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TAMPINES DISTRICT

PATROL LEADER TRAINING COURSE


PARTICIPANTS COURSE NOTES

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Table of Contents
1. PATROL SYSTEM, PIC AND PLC .......................................................................... 5
1.1. The Patrol System ............................................................................................. 5
1.2. Roles and Responsibilities ................................................................................ 6
1.2.1. Senior Patrol Leader ................................................................................... 6
1.2.2. Patrol Leader............................................................................................... 6
1.2.3. Assistant Patrol Leader ............................................................................... 6
1.2.4. Treasurer ..................................................................................................... 7
1.2.5. Scribe .......................................................................................................... 7
1.3. Patrol in Council (PIC) ..................................................................................... 8
1.3.1. Who is in the PIC? ...................................................................................... 8
1.3.2. What to discuss in a PIC? ........................................................................... 9
1.4. Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC) ....................................................................... 11
1.4.1. PLC’s Code............................................................................................... 11
1.4.2. Who belongs to the PLC? ......................................................................... 12
1.4.3. Decision-making ....................................................................................... 12
1.4.4. Agenda ...................................................................................................... 13
1.4.5. 3 Ws .......................................................................................................... 14

2. ROLES OF PLs & APLs .......................................................................................... 15


2.1. Your Role as a PL ........................................................................................... 16
2.2. Typical Characteristics of a Patrol Leader...................................................... 17
2.3. How to be a good Patrol leader....................................................................... 18
2.4. Duties and Responsibilities of a PL ................................................................ 19
2.5. The Patrol Leaders’ Creed .............................................................................. 20
2.6. Promoting good behaviour in the Scout Group .............................................. 21
2.6.1. PL’s and APL’s responsibilities: .............................................................. 21
2.7. Games in Scouting .......................................................................................... 22
2.8. In Summary..................................................................................................... 23

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3. Leadership................................................................................................................. 24
3.1. Personality of a Leader ................................................................................... 25
3.2. Different approach of leadership .................................................................... 26
3.3. Communication............................................................................................... 27
3.3.1. Confidence ................................................................................................ 27
3.3.2. Body Language ......................................................................................... 27
3.3.3. Feedback and empathy.............................................................................. 28
3.4. How Scouts can be trained.............................................................................. 29
3.4.1. Discovery Training ................................................................................... 30
3.5. Giving instructions.......................................................................................... 31
3.5.1. Preparation and introduction..................................................................... 31
3.5.2. Explains..................................................................................................... 31
3.5.3. Supervises practices .................................................................................. 31
3.5.4. Follows up................................................................................................. 32

4. Programme Planning................................................................................................. 33
4.1. Types of Programme....................................................................................... 33
4.2. Why do we plan? ............................................................................................ 34
4.3. Objectives ....................................................................................................... 34
4.4. Basic Rules in Planning .................................................................................. 34
4.5. The 5-step Method .......................................................................................... 36
4.6. Ingredients of a Good Unit Meeting ............................................................... 40
4.7. Evaluation ....................................................................................................... 50
4.8. Summary of planning...................................................................................... 50

5. Risk Management ..................................................................................................... 51

6. Camping Standards ................................................................................................... 62


6.1. How to Choose a Campsite............................................................................. 63
6.2. Camp Hygiene ................................................................................................ 64
6.3. Personal Hygiene ............................................................................................ 64

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6.4. Camp Organisation ......................................................................................... 64
6.4.1. Kitchen Organization ................................................................................ 64
6.4.2. Storage of Food......................................................................................... 65
6.4.3. Utensils and Garbage Disposal ................................................................. 65
6.4.4. Latrines ..................................................................................................... 65
6.5. The morning inspection .................................................................................. 66
6.5.1. Personal Cleanliness ................................................................................. 66
6.5.2. Layouts...................................................................................................... 66
6.5.3. Tents & surroundings................................................................................ 66
6.5.4. Kitchen...................................................................................................... 67
6.5.5. Utensils ..................................................................................................... 67
6.6. Standard Layout .............................................................................................. 68
6.7. Breaking Camp ............................................................................................... 80

7. Campfire Planning .................................................................................................... 81


7.1. How to organise a Scout Campfire ................................................................. 81
7.2. Campfire organizing checklist ........................................................................ 82
7.3. How to prepare a campfire programme .......................................................... 83
7.4. Balance & Variety........................................................................................... 83
7.5. The Programme............................................................................................... 84
7.6. Opening of Campfire ...................................................................................... 85
7.7. The Closing..................................................................................................... 85
7.8. What to Plan for? ............................................................................................ 87
7.9. Manpower Planning ........................................................................................ 87
7.10. Equipment Planning........................................................................................ 87
7.11. Dos & don’ts ................................................................................................... 88

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1. PATROL SYSTEM, PIC AND PLC

1.1. The Patrol System


The basic foundation of a Scout Unit is the patrol system. This is the difference
between us and the other uniform groups. The patrol system is unique in such that
the scouts are in charge of the running of the weekly unit meetings. Scouts are
encouraged to mould their own personal development in small groups.

The aim of the patrol system is to give as much responsibility to the scouts as
possible. It leads each of them to see that he/she has the sense of individual
responsibility for the good of the patrol & the unit. Through this system the scouts
have a considerable say in the progress of the unit.

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1.2. Roles and Responsibilities

1.2.1. Senior Patrol Leader


• To maintain the Unit’s discipline
• To assist the Adult Leader in training the Unit
• To pass down messages from the Adult Leader and execute them
• A role model for the Scouts

1.2.2. Patrol Leader


• To lead the Patrol
• Impart the knowledge to the members
• Maintain discipline in the Patrol
• Make sure that the Patrol and the Unit’s goal is adhered
• A Leader and as a father of the Patrol

1.2.3. Assistant Patrol Leader


• Assist closely to the Patrol Leader in training and organizing the
Patrol
• Act as a Patrol Leader, if the Patrol Leader is not present
• Keep important records like members progress records

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1.2.4. Treasurer
• Collect and record the Unit’s fund
• Keep and record of the income and expenses
• Produce a monthly financial report
• Produce a yearly balance sheet

NOTE: All items must be accounted for with a receipt. If there is none,
produce voucher of the items purchased. All records must be signed by the
treasurer and counter signed by the Senior Patrol Leader.

1.2.5. Scribe
• Record the minutes of all Patrol-in-Council
• Write an account of all Units’ meeting
• Mark attendance at all meetings

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1.3. Patrol in Council (PIC)
As we already know that the basic foundation of the scout movement is the patrol
system, thus the patrols have to suggest to the unit’s PLC on what are the
activities they want to do. Hence to get the suggestions from the members the PL
together with his APL needs to sit together with their patrol members & ask for
their views & opinions. This meeting is called the Patrol in Council (PIC).

1.3.1. Who is in the PIC?


The members of the PIC are actually the members of the patrol
themselves. But in order for them to have a sense of responsibility each
member in the patrol is assigned specific duties.

Example of a patrol hierarchy:


• Chairman - Patrol Leader
• Scribe – Any Member
• Quartermaster – Any member
• The rest of the patrol members will form the members of the PIC.

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1.3.2. What to discuss in a PIC?
Always begin the PIC with the 3W questions:
What Went Well?
What Went Wrong?

Do not forget the O.I.P.


O - Observation (3Ws).
I - Interpretation (explains the above).
P - Planning (what could be done to improve the activity/meeting).

Always get suggestions from the members on how to improve & what to
include in the future meetings/ activities.

It is often that you meet a fellow scout that says that they are the members
of the unit’s patrol leaders in council. But most of the time they do not
know the reason for its purpose. Your first job in the council is to find
what is required of the council & its members that include you. Each
member must only do the tasks that interest him the most & the one he
qualifies the most. Never be silent in the council as, “SILENCE IS THE
VIRTUE OF FOOLS & IS NOT GOLDEN IN THE LAW OF THE
COUNCIL”.

Do not worry in appearing stupid by asking questions & opinion as you


have everything to gain & nothing to lose.

Always make the meeting an open discussion with views & suggestion
coming from all sides. But be very careful never to drag the meeting too
long, as this will only lead the council members to be distracted. Always
stay focused on the set agenda.

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Always remember that the council must always be united & work together
as a team. And remember, “UNITED WE STAND, DIVIDED WE
FALL”.

For the Patrol Leader to understand the views of his members, a


discussion has to happen. This is done through the PIC.

Patrol members should discuss:


• Decisions from the last/previous PLC.
• Members’ point of view. Helps the PL in representing the Patrol in
a fair way.
• Plan patrol activities.

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1.4. Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC)

1.4.1. PLC’s Code


• As a member of the PLC you are responsible in the up keeping of
the code set:
• Set a good example in living the Scout Promise & Law.
• Uphold the honour & traditions of the council & the unit.
• Consider patrol / unit before self.
• Make a fair & just judgment.
• Abide to the decision of the majority.
• Assist the leaders in running the unit.
• Respects the secrecy of decisions made by the council (wherever
appropriate).

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1.4.2. Who belongs to the PLC?
• All Patrol Leaders
• All Assistants Patrol Leaders
• Quartermaster
• Scribe
• Advisor (any leader from the unit, no voting rights)
• Invited observers

1.4.3. Decision-making
All decisions made by the PLC are final once approved by the unit’s GSL/
SL. No one has the power to veto.

In coming to the decision the PLC must first look at all aspects & views. If
there is a dispute, the matter will be put to a vote or the council can come
to a consensus.

Voting Consensus
Voting is when the PLC decides by Consensus is when all views are collated
the show of hands on who is for the & a decision is made through the views
motion & who is against. This is an expressed. It is a longer process but it is
easy way but may lead to disparity, ensured that most members will be
as some member views may happy with the decisions made.
sometimes never be popular.

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1.4.4. Agenda
All meetings will not be fruitful if the members do not know what will be
discussed. Thus the agenda must be set earlier by the PLC Chairman.

If any member has anything to bring up during the meeting


(suggestions/views from PIC), he must have it in writing so it can be
discussed during the meeting. This way no views will be missed or
forgotten.

Guideline of an agenda setting:


• Open with a moment of silence.
• Confirmation of last minute of meeting.
• Review of the day’s programme/evaluate (3Ws).
• Review of PIC discussion.
• Plan next meeting.
• Any additional programme proposal.
• Any disciplinary lapses to be dealt with.
• Leader’s comments (ensure that the leaders do not run the
meeting).
• Summary of the meeting.
• Close with a moment of silence.

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1.4.5. 3 Ws
When evaluating always ask the 3W questions:

What Went Well? & What Went Wrong?


This method will assist you in looking at the day’s events and allows you
to see and make improvements for the better.

Take into consideration all matters. DO NOT “categorise” matters into


small and big ones. SOLVE all matters at hand.

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2. ROLES OF PLs & APLs
The basic foundation of a scout unit is the patrol system. This is what makes us different
from the other uniform groups.

The patrol system is a unique system where scouts are in charge of the running of the unit
weekly meetings. The system comprises of a group of 08 scouts being led by a Patrol
Leader (PL) whom is elected by them or has been appointed by the unit’s GSL.

An Assistant Patrol Leader (APL), whom is also elected by the patrol or appointed by the
GSL, assists the Patrol Leader.

The Patrol Leader and his assistant, forms the Patrol Leaders in Council (PLC) with the
other Patrol Leaders and their assistants. The PLC is the heartbeat and the backbone of
the Scout unit.

Thus, with such an important role to play in the unit, it is important for you to know your
role as a Patrol Leader.

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2.1. Your Role as a PL
The responsibility of the Patrol leader, as was discussed earlier, is a challenging
one. Your Scout Leader expects a great deal from you & will often give you the
free hand in running the weekly meetings & some activities.

The Patrol Leader is in charge of the welfare of the patrol, looking into the needs
of each of his/her patrol members. These needs can be scout related or others.
This is in line with the scout sign meaning the elder & stronger helping the
younger & weaker.

The Patrol Leader has to be able to command the respect of his/her members but
not through the regimentation but through the activities they do together. Through
such activities, the members learn to listen to their PL and this builds honour &
success for the patrol.

A patrol leader must be able to perform the duties himself / herself before he / she
can instruct his / her members to do it.

He / She also chairs the Patrol in Council (PIC) & channels all information
gathered in the PIC to the Patrol Leaders in Council (PLC) in which he / she and
his / her assistant are members of.

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2.2. Typical Characteristics of a Patrol Leader
• Must be at least a Scout Standard holder
• Must be responsible & trustworthy
• Responsible for the efficiency & smartness of his/her patrol members &
help in their progress.
• Train his/her patrol & set a high standards for himself/ herself
• Organises patrol activities
• Inspires patrol togetherness
• Assists the Scout Leader in the running of the unit

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2.3. How to be a good Patrol leader
Set a good example. Whatever you do your members will follow.

How can you do it?


• Show them that you can obey orders whether they are verbal, written or
printed
• Show them that trust & honour are of importance to you
• Always play & work hard together
• Your members will follow with very little persuasion if you remember that
you must LEAD not PUSH.

“I want you, Patrol Leaders to train your members, entirely on yourselves,


because it is possible for you to get hold of each & everyone in your patrol &
make a good scout out of him/her. It is of no use in having only one or two
brilliant scouts in the patrol leaving others to be just no good at all but you
should endeavour to make them all to be fairly good. The most important step to
this is yourself, because what you do, your members will follow. Show them that
you can obey orders whether they are given by word of mouth, printed or written,
that you can follow & carry them out whether your Scoutmaster is present or not.
You should also show them that you can earn proficiency badges, this they will
follow with little persuasion. But remember that you must LEAD, not PUSH”

- Lord Baden Powell, Scouting for Boys.

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2.4. Duties and Responsibilities of a PL
• A PL is a scout appointed by the Scout Leader to take charge of the patrol.
Sometimes, he/she is elected.

• His/her duty is to try and take hold and develop the qualities of each scout
in his/her patrol.

• He/she trains his/her Patrol through activities

• Leads his/her Patrol in everything and does not let his/her members do all
the things themselves

• Careful in choosing APL

• In training, the PL keeps himself/ herself ahead of his/her patrol

• Sets and maintains standards within the patrol

• Arranges and plans programmes

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2.5. The Patrol Leaders’ Creed

• “I shall develop the spirit of Scouting in my patrol by striving to make my


Scouts keen, loyal, happy and hardworking

• To keep myself and my patrol moving steadily up the Scout Ladder of


Progress

• To be an example to the members of my Patrol to the best of my ability by


keeping the Promise and Law

• To make my Patrol more useful

• To lead my patrol by standing up for it

• To plan thoroughly all the work assigned and be generous in


encouragement, give credit where due and be charitable.”

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2.6. Promoting good behaviour in the Scout Group
You as Patrol Leaders or APLs are the main link from which Leaders and all
Scouts in the Troop can establish good behaviour.
Discipline is a team effort!
Planning and editing of a Code of Conduct in the Troop. This may not necessarily
be very regimental, but unique to the Troop, and one where Scouts are proud to
identify with and to abide to.

2.6.1. PL’s and APL’s responsibilities:


• Running the Patrol and getting the members to be together.
• Obtain feedback through the Patrol Leaders’ Council.
• Convey message from the Leaders.
• Remind members from time to time about rules and making it a
part of them.

Simple rules have the most effect, where they are easily remembered.

Example:
- All Scouts should meet up in Troop meetings regularly.
- Scouts work as a team.
- No bullying.
- No making fun of others, as I do not like it too.
- No noise during sessions or prayers, give some respect!

The PL and APL’s role also includes being the eyes for the Leader and the Patrol
Leaders’ Council. They help to observe individuals, and foresee any problems in
the near future.

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2.7. Games in Scouting
Many times, the fun side of being the PL and APL is to be given the tasks of
organising games for the Troop or members.

Games are more enjoyable and is often much more effective in teaching Scouts
rather than through classroom sessions. Here are some pointers for you if you are
preparing games:

Variety - don’t overdo old favourites, they can eventually become boring
Equipment - Ensure all equipment are ready and in good condition before
commencement of games. This will ensure safety too.
Rules - Make them simple and clear.
Fairness - Prevent reciprocal actions by making the game a fair and fun one.
Trial - Always have a trial for new games. It will ensure understanding and
prevent unhappy situations.
Knockouts - Involve as many people as possible, prevent knockout games.
Competition - Good balance of competition will promote learning and
encourage participation.
Time - Do not over play a game. You may want to stop while it is still being
enjoyed.
Troop game box/ book - You may suggest a book to be maintained by the troop
for games, along with a box where all the equipment is kept. This will facilitate
your incoming orientation or camping anytime by insertion of a game.

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2.8. In Summary
• A Patrol Leader should:
• Assist the Scout Leader(s).
• Be an active member of the Patrol Leaders’ Council.
• Encourage Patrol Activities and Meetings.
• Train himself/ herself.
• Do his/her best to live up to the Promise & Law.
• Take care of the welfare of his/her members.
• Command respect; thru’ activities done together (NOT by regimentation).
• Be able to do the task before delegating to others.
• Respect his/her members and be at best discipline at all times.

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3. Leadership
All of us in some ways or at some times are leaders. Some assume the post of a leader of
a club, uniform group or class. But others appear as leaders in a certain situation or
moment. Whether you like it or not, it is human nature to lead & to follow. One must
remember not to just be a leader, but a good & fair one.

“Leadership is the knack or art or skill or simple ability in getting others to follow you &
do it willingly the things you want them to do”

Differences between Leaders & Commanders

In scouting there is no room for commanders. A commander can only be effective if he is


given some legal power of punishment & sanctions. The kind of leaders that we would
like to nurture through scouting must be able to motivate, inspire, encourage & even
persuade his followers. He must command respect & gain the confidence of the people he
leads.

A leader acts to help a group to attain its objectives with the maximum applications of its
capabilities. He does not always have to stand behind the group to push & prod; instead
he places himself before the group at times as he facilitates their progress & inspires them
to accomplish the group’s goal.

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3.1. Personality of a Leader
What makes a good leader? Try listing out before looking at answers below.

• Builds trust.
• Talks & expresses his/her views well.
• Able to build-up confidence & motivates.
• Does not discourage
• Cares for his/her members
• Lets others take the credit (humble)
• Respect the feelings of others (considerate)
• Asks questions & is open to new ideas
• Honest, disciplined, mature, courageous
• Has a wide vision- able to adapt to different situations
• Has a sensible sense of humour
• Sets good examples
• Sets a limit, knowing when to say NO
• Establishes good communication with his/her members
• Able to give feedback to his/her superiors about his/her subordinates
• Problem solving – Identify & analyse the problem
• Setting goals & objectives
• Searching for solutions
• Plans & evaluates
• Able to delegate & ensuring the completion of tasks by his/her members

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3.2. Different approach of leadership
There are a few approaches of leadership namely:

Authoritarian- commanding, one way traffic approach


This method is where the leaders just give a ‘one way’ traffic situation. All orders
come from him & do not listen to his/her subordinates at all. This is not an
acceptable way.

Lassies-faire – This is a method whereby all tasks are given to the members by
the leader without any checking. All the members can highlight their views but
there will be more time taken in discussion than the execution of task. A very
slow and ineffective approach

Democratic – This method is where all the decision making of the group will be
put to a vote first. Once the decision is made, the leader shall impose it & ensure
that all the members abide to the decision. A very suitable approach

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3.3. Communication
As an effective leader, it is necessary to have a clear and open method of
instructions to enhance his/ her leadership. Different ways of communication will
have a different impact on the followers in the group.

3.3.1. Confidence
The amount of confidence that a leader has determines the unity and
strength of the group as a whole. A person with charisma and knows what
is going on will assure followers in times of hardship and motivate them to
push on. A confident leader does not mean he/ she is macho and orders
without questions. Instead, the leader cares and may not have to speak in a
demanding way. However, too much confidence without knowledge and
empathy will cause unpleasant situations, and to keep in mind, there is
only a very thin line between being confident, and an authoritarian!

3.3.2. Body Language


Over 90% of things being received are from the body language. It is a 2-
way communication bridge for the patrol. Through body language, leaders
can identify different emotional stages, and physical conditions that the
followers are in. For followers, there will be more impact on the
instructions or decisions made by the leader. One of the most effective
body language is “Lead By Doing”. The leader not only supervises, but
goes through the training stages with followers, showing them that all can
be done.

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3.3.3. Feedback and empathy
It is often good if the leader is open to feedback, ideas and criticism. Other
than the communication channel, the followers should feel that the leader
is always as happy to accept feedback/ criticism as accepting contributions
from the group. At the same time, communication with followers does not
only include tasks, but also emotions and problems that human beings
encounter at points of life. If possible, helping the troubled mind to sort
out pros and cons is good. If not applicable, it is always good to lend them
a listening ear and a shoulder to lean on. However, as far as possible,
avoid biased or personal comments/ preferences.

Now with technology getting so advanced, we are no longer hindered by


poor means to communicate. SMS, the internet, email and the fact that a
majority of individuals now each own a mobile phone, shows that there
are many ways a leader can communicate with his/ her members
effectively.

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3.4. How Scouts can be trained
Every Scout is different, and has his/her own personality, talents, likes and
dislikes, enthusiasms and background experiences.

Scouts learn best when they have a personal desire to do so, and the want for their
patrol to be successful in all that they do.

To have a conducive environment for learning, their opinions, ideas, experiences


and questions have to be taken seriously. Physical factors such as no distractions,
letting each and every Scout see what is going on is important. However, these
vary from lesson to lesson. Camping lessons should be held outdoors, whereas
Promise and Law sessions can be indoors or under shelters.

It is important to know all fellow Scouts in the Patrol, and if possible, know the
Unit well.

A useful technique is to check back with them in every step that is being taught.
For many younger Scouts, the desire for recognition is desired, and not forgetting
their sense of achievement by praising them.

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3.4.1. Discovery Training
It involves LEARNING BY EXPERIENCE, finding out for them,
reporting on what they have found out and drawing conclusions with
proper guidance.

As a Patrol Leader, remember:

Scouts enjoy finding out things and sharing with fellow Scouts.
Scouts remember things better when they discover them, than shown.
The hunt for information often encourages them to spur on to find out
more, and self-motivation is achieved through personal sense of
achievement.

Short projects are good ways to know your Patrol Leaders and members of
the Patrol. In a meeting, suggest to your Leader to have simple initiative
games or tasks that require the Patrol to come together.

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3.5. Giving instructions
A good instructor should be enthusiastic, disciplined and competent about their
ability in the subject(s) they are conducting.

A good instructor will learn to take as much trouble as they did with the first
presentation as they are doing for the thousandth time. This is to ensure smooth
flow in the instruction, and minimise the probability of having errors.

3.5.1. Preparation and introduction


• Arousal of interest in the subject, establishing what is already
known.
• Selection of an appropriate training method.
• Preparing materials.
• Ensuring the environment is right.
• Rehearse!

3.5.2. Explains
• Telling. 3Ts – Tell them what will be done, tell them what it is
about, and tell them what was being taught.
• Showing and demonstrations.
• Explaining in the correct level of understanding.
• Emphasising the important points.
• Answer questions.

3.5.3. Supervises practices


• First leading the activity;
• Next, letting them do it together;
• Finally let them do it on their own.

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3.5.4. Follows up
• Correcting errors
• Re-instruct if necessary
• Planning for any future progression

Some note taking hints for individuals


Do not miss out on what the trainer is saying, because note taking can be
done at appropriate breaks, or after the session, where clarification can be
easily made.
• Start a new page for every new topic.
• Use a shortened style of writing.
• Leave space for discussion points.
• Do not use rough paper, or rough notes.
• Use large labelled diagrams.
• Read and refer back from time to time.

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4. Programme Planning

“No one plans to fail, they only fail to plan!”

The scout motto calls us to ‘Be Prepared’. Hence when it comes to activities, planning is
essential for the success of the event. Without good planning the event will become
boring & thus will lead to the decrease in interest & membership.

4.1. Types of Programme


There are various types of programmes. Let’s take a look at the various
programmes that you and your PLC members may be undertaking:

• Unit Programmes
• HQ Activities
• Area Activities
• District Activities
• School Activities

Most units’ leave the short term planning to the PLC & the long term planning is
left to the responsibility of the unit leaders.

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4.2. Why do we plan?
Before doing anything, you must first decide on how you plan for the task to be
done. The plan should make you achieve the objectives that were set earlier. No
matter how gifted you are, all efforts made will be wasted if there’s no planning &
poor allocation of tasks. More can be achieved with proper planning, than being
optimistic & leaving everything to chance.

4.3. Objectives
Before you begin to plan always set the objectives to be met. For example the
training camp was organised in order for the scouts to achieve their respective
standard badges.

4.4. Basic Rules in Planning


Now, in most things we do, there are rules and regulation that we live have to
abide by. Same goes with planning. You wouldn’t want your planning to be
disrupted. So observe them!

• Programme discussed by the unit and decided by the PLC.


• Youth Programme should form part of the planning.
• Plan based on quarter year.
• Meet early in the year to plan a skeletal programme for the year.
• Have a SUPER ACTIVITY to top the year of activities.
• Meeting should, whenever possible, have little formality to allow
creativity.
• Design your programme to suit religious concerns.
• Make use of calendars of the HQ, area, district and school in your
planning.
• Allow opportunities for progress in the planning.
• Plan balance of indoor and outdoor.

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• When planning always include a contingency (back-up) plan.
• Remember to record everything that was discussed & allocate the duties
evenly.
• Always EVALUATE

‘What we hear, we forget; what we see, we remember; what we do, we know’

A final note, we can have the most excellent plan but without good execution of
the plan it will be a wasted effort & the most crucial of all planning is the
evaluation of the plan at the end of it all

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A simpler view of planning for you:

Should you observe the diagram, you would notice that Evaluation plays an important
role. You should always evaluate your planning not only at the end but as a constant
process in each part of your planning. This helps to fine tune your planning and straighten
any possible wrinkles along way.

4.5. The 5-step Method

The method above will help you with the start-up you need. Look at it as a start-up toolkit
for your PLC

Step 1: State Objective


Identify and analyze task based on overall target set by unit
Break into Aim (What to achieve) and Objective (How to define that you have achieve)

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Step 2: Collect Ideas
Have a good selection of ideas so that able to choose the best possible

Try the following idea generating headings:


• Things done before
• New Ideas to try
• Major Projects
• Scout Test Scheme
• Other events

Step 3: Plan the Programme


• Have programme ideas ready
• Constant review to check if it
• Meets objective
• Good Variety
• Affordable
• Enough time for preparation

Upon satisfying the above, proceed with detailed planning. These should include:
• Venue booking
• Transport booking
• Food arrangement
• Equipment requirement
• Manpower allocation
• Safety issues
• Detailed day programme
• Instructions for participants
• Programme budget

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Step 4: Take Action
Ensure activity has an organizer
Putting the plan into implementation (remember the diagram?)
Ensure all executed well
Exercise flexibility in dealing with matters

Step 5: Evaluate
Most important part
Way to monitor and improve
Not necessarily done at the end of activity, as and when necessary
Feedback regarding activity

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“P.E.R.S.P.E.X.”
(the planning code words)

P– Personal fitness (when planning always looks into the fitness of the group)
You cannot expect to plan for a mountain climbing expedition when half of the group is
not fit to climb the mountain

E– Equipment (always plan to bring sufficient equipment)

R- Risks (always include the amount of risks involved)

S- Safety rules (always abide by the safety rules & regulation set by the Association /
school or organisation. Get consent from parents (Consent forms)

P- Planning (always have a good plan at hand)

E- Emergencies (always be ready for any emergencies such as injuries. Have a First
Aid Kit available.

X- Unexpected (always expect the unexpected, have a contingency plan)

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4.6. Ingredients of a Good Unit Meeting

A Balance of Challenge and Achievement


Something new discovered and learned, some obvious progress in the Proficiency Badge
work for the scouts

Physical Activity
Games preferably outdoors, trails to follow, treasure hunts, exciting projects

Imagination
Play acting games

Sense Training
Often by quiet games and activities

Inspiration
Yarns, campfires, prayers

Good Order
Obvious discipline in games, activities and ceremonies.

Good Fun
Laughter and good humour

Variation
To counter boredom

Surprise
Items as such should be included now and then

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Competition
Act as a stimulus when held from time to time.

Purposeful
Skills in pioneering, orienteering and camp craft

Full Participation
Check that all adult leaders and scouts have a part to play

Balanced
Ensure that the weekly meeting is well balanced and has variation

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Hints on planning!
• Ensure that the activities planned are in line with the scouts’ strategy of learning
by doing.
• Ensure that all participants had parental consent (Consent forms).
• Ensure to get the approval from relevant authorities.
• If a specific person is required please inform him well in advance.
• Active activities are better than passive.
• Be a participant than a spectator.
• Go outdoors than indoor.
• Plan unusual than the norm.
• Plan surprises instead of the usual.
• Be mysterious about the plan; don’t give too much away.
• Use reality instead of substitute.
• Do not forget to evaluate!

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4.7. Evaluation
• All good planning will end with an evaluation (post-mortem)
• It is good to evaluate to find out what went well, what has contributed to
the success of the meeting and how we can build on them
• If the meeting is a failure, be courageous and admit it and find out what
had gone wrong.

What to ask in the evaluation?


• What Went Well?
• What Went Wrong?
• Was it fun? Why?
• Did we learn anything? What?
• Was everyone involved? Why?
• Was it successful? Why?
• How was the discipline? Any action taken?
• Was there anything needed to be improved?

4.8. Summary of planning


P.E.E.
P-lanning
E-xecution
E-valuation

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5. Risk Management
Are we taking risks?

In any activity we do, there are bound to be risks. From as simple as planning a
pioneering a pioneering project to climbing Mount Ophir, there are risk that we take
while conducting these activities.

It is very important we identify the risks involved and take the necessary precautions to
limit or reduce the risk factors. It helps in identifying less risky alternatives.

This is what known as RAMS (Risk Assessment Management System).

RAMS (Risk Assessment Management System)


Simple to operate.
Ensure Safety.
Identify how and why activities should be run in certain ways.

In this system, the risks are evaluated prior to the activity so that decisions are made to
reduce the risks to the minimal and ensuring safety.

There are five steps to system


Step 1: Hazard Identification.
Step 2: Risk Assessment.
Step 3: Risk Control Options.
Step 4: Implementation of Control Measures.
Step 5: Effective Supervision.

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Step 1: Hazard Identification
Examine for potential sources of danger.
Assess and control the risk factor.
May be in the form of surrounding or participants.
Organizer to be vigilant as hazards may come up from time to time.

Step 2: Risk Assessment


Assess the level of risks.
Determine the potential impact of hazard on the activity.
Best accomplished through ‘What if’ question.

Step 3: Risk Control Options


Identify as many possible ways to control the risks.
Selecting the most appropriate one according to situation.
Process of eliminating and reducing risks.
Assess should level of risks is acceptable.
Accepts risk ONLY if the benefits outweighs the cost.

Step 4: Implementation of Control Measures


Implementing the control measure identified in step 3.
May need to integrate specific control measures into the plans.

Step 5: Effective Supervision


Ensuring the effectiveness of the risk control.
Being vigilant at all times.

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6. Camping Standards
Camping standards is a level of proficiency as regards to personal & general camping
hygiene and organisation of all matters in the camp, which contributes to the comfort of
the camp

Ensuring good camping standards, helps develop discipline & self-reliance as well as a
sense of pride among the group.

Both Scouts & leaders are responsible in maintaining the standards of the camp.

The most frequently asked question is; what is the standard to expect?

This varies between unit-to-unit looking into consideration of the experience of the scouts
& their leaders.

Pre-camp training & competitions are a good method of instilling standards. A troop
camp provides opportunities for scouts to put into practice, skills learnt during troop
meetings and is a good measurement of the standard achieved.

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6.1. How to Choose a Campsite
In choosing a campsite, several factors must be taken into consideration. At the
campsite, beware of:
• Long & tall grass – snakes make lie there
• Low-lying grounds e.g. Near rivers – floods may occur
• Ant hills and wasp/ bee nests
• In a valley (flash floods may occur)
• Ground with lots of stones and rocks – dangerous and uncomfortable.
• Tall overhanging trees – branches make break and crash down on the tent
or lighting may strike the tree.

Drainage is important so that water logging or flooding will not occur in the event
of rain. Therefore, choosing the type of soil is also important. It also determines
how securely the pegs can be driven into the ground.

Sandy soil: drains well but if site is exposed, may need longer pegs
Gravel: drains well and hold pegs well
Loam: reasonably good drainage, hold pegs well
Clay: liable to be water logged, do not hold pegs well
Peat: is absorbent, do not hold pegs well

The site should also have a safe drinking water in supply. Tap water is ideal but
check if it is potable and from the mains. Water from lakes, rivers and wells
should be deemed unsafe to drink.

If in doubt boil the water first. The use of purifying tablets is also recommended.

Make sure also that your camping area is accessible by means of transportation.
This is in case of an emergency, it is easier to transport out. There should also be
cover from wind. Look out for a belt of trees or in a rise in grounds to counter the
wind.

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6.2. Camp Hygiene
• Do not throw broken bottles, opened cans and other unwanted articles in
the bushes or anywhere around the campsite. They should be collected and
dumped into a hole or a container and emptied into bins at a central refuse
collection area.

• Waste food and litter will attract flies and create a stench throughout the
whole campsite

• Food containers must be washed clean, free from oil and excess food.

6.3. Personal Hygiene


• Daily relief of bowels to prevent constipation
• At least a bath at the end of the day especially after vigorous activities
• A change of clothing
• Air all clothing, wet clothing must be hung out to dry
• Daily change of underwear
• Cut and clean your nails
• Clean hands before meals
• Have sufficient sleep
• No walking around barefoot in camp
• Use mosquito coils or repellents with discretion

6.4. Camp Organisation

6.4.1. Kitchen Organization


• Locate away from tent. Determine wind direction
• Kept dry at all times
• Utensils to be kept properly
• No washing in the kitchen area. Have a separate area for that

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• No washing of utensils in bathing area

6.4.2. Storage of Food


• All food should be consumed or kept dry and properly stored
• Rustproof containers should be used to store food.
• Keep off the ground, free from animals and insects
• Canned milk should be kept cool. Place in a dish of cold water
covered with a wet muslin cloth
• Keep away from the sun
• Aeration keeps food fresh

6.4.3. Utensils and Garbage Disposal


• Clean immediately after use
• Boil water to clean utensils
• Dry all equipment before storing
• Wet and dry pits for garbage
• Burn all garbage daily (if necessary)
• Crush all cans for easier disposal and lower accident risk
• Have a sufficient number of plastic bags for garbage disposal

6.4.4. Latrines
• Located away from living and cooking area
• Shelter must be build to protect from public view
• Dig a trench 30cm wide, 60cm deep and 90cm long. Leave top soil
beside
• Use top soil to cover your shit when you are done
• Wash hands after use.
• Disinfect regularly for hygiene purposes.

“A CLEAN CAMP IS A GOOD CAMP”

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6.5. The morning inspection
It is a good method of gauging camping standard. There is no hard & fast rule in
conducting this exercise.

Basically in a normal scout activity camp, there are five areas assessed in the
morning inspection:

6.5.1. Personal Cleanliness


It is a must that this is maintained. This reduces the chances of catching
any illnesses. Spending time in the sick bay is the last thing a participant
wants to do in a camp.

6.5.2. Layouts
Belongings are to be exposed to the sun for airing. This prevents the tents
from becoming too stuffy & smelly. It is important that wet or damp
clothing are hanged on the clotheslines & not mixed with other dry and
clean ones.

Keep certain items such as soaps & batteries away from direct sunlight

6.5.3. Tents & surroundings


Proper pitching & maintaining of tents must be observed. It is an eyesore
to see wet clothing hung on the roof & guy-lines of the tents especially on
a scout’s tent.

A littered surrounding is an open invitation to insects & pests

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6.5.4. Kitchen
Ensure that there is proper storage of the food items & all utensils must be
cleaned & free from oil stains. Standard & hygiene must be maintained
here as any slips can contribute to food poisoning commonly caused by
mixing food items & detergents.

6.5.5. Utensils
These must be properly washed and free from oil. It should always be
properly stored and if possible, make a camp gadget to hold these in place.

Points to Note:
• Tent brailing should be rolled up and tied with a slip-reef knot

• Pyjamas, etc, towels, blankets and sleeping bags should be hanging


out to air

• All kits (except as above) should be arranged uniformly according


to Patrol ideas on the personal groundsheets or floorboards, in a
line, outside the tents, with the Boys behind their own belongings

• Shoes should be in front of the groundsheet, never on the


groundsheet itself. Toilets materials should be in the bathroom of
the Patrol. All batteries must be out of the torchlight

• The Patrol Leader should accompany the Scouter as he inspects


and whichever scout is in charge of the kitchen or store tent should
go with the inspecting Scouter when he reaches there

• The Scouter, on arrival waits for the Patrol Leader to call his Patrol
to the ‘Alert’ and he salutes the Scouter.

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• After inspection and commenting (privately or openly) to the
Patrol Leader, the Scouter salutes the Patrol Leader (who returns
it) goes his way and the Patrol Leader will bring the Patrol to ‘At
Ease’ and then ‘Break Off’.

• On a very wet morning, inspection will no doubt be of a somewhat


lazy nature, but should never be omitted.

6.6. Standard Layout


Inspection is an important aspect of a scout camp. It provides you a chance for
you to air your belongings so as to prevent them from smelling & rusting. It is
also an avenue for the leaders to check what items you brought with you.

The layout follows a simple rule and is a rather common sense format.
• Whatever is worn on the head is to be placed at the top of the layout,
followed by the rest of your garments. Eg. Bag, Cap, T-shirt.…. socks

• Shoes to be placed on the shoe rack, if not, at the bottom of your layout.

• Stationery, torchlight, camera, knife on the right side. Batteries (removed


from appliances) are to be placed away from the sun.

• Utensils, toiletries, tools, medicine, matches & food items should be


placed in the kitchen shed

• Wet clothing on the clothesline

• No water should be in the kitchen shed

• All equipment in the kitchen shed must cleaned & dry

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• Campsite should be neat, tidy & presentable at ALL times

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6.7. Breaking Camp
Start to break camp the day before campers are scheduled to leave. There are
many things that can do in advance to ensure a speedy getaway. Such as cleaning
pots and pans no longer needed, packing away equipment and taking down some
of the gadgets.

One thing that must do is to settle all bills with local trade people if provisions
have been purchased from them. Also, make the final check on transport back to
town.

The order of breaking camp may follow this plan:


• Clean all kitchen gear and pack.
• Pack all personal equipment and belongings.
• Take down all kitchen arrangements, including fire-places; fill in wet and
dry pits.
• Clean out washing place, fill in latrine, and clean campfire circle.
• Take down all tents and pack them up.
• Clean all tent sites, filling in all ditches and tent holes.
• Check list of all equipment and supplies to make sure that everything is
there.
• Gather around the flagpole for a short closing ceremony while the flags
are
• Lowered slowly, officially closing camp. Take down flagpole and put it
away.

On breaking camp, leave behind


“A CAMPSITE IN BETTER SHAPE THAN YOU FOUND IT”

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7. Campfire Planning
Presently the very mention of ‘campfire’ all will associate it to scouting. Although others
have copied it, it is still recognised that scouts generally organise a better campfire.

Campfires originate from the Africans & the Red Indians. After a day’s hunting, the tribe
would celebrate with a feast, singing songs and offering prayers to the gods. It is also
known that during such events, the elders would share his wisdom with the young ones.

The magic circle (campfire) was one of the activities organised by Lord Baden Powell
during the Brownsea Island Camp, the first scout camp.

The reputation of the scout campfire is dwindling fast as more & more campfires are
running away from the scouting traditions.

7.1. How to organise a Scout Campfire


Before organising a campfire you must first ask, does it have a purpose?

The purpose may vary from unit to unit, person to person. You may want to
organise the campfire to commemorate your unit’s anniversary, National Day
celebrations, etc.

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7.2. Campfire organizing checklist

List of Items Check Notes


Do I have a purpose What?
Do I want a theme -If do, inform guests to follow the chosen theme
Date
Time
Venue
Approval School, Town Council, Police, etc
Invitation: Guest of Honour Who (must he give a speech, if yes do inform in
Guest (Parents) advance)
Other Units/Uniform groups Invite parents of the members of your unit
especially if there is an award presentation.
Send Invitation early & monitor response closely
Number of guest/ Have a confirmed list latest 01 day before the event
Participants attending
Committee members Try not to use only the PLC members

Equipment Planning What equipment do you need


Catering Not necessary but a good touch. Only light
refreshments please
Plan a budget (if necessary) Stick to the budget & do not over-spend!!!

Back up plan (must have one) Wet weather programme

IMPORTANT: Time and again we forget to take note of this and end up spoiling
the whole event. Always, always have a wet weather programme.

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7.3. How to prepare a campfire programme
• You are going to construct your programme for a particular campfire and
be it for anything, the method and general principles involved are still the
same.

• Ask yourself first; what is the theme? How long should it last? Most
standard campfires should not exceed 90 minutes. You will start to lose
the audience’s attention after that length of time.

• All experienced Campfire Leaders know that campfires have moods. In


planning your programme try to visualise accordingly but more
importantly, try to assess early on in the campfire, its mood and change
your programme to suit it. Keep in touch with the mood or you’re heading
for FAILURE!

7.4. Balance & Variety


Arrange the following in an orderly pattern:
• National/Folk/ Scout songs
• Yells
• Round or Part songs
• Items & Sketches
• Yarns
• Duty to God

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7.5. The Programme
Programme planning is something you have heard about in connection with unit
meetings. At a campfire, it is very important too.

A campfire programme should be like a curve graph that starts from the bottom,
gradually goes up, hits the highest point and then comes back down. Here’s how:

• The campfire should have a good cheerful start, so choose a well-known,


cheerful and exciting song for this, to enable everyone to join in
immediately and enjoy himself. Eg. Campfire’s Burning, The More We
Get Together etc.

• You must let the mood get more and more exciting, with faster and more
engaging songs. You can also have items, dances and yells in between,
until about ¾ of the way through the campfire. Eg. Father Abraham,
Thousand Legged Worm, Ginglee Nona, Onion Yell, Flea Fly Mosquito
etc.

• Now it’s time to slowly quieten things down leading towards the end. It
would be wrong to have noisy lively chorus only a few minutes before you
want to give the ending speech, yarn or prayer. Eg. Edelweiss, By the
Blazing Council Firelight, Five Hundred Miles etc.

• If you have a guest speaker to give a yarn, then this quieter period is the
best; when the boys have worked off their extra energy and excitement
and are quiet and ready to listen

A good campfire can be a first class scouting experience if handled in the right
way.

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7.6. Opening of Campfire
• There are many ways to open the campfire. Perhaps one torch bearer could
approach from the north, one from south and so on. It’s up to your
creativity.

• Always remember to light the fire first before asking the Guest of Honour
to declare the campfire open. It is always nice for the Guest of Honour to
enter the campfire circle with a big fire to welcome him/ her.

• Always brief you Guest of Honour on how to open the campfire if he/ she
has never done so before.

• After the opening ceremony, everyone sits down. It is not necessary to


stand up when a song is sung unless the campfire leader says so. Only
those who are actually performing need to stand up as for example when a
patrol gets up to do a sketch or sing a song together.

7.7. The Closing


• The last fifteen minutes should consist of quieter songs to allow the boys
to settle down. Remember, no more feeding of the fire. The end of the
campfire should be calm, controlled and peaceful. Remind the scouts of
the presence of the Almighty.

• If you may have any notices, give them out about five minutes before the
end. No one no matter what, should interrupt the peaceful ending of a
campfire with announcements or even votes of thanks. If you have a guest
who wishes to speak, let him speak before you make the announcements.

• Finally end the campfire with one or two quieter songs like “Taps” or
“Auld Lang Syne”.

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7.8. What to Plan for?
• Campfire Programme
• Campfire Songs
• Sketches
• Yarn
• Guest lists / invitations
• Budgets
• Approval
• Souvenirs
• Wet weather programme

7.9. Manpower Planning


• Reception / ushers
• Campfire Leader
• Torch bearer
• Song-leaders
• Fire-keepers
• Physical arrangements I/C
• Safety/ First Aid/ Security

7.10. Equipment Planning


• Firewood (must be soaked in kerosene & dried in advance)
• Gunny sack (for torch & base of the fire)
• Kerosene
• *NOTE: “Petrol Bombs” are not recommended as they are dangerous
unless you have experience in handling them
• Torches
• Rags
• Matches
• Garbage bags

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• Zinc sheets
• Sand
• Parang/ Axe
• Saw
• Ropes
• P.A. System (if necessary)
• First-aid kit
• Fire extinguishers
• Pails of water
• Gateway, etc.

7.11. Dos & don’ts


• At any time never let more than one person lead the campfire. This will
lead to different rhythms & tempos thus upsetting the campfire.

• Never allow bad manners during the campfire. Pause for a moment in
order to regain control.

• Be prepared to change the programme as songs may not be appropriate for


the situation at hand.

• Place song leaders at strategic areas to help in keeping tempo & order of
the campfire

• Never issue a songbook during the campfire. Try to send the rough
programme together with the invitation.

• Try not to teach new songs during the campfire. If you want to, use only
catchy tunes & simple words.

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• Run the programme smoothly with minimum interruptions between items
& songs.

• Never serve refreshments in between the campfire. This is a very


disruptive act. Do serve only light refreshment at the end of the campfire.

• Never start a song with the introduction of the title & say “1, 2, 3…” Just
start the song & let the campfire participants follow you.

• Choose songs that are familiar & popular.

• Start the campfire with a bang and end it with a memorable finale.

• Declare the campfire open only after the wood stack has started to burn.

Final Note:
Times have changed, we live in a modern world with new technology and new trends, be
it music, fashion etc. and as Scouts, we must move with the times. But, we must never
forget that in the face of modernisation, we can still maintain our traditions and values.
NEVER forget the traditional aspects of the campfire for it is those traditions that make
the Scout Campfire so unique!

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