Sie sind auf Seite 1von 27

The language and the sign

SEMIOTIC AND SEMIOLOGY..............................................................................................3


An idle hypothesis?..........................................................................................................................................................3
Diversity of language-focused disciplines.......................................................................................................................3
Proto-history of new disciplines and the ‘same old suspects’.........................................................................................3
After the fall of Historical and Comparative Linguistics................................................................................................3
A new science: semiotics or semiology...........................................................................................................................4
Synchronic / Diachronic..................................................................................................................................................4
The sign according to Saussure.......................................................................................................................................4
Code: a sign-system.........................................................................................................................................................4
Arbitrary nature of signs..................................................................................................................................................4
Langue and Parole...........................................................................................................................................................4
Peirce’s notion of sign......................................................................................................................................................5
Saussure and the official establishment of semiology.....................................................................................................5
The goals of semiology and its position towards linguistics...........................................................................................5
Peirce’s idea of semiotics.................................................................................................................................................5
The structuralism.............................................................................................................................................................5
Language and society according to Edward Sapir...........................................................................................................6
According to Sapir and Whorf:........................................................................................................................................6
La lingua relaziona la realtà ............................................................................................................................................6
Lotman’s metaphorical construct: the semiosphere.........................................................................................................6
Culture and language in Lotman......................................................................................................................................6
Lotman’s notion of ‘Culture’...........................................................................................................................................7
Lotman and the importance of remembrance within societies........................................................................................7
Modelling systems...........................................................................................................................................................7
Modelling.........................................................................................................................................................................7
Hjelmslev – connotation (founded the school of Copenhagen).......................................................................................8

EXPERIENCE, COMMUNICATION AND TEXTUAL FUNCTIONS......................................9


Halliday on language and experience..............................................................................................................................9
Louis Althusser: language is not a transparent medium..................................................................................................9
Alan Cruse’s definition of communication....................................................................................................................10

Do we really know the codes we use?..............................................................................................................................10


A translator and his instinct...........................................................................................................................................10
Shannon’s diagram of communication...........................................................................................................................11
Roman Jakobson’s scheme (diagram) of communication.............................................................................................11

Jakobson’s functions........................................................................................................................................................12
Drawing some conclusions............................................................................................................................................12

SOCIOLINGUISTICS AND CONTEXTS.............................................................................13


Bernard Spolsky’s definition of Sociolinguistics .........................................................................................................13
The context of communication accounts for the variability of language......................................................................13
Some key terms..............................................................................................................................................................13
Sociolinguistics and its task...........................................................................................................................................13
Language variability according to M.A.K. Halliday.....................................................................................................13
“Language is in large part what users have made of it” (Dell Hymes 1980) ................................................................14
Language, Context and Text by M.A.K. Halliday and Hasan.......................................................................................14
Bernard Spolsky.............................................................................................................................................................15
Esempio di TENOR.......................................................................................................................................................15
Mari D’agostino.............................................................................................................................................................15

DIALECT AND SLANG ......................................................................................................17


Definizioni ironiche ma efficaci del rapporto tra lingua e dialetto................................................................................17

1
Language and social classes.............................................................................................................................................17
Labov and his work in NY.............................................................................................................................................18
Accommodation and audience design...........................................................................................................................18
SLANG AND SOLIDARITY........................................................................................................................................18
Speech communities (comunità di parlanti)..................................................................................................................19
Language is a mirror of our identity, the slang according to Peter Trudgill..................................................................19
Eliza Doolittle (from Shaw’s Pygmalion): when you are not so much what you say as how you say it.......................19
Higgins’s principle ........................................................................................................................................................19
Code switching (commutazione di codice)....................................................................................................................20

Literary examples of code-switching (CS)......................................................................................................................20


Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange and Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children...................................................20
Da un’edizione della Gazzetta dello Sport del 2008 .....................................................................................................21
From Brian Freil, Translations (1981)...........................................................................................................................21

IRELAND CASE..................................................................................................................22
Celtic Revival................................................................................................................................................................22
Language and ethic identity ..........................................................................................................................................22
Irish history....................................................................................................................................................................23
La tendenza semplificatoria...........................................................................................................................................24
Telmon’s scheme............................................................................................................................................................24
Variability of Language.................................................................................................................................................24
Pidgins...........................................................................................................................................................................25
Irish English...................................................................................................................................................................25
Dublin English...............................................................................................................................................................25

References..........................................................................................................................................................................26
Bibliography:.................................................................................................................................................................26
Siteography:...................................................................................................................................................................26

2
Semiotic and semiology
(Part 1)
There are relationship between language and knowing, we are going to explore linguistics issues.
Communication, languages and their relations to societies have been the focus of age-long
discussions.

Human beings have always dealt with these notions from a multiplicity of perspectives and carrying
out investigations of different nature and in relation to very diverse contexts.

An idle hypothesis?
Unlike past scholars, most linguists today from different backgrounds argue that human language
was probably not born out of the need to communicate, but from the very act of reasoning.
Linguistics say communication is not the birth of language.
[La lingua fa di noi esseri umani con un vantaggio evolutivo. Gli esseri umani hanno sviluppato il
linguaggio per sviluppare il pensiero. In virtù di queste esigenze l’uomo ha sviluppato le lingue
naturali].
Communicate is not the only function in language but language permits to express an identity.

Diversity of language-focused disciplines


• Investigations on language, communication, and ultimately on their social dimension have
alternatively drawn our attention towards different aspects, the interaction of these with
diverse domains of reality, and even more frequently they have differed in their analytical
tools and subsequent applications.
[Dal momento in cui gli esseri umani hanno iniziato la scrittura e codici in grado di fissare, il
linguaggio è diventato soggetto di speculazione. A volte alcuni studiosi si sono focalizzati su alcuni
aspetti del linguaggio, o sullo stesso argomento ma con diverso occhio critico.
Psicologia, pragmatica, teoria della comunicazione e sociolinguistica sono tutte materie che
analizzano il linguaggio].

Proto-history of new disciplines and the ‘same old suspects’


• Most of these disciplines are established precisely by retrieving the meditations of past
scholars (regardless of their background) who had more or less explicitly addressed these
notions.
• Aristotle, Plato, the Stoics, St Augustine, Leibniz, Von Humboldt and a few others are made
reference to any time a new discipline is established; thus their works are explored as
legitimating anticipations and subsequently adapted to the new goals and according to
contemporary models and frameworks.
[I fondatori di queste discipline hanno fatto riferimento ai soliti noti: Platone, Aristotele, De
Saussure; riadattando i loro studi a differenze culturali]

After the fall of Historical and Comparative Linguistics


“Ma all’inizio del ventesimo secolo troviamo l’insegnamento seminale di Saussure sulla linguistica
generale; e dopo di esso lo sviluppo di tendenze diverse dello strutturalismo: i gruppi di Ginevra
(con Bally, Sechehaye, Frei), di Praga (con Trubeckoj e Jakobson), di Copenhagen (con
Hjelmslev), e le scuole americane di Sapir e Bloomfield e dei loro successori fino a Chomsky e ai
post-chomskiani.”
Giulio C. LEPSCHY, Mutamenti di prospettiva nella linguistica (Bologna: Mulino, 1981), p. 130.
Prima il linguista parlava di ceppi linguistici e le lingue venivano comparate (sanscrito, aramaico).
Con la linguistica generale si delineano le teorie di funzionamento di una lingua.

3
A new science: semiotics or semiology
• Ferdinand de Saussure (set up the European tradition of semiology)
• Charles Sanders Peirce (founded the American tradition of semiotic studies)
• Both semiotics and semiology come from the Greek word “semeion”, sign

[Questi due personaggi inizialmente vertono i loro studi: uno su logica, Peirce, e l’altro su
linguistica generale, De Saussure. Essi convogliano l’analisi del simbolo in concetti convergenti]

Synchronic / Diachronic
• Diachronic analyses: the object of study is conceived as in progress, changing and
developing in time.
• Synchronic analysis: the object of study is seen as immanent, i.e. fixed at any given time.
Accordingly, the analysis does not take into consideration any historical developments.

The sign according to Saussure


Saussure conceives the sign as a two-sided entity, whose two sides are inseparable:
1. The signifier, is the material aspect of the sign that conveys the second side.
2. The signified is the mental concept entailed in the sign.

[La lingua viene studiata da De Saussure come prodotto fisso, e si chiede quali sono stati gli
sviluppi storici che l’anno portata ad essere quello che è. Saussure e i suoi studenti si sono occupati
dell’analisi con la nozione chiave del SEGNO (inizialmente non hanno pubblicato).
Il segno per Saussure è una diade, cioè un’entità bifronte formata da significante e significato.
SIGNIFICANTE: veicolo sensoriale (film, ricordo, “tutto”)  udito, vista…
SIGNIFICATO: il concetto che il segno esprime (non l’oggetto!)
(Se dico “cane” ognuno ne immagina uno diverso)
La relazione tra signifier e signified non è obbligatoria ma arbitraria dunque convenzionale].

Code: a sign-system
• A code is a patterned system of signs by means of which mental concepts are associated to
physical expressions (encoded) in order to disclose them to other individuals.
• Language itself is a two-level code comprising the level of content and that of expression.
[Il codice permette di associare concetti mentali a espressioni fisiche. La lingua è un codice con due
livelli: contenuto ed espressione].

Arbitrary nature of signs


• The relationship between a signifier and its signified is arbitrary and conventional.
• Language is a social product: “[it has] a potential existence in the brains of a group of
individuals. For language is not complete in any speaker; it exists perfectly only within a
collectivity.” (sociolinguists would say “speech community”)
[La lingua esiste in potenza soltanto se esiste una società].

Langue and Parole


• Saussure distinguishes the Langue (social, general, abstract and theoretical dimension of
language)
• from the Parole, that is the individual, particular, tangible and practical use of speech.
Dicotomia:
Langue la lingua in teoria che idealmente viene immaginata così (grammatica).
Parole esecuzione individuale, particolare, materiale della lingua.
La sociolinguistica privilegia la parole.

4
Peirce’s notion of sign
“Something which stands to somebody for something in some respect or capacity”.
• REPRESENTAMEN (firstness),
• INTERPRETANT (secondness),
• OBJECT (thirdness).
Qualcosa che sta per qualcosaltro per qualcuno

Divieto di sosta Automobilisti

Un segno

Quello che viene indicato non è l’oggetto ma il concetto mentale, già presente nella mente del
“somebody”.

Saussure and the official establishment of semiology


“Language is a system of signs that express ideas, and is therefore comparable to a system of
writing, the alphabet of deaf-mutes, symbolic rites, polite formulas, military signals, etc. but it is the
most important of these systems.
A science that studies the life of signs within society is conceivable; it would be part of social
psychology and consequently of general psychology; I shall call it semiology […]”

La semiologia è una scienza che studia il funzionamento dei sistemi di segni nella società.
La lingua condiziona il pensiero.
Non tutto ciò che si prova si riesce a descrivere (sentimenti).

The goals of semiology and its position towards linguistics


“Semiology would show what constitutes signs, what laws govern them. […] Linguistics is only a
part of the general science of semiology; the laws discovered by semiology will be applicable to
linguistics, and the latter will circumscribe a well defined area within the mass of anthropological
facts […] If we are to discover the true nature of language we must learn what it has in common
with all other semiological systems.”

Peirce’s idea of semiotics


• “By semiosis I mean an action, possibly an influence, which entails the cooperation of three
objects: a sign or representamen, its object and its interpretant”. [Somewhere else he
defines the interpretant as the “cognition produced in the mind”]
• Peirce imagines the world to be “perfused with signs” and, unlike Saussure, he does not
distinguish between conventional (human-mediated) and natural signs (those you can find in
nature and do not require a human intention).
Peirce era un anticonformista, egli immaginava un universo di segni a prescindere dalla volontà
umana.

The structuralism
Da De Saussure nascerà lo strutturalismo che poi si attecchirà in molti altri campi oltre alla
linguistica: critica letteraria, psicoanalisi, storia, antropologia.
STRUTTURALISMO: tutto si tiene.
Es. 1 un suono tiene con altri una relazione, se si considerano le seguenti frasi:
- “the cat sat on the mat”
- “the mat sat on the cat” (non ha senso!)
Es. 2 Nel momento che negli scacchi si muove una pedina si aprono ad alter possibilità
di movimento non solo quella pedina ma tutte sulla scacchiera.
5
Language and society according to Edward Sapir
“Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as
ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become
the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to
reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of
solving specific problems of communication or reflection.”
“The fact of the matter is that the 'real world' is to a large extent unconsciously built upon the
language habits of the group. No two languages are ever sufficiently similar to be considered as
representing the same social reality. The worlds in which different societies live are distinct
worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached [...] We see and hear and
otherwise experience very largely as we do because the language habits of our community
predispose certain choices of interpretation.”

According to Sapir and Whorf:


Signification processes involving human beings are always social facts, unconsciously filtered
through linguistic habits.
Language always filters and affects (even though does not determine) our cognition of the world,
ourselves included.

La lingua relaziona la realtà


La distinzione fondamentale è tra influenza e determinare il modo in cui mi relaziono alla realtà che
è sicuramente influenzata dal linguaggio. La visione è glottocentrica (lingua al centro di tutto). C’è
l’incapacità di staccarsi dal linguaggio. Spesso vi è anche l’incapacità di distinguere tra
rappresentazione (testo: film, immagine, libro) e realtà che sfocia in atti eclatanti (violenza).
Per esempio i colori sono uno spettro che viene segmentato in modo diverso, lo spettro è da
immaginare come la realtà (esemplificando in inglese Blue sta per azzurro).
Chi, per esprimersi, utilizza termini diversi non vive in un mondo diverso (es. in luoghi in cui la
neve è molto presente ci sono una cinquantina di nomi diversi per denominarla, in Italia ce ne sono
4-5). Dunque le condizioni ci hanno portato ha diverse necessità.
La lingua non cambia la realtà ma ci aiuta a conoscerla, ma la conoscenza non è filtrata solo dal
linguaggioperchè possiamo conoscere una sensazione e non poterla esprimere.

Lotman’s metaphorical construct: the semiosphere


• The semiosphere enables the elaboration of information and communicative processes in
much the same way as the biosphere enables organic life.
• In other terms, the semiosphere makes semiosis possible.
The semiosphere is a way to imagine the universe, the life is possible in the biosphere for the
energy irradiated to the Sun, the semiosphere is a metaphorical concept to see as circuit in which is
possible to communicate.
BIOSPHERE SEMIOSPHERE

Life Meaning

Culture and language in Lotman


Within the semiosphere we find different substructures or cultures, and different languages. And
yet, the semiosphere should not be thought of as a set of separate texts and languages. The
interaction between these sub-structures is essential for their existence.

6
Lotman’s notion of ‘Culture’
• Lotman (small wonder he defined himself a culturologist) conceives a Culture as an
organism, part of a universal organism (the semiosphere), dependent upon other organisms
(other Cultures), and characterized by a mobile, dynamic condition.
Each Culture elaborates its own relation with the sign and with signification processes.
• Successful Cultures (those which provide their member with a shared and not controversial
vision of the past and consequently with a cohesive identity) manage to disguise their
internal organization as a natural one. In other terms, their members assume their social
organization to be not so much the product of historical processes as a most natural
outcome.
All’interno della semiosfera (immaginaria) ci sono diverse culture caratterizzate dal relativismo e
con forte dinamicità, non c’è omeostasi.
(Es. il fiorentino con il XIX sec ha sviluppato una sua lingua, questa posizione è stata scalciata dalla
lingua standard ed ora la lingua televisiva ha scalzato la lingua precedente).
Ogni cultura è tendenzialmente egemone (in grado di controllare le altre) ed all’interno di questa
cultura ci sono individui egemoni ad altri (es. in Italia non abbiamo un’identità nazionale forte, ma
ci sono modelli che condividiamo).
IDEOLOGIA: serie di gerarchie di valori in base alla quale si classificano certe prassi (la vita per
come si vive) della realtà.

Lotman and the importance of remembrance within societies


• From a diachronic point of view, a Culture is the store of knowledge where information can
be either kept or removed
• Lotman argues that Memory is the key force of every Culture
Cultures are not homeostatic. There is dynamicity within Cultures, with ongoing struggles among
different expressions for more central positions at every level or discourse (ethics, codes, sciences,
politics and economy)
Every Culture holds as vital to preserve its internal structure, one that nevertheless heavily rests on
language

Modelling systems
Language = is the primary modelling system, i.e. a code that cannot be tracked back to other
codes.
This is the basic medium by means of which a Culture gets to know and to represent reality.
Secondary modelling systems:
• arts (such as literature, sculpture, etc), sciences (such as medicine, physics, etc), and any
other organized discourse, built on language (i.e. on the primary modelling system), and
addressing a specific portion of reality from a specific point of view.
• By means of secondary modelling systems human beings produce texts such as paintings, a
rite, a political rally, a building, a televised image, a novel, a song.

Modelling
The Soviet scholar employed the world modelling so as to stress that it is thanks to language that
people are able to represent reality, to construct. In other words, through language people set up
analoga (plural of analogon) of the real objective world.

Le parole sono un testo e un modello, gli uomini costruiscono attraverso esse un analogo della
realtà. La letteratura è un modello secondario perché usa la lingua per costruire un mondo di
finzione. La letteratura modella un mondo possibile.

7
Hjelmslev – connotation (founded the school of Copenhagen)
• While denotation can be regarded as the definitional, literal, direct, commonsense meaning
of a sign, connotation is an individualistic surplus of implied, indirect information.
• Connotation amounts to the socio-cultural and personal associations (ideological,
emotional, etc.) of the sign.
Continuatore di De Saussure, afferma che il segno non esaurisce il significato, c’è un qualcosa di
extra-segno, una realtà extra-testuale alla luce di concezioni esterne.
CONNOTAZIONE: qualcosa di aggiuntivo che può avere una sfumatura individuale, emotiva e
sociale.
Per esempio la parola democrazia ha connotazioni delle più disparate, invece la parola casa
significa solo “casa”, perciò la denotazione è unica.
(Esempio concreto: nei film di Woody Allen ultimamente si usano molto termini come fucking,
questi non vengono del tutto tradotti in italiano, e in Germania ancora meno, perché hanno
connotazioni diverse, sono meno accettate).
La connotazione risente di storia, cultura e conoscenza.
Tutti noi abbiamo dei quadri, non siamo mai del tutto liberi. Nel momento in cui il conctto viene
interiorizzato diventa parte di noi.
Per questo alziamo le antenne se ci rendiamo conto di essere sottoposti a moderna manipolazione,
come per esempio il fatto che “l’omosessualità è innaturale”, che è solo un punto di vista
storiacamente condizionato.
Secondo Hjemslev dal momento in cui apprendiamo le denotazioni impariamo anche le
connotazioni.
Concepts
• Origins of language (reflexive versus communicative function)
[I linguisti tendono a spiegare le funzionalità del linguaggio come quella di riflettere, si credeva che la lingua
fosse nata solo per comunicare].
• Variety of disciplines investigating language
• Recurrent patterns in the proto-history of disciplines addressing language, communication and their interaction
with society from diverse viewpoints
[Nasce la necessità di riplasmare quadri di riferimento di pensatori come Aristotele.
PROTOSTORIA: ciò che viene prima, si recuperano appunti e scritti; posso parlare di protostoria della
semiotica citando Aristotele anche se egli di semiotica non aveva mai parlato].
• Semiotics through the work of its founders: Saussure and Peirce
• Saussure’s idea of sign
• Arbitrary and conventional nature of the bond between signifier and meaning
• Expression / Content
• Code in semiotic terms
• Contact and sensorial experience
• Language as a code. Language as a semiological system.
• Diachronic versus Synchronic analysis
• Langue and Parole in Saussure
• Peirce’s vision of the sign
• Distinction between conventional and natural signs and different position within Peirce and Saussure’s
theoretical frameworks
• Language as a code. Language as a semiological system.
• Diachronic versus Synchronic analysis
Language in society
• Language and society according to Sapir / Whorf
• Language as a social product
• Knowledge and experience are filtered through linguistic habits
• Signification processes are social facts embedded in Cultures
• Juri Lotman and the semiosphere
• Culture according to Lotman
• Primary and secondary modelling systems in Lotman
Connotation, ideology, and the task of semiotics
• Hjelmslev: denotation and connotation

8
Experience, communication and textual functions
(Part 2)

Halliday on language and experience


“Language is itself not only a part of experience, but intimately involved in the manner in which we
construct and organize experience. As such it is never neutral but deeply implicated in building
meaning”.
[La lingua non è solo esperienza ma presente nei modi in cui le costruiamo].

Culture and identity


A: My culture is right! Il buon senso è una
B: Why? legittimità, quando non
A: Come on, it’s just common sense. riusciamo a classificare
logicamente.
La cultura quando funziona diventa così interiorizzata che non ne si sente la presenza e di fronte
alla diversità non la si riconosce e non si vede una cultura nei diversi, perché non è la nostra).
Ritorna l’esempio dell’“omosessualità innaturale”, stereotipi come questo sono prodotti determinati
storicamente (è andata così).

Semiotics can be seen as a way to organize and structure one’s observations of the world and at the
same time a means to decode those of other people.

Hjelmslev - connotation
• While denotation can be regarded as the
definitional, literal, direct, commonsense
meaning of a sign, connotation is an
individualistic surplus of implied, indirect
information.
• Connotation amounts to the socio-cultural and
personal associations (ideological, emotional,
etc.) of the sign.

Es. “democrazia” segno


 Denotazione: polis (la sostanza)
 Connotazione: organizzazione, uguaglianza
(significato molto personale che dipende dalla
società)

Louis Althusser: language is not a transparent


medium
• “When we first learn denotations we are also being
positioned within the ideology by learning dominant connotations at the same time.”
• Connotations are fragments of an ideology.
I linguisti pensano che dalle espresioni e dalle connotazioni si possa svelare l’ideologia, che Lotman
intende come cultura. Diventa molto importante il mezzo di comunicazione del messaggio per i
significati, se viene comunicato con la lingua, essa avrà un background culturale.
I significati dei segni sono sul vocabolario, le connotazioni no.
• Any utterance [=affermazione] is socially oriented.

9
Alan Cruse’s definition of communication
Communication can be conceived very broadly, including within its scope such matters as
the transfer of information between biological generations, via the genetic code, the
interaction between a driver and his car, and indeed any sort of stimulus-response
situation. [Communication is] the transfer of information between human beings.

Alan Cruse si occupa di pragmatica e semantica, egli è ideologicamente più vicino a De Saussure,
poiché riguarda un circuito comunicativo (persone che parlano).
Secondo il suo parere “il significato ha ben poco significato al di fuori del percorso comunicativo”.
La comunicazione può essere considerata in senso lato come ogni stimolo

Do we really know the codes we use?

A translator and his instinct

Il processo di decodifica è istintivo, quante


volte sappiamo dare forma a dei contenuti ma
non conoscendo il codice non possiamo capirlo.

10
Shannon’s diagram of communication
Egli è un ingegnere che lavora per le compagnie telefoniche.
Conceive and formulate Interpret and recognize
Message Message
↓ ↑
Encoding Decoding
↓ ↑
Sender Impulses (channel) Receiver

Message Encoding Transmitted Channel Received Decoding Message


Sender → Signal ………….. Signal → Receiver
or ↑ or
Addresser Addressee

Roman Jakobson’s scheme (diagram) of communication


Six factors and six functions
Contact
 Canale fisico per comunicare
 Connessione psicologica tra
mittente e destinatario
Sender message Receiver
[Scrittore] [Lettore]
code
context / reference
[Costrutto psicologico/argomento del
libro]

11
Jakobson’s functions
Jakobson afferma che ad ognuno di questi fatttori corrisponde una funzione diversa. Non esiste
enunciato che comprenda tutte e sei le nozioni.
Phàtic
Prevale in quei messaggi in cui si vuole
insistere sul contatto:
- Il cantante che dice: «one, two, three»
prima di iniziare;
- Il «pronto» del telefono (verifico che la
linea ci sia);
- «You are with me»; «is that true»; «I got
it».
To test the regular transition of meaning .
Expressive Poetic Directive (o conativa)
or emotive Dà più attenzione alla forma che alTipica dei messaggi che si
Si concentrano sul propriocontenuto: orientano verso il destinatario, il
mittente: - in letteratura domina la funzionemittente cerca di influenzarlo,
- la poesia contiene unapoetica; addirittura a farlo agire come
funzione emotiva, nel- nella letteratura barocca o roccocò lavuole:
monologo al centro sta funzione poetica prevale.
- la pubblicità per eccellenza è
l’io del mittente. una tipologia testuale che
convince ad un consumo;
- in tutti i testi in cui figura il
modo imperativo;
- presente anche nella scrittura
saggistica, perché è presente una
intenzione suadente;
- nei pamphlet.
Meta-communicative / Linguistic
Il messaggio è concentrato sul proprio
codice
Referential
Rappresenta l’esterno e il reale;
- informatore alla stazione.

Drawing some conclusions


1) Language is a social product as well as any kind of signification process. Textual function
are always social oriented.
[Ciò che è condiviso tra sociolinguistica e semiotica è che la lingua è il prodotto della società].
2) There is a relationship between language and knowledge even though its nature is highly
controversial and has stirred lively debates. While influence of society on language is
unanimous, the influence of language on society (on people’s thought) is feasible but not so
overwhelming as to control its world-view, as stated by Sapir and Whorf.
3) It is social function that has determined what language is like and how it has evolved.
La relazione tra esperienza e lingua è molto controversa, la relazione è biunivoca, la lingua
influenza la società e la società influenza la lingua (in un certo tipo di contesto ho la necessità di
chiamare la neve con molti nomi diversi).

12
Sociolinguistics and contexts
(Part 3)

Bernard Spolsky’s definition of Sociolinguistics


“SOCIOLINGUISTICS is the field that studies the relation between language and society, between
the uses of language and the social structures in which the users of language live”

SOCIOLINGUISTICA: relazione tra lingua e società, uso che si fa della lingua in un contesto
sociale.

The context of communication accounts for the variability of language


We change (switch) different kinds of language according to the people we are talking to, to the
subject we are addressing, and to the overall context of communication (Malinowski).

Malinowski ritiene che a cambiare il linguaggio sia il contesto comunicativo. “The environment in
which the communication takes place”. Non è possible congelare o staticizzare una lingua. Una
lingua non può sempre essere la stessa.

Some key terms


Variety / varieties is the general term we use for the different kinds of language.
Standard English is the official variety of English language, one associated with social prestige.
Other varieties are sometimes associated with social stigma.
“Standard English is frequently taken to be the English language, which inevitably leads to the
view that other varieties of English are some kind of deviation from the norm, the deviation being
due to laziness, ignorance or lack of intelligence […] the fact is, however, that Standard English is
only one variety among many, although a peculiarly important one. Linguistically speaking it
cannot be considered better than other varieties.” Peter Trudgill

In base a una visione conservatrice si associa a prestigio morale allo Standard English e pigrizia ed
ignoranza alle variazioni. Ma la lingua parlata Standard English non può essere considerata
migliore di altre, poiché non funziona meglio di African Engish o Indian English. Anzi si può
affermare che hanno pari dignità, giacché tutte tendono alla comunicazione.

Sociolinguistics and its task


• Sociolinguists have observed the “existence of patterned variation in language”
• The task of Sociolinguistics is therefore to provide socially relevant explanations for
regular patterns of variation in language use.
La sociolinguistica cerca di trovare i fattori che identificano la variabilità del messaggio:
 inconsciamente siamo in grado di distinguere la variabile linguistica dal momento
che stiamo vivendo;
 è necessario un contesto comunicativo nell’atto comunicativo altrimenti stride e
contrasta.
Il compito della sociolinguistica è di stabilire le regole della variabilità del linguaggio.

Language variability according to M.A.K. Halliday


Language user Language use
1. Time 1. Field or domain
2. Place 2. Tenor
3. Milieu 3. Mode (modality)
13
A far variare il linguaggio è chi lo utilizza e come lo utilizza. Il significato varia anche in base al
tempo e in varietà di termini geografici.
TIME: FIELD: What’s going on?
 atheist (=ateo) un tempo significava  si riferisce a ciò che sta accadendo;
persona empia (profanatore);  in cosa sono coinvolti i partecipanti;
 coach ai tempi di Shakespeare significava  simile all’argomento.
carrozza;
 la relazione è diacronica, in quanto la TENOR: Who is taking part?
lingua cambia.  relazioni che intercorrono tra chi vi partecipa;
 il tipo di ruolo linguistico che assumono nel dialogo;
PLACE:
 l’intero aggregato di relazioni.
 pioneer - [in US] il pioniere;
- [in IR] una persona che fa della
MODE: What is the channel of communication? /
crociata contro l’alcohol una role of language?
ragione di vita;  ruolo che i partecipanti assumono al linguaggio in
 stop while lights show una situazione;
(while=until in the Yorkshire dialect).  scritto o parlato;
 modalità retorica (modo di esprimere lo stesso
MILIEU
concetto);
 social environment and condition.
 presentazione del messaggio.

“Language is in large part what users have made of it” (Dell Hymes 1980)
“A particular situation makes us respond with an appropriate variety of language, and as we move
through the day, so the type of language we are using changes fairly instinctively with the situation
[…] Clearly there are appropriate linguistic ‘manners’ for the different types of situation in which
language is used.”
“As early as the age of five, children asked to play roles try to imitate the styles of speech of
different people”
David Crystal and Derek Davy, Investigating English Style (London: Logmans, 1969)
 Stylistics and sociolinguistics argue that there exist patterns which differentiate varieties of
language from each other; in other terms speakers choose forms of expression according to
the situation.
 Children are able to play roles by imitating the styles of speech of different people already
at the age of 4 years old.
La lingua è in buona misura ciò che ne hanno fatto coloro che la usano.
Il tipo di lingua che usiamo cambia istintivamente al variare delle situazioni.
Esistono linguistic manners appropriate alla tipologia di situazioni.
We take variations for granted.
Fin dall’età di 3 anni i bambini iniziano ad imitare e a riconoscere gli stili. Hanno la capacità di
conoscere dei ruoli e il linguaggio a cui ci si adatta.
LINGUISTCS PATTERNS: schemi che regolano la variabilità del linguaggio.

Language, Context and Text by M.A.K. Halliday and Hasan


“Variation in language goes with variation in the context of communication. […] A register is a
semantic concept. It can be defined as a configuration of meanings that are typically associated

14
with a particular configuration of field, mode and tenor. But since it is a configuration of meanings,
a register must also, of course, include the expressions, the lexico-grammatical and phonological
features, that typically accompany and realise these meanings”.
The difference between registers and dialects is that a register is a variety of language
according to use whereas a dialect is a variety of language according to the user.
Dialects can be either geographical or social varieties. In this latter case they are more frequently
called sociolects.
Il registro è una varietà del linguaggio che corrisponde a field, tenor e mode. A variare sono the
accents come espressioni retoriche, scelte lessicali, scelte grammaticali (profilo morfo-sintattico).
Il dialetto è una tipologia di linguaggio e la variazione è di natura geografica e sociale (c’è il
dialetto dei giovani).
SOCIOLET: dialetto sociale.

Bernard Spolsky
“A register is a variety of language most likely to be used in a specific situation and with particular
roles and statuses involved […] A register is marked by choices of vocabulary and other aspects of
style.” (Sociolinguistics, pag. 34)

JARGON: si aumentano termini tecnici di ambito specifico.

Esempio di TENOR
Il tenor determina distanza e la cortesia tra mittente e ricevente. L’eterografia della comunicazione
si occupa delle variazioni delle formule di cortesia in base alla situazione.
Esempio: «How’s your meal?»
1 «I find it exquisite! It is the best meal I have ever had».
2 «This is some meal. This is gorgeous».
3 «Nice».
4 «Mmm».
5 [silence] Il silenzio è linguistico e intriso di significati.

Mari D’agostino
I segni linguistici che gli individui si scambiano, si caratterizzano proprio per la presenza di un
enorme numero di oscillazioni e fluttuazioni, un’infinita quantità di variazioni, non solo per
ciò che attiene al versante fonico, ma anche per ciò che attiene al mondo dei significati. Uno dei
concetti chiave dell’intero volume è proprio la variabilità delle pratiche linguistiche (o meglio
sociolinguistiche), considerata come una delle caratteristiche essenziali di ogni lingua storico-
naturale.
Uno degli strumenti utilizzati dalla ricerca linguistica per analizzare queste molteplici forme di
diversità è la nozione di variabile. Le variabili (variables) linguistiche possono essere
considerate come insiemi di modi alternativi di dire la stessa cosa e ricorrono a tutti i livelli
dell’analisi (lessicale, fonologico, morfologico, sintattico). Le differenti realizzazioni di una
variabile da parte di individui diversi, o, anche, dello stesso individuo (nello stesso contesto e
in contesti diversi) sono chiamate varianti (variants).
Queste “maniere differenti di dire la stesa cosa” possono avere un grande significato sociale poiché,
a volte, l’utilizzazione dell’una o dell’altra variante è correlata con caratteristiche del parlante (l’età,
il sesso, il livello di istruzione, la sua area di provenienza) o, su un piano diverso, della situazione
comunicativa. Parliamo in questo caso di variabile sociolinguistica. Essa può definirsi come una
variabile linguistica che assume valori diversi in rapporto a fattori extralinguistici (come i dati
biografici e socioculturali dei parlanti, le reti sociali in cui è inserito oppure la situazione
comunicativa).

15
A language and a dialect do not differ in their internal structures. They are all codes ad as such they
cannot be said to be better or worse, either more or less functional. The distinction between a
language and a dialect is based on social criteria encompassing their social functions, the
communities using them and the social prestige or stigma they are associated to.

16
Dialect and slang
(Part 4)

Definizioni ironiche ma efficaci del rapporto tra lingua e dialetto


• “La lingua è un dialetto che ha fatto carriera”.
(il toscano è una lingua perché Manzoni lo ha preso come modello per il suo romanzo).
• “La lingua è un dialetto con l’esercito”.
(un dialetto può acquistare una sua “dignità” se diventa di stato).
• “Il dialetto è una lingua abbandonata dagli intellettuali”.
(definizione basata sul prestigio mancato).

La distinzione tra lingua e dialetto è determinata da fattori extra linguistici, come l’autonomia,
l’indipendenza e la politica, questi fattori rappresentano una lingua. Quindi le lingue non hanno un
valore empirico.
Ignazio Buttitta in “Lingua e dialettu” diceva in siciliano “il popolo diventa povero e
servo se gli si toglie la lingua”  “la chitarra del dialetto”
Differenza tra
Volgo: etimologia popolino
Vernacolo: etimologia verga=schiavi
Il “noi” è vissuto dalle persone in società che si riconoscono in zone dove la lingua è stata citata
come vessillo di autonomia.
In molti luoghi del globo molte lingue sono morte, tutto sta crescendo verso un’omologazione.
Per esempio in Italia le persone nate a partire dagli anni50 sono state educate in lingua italiana.
In "E se se copassimo?" Marco Paolini intellettuale, documentarista afferma che la lingua
non è fatta solo di ciò che si comunica, ma anche il riflesso del sentimento.
Il dialetto è sempre a contatto con la materialità delle cose, per esempio certe cose si possono si
possono raccontare solo in romagnolo.
Il dialetto può essere anche chiusura se ci si ostina a non provare a capire l’italiano, viene così
concepito come inclusivo verso l’interno ed esclusivo verso l’esterno.

“Perception is reality: Parisian and Provençal perceptions of regional varieties of French”, by


Lawrence Kuiper, Journal of Sociolinguistics.
Speakers from these two regions have strikingly similar views about the region where French is
most correct (Paris) and where it is most pleasant (Provence). Qualitative data from interviews and
perceptual mapping show that respondent perceptions about normative language have little basis in
empirical reality (i.e. language performance), but still may have a strong effect on speaker self-
image.
All languages constantly change over time and one of the reasons for this process of perpetual
development is the situation of contact. Contact among people of different genders and
backgrounds, belonging to different social classes, and in situation of migrations, people speaking
utterly different languages. This implies linguistic contamination.
Into the city there are possible situations of contact.

Language and social classes


• “In a capitalist society, ‘status’ not directly derived from Marxian ‘class’ must be
recognized, and this leads to differences in what Weber called ‘styles of life’, marked by
such things as ‘housing, dress, manner of speech, and occupation’” (Giddens 2001: 285).
• Pierre Bourdieu: cultural capital (such as the use of socially highly valued language forms
such as Standard English and Received Pronunciation) gives advantages over people

17
• According to some sociolinguists speech styles are ranked in the same way as classes, while
sociolinguists see social class differentiation from the perspective of a conflict model.
• The language is a mirror of identity.
• Marx said those who control the production are upper class, those who do not are prolet.
La lingua diventa un elemento costituente fondamentale dell’identità e del modo in cui ci
relazioniamo agli altri.
Speech styles appeared to be ranked in the same way of class.
Esiste una corrispondenza tra classi sociali e modo in cui si parlano.

Labov and his work in NY


• Labov observed that upwardly mobile and socially insecure lower-middle class people
tended to over-use socially desirable features in their linguistic practices which entailed
contact with presumably upper-classes people. This is called hyper-correction by Labov
who also argues that these people are not unaware of the social value associated to the
linguistic features they over-use.
Egli ha condotto uno studio linguistico a New York e ha individuato che gli schemi vanno pari
passo con le classi. La scelta della variante linguistica da parte della lower-middle class non avviene
in modo automatico ma per accomodation of audience, cioè se l’ascoltatore appartiene a classi alte
l’enunciatore parlerà in un determinato modo, questo viene denominato fenomeno di
ipercorrezione.

Accommodation and audience design


The process by which in conversations people speaking differing varieties of language tend to move
slightly closer together. A speaker can thus choose either to diverge or to converge, thus suiting
one’s style to one’s audience.
[In italiano il frequente utilizzo del congiuntivo è un marcatore sociale].

SLANG AND SOLIDARITY


• Language is of primary importance in establishing social identity. This is also the case
of slang, a special type of ‘intimate’ or in-group speech characterised by its rejection of
established norms and vitality.

18
• It is most frequently used to claim group membership, to stress its users’ sense of
belonging to a ‘group of peers’, while intentionally obtaining a certain extent of secrecy. It
is not an inclusive linguistic practice.
SLANG: il linguaggio utilizzato da intimi con un registro caratterizzato da una certa freschezza e
colore che viene utilizzato per la solidality, da intendere come affinità, cioè il senso di appartenenza
ad un gruppo sociale.
A differenza della lingua lo slang è caratterizzato da secrecy, ovvero è differenziato tra fasce della
popolazione.

Speech communities (comunità di parlanti)


Speech community = all the people who speak a single language and share a knowledge about a
repertoire of language varieties and the relative appropriate use patterns

Quando si cercano di caratterizzare le varianti di una speech community quello che conta è il
desiderio di essere associata con quello stereotipo. Ciò che conta non è la classe sociale ma la nostra
voglia di esserene associati a una determinata (stereotipo di appartenenza sociale).

Language is a mirror of our identity, the slang according to Peter Trudgill


• There may be any kind of writing (mail, forum and electronic format), but when we write
we adopt many more filters, it is more formal and is much more codified. Therefore is more
difficult read a text then listen to someone speaking.
• The slang is a social jargon, people feel that they are in a group. It is frequently with
syntactic and grammatical mistake. The slang use a lots of neologisms.
• The slang is part to a social group that is not attempting to reach a central position.
• Other people are discriminate.
• With the slang you may recognize the people identity. Your class can be recognized in the
use of your language according you use it.

Eliza Doolittle (from Shaw’s Pygmalion): when you are not so much what you say
as how you say it
“What are you sniggering at?”
“the new small talk you do it so well”
“if I was doing it proper what was you laughing at … have I said anything I oughtn’t?”
[…]
“Walk, not bloody likely! I’m going in a taxi.”
The accent of the lady is cocky and shocks the people around. She is trying to fake an accent.
Frightfully interesting: to change a human being into a different one creating a new speech.

Higgins’s principle
• "You have no idea how frightfully interesting it is to take a human being and change her
into a quite different human being by creating a new speech for her. It's filling up the
deepest gulf that separates class from class and soul from soul."

19
"Labhair cibé Gaeilge atá agat"= Speak whatever Irish you've got

Code switching (commutazione di codice)


In bilingual country are where you may come across immigrants (Switzerland, Canada) you have to
distinguish the mother tongue from others, there are very few country where they speak only a
language, and both language are affected from their contact.
[Si tende a creare “contaminazione” tra due lingue parlate nell’unico stato.
Una forma di interferenza è il PRESTITO da un’altra lingua. I prestiti non sono solo terminologici
ma riguardano anche strutture morfo-sintattiche o grammaticali.
(Es. in giamaicano si sono “mescolati” i termini tra inglese e lingue dell’Africa e anche le strutture
grammaticali).

Literary examples of code-switching (CS)

Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange and Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children


“There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie and Dim, Dim being really
dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening [. .
.] The Korova Milkbar was a milkplus mesto, and you may, O my brothers, have forgotten what
these mestos were like, things changing so skorry these days and everybody very quick to forget,

20
newspapers not being read much neither. Well, what they sold there was milk plus something else.
They had no license for selling liquor, but there was no law yet against prodding some of the new
veshches which they used to put into the old moloko, so you could peet it with vellocet or
synthemesc or drencrom or one or two other veshches which would give you a nice quiet
horrowshow fifteen minutes admiring Bog And All His Holy Angels And Saints in your left shoe
with lights bursting all over your mozg. or you could peet milk with knives in it, as we used to say,
and this would sharpen you up [. . .] and that was what we were peeting this evening I'm starting
off the story with.”
Nel romanzo Arancia Meccanica I drughi usano espressioni piene di parole inglesi unite a russe.

“it was my own foolish pride and vanity, Saleem baba, from which cause I did run from you,
although the job here is good, and you so much needing a looker after! But in a short time only I
was dying to return.” (Salman Rushdie 1982: 192-3)

Da un’edizione della Gazzetta dello Sport del 2008


“E i rumors danno i bianconeri su Pjanic, talento del Metz che piace alle big”.
(notizia letta in treno fra Mori e Rovereto)

• “Most ethnic groups believe that their language is the best medium for preserving and
expressing their traditions.” (B. Spolsky, Sociolinguistics, p. 57)
• “For the Irish […] a life conducted through the medium of English became itself a sort of
exile.” (Declan Kiberd, Inventing Ireland)
• Without a people’s native language even the places around them are silenced: “the whole
landscape a manuscript/ We had lost the skill to read,/ A part of our past disinherited.”
(John Montague, The Rough Field)

From Brian Freil, Translations (1981)


Indeed – he voiced some surprise that we did not speak his language. I explained that a few of us
did, on occasion – outside the parish of course – and then usually for the purposes of commerce, a
use to which his tongue seemed particularly suited – (shouts) and a slice of soda bread – and I went
on to propose that our own culture an the classical tongues made a happier conjugation – Doalty?
[…] Indeed – English, I suggested, couldn’t really express us.

DIGLOSSIA: specific case of code switching, the speakers know both language and they know
when to use one and when the other.
[Quando parlo con una persona uso il dialetto quando parlo con un’altra l’italiano].

All the people of the community speak both languages but there is a distinction between high
variety which have more prestige and low variety which is associate to stigma. Therefore the
diglossia is a specialization of function of two languages.
In colonial country often the high variety is for establishment, education, financial and commerce.

21
Ireland case
(Part 5)

Celtic Revival
In Irlanda la low variety viene “sbandierata”.
È consueto tenere parole inglesi negli ambiti:
• Economico
• Medico
• Tecnologico

In Italia scandalizza sentire election day o gossip al posto di pettegolezzi.


Perché in certi ambiti si ricorre alla lingua inglese più che in altri?
Evidentemente ci sono associazioni culturali con stereotipi dominanti quando la connotazione si
spaccia per denotazione (Es. “La carne fa diventare forti”  associare la carne solo a questo
aspetto è un travestimento di connotazioni)
Il cammino inverso a quello della semiotica è riconoscere situazioni che gettano radici in percorsi
storici ben determinati.

L’Irlanda è il tipico luogo di conflitto per la scelta di una lingua.


CELTIC REVIVAL: they try to restate the cultural tradition and language.

Language and ethic identity


Language has always been a flag. Language is a definition of an ethic group or ethnicity. Most ethic
groups think that their language is the best.
If you write in English there will be a wide audience.
Thought movement: the English language cannot have the shades.
"Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste"=Broken Irish is better than clever English

22
For the Irish a life conducting through English becomes a sort of exile.
When the Irish where deprived by their language they were cancelled.
[Spogliare di una lingua significa renderla inintelligibile e muta].

The wind that shakes the barley


Gli ingegneri della regina cambiano il nome a luoghi e persone, nei nomi giace l’essenza.
Inoltre correggono le mappe dell’Irlanda con nomi inglesi.

Doaltly: a man who can speak Latin and Greek but he do not want to speak English.
Nell’ambito della parish (=parrochhia) l’inglese non è tollerato ma solo nell’ambito del trade.

Irish history
• Nel 300 a.C. la presenza degli indoeuropei che poi diventeranno celti sarà egemonica.
• Nel 432 i monaci irlandesi hanno un ruolo importante, mantengono preservato e trascritto
documenti storici. Sant Patric porta il cristianesimo in Irlanda.
• Nel 795 arrivano i vichinghi che bruciano monasteri e si coprono di barbarie.
• In Irlanda non c’era un potere centrale ma erano divisi in clan.

• In 1169 an earl [figure nobili a capo dei clan] called English because he was losing a battle
and the latter remained stuck in there. They were able to rule in Dublin.
• The Tudors decided to do a settlement policy [=politica di insediamenti] and to send there
their faithful people who would represent the English crown. The English people settled
themselves in the wide large estates [=latifondi].
• Irish did not want the protestant religion and the English ruling in their island.
• In 1534 English took over the government and because of the blide (disease that affected
potatoes) many people who spoke Irish as their first language died in the coffin ship.

• Giraldo Cambrensis fu il primo a notare che gli inglesi mandati diventavano più irlandesi,
per l’osservatore era una non cultura, ma nel 1634 Geoffrey Keating confuta i suoi testi.
• Nel 1649 avviene la repressione di Oliver Cromwell che uccide parecchi irlandesi, le leggi
violavano i diritti naturali in quanto se si davano generalità in irlandesi si poteva essere
arrestati.

• Some argued this was an holocaust because in the rescue camp they helped you only if you
sold your lands. (1842-1850 during Victorian Age)

23
• In 1842 hedge school, which was informal schools for poorest people, were closed and
replaced by school where you must speak English. They were killing Irish considering it a
low variety.
• Then there was a Celtic revival, in 1848 the Gaelic League claimed the independency and
few people raised and struggled for a political agenda called home-rule. In this way the
scholars restudied the history stressing the Gaelic and the event of autonomy, furthermore
banned sports was re-established.

• Nel 1867 ci fu la Fenian Rising.


• Le azioni di rappresaglia, a sud il movimento era massiccio e formato da cattolici
repubblicani, invece a nord vi erano protestanti e monarchici.
• Nel 1919-20 si firma un trattato di pace che conferiva un parlamento agli irlandesi, il trattato
non viene accettato e si scatena la guerra civile.
• 1921: gli irlandesi chiesero di staccarsi dal Commonwealth.
• 1922-23: civil war.
• Nel 1937 si costituisce una costituzione repubblicana.
• Negli anni di piombo (1968-69) si hanno troubles and civil war.
• 1998: Belfast Agreement con il quale si afferma l’identità molteplice (si è liberi di sentirsi
come si vuole) e la pari dignità tra le lingue.

La tendenza semplificatoria
Vuole che da una parte si parli la lingua imperiale del colonizzatore (inglesi) e dall’altra quella del
nativo (irlandesi).
Inglese lingua: Irlandese lingua:
• dell’intelletto razionale; • dell’anima;
• dei commerci omodernità; • della storia;
• della poesia; • della filosofia;
Con gli statuti di Kilkenny sorgono due
• vista contro paganesimo e superstizioni;spiegazioni:
• che non si assoggetterà mai alla riforma protestante;
• gli inglesi vengono visti come coloro con una volontà forte e restia;
• monarchica. • repubblicana.
• il punto di vista dei britannici è che nei primi 200 anni l’isola è stata lasciata indipendente.
Era sotto la corona di Dublino e la zona del fiume Pale.

Telmon’s scheme
PARAMETER TYPE EXPAMPLE
Space Regional / spatial variety Galway Irish
Society Social variety Language of the youngsters
Function Contextual / Functional variety Informal register
Medium Medium variety Written / Spoken

Variability of Language
According to David Crystal the pure language do not exist, but should always seen from a
diachronic point of view.
The language is thought and used in different ways from how it is learnt.
• Why people communicate?
Communication is determined by the macro-system.

24
• How does language vary?
Speakers share knowledge, but the change are never carried out by a single person
individually but it is a social change. In fact firstly the neologism emerges in a person’s
mind but then enters in the society.
These are the conditions to account for the variability of norms that govern language.

Trying to class the language with parameter or factors affecting languages is important introduce the
concept of gender that is one of the crucial component.

GENDER: it is a multi-layer phenomenon; in the social division sex also affects language,
especially in some context.
[Il modo in cui il sesso della persona si relaziona alla lingua].
In some contexts the male language was considered higher than the female one.
The women are more attached to the norm, and in other hand the men use more the slang.
[Non ci si aspettano certi comportamenti dalle donne. (Es. chi bestemmia di più: uomini o donne?)
La lingua diventa strumento per attecchire stereotipi di genere].

Pidgins
David Cristal talks about pidgin which is different from the diglossia because regard the colonies.
PIDGINS: the mix of two varieties.
[pidginization: in casi di interizione si usa la lingua mista come in giamaica]
• Pidgin languages are used in important context, they are not inferior. Pidgins are used in
Sierra Leone and China.
• Pidgins are likely to evolve and become more standardized.
[Il pidgin non ha madrelingua perché nasce da una situazione di contatto].
CREOLE: is a pidgin with acquired native speakers.
Processi:
1. piggizzazione: prima fase in cui le lingue si uniscono;
2. preorizzazione: seconda fase in cui nascono bambini madrelingua e si standardizza.
[La standardizzazione è compresa nella preopizzazione e comprende grammatica e morfologia.
Questo non è il caso dell’Irlanda].

Irish English
It is the variety of English spoken in Ireland.
SUBSTRATUS VIEW: the influence of Gaelic on Irish English, the latter has structure of the
Gaelic.
(Es. 1 [IE] “There is two bars” non è una sgrammaticatura ma un riflesso della costruzione del
Gaelico)
(Es. 2 [IE] “I’m after studying this book” = I’ve studied this book [BE])
In Irlanda la risposta yes o no non è frequente perché non esistevano in gaelico.
La risposta positiva è espressa con indeed, sure.
Inoltre in Gaelico esisteva la seconda persona plurale differente dalla singolare e questo si riflette
nell’Irish English. (Es. “Youse have to study”)
COLONIAL LAG: fase in cui si dimostra la conservazione.

Dublin English
In Dublin you have the chance to speak Global English or Irish English. The city is divided in two
areas:
• north side: rough area, less rich, less educate
• south side: area of business and university were they speak English.

25
According to Raimond Hicky there is a Dublin English divided in:
• local vernacular: traditional and conservative;
• non-local vernacular: metropolitan and spoken by people who do not want to accept the
culture of Dublin;
• new fashionable: English spoken in multicultural environment.
In ogni caso si decide di parlare quella lingua a cui si associano determinati stereotipi.

References

Bibliography:
1. Language and Communication.
Michael A.K. Halliday, “Introduction” and “Language as Social Semiotic”, in Language as Social
Semiotic: The Social Interpretation of Language and Meaning (London: Arnold, 1978), pp. 1-5,
108-126.
These two articles are also collected in Paul Cobley, The Communication Theory Reader
(London/New York: Routledge, 1996).
Peter Fawcett, Translation and Language (Manchester: St Jerome, 1997) pp. 72-84.
2. Sociolinguistics.
Bernard Spolsky, Sociolinguistics (Oxford: OUP, 1998), pp. 3-65.
At least two (any) chapters from: Peter Trudgill, Sociolinguistics: An introduction to Language and
Society (London: Penguin, 2000).
3. World English.
David Crystal, “Why a Global language”, in English as a Global Language (Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1997), pp. 1-23.
4. Irish English (Choose one of the following):
Markku Filppula, The Grammar of Irish English. Language in Hibernian Style (London/New York:
Routledge, 1996), pp. 1-35.
Raymond Hickey, “Irish English in the Context of Previous Research” in Anne Barron and Klaus
Schneider, The Pragmatics of Irish English (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2005). This article can be
downloaded from the publisher’s website: http://www.degruyter.de/cont/fb/sk/detail.cfm?id=IS-
9783110184693-1

Siteography:
Patois Jamaican English:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m44Bd7gASg

26
Ignazio Buttitta, lingua e dialetto:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en6Yp6A7GGo
Marco Paolini:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag0D5A7mcPE
Trainspotting
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5afCwO8JxP4
Murals and Irish language
http://wpcontent.answers.com/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/91/Southie_Mural.JPG/425px-
Southie_Mural.JPG
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dnnY20Bu_hM/R3bcQBkLeWI/AAAAAAAAAsk/VMH8FSnUFk8/s40
0/460_0___30_0_0_0_0_0_mural2.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/79/Ireland's_Holocaust_mural_in_The_Falls,_B
elfast.jpg/350px-Ireland's_Holocaust_mural_in_The_Falls,_Belfast.jpg
Gomorra:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVK5GBiVeAM&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jG3jhXuct70&feature=PlayList&p=D4DFA96B87F7FAE6&pla
ynext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=15
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4jtSFYlbr4
http://www.repubblica.it/2009/02/speciale/sanremo/gallerie/pravo-nude-look/pravo-nude-
look/1.html
loach
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKCxwakIYMM
friel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Hj8_9JLMwA
crystal
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8qOC6PJGvA

27