuss their trees. This is
an excellent opportunity to view the level of trees you may
not see anywhere else. The tour takes place Thursday, October 28, from 8:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.

Wine Tasting
Following the activities of the Convention, a little relaxation may be in order. Leave the driving to us and visit three
local wineries: Piccetti Winery, Ridge Winery, and Testarosa
Winery. Enjoy some of the fine wines produced in Santa
Clara County in comfort.
Sunday, October 31, 2:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Workshop Offerings:
Ryan Neil
Collected Ponderosa Pines
See biography on headliners page.
Headliner Ryan Neils subject for this
workshop is Ponderosa Pine. Six lucky
students will work on these wild trees
and fashion them into what will become
prized bonsai. He will demonstrate and
pass along the techniques he learned while studying with
Masahiko Kimura in Japan. The afternoon session will entail analyzing, cleaning up, pruning and rough wiring the
trees with detail wiring and branch placement to follow the
next morning.

Katsumi Kinoshita

Monterey Cypress
Katsumi Kinoshita is a bonsai artist from Monterey, CA. He joined the
Monterey Bonsai Club in 1963 and studied under Ray Murakoshi, the club sensei.
In 1982, Kats became president of the
club. He is currently sensei of Monterey
Bonsai Club, Salinas Bonsai Club, Akutsuki Bonsai Club in
Fresno and the Watsonville Bonsai Club. He is a member
of Nippon Bonsai Kyokai Association. He has won many
awards including the Green and White Award from the Agricultural Society of Japan and the Circle of Sensei award
from GSBF in 2003. Most recently, he won this years Kazari
Bonsai Display Competition in Hanford, CA, for Best Bonsai Display with his Monterey Cypress. Kats will conduct a
workshop using Monterey Cypress 18 to 30 tall in five gallon containers. He will review design, cleanup, pruning and
wiring. These trees will lend themselves to Moyogi, Bunjin
and group planting styles. It should be a fun workshop with
material you dont see very often.
Valerie Monroe
Field grown Trident Maples
Valerie Monroe has emigrated from
San Mateo to the Big Island of Hawaii.
Thank goodness she has a commitment
to the City of San Mateo to prune and
look after their Japanese Garden. She
received her first bonsai in 19?? and saw the magic and
wonder of this art form at a very early age. She has studied
with and befriended many bonsai artists who have shown
her the techniques and pure art of this discipline. She has
helped many members of her home club, Sei Boku Bonsai
Kai, embrace the art form of bonsai. Her ability to find the
flowing line and sinuous feeling in a tree is extraordinary.
She works very well with students and makes it an exhilarating experience for them.
Valerie will be working on Trident Maples for this years

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

Workshops continued

workshop. These field grown trees will yield Shohin to


Chuhin sized bonsai. They have 1 to 2 trunks and have
some interesting movement. There will be plenty of information on care, design, and creation of these trees as
fine bonsai.
Peter Warren
Collected Sierra Junipers
See biography on headliners page.
Our headliner, Peter Warren, will be
offering six collected Sierra junipers for
his workshop. The trees were collected
three to seven years ago and range from 15 to 27 tall with
bases in the 2 to 5 range yielding Shohin to Chuhin sized
bonsai. They have interesting deadwood features and will
be a striking addition to the collection of the lucky six students who get to work on them. He will be passing on the
lessons he learned from his sensei, Kunio Kobayashi, during
his apprenticeship in Japan. See photos of the trees on the
GSBF convention website.
Mel Ikeda Prostrata Juniper Raft Style
Mel Ikeda is a bonsai artist, teacher
and enthusiast from a bonsai family. He
grew up working with his father Masayuki Ikeda at the familys Ikeda Bonsai
Garden. He has also studied with John
Naka, Harry Hirao, Khan Komai and other Southern California greats and brings a lot of bonsai skill and knowledge to
the table for his lucky students this year. He has given demonstrations and workshops for clubs and conventions in the
U.S. including his latest as headliner of the Bonsai Ohana
II Convention in Hawaii in 2009. He has been an active organizer and participant in many conventions for California
Bonsai Society, Kofu Kai and GSBF.
This year, Mel is conducting a workshop on Prostrata
junipers in five gallon containers. He will help his 6 to 7
students create raft style or Kabudachi, multiple trunk style
bonsai. Bring your tools!
Boon Manakitivipart
Collected Western Junipers
Boon Manakitivipart is a professional bonsai artist and teacher who lives
in Alameda, CA. He received a juniper
bonsai for his birthday, was totally fascinated with it and joined the Bonsai Society of San Francisco for his first classes
in 1989. He studied with as many bonsai teachers as he
could and was awarded a Teacher Development Scholarship
from GSBF. In Japan, he spent one year with Yasuo Mitsuya
before he began six years with Kihachiro Kamiya at famous
10

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Kihachi-en. He has won numerous awards in bonsai including the Ben Oki International Design Award in 1995 and the
Kindai Bonsai Styling Contest in 2000. He travels nationally
and internationally teaching, demonstrating, and working
on clients collections. He is the founder and sensei of the
Bay Island Bonsai Club where he conducts workshops and
the Bonsai Intensive Program which is a three year course
teaching the basics techniques through the nuances of bonsai.
Boon will be giving a unique workshop this year. Ten
students will learn and practice techniques on collected
Western Junipers in a two-session workshop. The unusual
part is this: The student may select one of the trees to purchase and work on and develop it during the workshop or
the student may elect not to purchase the tree and enter
a drawing to simply work and learn on one of the unsold
trees. To view the workshop trees visit the GSBF Convention website or Boons website at bonsaiboon.com. To purchase one of the trees for the workshop contact Boon at
boon@bonsaiboon.com.
Michael Hagedorn
Collected Engelmann Spruce
See biography on Headliners page.
Headliner Michael Hagedorn will be
featuring Engelmann Spruce as his workshop material. These upright trees and Michaels talented eye will produce a workshop without any trunk chops or severe branch cutting and
will be largely a fine wiring workshop. There is older bark
and the tapers are natural and complete on branches and
trunks. There is variability in style, size and feeling with
these trees. Please number your preference 1 through 6
for these trees. See photos of the trees at the GSBF Convention Website to make better choices.
Peter Tea
Japanese Black Pine
Peter Tea is a bonsai enthusiast, artist,
and teacher living in San Jose, CA. His bonsai journey began when, as an automotive
technician in 2001, he was introduced to
bonsai by his foreman, joined the Midori
Bonsai Club, became hooked, and jumped
in with both feet in 2003 by enrolling and completing the
three year Bonsai Intensive Program with Boon Manakitivipart. As a talented and enthusiastic graduate, he became a
valued member of Bay Island Bonsai. To fund his obsession,
he began his bonsai business in 2008: Peter Tea Bonsai.
In 2009, at the GSBF Riverside Convention, Peter won the
Joshua Roth New talent Contest. He has served as President of Midori Bonsai Club and is chairman of the Display

Workshops continued

Committee for the 2010 GSBF Convention. Through bonsai,


Peter has developed a connection with living trees and appreciates the dynamic characteristics they possess.
Peter is bringing his enthusiasm to convention goers
and providing a workshop with Japanese Black Pines. They
are seven to twelve years old and exhibit nice barking. The
trunks are from 2 to almost 4 in diameter. After repotting this spring, they were de-candled in June. By convention, they will be in perfect shape for their next step. You
may view these trees at Peters website peterteabonsai.
com and also at the GSBF Convention website.
Bob Shimon
Collected Coast Redwoods
Bob Shimon joined the Redwood
Empire Bonsai Society around 1985. He
first studied with Mas Imazumi, the club
sensei. He has also studied with Yasuo
Mitsuya, Tokita, and Taka from Japan,
and Italian artist Marco Invernizzi. He
continues to take regular workshops with
the current club sensei, Kathy Shaner. He has conducted
demonstrations and workshops for clubs and has a reputation for providing interesting material. With his son Zack,
he owns Mendocino Coast Bonsai. They sell trees they
have collected in Northern California such as their specialty
coastal redwoods, oaks, pygmy cypress and sierra junipers.
Bob is a vendor at this years convention.
Bob will be working on collected redwoods for this
years convention. These redwoods have 6 10 bases
and nice deadwood features. Some of the trees may be
seen on the GSBF Convention website.
Jim Gremel
Field Grown Shimpaku Junipers
Jim Gremel is a bonsai artist, teacher
and potter living in Occidental, CA. He is
the owner of Deer Meadow Bonsai and
is a vendor at this years convention. He
has studied with Mas Imazumi, Dennis
Makashima, Kathy Shaner, Boon Manakitivipart, and Marco Invernizzi. His style shows an emphasis
on movement and strong design. His low-key approach to
styling makes it easy for students to understand and learn.
He has won several awards, including the 2009 Kazura Bonsai Display competition and the grand prize in last years 1st
U.S National Bonsai Exhibition in Rochester, NY.
This year Jim will be working on field grown shimpaku
junipers in his workshop. These Yamadori style trees have
1 to 2 bases with lots of movement and plenty of opportunity for creating interesting deadwood. They will be
suitable for Shohin to Chuhin sized bonsai: about 7 to 16

tall. Jim will have both the morning and afternoon to make
sure you get as much done as possible on these interesting
trees. Visit the GSBF convention website to see examples
of these trees.
Ryan Neil Bring Your Own
See biography on Headliners PageHeadliner, Ryan Neil is ready and willing
to help you design your challenging tree.
Bring that tree you are not sure what you
should do with or that tree that could use
some refining. Whichever you choose, you
will be given guidance to improve your
bonsai during this session.
Harry Hirao
Collected California Junipers
Harry Hirao is the most prolific collector in California. His title as Mr. California
Juniper is well earned and he has introduced more people to the joys of collecting
California junipers than any other person
we know. He is a most generous hearted
person and is respected and admired as a friend to the bonsai community. Harry has received many awards including
having the reception area of the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum at the National Arboretum named after him.
He also received the Green and White Award from the Agricultural Society of Japan and is a proud member of the
GSBF Circle of Sensei.
This year Harry will offer six collected California
Junipers (imagine that) for the convention. Harry will put
his personal touch on the trees for these lucky six students. Expect interesting trunks and deadwood on these
beauties.

Harry Hirao - CA juniper 2008 GSBF Convention in Modesto


Photo - Al Keppler
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

11

Workshops continued

Ted Matson Saikei


Shimpaku Juniper and Mixed Species
Ted Matson began study in bonsai in
1979 in San Francisco with John Boyce.
When he moved to Los Angeles the next
year, he became involved in a number of
clubs and began a serious pursuit of the
art. Ted began taking classes from leading masters in Southern California including Ben Suzuki, Shig and Roy Nagatoshi,
Melba Tucker, Warren Hill and John Naka. He has written
articles, taught workshops, and demonstrated at clubs and
conventions throughout the country. He is a co-founder
of California Shohin Society. He has served GSBF in many
capacities for years, most recently as President in 20082009 and as co-chair of last years convention in Riverside.
Although Ted is a lover of Shohin bonsai, his collection includes trees of all sizes, styles and a variety of species. His
trees are known for proportion, refinement and detail.
Ted will be conducting a Saikei workshop with shimpaku
and other mixed variety trees. It will include tray, rocks,
plants, soil and dressing. It should be a very interesting and
lively session with plenty of opportunity to get your hands
in the dirt. Join the fun! Students should bring their own
turntables and tools.
Gordon Deeg Field Grown
Mikawa Japanese Black Pines
Gordon is a bonsai enthusiast and artist
who lives in Atherton, CA. He started bonsai
in 1964 with his first club being the American Bonsai Club in Sacramento. Gordon had
early teachers in Dan Buckley and Harvey
Suzuki. In the early 1990s, he joined Sei
Boku Bonsai Kai, has twice been president
of the club and is a SBBK beginners instructor. He has been
involved with GSBF as trustee from 1999 to 2006, is chairman of the California Shohin Society and is also chairman of
the GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt. Gordon has been
to Toyohashi, Japan over several years and spent time training with Professional Bonsai Master, Yasuo Mitsuya, and has
learned the Masters techniques on many species including
Japanese Black Pine.
Gordon will be using 15 year old Mikawa Black pines
that were grown from seed at El Dorado Bonsai Garden. He
has been growing and refining these trees for several years.
The trees are 18 to 24 and have bases above the nebari of
1 to 2. They are in seven gallon containers and have been
growing in Akadama since they were collected from the field
three years ago. They have developed good nebari and have
started barking nicely. He will be teaching his students the
same lessons that he learned in Japan from his sensei, Mr.
Mitsuya, who a true master of Black Pine bonsai.

12

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Greg McDonald Valley Oaks


Although he began his bonsai career
officially in 1999, Greg has been exposed
to the aesthetic principles of clean lines
since he was born his mother lived in
Japan for four years and collected Japanese art and his father studied with Frank
Lloyd Wright. When he started to study
bonsai, he joined Santa Cruz Bonsai Kai and studied with
Kats Kinoshita. He became passionate about native trees
when he collected oaks with Gareth Shepherd. He says he
basically found my canvas in life. He and his brother, Jay,
are now known affectionately as the Bonsai Guys. Greg
now lives in Placerville in the trees.
Greg will lead the Bonsai Basics classes with Valley Oaks
grown from seed. They are five to six years old and have
had some root work.

SeeAllThisandMore!

2010GSBFConventionXXXIII
SantaClara,CA
October2831,2010

SeeAllThisandMore!

2010GSBFConventionXXXIII

SantaClara,CA
October2831,2010

WellSeeYouThere!!!

2010GSBFConvention
SantaClaraMarriott
2700MissionBlvd.
SantaClara,CA95054
(408)9881500

WellSeeYouThere!!!

2010GSBFConvention
SantaClaraMarriott
2700MissionBlvd.
SantaClara,CA95054
(408)9881500

The Convention 2010

An Anticipation by Don White

Wow, am I excited about this years Convention! Yes


siree, I am excited with anticipation to see the three
NEW FACES OF BONSAI. And, I think you will be
excited as well, when youwatch these three young men
display their bonsai skills at the Golden State Bonsai Federations convention this coming October 28th through
the 31st. The Santa Clara Marriott Hotel, in downtown
Santa Clara, California, will be the venue for this event.
Why am I excited about this years convention? Well,
for one thing, I am glad to see some young blood take up
the task of bonsai leadership from this part of the world.
And, with two from this side of the Great Divide, and
one from the British Isles, who has been to this country so many times, maybe we can call him our BritishAmerican? Well, anyway, hopefully the tide is beginning
to change as to where our own bonsai masters are coming
from.
Ryan Neil was an apprentice to the great bonsai master Masahiko Kimura for over five years. I have watched
with much admiration as Ryan worked with Kimura during their demonstrations. This was like watching a surgeon and assistant perform an intricate operation to perfection. I even had a brief conversation with Ryan.When
I asked him what it was like to work with the great master
Kimura,Demanding! was his short retort.
I have participated in three workshops with Peter
Warren and I really appreciated his quiet demeanor, and
the imparting of the vast knowledge that he has accumulatedunder the tutelageof Kunio Kobayashi. When he
took one of my California junipers that I thought was
a miscreant and showed me how to make it into a nice
show piece, even my usual loquacious Irish nature was at
a loss for words.
Michael Hagedorn. Alas, I have only read his book
titled, Post-Dated. This is a fine read about his experiences as an apprentice under Shinji Suzuki, and it illustrates what one must endureto pursue their bonsai quest
to become a master teacher. Michael has also written
many interesting articles on creating bonsai from different types of material. You should check out the article in
the magazine BONSAI FOCUS, issue 125/102, (1/2010 Jan/
Feb) which is an extensive article with photos on his styling of a Sierra juniper. Transformation stunning, artistic
ability fantastic!
Each headliner will not only be demonstrating their
skills on a different type of a large tree creating a future
beautiful bonsai, but will also be conducting workshops
to help you perfect your own tree.So, now that the registration forms are available, get them in right away or go
online to www.GSBFConvention.com as the headliners

workshopswill fill up rapidly.


The three headliners will not be the only exciting
event of the convention. Lets not forget that there will
be over 40 magnificent trees on display by some of the
countrys leading bonsai artists. This is a great way of
observing what other artists have done with a particular
tree. It might make you think twice before styling your
next bonsai.Suiseki will also be featured in an exhibit.
Of course there will be workshops galore. Workshopsfeaturing many of Californias best bonsai teachers
who will help us make nice bonsai out of different kinds
of material. From pine trees to redwoods, from Monterey
cypress to quinces, just to name a few types ofplants that
will be offered.
There are outdoor events scheduled for the GSBF
Convention, as well. If you have not been to theGSBF
Garden at Lake Merritt in Oakland recently, well,this is
a great opportunity to see some great old beautiful bonsai
in a superbsetting. Also, on this same trip you can visit
the private gardens of Gordon Deeg and Boon Manakitivipart.
But, the trip-of-trips will be the stone collecting trek
to Eel River. Maybe you will find that perfect stone for
your collection, or just revel in the beauty of the Eel River area. The Eel River alone is worth a days trip as this
is one of natures truly beautiful creations. This tripwill
also fill up quickly.
One of my favorite features of these conventions is
the critiques of the exhibited trees.This is when, what
may be considered a finished bonsai, is given a going over
by a bonsai master on how the tree might be made into a
more interesting bonsai. Sure, egoscan be deflated here,
but only for a little while. The critiquemight also make
the tree for a better showing the next time around.
A new wrinkle in the convention program this year
is the Luncheons and Discussions. During the lunch
break on Friday and Saturday,while we are dining on excellent cuisine, the three headliners will be open for questions and answers. This ought to be very interesting. Too
many questions and maybe the boys will not getlunch. So
keep the questions to the topic of bonsai folks! The lads
need nourishment as well.
Then during the days activities of participating in
a workshop, or simply watching a master demonstrate his
skills, you probably will find that you need a new tool, or
two, or different kinds of soil, a strainer, a T-shirt, a piece
of jewelry, or perhaps a plant. These items are just a few
of what can be purchased from the MANY VENDORS
available.
Now, if you are in for some competition, get a team
from your club and enter the District Competition event.
This is really a neat way to find out who your friends really are when working together to make a nice bonsai and
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

13

win a prize.
After an exhausting day, it is always nice to sit down
with friends, have a libation or two, discuss the days
events and then have a delectable dinner. And, I have
not been to a convention yet, that has disappointed in
this matter. Friday nights Welcome to the Convention
Dinner, and the dinner on Saturday night will provide
just the opportunity to reacquaint with old friends and
discuss the progress of ones bonsai collection. Or, other
matters of importance?
Providing all this activity and entertainment during
the Convention does not come without paying the piper.
Registration fees pays only part of the GSBF Convention
expenses. But, there is one other way to defer these expenses, and for me this is one of the most fun parts of the
event -- the BENEFIT DRAWING. During the dining
hours, many items of bonsai interest and non-bonsai interest can be won. There will be all kinds of items offered
during the Benefit Drawing. And, you cannot win anything without a raffle ticket. So, purchase plenty of raffle
tickets and help offsetthe convention expenses. You will
be able to purchase raffle tickets throughout the day during convention hours. Who knows what you maybe taking home?
One other event that creates a lot of excitement is
the AUCTIONS where trees designed by the headliners during their demonstrations are auctioned off after
dinner on Saturday night.
There are many ways that you can help with the Benefit
Drawing. Personally donate an item or two! If you do
not have an item such as a plant, a tool, a suiseki, scroll,
an attic item, and cannot think of an item to donate,
MONEY will suffice.Also, promote your club to donate
something. It is always nice to hear your clubs name
called out when a raffle prize is given out. The second way
to help defer the convention expenses is to BUY LOTS
OF RAFFLE TICKETS!! After all the GSBF is a nonprofit educational organization helping to promote this
great hobby of ours called bonsai. Besides, the BENEFIT
DRAWINGis fun, and you might win a great prize.
Well, these are my thoughts frompastGolden State
Bonsai Federation Conventions, and what I anticipate
for the Convention 2010 this coming October. And I
am sure, once again it will not disappoint. It does not
matter if you are an overly experienced bonsai fanatic like
myself, or a part timer or a beginner, just find Highway
101 to Santa Clara and the Marriott Hotel next to the
Great America Theme Park, and if even you can only go
for a day instead of the entire weekend, you will enjoy
the experience, and maybe you will come away with some
new knowledge, maybe new friends, or a prize from the
Benefit Drawing. But, more importantly you will be
introduced to the NEW FACES OF BONSAI... See you
there!!!!
14

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Photo permissions were granted by the artists referenced in the article

Bonsai Bytes:

Bonsai in the age of the Internet


July/Aug 2010

Women in the Mud,


a Final Look
Article by Joanie Berkwitz
We have two more women in the mud to explore,
before we move on. Both are very different, yet they
would have much to talk about over a cup of coffee and
a pastry.
Elsebeth Ludvigsen lives in Denmark, a country far removed from the Asian cultures. When she and
her husband took a trip
in 1981, they ended up
in Japan, where she was
astonished and captivated by the tiny trees in
beautifully understated
pots that seemed to be
everywhere. That set
her foot on a long inner
journey, studying Shoji
Hamadas pottery masterpieces, and immersing
herself in the bonsai potters art. Elsebeths pots
are popular in Europe,
where their classic lines and subtle glazes show off the
bonsai to good effect. Elsebeth creates her pots by handbuilding or wheel throwing, using high fire stoneware and
ash glazes.
You can see some of her work at
www.shohin-europe.com/ELSEBETH.html
(see that delightful little ficus!) and you can purchase
her pots at www.nordic-bonsai.dk .
(click on Skale-SHOHIN-Ledsager or
Skale-Handlavede to see Elsebeths pots. You can

click on the picture of the pot for a larger picture)
Wendy Heller, on the other hand, lives in Northern California, and she started making bonsai pots for
her own use and enjoyment, branching out
when they proved to be
popular. She is inspired
by the redwoods around
her, and paying close attention to their textures

and colors, carries that


inspiration into the studio. Viewing her ruggedly
textured, oxide stained
pots immediately takes
your imagination back
out to the forest, a touch
of moss and the sounds of birds would make the picture
complete.
She
uses
stoneware and porcelain, her
stoneware generally being stained with oxides,
and her porcelain is often glazed in a delicate
celadon. Of the celadon,
she writes, Its a very simple and very ancient type
of glaze, mostly composed of ash and I like it a lot. You
see it in pottery of the Sung dynasty. I love to work with
porcelain--its like playing with cream cheese.
This tickled me, because so many women artists that
I know use food imagery in their conversations! Wendy
hand builds her pots, and occasionally turns them on the
wheel.
She had a catalog for direct sales, which you can
access here:
http://pages.suddenlink.net/hellerbonsaipots/catalog.pdf
The catalogs photos does not do justice to her work,
so when she sent me large copies of the photos, I was
amazed at how lovely and well crafted her pots are.
In the next article,
we will step into some
Japanese Gardens, where
we can search out the
inspirations that underlie the Japanese Garden
aesthetic. Our bonsai
can be enhanced by using
the principles of art and
harmony in their surroundings, and the study of those
principles will bring many insights. If you ever wondered
how to give that authentic look to your little corner of
the world, you will enjoy this series! There is a Japanese
Garden Symposium being held in San Diego in October,
which promises to be an interesting and well attended
event.
See the website at
www.niwa.org/international-japanese-garden-symposium.
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

15

Kusamura Bonsai Club


March 20-21, 2010
50th Anniversary Show

Article and photos by Jerry Carpenter

Kusamura Bonsai Club arose out of an initial


organization named Hokubei Kusamura Mujin-ko
with its earliest recorded formal meeting in 1956.
It became known as the Northern California
Kusamura Mutual Association a few years later.
We became Kusamura Bonsai Club in 1960 lead by
Tosh Saburomaru.
The club meets the 3rd Friday of each month, at
7 PM in Palo Alto, CA. Prospective members and
visitors are welcome. Find us on the web at: http://
www.gsbf-bonsai.org/kusamura/ and contact the
club via email at: Kusamura-info@gsbf-bonsai.org
Display below: Toshs Coast Live Oak loaned by
Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt

At right:
Bang Vs Bougainvillea
Charlene F.s White pineInherited from B. Nakata
Restyled with direction from
Mitsuya - 1980s
John P. - Trained by Tosh
Saburomaru
Restyled by Mitsuya
San Jose Juniper
trained since 1970s

16

Jerry C - Originally from Tosh


Saburomaru, styled by
John Naka and Tokita.
Juniper Sargentii - 1980s
Nancy E. - Trident Maple
Rita C. Grown by C. Young,
styled by Tosh Saburomaru
Eastern Red Cedar
trained since 1970s

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

California Bonsai Society

53rd Annual Exhibition, Huntington Library


March 27-28, 2010 - Photography by Larry Ragle

California Bonsai Society Members

Entrance. John Naka Black pine

Show overview

Show overview

Ben Oki Elm with Kern River stone

Tak Shimazu - Shimpaku juniper

David Nguy California juniper

Bob Kinoshita California juniper

Marge Blasingame, Tokonoma - Shimpaku juniper

Memorial Mas Moriguchi Ume

Mini Demo

Nina Ragle Eel River stone, Crab apple

The partys over


Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

17

Photos by Lucy Sakaishi- Judd

Three (color-coded) Sacramento Club Exhibits from May, 2010


Sacramento Bonsai
Club Trees

Sacramento Bonsai Club Members

The Owyoungs CA juniper - Members Choice

CA Juniper

Ezo Spruce Planting

Umbrella plant, Schefflera

Pictured Satsuki Aikokai


show photos are:
1. Kobai
2. Godaishu
3. Hatsukan Setsu
4. Shinsho no Hana
18

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

White Pine

Juniper

Fringe Tree

Heavenly bamboo

Shohin - Members Choice

Maple

Hawthorn

Korean Hornbeam

ABAS, American Bonsai


Association, Sacramentos Trees

Satsuki Aikpkai of
Sacramentos Trees

Satsuki Aikokai of
Sacramentos Trees

Three, of Sacramentos four bonsai clubs, held May exhibits


and Lucy Sakaishi-Judd was there to capture these highlights to share
American Bonsai
Association, Sacramento

Won by the Judds!

Cryptomeria styled by Ryan Neil

Trident Maple

Juko Satsuki Azalea - drop branch style

Star Jasmine

White Pine
5

Trident Forest Planting

Crabapple
6

Shimpaku juniper

Higasayama Maple

Silverberry
7

Yuzo Maruyama with the demo tree he styled


10

Satsuki Aikokai club show trees are:


5. Kakuo
6. Kakuo
7. Miyama Kirishima
8. Akemi no Tsuki
9. Akemi no Tsuki
10. Kirin no Kagami

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

19

Bonsai Studio 3
An Artists Approach

Artwork and text.


Copyright Peter Adams 2010
Main Photography, Kate Adams
Additional material, Greg McDonald

Quercus Lobata, Valley Oak Part 2


In this second look at Greg McDonalds Valley Oak
we are thinking about the shape of the particular species
and how that can be woven into bonsai form and into this
tree.
The last images of the tree seen in the previous
article brought the developing tree quite a long way
towards what is acceptable as a bonsai anywhere, but did
it feel like a valley oak? If not so much, then why not?
That question provides a good place to start.

February, 2010 - Photo


In this photograph the general posture and mass of
the tree generates the form of an oak. As a bonsai it
falls loosely into
the broom form
and with development can
be made into
a memorable
bonsai. The
steps in the
trunk profile
on the left side
are where former branches
fattened the
trunk and they
add a lot of
character to
this image of a
rugged old oak.

The preceding future state drawing takes the February, 2010 form through the next couple of stages and
shows it with varied branch lines and ramified finer
detail. The negative space works well also in revealing
some of the gnarly lines and as an overall oak shape its
great, but as a Valley Oak.?

March, 2010 - Photo


This photograph was taken after another styling
session with the
design group
in March. The
branches have
thickened
considerably over
the past year and
have now been
thinned, wired
and shaped again.
At last they are
getting the real
character of the
Valley Oak which
displays both rising and
descending lines.
As a result, this
is not just a bonsai - it is beginning to be an American
bonsai!

Future State Drawing

Future State Drawing

This future state drawing emphasizes the aged


framework of main branches and indicates a greater
lateral branch spread. This gives the familiar widerthan-tall image of the Californian oaks but here also are
branch lines that first arch and then descend slightly,
the hallmark of the Valley Oak. The descending characteristic depicted here cannot be convincingly achieved
in bonsai by wiring alone. The extending lines must be
wired, grown on and cut back many times over the years
to build taper and to generate the many small changes
in growth direction that make up the successful bonsai
image.
20

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Future Diagram
This diagram
shows the greater
extent of the
green canopy and
demonstrates the
important role of
negative space in
the combination
of lines that say
Valley Oak.
The pot is a larger
version of that
shown in the
previous drawing.

March, 2010 Alternative View


This
alternative
view of the
tree is one
I liked as it
suggested the
form of a
hollow trunk a tree perhaps
devastated by
lightning.
There
are many
ancient oaks
like this in
my native
England.
From this
angle too the
trunk appears even more powerful and compact.

Future State Drawing

lower right branch complex. Those sling-shot branches


near the apex have been fixed by lowering them and
encouraging laterals to infill. The lower left branches
are up to 100% wider and add a lot of grace to the trunk
form. More has been made of the existing trunk hollow which could be enlarged further. From this side, the
roots are the weakest feature, but they can be improved
with careful shaping over time.

Diagram - Wider Profile


This
diagram
really punches up the
terrific width
of the tree.
Note how the
lower right
branch mass
sweeps down
in a subtle
movement
that checks
and holds the
leftward motion of that stocky trunk. The typical arching branch
shape is there but is more understated in this design.
The negative space is eloquent of oak character in its
exposure of the aged framework of branches. I have
anticipated some surface root pattern which should be
attainable without too much hassle.
The pot is a classic Japanese design in an unglazed
gray/brown ware. It has a lot of length but its medium
depth gives it beautiful proportions. Its form was
sometimes favored by the late Kyuzo Murata, one of the
greatest artists of bonsai.

May, 2010 - Photo


This photo,
just in from Greg,
shows the oak is
spreading well now.
Join us for
my design workshops in Diamond
Springs on Friday,
September 17th
with the Grass
Root group.
Contact Greg McDonald (530) 642-2521. Saturday and
Sunday at Lotus Bonsai Nursery and Gardens, 1435
Lower Lake Drive, Placerville. Contact (530) 622-9681.

The future state drawing shows the leftward lean


of the trunk visually balanced by the spread of the

Peter Adams

www.peteradamsbonsai.com
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

21

Repotting the Mas Imazumi Japanese Black Pine


Photos by Jerry Carpenter

Retaining wires under the pot were cut

Root wrap and throttling were found

Compressed roots were found

Diligence and skill will win out

It took a team 3 days to carefully work the roots

Day 3: We have a pot

Fine root work at the nebari

Above, the final tree now prepared for potting reveals a view
of the Mas Pine that has not been seen in a very long time.
At right, newly repotted the base of the trunk looks
supported, rather than appearing buried in the ground.
22

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Wet towels protect the root ball

Kathy, Gordon, Kirk place the tree

Repotting the Mas Imazumi


Japanese Black Pine

Article by Jerry Caprenter

On Feb 24 , 2010 Kathy Shaner and a team of GSBF Bonsai


Garden at Lake Merritt volunteers began the work of repotting
the Mas Pine. Kirk Demerest, Aaron Packard, Gordon Deeg, and
others chose to work on the tree. The group effort was greatly
appreciated as the process would take three days to complete
due to the amount of work and care required.
th

This tree, with its large canopy of needles and wide buttress, is
very heavy. The size added to the complexity of the process but
more importantly the bark of the tree could not be touched due
to its fragile nature. This meant that the team could hold the tree
only by the newer branches (where the bark was stronger) or by
the deadwood areas.
All retaining wires were cut and removed. The pots slight inside
edge required the team to cut along the inside of the pot as deep
as possible to free the tree. The team spent almost an hour
cutting along the edge when Kathy and Gordon interceded to
do it again, laying the tree on its side to extract the large heavy
pot. Extra care had to taken in the freeing process as not to cut a
large heavy root that came very close to the edge of the pot. The
pot size was 22x17 x5.5 and was extremely heavy. With the
aid of some very heavy tools the tree finally came free of the pot.
The previous documented repotting of the Mas Pine was in 2006
by Yasuo Mitsuya and Kathy Shaner. At that time only a third of
the root area was worked hard. Mitsuya found a great deal of old
original dirt and many heavy roots and had concentrated his work
on the center area of the roots. Since that repotting, the tree has
become healthier. Then in September 2009, Mitsuya worked with
a team of garden volunteers to reduce the needles and thin the
canopy so that it would have more strength for the repotting.
Observation of the root ball this time showed a large amount of
mottled, compressed roots on the bottom. Good root growth this
time indicated that the tree had repaired itself well from its early
issues found in 2006.
Kathy illustrates that the soil must be removed from the bottom
area first and that good clean cuts must be made on the roots.
The root base was then squared off and about 2 of soil and root
was removed from around the sides. The team was instructed to
work close to the roots ,carefully removing dirt and clearing out
crevices without damaging the roots.
The plan of root work was multifaceted; roots on the left side of
the pine would be cut very clean in straight lines following the
direction of the root to encourage root development. Since there
was evidence that the tree has not been repotted very often over
a hundred years, much work will need to be planned for each of
the next few repotting periods. Cutting any major root could be
dangerous because it may be the one root that moves around the
entire tree. There was a great deal of root wrap and root throttling
going on so that root work had to be done very slowly. One of the
major roots showed some chisel work done by Mitsuya and this

root would be worked some more to help develop fine root growth
but a decision would be made later; if there were fine roots farther
up the main root that could support the growth then a major root
could be removed. That large root was then carefully pried back;
behind it we found excellent root development but after careful
inspection, the large root was found dead and was removed.
Roots continued to be inspected looking for a live cambium layer.
If a root is seen to have just bark and hardwood then the root is
dead and can be removed. Some live roots were cut and sliced
with a very sharp knife to make a clean cut. This slice reduced
the heaviness of a particular root and would further stimulate new
fine root development. Underground, much dead material and
stones were removed to allow new root growth.
After the general cleaning of the bottom and edges, the team
began working on the nebari of the pine. Kathy Shaner suspected
there were great roots on the nebari just below the surface of the
soil that had been buried for a very long time. Exploration began
with Kathy instructing the team on how to remove the old original
soils from the nebari without damaging the roots by using dental
picks, small metal picks with little scoops on one end and sharp
pick on the other, as well as sharpened chop sticks. This was
the beginning of many hours of teamwork by shifts of members
working into the night carefully picking away at old punky smelling
dirt around the base of the tree. Aaron, Kirk, Jerry and Kathy
did the painstaking duty. Our goal was two-fold; uncover these
beautiful roots and find new drainage in the area from the top
down through the root mass. Periodically there would be a
breakthrough wherein we could get our tool all the way through
and there was much rejoicing. At the end of the first day the tree
root ball was layered with towels and watered down to keep the
roots safe overnight.
The following day the work continued to reveal an exciting nebari
with many new canyons and holes for the water to travel through
the root ball. These new water drainage areas would provide
space for new healthy root growth and help to ensure there was
no rot occurring in those areas. In other words, the tree will be
able to breathe much better. More root work was done on the
bottom of the root ball as we ended out second day. However;
at the end of the second day a frantic search went out to find the
correct pot for the tree. The original pot was determined to be too
small and heavy, not allowing for the roots to grow sufficiently and
it was just too heavy looking for the new found nebari and the tree
in general. Finding the right pot for an old growth tree is not an
easy challenge. Many sources were called with no luck. A tree of
this quality cannot go into just any inexpensive large pot either;
color, depth, size and shape were carefully considered. A pot
without an inside lip was a must so that removal of the root ball in
a few years will be easier and faster.
Day three: Kathy Shaner located the perfect pot to house the tree
for the next few years. The pot was measured and documented
for the record and then perfectly leveled on a stand to begin tree
placement. It is important to ensure the pot is perfectly level
when placing a tree. Its position will have to remain for a few
years so it had better be done carefully and perfectly to present
the tree in the best way possible.
Again, like the night before, the tree soil was covered in towels
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

23

and watered heavily to keep the roots wet. An essential point was
made that roots of any tree being repotted should not be allowed
to dry out. A spray bottle of water with HB101 was always kept
handy. If the tree were to be left unattended for any amount of
time it was covered with wet towels.
The pot was then wired and prepared to receive the tree. Once
balanced and leveled, the tree was carefully moved and seated
inside the pot to check the size. As always, it is not perfect the
first time and more material had to be removed from the side
and the bottom. More detailed root work continued. We learned
that every time we were ready to say it was done; well, it wasnt
and more study always revealed more that should be done
for the health of the tree. Work continued and we really began
exploiting those new drainage areas through the root ball. A
chop stick inserted from the top would show through the bottom
and presented a place to be widened some more. Careful root
trimming was done to allow greater drainage areas through
the root ball. This work proceeded through the late afternoon.
Fine root work at the nebari continued as well. Hours later as
darkness began to fall on the third day Kathy continued to refine
the detailed work on the newly exposed roots. Dark black roots
of the nebari were carefully excavated from the soil revealing the
new tree. Tireless work was required to do this level of detail
but on a tree this old and important, and one that will not be
touched for several years to come, the time had to be found.
In the cover of darkness by then, the tree was moved into its new
pot. The root ball had been reduced by nearly half its original
mass. Soil preparation contained the standard Akadama mixes
and was amended with charcoal, bone meal, and a secret
ingredient of Down To Earth Root Enhancer that contains
mycorrhiza.
Kathy, Gordon, and Kirk placed the tree for the final time. The tree
is sitting much higher in the pot now so that it can develop new
fine roots. Once the tree was set into the pot it was moved or slid
from front to back and Kathy said you can just hear that the tree
is solid in the soil as it did not shift much and did not make any
noise. Careful new soil working was done to ensure that there
were no air pockets in the roots. This process of pouring a little
new soil and chop stick work continued for over an hour. Fine soil
was worked into areas near the nebari and in the drainage areas
that had been created. A rubber hammer was used to ensure the
soil would settle well in the pot.
The final tree reveals a view of the Mas Pine that has not been
seen in a very long time. The image in the upper right is the final
shot of the tree before it was moved to its stand. Notice the nebari
floating on top of the soil. The base of the trunk now appears
supported instead of being buried in the ground. The tree also
stand a bit more upright in its new position and is elegant shown
in the lighter colored, wider, and shorter pot.
Be sure to come by and see the Mas Pine in all its glory. Now in
May there are great signs of flourishing growth with new candles
and bright green needle growth. If you have seen the tree before;
you will see again for the first time.

24

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Yamato Bonsai Kai


Presents

Our 39th Annual


Bonsai Exhibition
Saturday, October 16, 2010 2:00PM to 9:00PM
Sunday, October 17, 2010 10:00AM to 4:00PM
Demonstrations by Johnny Uchida
Saturday at 7:00 PM & Sunday at 1:00PM
Admission $5.00 includes entry to exhibit,
sales areas, viewing of the demonstration
and a raffle entry for the demo tree.
Yamato members will serve dinner
Saturday from 5:00 to 6:30 PM for a small
fee of $5.00. Come see the Exhibition,
have dinner and conversation with friends
and stay for our first ever evening
demonstration.

Location:
Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church
32975 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, CA

www.yamatobonsaikai.org

The 2010 Fresno Bonsai Society


Spring Exhibit
Article & photos by Mike Saul

The Fresno Bonsai Society held its annual bonsai


exhibit on a beautiful spring day in April this year.

We sometimes struggle with defining a successful show and setting


goals for these events. Is
it a big crowd, generous
revenue, or exceptional
bonsai that awe the viewers? Or is it the camaraAl Keppler, Steve Da Silva with
derie and enjoyment of a
Maple. (Tokonoma behind them)
gorgeous day in a Japanese
Garden? This show was
clearly a wonderful success
by that standard. Is success measured by educating
our community about the
joys of bonsai? This event
was outstanding by that
Local artists selling wares
standard too.

I am always reminded of Bob Hilvers dictum


about bonsai: If you aint having fun, you aint doin it
right. We did it right this year.

True, it is hard to replicate the beauty of the


Spring blossoms in the Shinzen Gardens with a
tree on a table, but judging from the ooohs and
ahhhs, the public enjoyed the small trees as much as
the large ones. In this outdoor setting with noisy peacocks and ducks walking
past, we loose a lot of the
dignity of a quiet indoor
show. Our exhibit is held
in conjunction with the
Spring Blossom Festival
in the gardens. We gain a
colorful community celTaiko Drummers
ebration with Taiko drums,
a Tea Ceremony and a
broad spectrum of people.
We were very fortunate
to have Ted Matson with
us for the day. Ted drew a
huge crowd for his dem-

Ted Matson led a tree critique


and provided a demo

onstration with his clear and polished presentation


of the basics of bonsai design. Earlier in the day he
provided a critique of several of the trees on display,
which was really enjoyed by our members.

On Sunday, Ray
Theime and Richard
Ramirez attracted another enthusiastic crowd
for
their demonstration.

We had a rare perfect


day for this event with cool Ray Theimes Lorapedium
breezes and bright sun. We
enjoyed one of the largest turnouts in memory and
our plant sales were robust.

Barbara Foley and her


son Donald supervised
the sale of accent plants
for the benefit of our
Power of One Project. The
handmade pots for those
kusamono were produced
Barbara Foley at the Power of
by our club earlier this
One sales area, a fundraiser to
year at a meeting devoted sponsor a members trip to the
to learning to make pinch GSBF Convention.
pots.

The Fresno City College Student Bonsai Club


conducted their plant sale
next to ours. Local artists
and the Fresno Iris Society
FCC Student Bonsai Club
were there as well.

Another measure of
the success of this years
show may be the number
of people who signed up
for our newsletter. If they
all were to join the Fresno
Bonsai Society, we would
Past FBS President, Harold
double our membership.
Mitchell enjoying the event
It was, I suspect, only the
beauty of the day and the
smiling faces of our members that prompted their
enthusiasm. But we were
showing them the joy of
bonsai.
Al Keppler had a Tokonoma
display at the FBS Show.
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

25

Lucille Lee Roberts, a Pioneer in the Art of Bonsai in Metal


by Judy Glaister
Lee Roberts, known to
several generations for her
bonsai, as jewelry creations, recently turned 92.
Last year was tough
on Lee. She had a terrible
fall, breaking both her
wrists and hip, and she
struggled with a bout of
pneumonia as well. But Lee
is still going strong. While
Lee Roberts - Metal Artist
shes a little slower in her
movements and tires more quickly, her strength of
character and quick wit remain unphased.
We first met Lee at a Bonsai-A-Thon, an annual
event held at the Huntington. We heard about her
work as soon as we began our work creating bonsai
jewelry. Having just retired from own jewelry business we finally had time to do jewelry for the pure
joy of it. People would drop by our booth and show
us the wonderful pieces she had created for them.
Each piece was a treasured remembrance, but more
than that, a remembrance of Lee herself. Finally, we
looked up to find a lovely petite lady who introduced
herself, Hi, Im Lee Roberts. We were awe struck,
and have been ever since.
Born in Portland , Oregon in 1918, Lee grew up
as an only child, spending much time with her father
outdoors, horse back riding and enjoying nature. She
graduated from the University of Oregon as an Art
major, and worked in the Kaiser Shipyards
during World War II where she learned engineering
and mechanical drawing.
As time passed, Lee married and raised three children, all of whom still live in Oregon and Washington.
Her artistic interests began to turn toward bonsai and
photography. Her keen interest in Japanese culture
and horticulture was enhanced by her tour of Japan in
1969. In 1972, Lee won the Japanese Garden
Society of Oregons Photographic Competition. The
same year, she was awarded 3rd place in the national
photographic competition sponsored by the Japanese
government.
Lee has been a member of the Pacific Asia Art
Center in Pasadena for over 30 years.
26

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Aside from her docent responsibilities, Lee


became a successful jewelry designer, and pioneered
the concept of bringing photos or sketches of actual
bonsai trees to life in precious metals.
The original bonsai design was reduced to a size
that would be in the proper proportion for the piece
of jewelry created. First the pot was carved out of a
hard wax, then the trunk, roots and folage were built
up in wax to simulate the original photo or drawing.
Finally, sprues were added to the piece for casting,
and after casting, the channeling sprue was removed
and the piece cleaned up and polished.
Lees bonsai jewelry customers were drawn from
both the East and West coasts as well as from around
the world. Lee always has said, Theres something
special about bonsai people. Ive never met anyone
unfriendly, and you never have to worry about their
checks! They are the most honest people youll ever
meet.
Only an unfortunate eye surgery stopped Lee
from creating her beautiful pieces, but her original
molds have been preserved, and her legacy of creativity and courage in the face of adversity live on.
Congratulations, Lee, on a job well done!
Samples of Lees fine metal art - photos by Dave Glaister

Calling all GSBF


Club Webmasters
By Joe Byrd,
GSBF Website Liaison
Years ago, the GSBF created a newsletter contest
for member Clubs to encourage them to create better
newsletters and include certain key ingredients. The
winners of that contest receive a nice prize from the
GSBF at our annual Convention. There is one prize
for large clubs and one for smaller ones. This seems
only fair since the larger clubs tend to have more resources to call upon in order to create documents like
newsletters.
In recent conversations at the GSBF Board meeting, we reached an agreement to create a similar type
of contest to stimulate member Clubs to create and
update web sites for their members and prospects.
The aspect of having a web site that prospective
members can review is very important as I regularly
get people contacting me via email from reading
about our Club online. From those inquires we have
gotten several new members.
In an effort to identify those elements that would
make up a good Club web site and thereby good
contest measurement tools, I sought the assistance
of Jerry Carpenter, webmaster and member of the
Kusamura Club. The Kusamura site is one of the
best examples of Club web sites that I have seen, so
he speaks from personal experience. Here is the list
measurement tools that he suggested and that I agree
we should use:
Updated and current calendar of club
events
Updated stories to promote the
months upcoming meeting
About section that contains: Club Histor y, mission, focus, and contact information
Demonstration or Club project page
with pictures and written details of the event
and key takeaways
Newsletter pa ge with PDF or HTML
versions of newsletters for historical reference of articles
Feedback form for getting comments

from site visitors


Colorful design that incorporates pictures of the local club in action; this will put
faces to events and shows the character of the
club
Link to the www.GSBF-Bonsai.org web
site so we build our combined web traffic
He also suggested that we standardize on the
platform that we view the web site on. We will judge
the websites on two platforms: Windows PC running
IE 8.0 and Mac running Firefox at a screen resolution
of 1280 x 1024. This should give us a good idea of the
full range of issues that can occur in web site development.
Here are the contest rules for your Club to follow:
1. GSBF member Clubs who wish to have
their web sites judged should send an entr y
URL to me at Joembyrd@pacbell.net.
2. First make sure your web site is up-todate and that you have included as many of
the elements that are listed above as you see
fit.
3. Include in your request email the type
of platform you create your web site on and
the tools you use.
4. Be available on email to respond to any
questions we might have.
5. Include the number of members in your
Club.
6. Submit your entr y by no later than September 30, 2010.
Awards will be handed out on Saturday, October
30, at GSBF Convention 2010 at the Santa Clara Marriott. Plan on being at the 2010 Convention to receive
your award or cheering on those who win.
Good luck.

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

27

Bonsai Club of Santa Barbara


Trees
Photographed by Leroy Kubel

Pat Brodie
Hackberry

Keith Mautino
Pomegranate

Pat Brodie - Japanese


Mountain Maple

John Kopp
Banyan Fig

Wally Kunimoto
Ginkgo

Keith Mautino
Shimpaku Juniper

John Bleck
Plectranthus ernstii

Ann Marie Erb


Blue Atlas Cedar

Keith Mautino
Japanese Black Pine

Pat Brodie
Japanese Maple

Edna Hesthal - Red Leaf Beech

Susanne Barrymore
Japanese Black Pine

Ann Marie Erb


Trident Maple

Stephen Yee
Japanese Boxwood
Edna Hesthal - Procumbens Nana Juniper

Wally Kunimoto
Golden Cup Oak
28

Andrew Nelson
Japanese Black Pine

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Tom Post
Silverberry

Anne Marie Erb - Cork


Bark Japanese Black Pine

Joe Olson
Japanese Maple

Ko Yu Kai
Shohin Bonsai
Club members
trees
Displayed at the
2010 Dai Ichi Show

Photography by Michael Jonas

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

29

Our list of Advertisers

please patronize the companies that support GSBF by shopping


from the companies listed below:

REDWOOD
EMPIRE
BONSAI
SOCIETY
Proudly invites you
to their Free

27th ANNUAL
BONSAI SHOW
Saturday: August 28, 2010
10 am - 5 pm
Sunday: August 29, 2010
10 am - 4 pm
Simply the best, we cover all areas:
200 Bonsai exhibited
Largest vendor area
Largest member sales area
Continuous educational demos
by members
Critiques of show trees
for the public
Very large raffle and silent auction

Daily demonstrations
by accredited Bonsai master
Kathy Shaner
1:30 to 3:30 both days

Santa Rosa Veterans


Memorial Building
1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa
(Opposite the Sonoma County Fairground)
For Information Call: Bob
Shimon: 707-884-4126
Email: shimon@mcn.org
Web Page: www.rebsbonsai.org

30

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Barrymore Scrolls pg. 34


Blue Oak Nursery pg. 32
Bonsai Fusion pg. 34
Chikugo-en Bonsai Nursery pg. 34
David Glaister Bonsai Jewelry pg. 31
Gro Power pg. 35
Grove Way Bonsai Nursery pg. 34
GSBF Convention back cover, inside cover
Hisayasu Importers pg. 31
Joshua Roth Tools pg. 33
Kims Bonsai Nursery pg. 31
Maruyamas Bonsai Nursery pg. 31
Mendocino Coast Bonsai pg. 27
Perfectly Built, Bonsai Stands pg.4
REBS (Redwood Empire Bonsai Show) pg 30
Ryerson Ceramics pg. 33
Shibui Bonsai, Inc. pg. 14
Telperion Farms pg. 33
Wang Antique scrolls, stands, pots pg. 34
West America Import/Export pg. 33
Window Box Bonsai Accents & Art Gallery pg. 34
Yamato Bonsai Kai pg. 34

To Advertise: Contact Michael Jonas

mjonas48@hotmail.com Tel: 818-776-0813


1/8 page G 3.65 x 2.35 inches $30.00
1/4 page G 3.65 x 4.90 inches $60.00
1/2 page G Horizontal 7.50 x 4.90 inches $90.00
1/2 page G Vertical 3.65 x 10.0 inches $90.00
Full page G 7.50 x 10.0 inches $160.00
Back Inside Cover C 7.50 x 10.0 inches $290.00
Front Inside Cover C 7.50 x 10.0 inches $320.00
Back Inside Cover 1/2 page C Horizontal 7.50 x 4.90
inches $155.00
Front Inside Cover 1/2 page C Horizontal 7.50 x 4.90
inches $170.00
Back Outside Cover C 6.85 x 5.85 inches $215.00
(G=grayscale C=color)

* Display of ads in color online magazine is free with a


one-year, six-issue order. Call for more information.
All trademarks are the property of their
respective owners. All rights reserved.

Welcome to Kims Bonsai Nursery


Website: www.kimsbonsai.com
E-mail: phbonsai@yahoo.com
One of the largest
bonsai nurseries in
California. (10 acres)
In business since 1988.
Open daily 7 am-6 pm
(by appointment only)
Closed the 4th
Saturday of every
month.

Maruyama
Bonsai Nursery
(916) 421-6888
(916) 421-8306
Collected
& cultivated
quality trees.
accent plants

1423 47th Ave Sacramento, CA 95822

Kims Bonsai Nursery





8575-A Phelan Rd
Phelan, CA 92371
Phone: 760-947-0409
Fax: 760-949-7500

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

31

32

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

Telperion Farms

West America

Import and Export, Inc.

Japanese, Chinese and Korean bonsai pots.


Japanese bonsai tools.
Display stands
Akadama and black scoria
David and June Nguy 323-223-9102
email: waimexport@aol.com

1653 N. Main Street

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Dedicated to growing trees specially for bonsai


Featuring field-grown material:

Japanese Black Pine

Scots Pine

Shimpaku

Japanese Larch

Maples

Chinese Elms

Crabapples

Quince

Imported Specimen Satsuki and


90 varieties of satsuki whips in development
Over 50 other species of trees available

We are a full-service bonsai resource offering pots, tools,

soils & wire. Kanuma, aksdama, yamagoke, black lava rock.


Open to the public by appointment only

(503) 859-3697

(503) 881-1147

www.telperionfarms.com
tfarms@wvi.com

Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

33

Bonsai
Pre-bonsai
Tools
Books
Japanese Pots
& Accessories

Chikugo-En Bonsai Nursery

18110 S. Western Ave. Gardena, CA 90248 tel/fax: 310.323.4011


email: chikugoenbonsai@gmail.com

BONSAI FUSION
Hand Crafted Bonsai Pots

BONSAI
FUSION
34

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

635 North 13th Street


San Jose, CA 95112
Tel: 408 476 3112
Fax: 408 292 2246
bonsaifusion.com
hama@bonsaifusion.com

Got Caption?

Long lasting
Organic based
Clean, no odor

Send your Caption Entry for this photo of


Kenji Miyata to: mjonas48@hotmail.com

Captions are in ...

(800) 473-1307
www.gropower.com
Subscribe to
Golden Statements online at

http://www.gsbf-bonsai.org/gsbfmag_subscribe.html

or use the mail in Subscription/Renewal Form below


Along with your check made out to
Golden Statements, please provide your
Name: _________________________________________
Address:________________________________________
________________________________________________
Phone:_________________________________________
E-mail:__________________________________________
Primary Club affiliation:_________________________
I could have been a contender! - Michael Jonas
If you think this tree is big, you should see the one that
died! - Ron Krause

I was just a wee tyke when I found out with lots of dirt and a
little bit of water, you can make the neatest mud pies.
- Ron Krause
Cry me a River..., even with gloves this prickly Mama may
have you singing the blues too. - Joyce Mason

Mail to: Cindy Peterson, Subscription Manager


7241 E. Rocky Ridge Drive
Tucson, AZ 85750
Subscription Rates for one year (6 issue)
Regular - bulk mail (US $20)
First class in US, Canada, Mexico (US $35)
International via Air Mail (US $55)
Call 520-299-5952 with any questions or email Cindy
at: jojoba53@comcast.net
Golden Statements Vol. XXXlll No. 4

35

roF .emoclew si cilbup eht dna semaJ eoJ eb lliw reenoitcua


:ta su tisiv ro 5639-935-013 llac noitamrofni erom
iakiasnobihciiad/gro.iasnob-fbsg.www

Calendar of Events

ainrofilaC ,ytiC noinU


81-71and
rebotcO
List of GSBF Events,
t83 :iaK iasnoB otamaY
wen( ta noitibihxE iasnoB lBonsai
aunnA hand
Suiseki Shows
57923 ,hcruhC tsihdduB ytnuoC ademalA htuoS :)noitacol
dna MP5-MA01 ,yadrutaS era sruoH .daoR seliN-odaravlA
July
yb M
P0GSBF
01-5
:1 t
a sEvent
yad htob snoitartsnomeD .MSan
P4-MRafael,
A01 ,yaCalifornia
dnuS
Marin
Bonsai
Club:
Bonsai
Exhibit
at
the
Marin
selas &Oct
tibi28-31
hxe sedulcni 00.5$ foGSBF
noissim
dA .adihcU XXXIII
yCounty
nnhoJ Fair,
Convention
Clara,
noitVeterans
arts nomedMemorial,
e ht rof tek 10
cit Avenue
efarSanta
a of
dnathe
,noFlags.
itartsCalifornia
nHours
omed ,are
saer11AMa
10PM
daily.
Admission
to
Fair
is
$14
for
adults;
$12
gro.iakiasnobotamay.www ta noitamrofni lanoitiddAfor
.eerseniors
t
and children 5 to 12. For more information contact Craig Thompson, 415-472-6685.
ainrofilaC ,otnemarcaS
52-42 rebotcO
MAY
July
14

Oakland,
ot wohS yrasrevinnA ht01 :noitaicossA iasnoB ytiC lotCalifornia
ipaC
Bonsai
at the
eht East
dna tBay
tirreM
ekaLSociety:
ta nedraAnnual
G iasnAuction
oB FBSG
eht Lakeside
troppus Park
Center,
items
7PM;
dna Garden
nMay
edraG1-2
drapehS666
ehtBellevue
si noitacAve.
oL .sPreview
bulc iasnGardena,
ob otnatem
aCalifornia
rcaS Auction
starts
at
7:30PM.
Bidding
is
open
to
the
public.
For
Bonsai
wohSDai
.kraIchi
P yeBonsai
lniKcMKai:
ni .d24th
vlB Annual
yelniKcM
0333 Exhibit,
,retneC sSerenity
trA more
information,
contact
Janice
Dilbeck
at
925-458-3845.
.MP4-Through
MA01 ,yBonsai
adnuS dnata the
MP5Ken
-MA0Nakaoka
1 ,yadrutCommunity
aS era sruoCenter,
h
nd
10AM-4PM
are
laicep1670
s htiwWest
sbulc 162
rosnopStreet.
s yb MPHours
1 ta syad htob noitartsnoboth
meD days.
August
7-8
San Francisco,
California
on
selasSan
rNovice
ebm
em to
bulmaster
c dSuiseki
na roexhibitors.
dnKai:
eV .w29th
olloRound-robin
f Annual
ot sgniw
ard demonstration
efar in
iasthe
nobUnion
Francisco
Exhibition
on
Saturday at 1PM,
.043Room
1and
-036Saikei
-6at19the
tademonstration
dJapan
duJ yrCenter,
aG si tcby
a1675
tnFrank
oC Post
.saGoya
eraStreet.
Bank Hospitality
Sunday at 1PM. Demonstration trees will be in the benet
Hours are 10AM-4PM both days. For further information contact
accessories
tools, and
ainrJanet
odrawings.
filaC
,edi510-530-1577
srBonsai
eviR trees,or janet@jtroth.com

8-5 rebmevoon
N sale
Roth,
more
For
parking.
and
roF( throughout
.IIXXX noithe
tnevshow.
noC :nFree
oitaradmission
edeF iasnoB etatS nedloG
or visit us
424-456-4429
information
Aug
28-29
Rosa,
).rplease
evoc edcall
isniJohn
kcabLuhnow,
no da eesSanta
noitam
rofni California
erom
at:http://daiichi-bonsai.com
Redwood
Empire Bonsai Society (REBS): 27th Annual Show
at the Santa Rosa Veterans Building, 1351 Maple Avenue. (OpainrofilaC ,ssoR



...41-31 voN
posite
the Sonoma
County
Hours areCalifornia
Saturday,
Sacramento,
Fairgrounds.)


May 1-2
nedr10AM-5PM
aG dna trA nand
iraM
e
h
t
t
a
w
o
h
s
l
l
a
F
:
b
u
l
C
i
asnotrees
B nion
raM
Sunday,
10AM-4PM.
Over
200
exhibit,
Annual Bonsai and Suiseki
era slarge
ruSacramento
oHvendor
.dvlB earea,
kaBonsai
rDmembers
secnClub:
arF risales
S63rd
05 area,
,mooR
eromand
reviaLsilent
,retneauction.
C
raffles
Show at the Sacramento Buddhist Church, 2401 Riverside
dna )Demonstration
ABT( efar dnboth
a noidays
tartsnatom
ed ,rennby
id Kathy
,MP01Shaner.
-MP6 ,yFree
adirFadmis1:30PM
and
12Noon-5PM,
Saturday,
Boulevard.
giarCsion
lland
ac parking.
noitaShow
mrContact
ofni hours
erBob
om are
roF .M
P707-884-4126/shimon@
4-MA01,yadrutaS
Shimon
at
at
Manakitivipart
Boon
by
Sunday, 10AM-4PM. Demonstration
mcn.org for further information. .5866-274-514 ,nospmohT
2PM both days; rafe will follow. Plants and bonsai related
items for sale. Free admission. For further information contact
September 9-12
Rochester, New York
916-630-1340.
Gary Judd,
North
American
Bonsai Symposium: Airport Holiday Inn, 911
Brooks Avenue. Featuring: David Easterbrook, Mary Madison,
California
Santa Barbara,

Schmalenberg,
15-16Marty
May Neil,
Ryan
William.
N. Valavanis.
Demat
Annual Bonsai
Barbara:exhibits,
of Santa
Bonsai Club
onstrations,
lectures,
workshops,
auction Exhibition
and vendors.
Hosted
by
International
Bonsai
Arboretum,
William
N.
Valavanis
Road.
Canyon
Mission
1212
the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden,
585-334-2595
WNV@internationalbonsai.com:
www.internatio10AM-4PM.
llAM-4PM and Sunday,
Hours are Saturday,
nalbonsai.com
Demonstration at 1PM both days. Plant sales by club members;
native plants suitable for bonsai in the Botanic Garden's
October
California
Shop.
the Garden
Nursery2and bonsai books and other gifts inSalinas,
Salinas
Bonsai
Club:
Annual
Bonsai
Exhibit
will
be
held
at
email
805-929-4972,
Erb
For information, contact Ann
the Lincoln Avenue Presbyterian Church, 536 Lincoln Avenue.
annerb@charter.net or visit www.santabarbarbonsai.org.
Exhibit hours are from 11AM-4:00PM with a demonstration by
Katsumi Kinoshita at 1:30PM. A raffle of the demonstration tree,
California
items will follow theEncino,
15-16
May
and
other
bonsai related
demonstration.
Tea
Annual
California:
Southern
Sansui-Kai
and
cookies willof
be served,
and there is plenty of parking forBonsai
group
of
Department
Los Angeles
with the
in conjunction
ExhibitionFor
attendance.
more information
contact:
Don White,
831-724at the Sepulveda
Fair.Brubaker,
Parks, Country Garden
Recreation
9283;
e-mail:and
whiteslib@aol.com,
or Maggie
831-6635044;
e-mail:
maggee36@aol.com.
Hours are
16633 Magnolia Boulevard
Center,
Garden
food and
good
arts,
gardening
9AM-5PM daily. Plant sales,
entertainment galore. Admission is free. For directions go to
www.sansui-kai.com or for more information contact Michael
Jonas, 818-775-0813.

36

Golden Statements July/Aug 2010

roOctober
moc.bulc2-3
iasnobogeidnas.www ta etiThousand
sbew ruo eeOaks,
s noitaCalifornia
mrofni
MayValley
15-16 Bonsai Society: 7th
Sacramento,
Conejo
Annual
Bonsai
Exhibition
4101-134-067 ta einaoCalifornia
J llac in
the Resource
Center
at
the
Gardens
of
the
World,
2001
Thousand
Satsuki Aikokai of Sacramento: 40th Annual Show at the
Oaks
9AM-4PM
both3330
days.
Arts Center,
ain
rofShepard
ilaBlvd.
C ,oeHours
taGarden
M naare
Sand
0McKinley
2-Demonstrations
91 rebmeBoulevard.
tpeS in
the Bandstand
at
11AM
and
2PM.
Free
admission.
No
sales of
naS taShow
tibihxEhours
iasnoBare
launnSaturday,
A ht64 bu10AM-5PM
lC iasnoB oetand
aM nSunday,
aS
bonsai
related
items.
For
more
information
call
Ken
Fuentes,
805.laeR o10AM-4PM.
nimaC lE & Demonstration
ht5 ,retneC noiat
tae1:30PM
rceR kraboth
P lardays,
tneC followed
oetaM by
495-7480 or visit our Website at: http:/www.cvbs-bonsai.org
benet
.MP4-M
A01 drawings.
yadnuS dnMember
a MP5-and
MP2vendor
1 ,yadrsales.
utaS Free
era sadmission.
ruoH
information
visit
Satsukiaikokaisac@sbcglobal.net
retOctober
fa eFor
far more
d
n
a
e
l
a
s
i
a
s
n
o
B
.
s
y
a
d
h
t
o
b
M
P
2
t
a
n
o
i
t
a
r
t
s
n
o
meD
9-10
Oakland, California
or
contact
Ron
Pigram,
916-428-8505.
,noEast
itamBay
rofniBonsai
erom Society:
roF .nois49th
simdAnnual
A eerFBonsai
.snoitaShow
rtsnom
d eLakeht
atethe
,teside
n.labPark
olgcbGarden
s@anabCenter,
ihcats 666aBellevue
nabihcaT Ave. m
aS aretcSaturday,
atnoc
Hours
May 22-23
Sacramento,
California
.0749-84on
5-Sunday
056
10AM-5PM,
and Sunday, 11AM-4PM. Demonstration
American
Association:
51sta Annual
at 1PM
by DaveBonsai
DeGroot,
followed by
raffle of Show
bonsaiand
and Sale.
reilated
iawaHours
H
,ikik
are
iaW
Saturday,
10AM-4PM,
of bonsai
and
and
7related
2,Sunday,
62 ,52materials
re10AM-3PM
bmetpon
eSsaleat
items.
Large
selection
ta throughout
noitthe
nevnoShepard
Cthe
II show.
anaGarden
hOFor
iasn
o&
B :n
Arts
oitaicCenter,
ossA contact
iasn3330
oB Janice
iiaw
McKinley
aHDilmore
information
beck,
925-458-3845.
iasnoBBoulevard.
eb lliw sroHands-on
tartsnomedworkshops
derutaeF .lfor
etoH
allhlevels
caeB cfrom
icaPnovice
eht to
fo adekadvanced
I leM iesnenthusiasts;
eS iasnoB dlarge
na namember
paJ fo ikuand
zuSvendor
urhoT rsales
etsaMareas;
ta October
norafes
itarts16-17
igand
er door
dna prizes.
noitamrDemonstration
ofni lanoUnion
itidddaily
ACity,
.aat
inCalifornia
r1:30PM
ofilaC by
Yamato
Bonsai
Kai:
39th
Annual
Bonsai
Exhibition
gro.coRyan
ssAiasnNeil,
oBiiawwho
aH@precently
v dna groreturned
.cossaiasnofrom
biiawaan
H.wextended
watw the
Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church, 32975 Alvaradoapprenticeship in Japan with Bonsai Master Masahiko
Niles Road. Admission of $5.00 includes exhibit & sales areas,
contact
ainrofKimura..
ilaC ,esoFree
J naSadmission.
For further
information
62 rebm
etpeS Greg
demonstration and a raffle ticket for the demonstration tree. Sat530-642-2521
or
gregandleeanne@comcast.net
ehurday
t taMcDonald,
w
o
h
S
i
a
s
n
o
B
l
a
u
n
n
A
h
t
8
4
:
b
u
l
C
i
a
s
n
o
B
i
r
odiMwill
hours are 2PM-9PM. For a small fee of $5.00 dinner
,etbe
arapavailable
es 81 sedon
ulcSaturday
nI .tS ht6 evening
884 ,retnfrom
eC yt5PM-6:30PM,
inummoC edishfollowed
troN
22-23
yllby
anoour
iMay
tanfirst
,M
Pever,
03:1 evening
tA .iasnodemonstration
b e n fo s yalat
psi7PM.
dOakland,
tnioSunday
p-3 dCalifornia
na hours
2
Satsuki
16th
a are
elyt10AM-4:00
sBay
lliwArea
,trapwith
ivitikananafternoon
aAikokai:
M nooBdemonstration
,tsitra Annual
iasnobat Azalea
demialccBonsai
a
1:30PM.
Both
666
dndemonstrations
a stShow
op ,sloatotthe,swill
eLakeside
ert feature
fo sePark
laS
.Garden
eniP Master
kcCenter
alB Johnny
esat
enLake
apaUchida.
J Merritt,
nijnub For
Bonsai
are
and
iubadditional
ihSBellevue
,lemeinformation
rG Avenue.
miJ yb contact
dHours
ereffoTony
eb Hayworth,
llSaturday,
iw seiross510-289-5731
e10AM-5PM
cca iasnob or
bonsaicho@comcast.net.
eht rofSunday,
ecivda 10AM-4PM.
dna pleh gnilFabulous
yts eerF .sblossoms
rehto dnaand
,.cnbonsai
I ,iasnodisplay.
B
using
ro 737Demonstration
7-173)804( ta both
TJ tcadays
tnoC at."i1:30PM
asnoB .rD
" momature
rf cilbupbonsai
October
23-24Rick Garcia

material:
will be featured
teSacramento,
n.kon
nilSaturday
htrae@California
iasand
nobBonsai
tj
Capitol
City
Bonsai
Association:
11th
Anniversary
to
Master Johnny Uchida on Sunday. Large selectionShow
of bonsai
support the GSBF Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt and the Sacainroftrees
ilaC ,and
saniother
laS bonsai related materials
available
3 rfor
ebopurchase.
tcO
ramento bonsai clubs. Location is the Shepard Garden and Arts
nlocniLForeht further
ta wohs information,
iasnob launnAplease
:bulC contact
iasnoB sRon
anilaSReid,
Center, 3330 McKinley Blvd. in McKinley Park. Show hours are
sruSaturday,
oh 925-831-2500.
wohS10AM-5PM
.evA nlocniand
L 63Sunday,
5 ,hcruh10AM-4PM.
C nairetybseDemonstration
rP eunevA
.atboth
ihsondays
iK imatus1:30PM
taK yb M
P
0
3
:
1
t
a
n
o
i
t
a
r
t
s
n
o
m
e
D
.
M
4-MA1raffle
1
by sponsor clubs with specialPbonsai
wodrawings
llofMay
lliw to
22-23
smfollow.
eti reh tVendor
o dna eand
ert
nclub
oitarmember
tsnomeAnaheim,
dsales
eht fareas.
o eCalifornia
faContact
rA
si is
ereGary
hOrange
t dnJudd,
a dev916-630-1340.
rCounty
es eb lliwBonsai
seikoocSociety:
dna aeT .47th
noitartAnnual
snomed eBonsai
ht
noD tcExhibit
atnoc esat
aelthe
p noOrange
itamrofCounty
ni erom Buddhist
roF .gnikChurch,
rap fo y909
tnelpSouth
,reOctober
kabuDale
rB e28-31
iAvenue.
ggaM roExhibition
moc.loa@bhours
ilsetihare
w Santa
;310:30AM-4PM
829-4Clara,
27-138California
,eboth
tihW days.
Golden
State
Bonsai
Federation
Convention
XXXIII:
moeach
c.loa@
63efollowed
eggam ;4by
405a-3benet
66-13New
8rafe.
Demonstration at 1PM
day
FaceBonsai
of Bonsai.
The
New
Faces
will
shape
the
Art
Bonsai
pots, tools and accessories, along with of
books
and
for
come
vision
of
ain
royears
fplants
ilaC to
,skwill
aO be
dwith
naon
suthe
osale.
hTguidance
and

these
4-3 renew
botcteachO Ken
Contact
ocbonsai@gmail.com
or
noers,
itibiand
hxEthe
iasGSBF
noB714-553-7516,
la2010
unnAwill
ht6 be
:yfor
tthe
eicmore
oable
S iato
snreceive
oB yellthe
aV new
ojenvisions
oC
Schlothan,
information.
of bonsai and participate in the future of Bonsai. For more infor1002 ,dlroW eht fo snedraG eht ta retneC ecruoseR eht ta
mation visit http://www.gsbfconvention.com
.syad May
htob 23M P4-MA9 era sru oH .dvlB
skaO
dnasCalifornia
uohT
Grass
Valley,
htob ,M
P2 dnaCounty
MA11Bonsai
ta dnaClub:
tsdnaBSecond
eht niAnnual
snoitartSpring
snomeDShow
Nevada
iasnobatfotheseGrass
las oValley
N .noiVeterans
ssimda eeMemorial
rF .yadnuAuditorium,
S dna yadr255
utaSSouth
)508( Auburn
,setneuF Street.
neK llShow
ac noihours
tamrofare
ni e11AM-4PM.
rom roF .smeThe
ti deShow
taler will
847the
-594Art of
have a display of bonsai trees, demonstrations.0on
.iasnrefreshments,
ob-sbvc.www/rafes,
:ptth :tand
a beW
Bonsai throughout thegroday,
a sales
area with trees, pots, and other bonsai-related articles. Free
ainroadmission.
filaC ,anedFor
raG further information contact 61Leo
reboMartinez,
tcO
neK e530-273-2628.
ht ta noitcuA iasnoB launnA :iaK iasnoB ihcI iaD
nepo srooD .tS dn261 .W 0761 ,retneC ytinummoC akoakaN
ot smeti elaS .MP7 ta strats noitcua eht dna MP6 ta weiverp rof
ehT .erom dna stnalp tnecca ,siad ,seert iasnob :edulcni

Dai Ichi Show


Photos by
Michael Jonas
7RNRQRPDGLVSOD\+DUU\+LUDR&$-XQLSHU7HG2ND-DSDQHVH%ODFN3LQH-RKQ9DQ'H:RXZ6DQ-RVH-XQLSHU

1<5,
96*/,:;,95,>@692
/0:;690*46596,*644<50;@/6:70;(3(<+0;690<4

6=,94<:,<48<(30;@)65:(0-964790=(;, 7<)30**633,*;065:
,?/0)0;065:765:69:

05;,95(;065(3)65:(0(9)69,;<4
0*/0)(54(:(2<50;663
4,*6)65:(0202<;663:
@6:/0)65:(0;663:
4(:(2<50;663*647(5@
*,9;9,
*6305:3,>0:
:;65,3(5;,957<)30:/05.
:(5*;<(9@)65:(0;6++/(5:,5
)65:(0)@;/,465(:;,9@
:,(53:40;/
(+(4:)65:(0
)65:(0-6*<:
(4,90*(5)65:(0:6*0,;@
205+(0)65:(0:/<77(5
(9;6-)65:(07961,*;

:<7769;05.69.(50A(;065:

)65:(0:6*0,;@6-<7:;(;,5,>@692
>693+)65:(0-90,5+:/07-,+,9(;065
507765)65:(0(::6*0(;065
)65:(0*3<):05;,95(;065(3
7<,9;690*6)65:(0-,+,9(;065
569;/(4,90*(5)65:(0-,+,9(;065
(4,90*(5)65:(0:6*0,;@
)65:(0:6*0,;0,:6--3690+(
256>3,+.,6-)65:(0-69<4

0DQXHO0DUWLQH]&KLQHVH(OP.HL,NDUL6DQ-RVH-XQLSHU3HWHU0DFDVLHE)LFXV+DUOH\1HZPDQ-DSDQHVH%ODFN3LQH

(++0;065(3/0./30./;:

:,3,*;:(3,:(9,(
*(:/(>(9+:
(>(9+*,9,465@)(58<,;

+,465:;9(;69:

2\UPV2VIH`HZOP
4HYJV0U]LYUPaaP
+Y(SPJL*OLU

+DUOH\1HZPDQ3URVWDWD-XQLSHU0DULR3LQHGD%RWWOHEUXVK'DYLG1JX\.RUHDQ+RUQEHDP6KLJ0L\D3\UDFDQWKD

Join Dai Ichi Bonsai Club the 3rd Friday


of each month at 7 p.m. at the
Ken Nakaoka Community Center
1670 W. 162nd Streeet
Gardena, CA

+0:73(@@6<9-05,:;)65:(0
0M`V\OH]LHX\HSP[`IVUZHPHUK^V\SKSPRLP[JVUZPKLYLKMVY[OLL_OPIP[PVUHUKPUJS\KLK
PU[OL*VTTLTVYH[P]L(SI\TZLUKHJ\YYLU[WOV[VMVY[OLZLSLJ[PVUWYVJLZZ[V!


3HWHU0DFDVLHEDFFHQW
&DURO8SVWRQDFFHQW

>T5=HSH]HUPZ76)V_ 9VJOLZ[LY5@ 
 -(? >5='PU[LYUH[PVUHSIVUZHPJVT
4VYL0UMVYTH[PVU!^^^PU[LYUH[PVUHSIVUZHPJVT

5+

.D]0XUDL%RXJDLQYLOOHD+DQN6XJLPRWR&RUN3LQH7RP&XOWRP)RHPLQD-XQLSHU*DU\/DL*LQNJR%LORED

THE MAGAZINE OF GOLDEN STATE BONSAI FEDERATION

GOLDEN STATEMENTS
Golden State Bonsai Federation
1038 33rd Street
Sacramento, CA 95816
www.gsbf-bonsai.org
Change Service Requested

1RQ3URW2UJ
US postage
PAID
Sacramento, CA
Permit No. 1453

V O L X X X III N O . 4

GOLDEN
STATEMENTS

Headliners:
5\DQ1HLO
3HWHU:DUUHQ
0LFKDHO+DJHGRUQ
.DWK\6KDQHU6HPLQDU

0HHWWKH9HQGRUVQLJKW
'LVWULFW6W\OLQJ&RPSHWLWLRQ
7RXUWKH*6%)%RQVDL
&ROOHFWLRQDW/DNH0HUULWW 
3ULYDWH%RQVDL*DUGHQV
6DQWD&ODUD0DUULRWW
0LVVLRQ&ROOHJH%OYG
6DQWD&ODUD&$

Convention
registration materials
are inside this issue!

The GSBF 2010 Convention Issue


California Bonsai Society Show
Repotting Mas Imazumi's legacy Japanese Black Pine

$ 7.50

J U LY / A U G

2 0 1 0

Verwandte Interessen