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ENROLL IN

HEALTH BENEFITS

Sign up for a Health Care Reimbursement Account and receive a Health Care Card, which is similar to a debit card.

a Health Care Card, which is similar to a debit card. 4 ANATOMY OF A PAY

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ANATOMY OF A PAY STATEMENT

Ever wonder how your pay gets to you? In honor of National Payroll Week, follow the trail.

to you? In honor of National Payroll Week, follow the trail. 7 SUSTAINABLE DUKE Duke gets

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SUSTAINABLE DUKE

Duke gets out of the business of selling surplus property and into the business of donating it to non- profits and charities.

the business of donating it to non- profits and charities. WORKING @ DUKE N E W

WORKING @ DUKE

N E W S

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Global

Greeters

Duke’s International House Welcomes Visiting Scholars to Duke

International House Welcomes Visiting Scholars to Duke A s a Duke van rolled to a stop
International House Welcomes Visiting Scholars to Duke A s a Duke van rolled to a stop

A s a Duke van rolled to a stop in front of Target, Lisa Giragosian glanced in the rear view mirror and grinned at the diverse group

seated behind her. Her gaze was greeted by a warm smile from Katalin Molnar, a visiting scholar from Hungary and research associate in Biological Sciences. “Thank you for driving us here,” Molnar said, opening a small floral notebook that contained a shopping list. “I want to bake a Hungarian cake from my family’s recipe, and I need ingredients,” she said, jotting items such as coconut, flour and honey. For the moment, the van was a veritable worldwide welcome wagon, and Giragosian, assistant director for services at Duke’s International House, its multi-lingual chauffeur. She and other International House staff members make the shopping excursion twice a month as part of the services International House offers to help people from around the globe acclimate to Duke and the United States. “I don’t know what I would do without the people at International House because they help with so many things,” Molnar said. “When someone moves to the United States, there is a lot of paperwork involved and other challenges.” Visiting scholars fulfill vital roles as researchers, professors and physicians, among other positions, at the university and health system. Duke’s International House serves as a lifeline and support network. This fall, Duke has 550 visiting scholars, 100 are new to campus. “The number of visiting scholars and the number of countries they come from grows almost every year,” Giragosian said. “This year, we’ve got visiting scholars from more than 100 countries.” Duke’s vibrant international community enriches the campus, but the transition for visiting scholars may not always be easy. Whether it’s basic needs – transportation for grocery shopping or help finding a rental house, or more complicated needs – applying for a Social Security card or North Carolina driver’s license – the International House assists. The goal is to equip visiting scholars with skills to handle life’s daily issues on their own, said Patrick Morris, program coordinator.

Maryam Yavari, an Iranian physician, and husband, Amin Mahnam, a visiting scholar and faculty member in Duke’s Biomedical Engineering department, shop at a Target in Durham during a recent trip with Duke’s International House.

“It might be as simple as helping a family get their power turned on or finding a way for them to get a cell phone without signing a long term contract,” Morris said. “At other times, a visiting scholar might need assistance with taxes or in dealing with issues involving an illness in the family back home or feeling isolated.” Among its services, the International House hosts an informal orientation session several times a week about topics ranging from housing to registering children for school and signing up for English classes. Workshops also are offered on buying a used car, for example. Plus, visiting scholars can borrow linens, small appliances and other goods through the Loan Closet. “Because International House staff is not doing any of the visa work, this allows us to focus on services and programming in addition to trainings.” Giragosian said. “These are things that Duke is doing that you won’t find on many other college campuses.” Many visiting scholars, including Susan Leadbetter, said they appreciate the extra help in navigating foreign systems.

Top: Katalin Molnar, a visiting scholar from Hungary and research associate in Biological Sciences, brings to Target a shopping list with ingredients for a Hungarian cake during a recent trip to the Durham store with Duke’s International House.

>> See GLOBAL GREETERS, BACK PAGE

House. >> See GLOBAL GREETERS , BACK PAGE 2007 Gold Medal, Internal Periodical Staff Writing

2007

Gold Medal, Internal Periodical Staff Writing

2007 Gold Medal, Internal Periodical Staff Writing This paper consists of 30% recycled

This paper consists of 30% recycled

2007

Bronze Medal, Print Internal Audience Tabloids/Newsletters

post-consumer fiber.

LOOKING

AHEAD

@ DUKE

SEPTEMBER 23 : : Washington

National Opera presents a live simulcast of Puccini’s “La Boheme” with Placido Domingo as general director; Duke is one of 19 educational institutions around the U.S. selected to participate in this ground-breaking event, 2 p.m., Reynolds Theater, free.

SEPTEMBER 28 : : Duke Farmers

Market; last market for the season,

produce, flowers and more, 11 a.m. to

2 p.m., in front of the Medical Center

Store off Coal Pile Drive and next to

the walkway connecting Duke Hospital and Duke Clinics.

SEPTEMBER 29 : : North

Carolina Pride Festival and Parade, largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and

transgender pride celebration in the state kicks off from Duke’s East Campus. Duke’s Center for LGBT Life is a sponsor and will have a float in the parade, 10 a.m., festival;

1 p.m., parade.

a float in the parade, 10 a.m., festival; 1 p.m., parade. For more events, check the

For more events, check the university’s online calendar at http://calendar.duke.edu

Newsbriefs

Duke Signs Climate Commitment

As part of Duke’s continued leadership in environmental stewardship and sustainability, the university has signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. In signing the commitment, Duke joined more than 300 other colleges and universities across the U.S. to focus the research and leadership of higher education on the pressing issue of global climate change. “Duke was built on a culture of public engagement and the belief that we have the duty to share the knowledge of our faculty and students to address pressing global issues,” President Richard H. Brodhead said. “Tackling the complex problem of climate change here on our campus not only benefits this institution but society as a whole.” By signing the commitment, Duke is pledging to eliminate

campus greenhouse gas emissions over time. This involves completing an emissions inventory; setting a target date and interim milestones within two years for becoming climate neutral; taking immediate steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by choosing from a list of short-term actions; integrating sustainability into the curriculum and the overall educational experience for undergraduate, graduate and professional students; and making the action plan, inventory and progress reports publicly available. Learn about the Climate Commitment at www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org.

United Way Duke Partnership Campaign Begins

The United Way Duke Partnership Campaign begins Sept. 24, and Duke is aiming to increase participation and pledges. Last year, nearly 3,000 Duke faculty and staff contributed nearly $1 million to the

campaign. Monica Pallett, Duke’s campaign manager, said that participation and pledges have dropped since 2001, when the campaign raised $1.3 million. She said the conveniences of online pledging and payroll deduction make it easier for faculty and staff to support those most in need in our community. “Every pledge counts, no matter the amount, because it is the collective strength of our combined contributions that really makes a difference.” Pallett said. For more information, and to donate online, visit the campaign Web site at www.hr.duke.edu/unitedway.

visit the campaign Web site at www.hr.duke.edu/unitedway . Fall Run/Walk Club Open The fall season of
visit the campaign Web site at www.hr.duke.edu/unitedway . Fall Run/Walk Club Open The fall season of

Fall Run/Walk Club Open

The fall season of the Duke Run/Walk Club kicked off in August, but it’s not too late to participate, get in shape and feel healthy. Sponsored by LIVE FOR LIFE, Duke’s employee wellness program, the 12-week walking and running program includes cardiovascular training for all fitness levels, from new exercisers and beginning runners to those training for 5K events. The Run/Walk Club is open to all Duke faculty and staff. A list of new run/walk workshops is available online. For more information and to register, visit the Run/Walk Club Web site at www.hr.duke.edu/runwalk or call (919) 684-3136, option 1.

Duke Endowment grant supports affordable housing, other projects

The Duke Endowment has awarded a grant of $777,500 to Duke University to support programs of the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership. The money will underwrite ongoing affordable housing programs, leadership training opportunities for local nonprofits, and after-school tutoring and enrichment programs aimed at closing the achievement gap among K-12 students. “Duke provides high quality resources and after-school services to students in kindergarten through twelfth grade,” said Carl Harris, superintendent of Durham Public Schools. “We are grateful for Duke’s sustained programming in neighborhood schools and community centers, which reinforces the work students do in class.” Begun in 1996, the Neighborhood Partnership connects the university with local organizations and residents in 12 neighborhoods near campus to improve the quality of life and to boost student achievement in nearby public schools. In addition to educational enrichment programs for at-risk students, the Neighborhood Partnership has three other thematic areas for institutional priority and investment. The Duke Endowment grant will support nearly a dozen distinct programs in the areas of neighborhood stabilization, empowering community organizations and university engagement. Learn more about the Neighborhood Partnership at www.community.duke.edu.

Letters to the Editor must include name and contact information. E-mail letters to working@duke.edu or mail them to Working@Duke Editor, Box 90496, Durham, NC 27708. Fax letters to (919) 681-7926. Please keep length to no more than 200 words.

681-7926. Please keep length to no more than 200 words. You Have Mail: Primetime employee forum

You Have

Mail:

Primetime employee forum Sept.13

Hear from Duke’s Chief Information OfficerTracy Futhey

“I don’t count the number of e-mail I receive a day; it would be too depressing,” Tracy Futhey says. “I think of e-mails as an endless treadmill, where it doesn’t matter how far you go and how long you stay on it, there’s always more.”

I

nformation technology has become inseparable from university life, virtual ivy interweaving with the real stuff on the hall of academe. In the last few years, Duke has been at the forefront of the information transformation occurring at leading American research institutions. From the conventional (e-mail and phone service) to the transformational (the Duke Digital Initiative and the latest version of DukePass), centralized groups such as the Office of Information Technology have helped shape the digital future for Duke. University departments

Chief Information Officer with the hear Tracy Come technology is shaping Futhey discuss how the
Chief Information Officer
with the
hear Tracy
Come
technology
is shaping
Futhey discuss how
the digital future at
Duke.
What
new technologies
the classroom and workplace?
the horizon?
are on
How is technology changing
What role
does technology play in
Duke’s future?
at noon
on Thursday, September 13,
Come find out
Bryan Center.
in the
Griffith Theater, lower level
of the
R E FR
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PROVID ED
E T O D AY
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Sponsored by
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throughout Duke also have played a crucial role in providing opportunities for experimentation with new technologies in the classroom, the lab and the workplace. Technology also plays a vital role in Duke’s new strategic plan, “Making a Difference.” Among the plan’s priorities is investment in emerging technologies that improves collaborative learning and creates new opportunities to connect knowledge in the service of society. From noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 13, join Duke’s Chief Information Officer Tracy Futhey as she reflects on the many recent technology changes and lets the campus community in on new services and projects for the coming year. Futhey will address technology issues such as planned upgrades to Duke’s digital infrastructure. She also will discuss how these and other changes fit within Duke’s IT vision and the implications of these changes for teaching, learning, research and operations at Duke.

The event, the fourth in the Primetime employee forum series, will be in the Griffith Film Theater in the Bryan Center.

— By Bill Cannon Sr. Communications Strategist Office of Information Technology

LEARN MORE ABOUT OIT AT WWW.OIT.DUKE.EDU

Julie Corcoran with daughter, Olivia.

Why Is Your Health Important To You?

SIGN UP FOR HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION INSURANCE OCT. 1 TO OCT. 17

F or Andrew Corcoran, the picture of good

health took time to come into focus. “In September of 2002, my wife was diagnosed with a brain tumor,” he said. Corcoran, an IT analyst at the Duke Clinical Research Institute, and his wife, Julie, wanted to start a family, but held off when they found out about the tumor. Julie had three surgeries – the first was unsuccessful. After that, they went to Duke’s Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center. Today, their family picture includes a healthy 1-year-old

daughter, Olivia. “Thanks to Dr. Allan Friedman and all of the staff there, Julie is now fully recovered,” Corcoran said. “I am very thankful to work at an organization that provides such great health care and health benefits.” Open enrollment, the time to select or make changes to health insurance plans, as well as vision, dental and reimbursement benefits, begins Oct. 1 and runs through Oct. 17. New health insurance premiums, which take effect Jan. 1, will increase slightly, well below the expected national average. Duke’s premium increases for health insurance will be about one-fifth of the national average in 2008, said Lois Ann Green, director of Benefits. Duke Select premiums, which cover the majority of Duke employees and families, will increase $1.07 per month for individuals; $6.37 per month for families. The monthly premium increase for Blue Care and Duke Options is slightly higher, depending

How To Get More Information

on coverage selected. For the third straight year, Duke Basic will not have a premium increase. Green said that the low increases were possible, in part, because of improvements many people at Duke have made in their health. “Over the years, Duke has added deductibles, increased co-payments, adjusted premiums to maintain comprehensive and affordable coverage,” she said. “But the options to tweak the plan designs to moderate cost increases have nearly run out. Our best option to control cost is to improve the health of our employees. That’s why we are promoting and investing in preventive health programs.” Next year, out-of-pocket expenses for health, dental, pharmacy and vision insurance will not increase. And co-pays for diabetic insulin and supplies will drop from $35 to $10, which could help people at Duke with diabetes save about $100 a month. “Managing diabetes is key to preventing other health conditions,” Green said. Other 2008 health plan updates include:

The physician network will continue to expand for Duke Select and Duke Basic participants, offering residents in Wake County more options. The premium for vision care in 2008 will not increase. The monthly premium for the comprehensive dental plan will rise $1.24 for individuals; $3.75 for family coverage.

— By Elizabeth Michalka Writer, Human Resources Communications

Open enrollment packets with details about Duke’s health, dental and vision plans and how to make changes or sign up for a plan will be mailed to employees in September.By Elizabeth Michalka Writer, Human Resources Communications Information sessions about reimbursement accounts and

Information sessions about reimbursement accounts and health, dental and visionsign up for a plan will be mailed to employees in September. coverage are September 24

about reimbursement accounts and health, dental and vision coverage are September 24 through October 12. Find

coverage are September 24 through October 12. Find a session on the Duke Human Resources Web site at www.hr.duke.edu.

Representatives from the Duke Open Enrollment Service Center are available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday from Oct. 1 through Oct. 17; and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 6 and Oct. 13. Call (877) 371-9963.on the Duke Human Resources Web site at www.hr.duke.edu . Reimbursement Made Easy With New Health

Reimbursement Made Easy With New Health Care Card

T he biggest complaint about using health care reimbursement accounts has been the paperwork – filling out forms, mailing them with receipts, and then waiting for the check. That’s why employees like Lance Brown are looking forward to 2008 when Duke

like Lance Brown are looking forward to 2008 when Duke Get The Card Faculty and staff

Get The Card

Faculty and staff may enroll in the health care reimbursement account only during open enrollment, Oct. 1-17. Reimbursement accounts do not automatically renew each year. Information about signing up for the account is included in open enrollment packets and will be available later this month at www.hr.duke.edu. The Health Care Card will be mailed before Jan. 1, 2008.

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introduces a new Health Care Card through VISA® that will pay for many eligible health care expenses at the register using money from his reimbursement account. “It’s a huge advantage, especially for someone like me with significant health care costs every month,” said Brown, senior systems programmer at the Department of Statistical Science. He spends about $200 a month on diabetes and high blood pressure medication. The new Health Care Card, provided by WageWorks, Duke’s reimbursement account administrator, works similar to a debit card. The purchase automatically deducts money from an employee’s Health Care Reimbursement Account for eligible purchases, including dental and doctors’ fees, prescriptions, and some over-the-counter drugs. During open enrollment, employees can sign up for a reimbursement account and determine how much they want to contribute to the account in 2008, which sets the spending limit with the card. “Because reimbursement accounts use pre-tax dollars, faculty and staff can save about $30 to $40 for every $100 spent on eligible expenses,” said Saundra Daniels, Benefits plan manager.

The card can be used with health care providers, and at pharmacies and certified retailers for over-the-counter drugs. Certified retailers such as Walgreens, Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club currently accept the Health Care Card for eligible health care expenses, and more retailers will be added by 2008. “If a retailer does not accept the card or if a transaction is denied, purchases can still be reimbursed by submitting claims forms with a receipt for eligible expenses,” Daniels said. Daniels said all receipts should be kept with Health Care Card purchase because WageWorks may require documentation to verify expenses.

HEALTH CARE REIMBURSEMENT ACCOUNT SAVINGS

 

Without

With

 

Reimbursement

Reimbursement

Savings

Account

Account

Co-pays

$75

$50

$25

Prescriptions

$300

$225

$75

Over-the-counter

medicines

$75

$50

$25

Uncovered dental/

vision expenses

$300

$225

$75

Yearly Total

$750

$550

$200

Source: Human Resources

For example, while the card is accepted at a dentist’s office, cosmetic teeth whitening procedures are not eligible and will not be reimbursed. Daniels said reimbursement account participants should first verify expenses are eligible for reimbursement. A list of eligible expenses is at www.hr.duke.edu/benefits/reimbursement.

— By Elizabeth Michalka Writer, Human Resources Communications

Life of a P a y Duke Corporate Payroll Services By The Numbers 30,500 Duke

Life of a Pay

Duke Corporate Payroll Services

By The Numbers

30,500

Duke Employees

400

Department Payroll Representatives

24

Corporate Payroll Services Staff

1994

Year Direct Deposit Launched

40,497

W-2 Statements Printed in 2006

4

Printers for Direct Deposit Statements

85,715

Pay Checks Printed in 2006

508,666

Direct Deposit Statements Printed in 2006

$1.4 billion

Annual Duke Payroll

I
I

t starts with Duke’s payroll representatives, all 400 in various departments across Duke. They keep track of your hours and provide those numbers and other

figures to Duke Corporate Payroll Services, which compiles the data, ensures its accuracy and pays 30,500 Duke employees. Like clockwork each month, thousands of direct deposit statements, along with a small number of checks, roll off printers in the North Building for bi-weekly and monthly paid staff. “Most people don’t realize what we do to get employees paid,” said Anne Comilloni, associate director of Duke Corporate Payroll Services. “From data entry to printing, sealing and distributing payments, 24 Corporate Payroll employees and hundreds of people from other departments across Duke work together, behind the scenes, before you receive your pay.” And it does not end after printing. Soon after pay day, Corporate Payroll typically fields more than 250 calls from employees. Topics run the gamut, from deductions for health insurance premiums and vacation accruals to paid time off. Next year, Duke Corporate Payroll plans to go “green” by implementing an online direct deposit statement, the blue document university and health system employees now receive for a direct bank deposit. Faculty and staff will be able to go online to view and download direct deposit statements. In recognition of this month’s National Payroll Week, which celebrates the work of 156 million wage earners and the payroll professionals who pay them, here’s the life of a Duke pay statement.

ENTERING TIME CARD DATA

It’s 11 a.m. on a recent Friday, and Debbie Endsley and Nakia Harrington, team members in Corporate

Endsley and Nakia Harrington, team members in Corporate 4 Debbie Endsley, left, and Nakia Harrington, of
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Debbie Endsley, left, and Nakia Harrington, of Corporate Payroll Services, sort time cards in payroll offices at 705 Broad St.

Payroll, hover closely around a computer screen. They’re reviewing data within Duke’s payroll system processed during the week, so they can create a file that enables other staff members to input the next round of time cards. “The file we’re about to archive contains 166,119 records with updated data that has been entered this week, such as employees who have changed their address or signed up for health insurance,” Endsley said. Endsley and Harrington also edit scores of individual time cards in preparation for entering the data for pay. Inputting time card data – and verifying each batch – takes much of the staff members’ time Friday through Wednesday. “On Tuesdays, for instance, our goal is to key in the data from at least 5,000 cards,” Endsley said. “In addition, we also have to input any changes, such as new hires.”

PRINTING

Many hours go into the process – reviewing reports, balancing the records and ensuring accurate and quality data. After data is updated and loaded, Nakia Harrington

data. After data is updated and loaded, Nakia Harrington Leroy Mickens, shift supervisor for the Office
data. After data is updated and loaded, Nakia Harrington Leroy Mickens, shift supervisor for the Office
data. After data is updated and loaded, Nakia Harrington Leroy Mickens, shift supervisor for the Office

Leroy Mickens, shift supervisor for the Office of Information Technology, runs the Laser machine that prints 1,000 direct deposit statements in 15 minutes.

selects “print” on a computer screen, and names and figures are transmitted to another computer database in the North Building off Research Drive. In a windowless room cooled to 68 degrees, Leroy Mickens, a 43-year Duke employee, presided over one of several high speed laser printers, a Xerox Docutech that prints 1,000 direct deposit statements in as little as 15 minutes. Mickens lifted a bundle of 1,000 blank direct deposit statements from a box. Checks were retrieved from a locked area. He matched names and numbers of blank checks and direct deposit statements to information on a master list to ensure sequential printing by pay area. “I like to print one box at a time,” Mickens said. “If it doesn’t match up, you’ve got a problem.”

Statement
Statement

He loaded a bundle of direct deposit statements in the Xerox, pressed a few buttons, and within seconds, they rolled through the machine, which printed name and address on the Duke blue front, and pay, tax and deduction benefit figures inside. The freshly printed statements piled into stacks in machine trays.

FOLDING AND SEALING

The next morning, Mike Harris, another staff member from Corporate Payroll, collected 3 ½ boxes of checks and 13 boxes of direct deposit statements from the North

delivery to university and health systems departments. The envelopes for this recent pay day filled 18 postal crates. Although most checks and vouchers are delivered to payroll representatives in each department through campus mail, about 30 representatives choose to pick them up. On a recent afternoon, Aida Figueroa, human resources manager in the Pharmacy business office, and Alan Dunn, a payroll representative with Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI), joined others and collected their area checks and direct deposit statements from Corporate Payroll. “My job is to make sure 800 to 850 employees get paid, and that’s very important,” said Dunn, who has worked at Duke nine years. “I like driving over here and getting it straight from the source.”

PAY DAY

Most people

don’t realize

what we do to get employees paid, from data entry to printing, sealing and distributing payments, 24 Corporate Payroll employees and hundreds of people from other departments across Duke work

together,

behind the

scenes,

before you

receive your pay.”

together, behind the scenes, before you receive your pay.” — Anne Comilloni Associate Director of Duke

— Anne Comilloni Associate Director of Duke Corporate Payroll Services

Associate Director of Duke Corporate Payroll Services Mike Harris, of Corporate Payroll, cleans the machine that
Associate Director of Duke Corporate Payroll Services Mike Harris, of Corporate Payroll, cleans the machine that
Associate Director of Duke Corporate Payroll Services Mike Harris, of Corporate Payroll, cleans the machine that

Mike Harris, of Corporate Payroll, cleans the machine that seals pay checks and direct deposit statements.

Building and delivered them to Duke Corporate Payroll at 705 Broad St., where, once again, staff matched names and check and direct deposit numbers with a master list. Once the balancing processes were complete, the pay statements were ready for the next step. In a 10-by-18 foot room, Harris stacked the printed pay statements in a LaserMate, a long machine for pressure sealing. He pressed a button, and the statements were sucked into the machine, where they were folded once and sealed before rolling out like a ribbon on the other end.

SORTING AND PICKUP

After sealing, the pay statements were sorted by organization and deposited in envelopes for pickup or

by organization and deposited in envelopes for pickup or Sitting at his desk recently at DCRI,
by organization and deposited in envelopes for pickup or Sitting at his desk recently at DCRI,
by organization and deposited in envelopes for pickup or Sitting at his desk recently at DCRI,

Sitting at his desk recently at DCRI, Dunn sorted pay statements for delivery to bi-weekly paid employees. He makes the rounds twice a month, distributing about 500 pay statements to bi-weekly paid staff.

about 500 pay statements to bi-weekly paid staff. Naomi Pratt, left, receives her direct deposit statement

Naomi Pratt, left, receives her direct deposit statement from Alan Dunn, payroll representative for Duke Clinical Research Institute.

“Handing these out is the best part of my job,” he said. “On pay day, I suddenly turn into a very popular guy around here.” Among the employees, Dunn delivered a direct deposit statement directly to Naomi Pratt, a DCRI staff assistant and Duke employee since 1988. She has had direct deposit since it was offered in 1994. She doesn’t miss the hassle of rushing to a bank during lunch to deposit a check. “That’s the best thing they’ve ever done,” she said of direct deposit. Twice a month, when Pratt receives her direct deposit statement, it still holds special significance: pay day. “The check is in the bank,” Pratt said.

— By Leanora Minai and Missy Baxter Working@Duke

Got

Direct

Deposit?

Start the convenient

process to allow Duke to

directly deposit your pay

into a bank account by

filling out an agreement

form. Pick up a form at

Corporate Payroll Services

at 705 Broad St., or visit

www.finsvc.duke.edu/finsvc/

payroll, select “payroll

forms” and click “Direct

Deposit Authorization

Agreement.”

Chrissy Jones, Corporate Payroll specialist, distributes some pay checks and direct deposit statements to payroll representatives from across the university and health system outside Corporate Payroll Offices.

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statements to payroll representatives from across the university and health system outside Corporate Payroll Offices. 5

Create a culture of safety

REPORT OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES ONLINE WITHIN 24 HOURS

L ike many work-related injuries, the head trauma that

Nicole Coombs suffered in 2003 after being kicked in

the head by a patient created a backlash of

complications. A registered nurse at Duke North Hospital,

Coombs was on leave for several months for the injury that caused memory loss and required physical therapy. “I think it’s very important for injuries to be reported as soon as possible so that the person who is injured can

get the medical care they need and to hopefully prevent any other employees from being injured,” said Coombs, 27. Coombs’ injury was immediately reported to a supervisor in accordance with Duke’s workers’ compensation policy, which requires that all occupational injuries and illnesses be reported through the Web site within 24 hours.

“Duke strives to create a

culture of safety where employees do not suffer an on-the-job injury,

Occupational Safety Tips

• Check under your desk for computer cords, cables and other obstacles that might become tangled with feet.

• Observe wet floor signs, watch for spills and immediately clean or report them.

• Step carefully when transitioning from one floor surface to another.

• Take extra caution in inclement weather.

but if an injury occurs, it is crucial to report it online within

24 hours,” said Joyce Williams, director of

Workers’ Compensation.

said Joyce Williams, director of Workers’ Compensation. Williams said financial consequences exist for departments

Williams said financial consequences exist for departments that do not report injuries within 24 hours. Departments that report claims late may be responsible for their staff members workers’ compensation wage replacement. Williams said it is important to raise awareness about the role each person plays in creating a safe environment. “The goal is to help create a culture within the

university and health system in which everyone feels a responsibility to ensure a safe environment for all,” she said. Studies show that about 85 percent of all injuries are preventable, Williams said. The most frequent causes of employee injuries at Duke are slipping and falling; getting hit by or against an object and lifting/exertion. Many slip and fall injuries, for example, occur indoors and are the result of spills or objects on the ground. “The good news is there continues to be fewer injuries compared with this time last year in each category,” Williams said. “Awareness is the key. That’s why emphasizing a culture of safety is important.”

why emphasizing a culture of safety is important.” Nicole Coombs Report Accidents Within 24 Hours Safety

Nicole Coombs

Report Accidents Within 24 Hours

Safety is everyone’s responsibility. Managers and their employees must complete an incident report within 24 hours. Access forms online at www.hr.duke.edu/ workcomp. For more information, call Workers’ Compensation, (919)

684-6693.

— By Missy Baxter Working@Duke Correspondent

Borrow & Renew

Loan periods vary depending on circulation policies and your particular selection. Staff members, for example, may borrow a book or audiobook for four weeks; a film or video for three days; and a musical recording for a week. For more information on library services, visit www.library.duke.edu.

A Duke community member listens to a record in the Music Media Center on East Campus. Photo courtesy of Mark Zupan, Duke Libraries.

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East Campus. Photo courtesy of Mark Zupan, Duke Libraries. 6 find a book, film or audio

find a book, film or audio recording at Duke Libraries

I sat down recently with Jean Ferguson, a reference librarian at Duke. I wanted to know how to search the online Duke University Libraries database for a book,

film or audio recording. After all, Duke faculty and staff are automatically granted borrowing privileges from Duke’s vast

collection, one of the nation’s top 10 private university library systems. All you need is a valid DukeCard. If you want to use a computer to reserve a holding already checked out, you’ll need your NET ID and password. Duke has more than 5.5 million books, and finding yours isn’t as daunting a task as it may seem. Log on to www.library.duke.edu from any computer, including any Duke library screen. At the left of the screen, you’ll see a search box, much like a Google feature. Make sure “catalog” is selected. For this search, we typed J.D. Salinger’s novel, “The Catcher in the Rye.” The catalog returned 22 results, each with fields for author, title, format, year and location/call number. Scroll down for your particular title and format, e.g. book, and scan across to “location,” where the holding is kept. The location field provides the number of copies owned, and how many are on loan. For my search at press time, two copies of the 2001 paperback edition of “The Catcher in the Rye” were checked out. I am still able to request the book from the Perkins Library and its seven

branches. Click the link under “location/request” and select “request” under the “GetIt@Duke” column. Have your NET ID and password available. Don’t want to wait? Here’s a tip: Return to the results list. Select the live link in the title field for your book to get “full view of record.” Look for “more information” and select “view WorldCat web page for this item.” This offers other libraries in our area that carry the book, even by zip code. Because Duke is a member of the Triangle Research Libraries Network, faculty and staff have borrowing privileges at North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina Central University. Duke also has nearly 13,000 music CDs at the Music Library and more than 300 audiobook recordings and 18,000 video recordings at Lilly Library, including documentaries and foreign films. To find a movie, select the “advanced search” from the Duke Libraries home page. Change the “format” drop-down menu on the right side of the screen to “film/video,” choose “Lilly” from the “location” drop-down and search by keyword, title or author, which includes director, actor and others. For my search, I typed “All the President’s Men” and got five results, including a VHS and DVD for the movie, originally released in 1976. The “location” field showed the DVD in Lilly. Jot down the call number associated with your selection’s location, go to the public services desk at Lilly, give staff members the call number, and they’ll retrieve it.

— By Leanora Minai Editor, Working@Duke

uke Sustainable Y O U R S O U R C E F O R

uke

Sustainable

Y O U R

S O U R C E

F O R

G R E E N

N E W S

A T

D U K E

S O U R C E F O R G R E E N N E

Keith Byrd of God's Property Urban Ministry in Durham loads donated Duke chairs from the new surplus program for the organization’s transitional housing program.

Finding A Home For Duke Property

W hen Duke announced it was getting out of the

business of selling surplus equipment and into the

business of donating usable furniture, computers

and other property, Fran Alexander rented a truck. She and her staff furnished the EDGE Training and Placement center in downtown Durham with many fixtures, including 93 chairs. They also received a donation

of 30 Duke computers for the 28 to 30 students preparing for the General Education Development (GED) test. “It’s just been invaluable,” said Alexander, executive director of EDGE, which stands for Education, Development, Growth and Employment. “There’s no way we could have done it alone.”

Many non-profit groups and charities such as the Recovery Center of Durham, Community Wholeness Venture and Urban Ministries have participated in the

new Duke Surplus Property Program, receiving chairs, sofas, tables, televisions and microwaves, among other items. On July 1, the Duke Surplus Store closed its doors at the Shoppes at Lakewood after 10 years and started the new surplus property program as part of Duke’s commitment to socially responsible and environmentally friendly practices. The new program builds upon other initiatives such as the Duke Computer Exchange, which has donated more than 2,000 computers to Durham Public Schools and local non-profits. “If there’s still life in it, we can find a home for it,” said Mary Crawford, associate director for Procurement and Supply Chain Management. “By donating items instead of selling them, we are likely to create a more sustainable, closed-loop system with a greater level of waste diversion. This ’cradle-to-cradle’ business model will eliminate part of the waste stream and lower our demand on resources. The more items we provide to the community, the less likely new items will need to be produced from raw materials.” In addition to the new property re-use program, Duke constructs low-energy, resource-efficient buildings,

uses locally-grown produce in its dining services and participates in community service programs that enrich conditions at nearby schools and neighborhoods, all in an effort to have a positive impact on the community and world. Duke’s Procurement and Supply Chain Management coordinates the donation of all usable furniture, computers and other property to charities and non-profit organizations, as well as health system medical equipment and supplies for Duke’s Global Health PLUS program, known as Placement of Life-changing Usable Surplus. The new process for getting Duke property to charities and non-profit groups begins with requesting a pick up. Students, faculty and staff can go online to Duke’s Procurement Services Web site to enter surplus property information and request a collection. Once orders are received, items are scheduled for pick up by DeHaven’s and delivered to a local warehouse for distribution to certified charities and non-profit groups. Health System surplus medical equipment and supplies will be donated to the international community. Medical supplies not used in surgical or other procedures and usable surplus medical equipment will be donated to Global Health PLUS, which will distribute items to health programs around the world, including REMEDY at Duke, the Engineering World Health program, and the Duke- Uganda 2007 Neurosurgery Initiative. Duke neurosurgeon Michael Haglund, a member of the Global Health PLUS committee who heads the Uganda initiative, said that before the surplus store’s closing, medical equipment sat at the retail space until liquidators bought it. He said the new donation program will not only change lives, but also how surgery is practiced in East Africa.

— By Camille Jackson Writer, Office of News and Communications
— By Camille Jackson
Writer, Office of News and Communications
Camille Jackson Writer, Office of News and Communications How the Duke Surplus Property Program Works a

How the Duke Surplus Property Program Works

a Fill out a pickup request form at www.procurement. duke.edu

a Enter the required information about each surplus item, including computers and peripherals.

a DeHaven’s, a contracted moving and storage company, will collect up to six items at no charge when collected by two movers and a truck. Allow several days to coordinate pickups to eliminate excess trips to campus, thereby saving fuel.

a Items will be collected and stored in campus warehouses.

a Local charities and nonprofits will be contacted to schedule time to pick up items.

Get Property For Your Department

Call (919) 684-2964

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WORKING@ DUKE

HOW TO REACH US

Editor: Leanora Minai (919) 681-4533 leanora.minai@duke.edu

Assistant Vice President:

Paul S. Grantham (919) 681-4534 paul.grantham@duke.edu

Graphic Design & Layout:

Paul Figuerado

Photography: Jon Gardiner, Les Todd and Megan Morr of Duke University Photography

Support Staff: Mary Carey and William Blackburn

Working@Duke is published monthly by Duke’s Office of Communication Services. We invite your feedback and suggestions for future story topics.

Please write us at working@duke.edu or Working@Duke, Box 90496, 705 Broad St., Durham, NC 27708 Call us at (919) 684-4345. Send faxes to (919) 681-7926.

Call us at (919) 684-4345. Send faxes to (919) 681-7926. Did You Know? Duke has 550

Did You Know?

(919) 684-4345. Send faxes to (919) 681-7926. Did You Know? Duke has 550 visiting scholars on

Duke has

550 visiting

scholars on campus this fall.

Know? Duke has 550 visiting scholars on campus this fall. More than 500 visiting scholars used

More than

500 visiting

scholars used International House services in the past year.

The number of visiting Duke scholars has risen nearly 40 percent in the past five years.

scholars has risen nearly 40 percent in the past five years. The top visiting scholar countries
scholars has risen nearly 40 percent in the past five years. The top visiting scholar countries

The top

visiting scholar

countries are China, Japan, Korea, Italy and Germany.

countries are China, Japan, Korea, Italy and Germany. More than half of Duke post-doctoral scholars hail

More than half of Duke

post-doctoral scholars hail from countries outside the United States.

scholars hail from countries outside the United States. dialogue @ Duke “Why is your health important

dialogue@Duke

“Why is your health important to you?”

dialogue @ Duke “Why is your health important to you?” “ Staying healthy is definitely an

Staying healthy is definitely an important aspect of my life. It helps me stay focused on my job, keeps me happy, relieves stress and makes me more confident. I exercise and try

to stay fit because it improves my health in every way, both physically and emotionally.”

Naomi Alston

Staff Assistant, Arts & Sciences Development Office

10 months at Duke

Arts & Sciences Development Office 10 months at Duke “ The older I get, the more
Arts & Sciences Development Office 10 months at Duke “ The older I get, the more

The older I get, the more I realize how important my health is to me. I’m trying to

work on a few things to get healthier, but weight doesn’t seem to come off as easy as it goes on.”

Robert Thornton

Maintenance Mechanic, Facilities Management

Got A Story Idea

Maintenance Mechanic, Facilities Management Got A Story Idea 10 months at Duke “ My health is
Maintenance Mechanic, Facilities Management Got A Story Idea 10 months at Duke “ My health is

10 months at Duke

My health is very important to me, and my Duke health benefits have served me well

over the years.”

Cloyce Lassiter

Assistant Business Manager, Study Abroad Office

24 years at Duke

Business Manager, Study Abroad Office 24 years at Duke Write working@duke.edu Call (919) 681-4533 — By

Write

working@duke.edu

Call

(919) 681-4533

— By Missy Baxter Working@Duke Correspondent

681-4533 — By Missy Baxter Working@Duke Correspondent Giragosian, assistant director for services at Duke’s

Giragosian, assistant director for services at Duke’s International House, drives a van with Duke international scholars to a Target in Durham on a recent Saturday. The International House serves as a support network for Duke’s 550 visiting scholars.

Global Greeters

continued from page 1

After only a few days in Durham, Leadbetter was among the seven visiting scholars who rode to Target on a recent Saturday to shop. Leadbetter, 27, is from Britain and working as a research associate in the Earth & Ocean Sciences division. Armed with a list of “basic essentials” such as shampoo and fresh fruit, she made her way around the store. “So far, the biggest complication is transportation,” Leadbetter said. “I’ll have to get used to the public transit system here. Until then, though, I’m very glad International

House offers rides to the store.” Other challenging obstacles for visiting scholars include day-to-day issues such as loneliness and communicating with co-workers. Molnar, the visiting scholar from Hungary, attends an English conversation club every week at the International House. “I’ve met a lot of new friends there,” Molnar said. “I think it’s wonderful that Duke assists people who are new to America.” Some Duke departments are following the cue from International House. Staff members in Romance Studies, for example, worked through the summer to welcome about a dozen new visiting scholars serving the department. To prepare for their arrival, Catherine Knoop, a Romance Studies staff assistant, attended a recent workshop at International House. Knoop and about 20 other staff members from various departments learned tips for helping visiting scholars and exchanged information gleaned from previous experiences. “We get a lot of questions about things like bus routes, health insurance and driver’s licenses,” Knoop said. “We help them with the issues we can, and for the more-complicated things, we direct them to International House.” Based on advice during the workshop, the Romance Studies department created an information packet with pointers about living in Durham. “It’s a cheat sheet that explains things like where to find out about bus routes and where to go for utilities and other services they need,” Knoop said.

How to Get Involved

If you don’t have direct contact with international scholars through your job at Duke, you can still welcome them by participating in several International House initiatives, including making donations to the “Loan Closet” or participating in the weekly conversation club. Visit http://ihouse.studentaffairs.duke.edu or call (919) 684-3585.

Along with providing assistance when possible, Knoop and other Duke employees agree that it’s important for every person on campus to extend a friendly welcome to visiting scholars. “You can tell that they appreciate it when you ask them about their culture and their country,” said Knoop, “so I’m going to start doing more of that.”

— By Missy Baxter Working@Duke Correspondent

D U K E T O D AY

For daily news and information, visit www.duke.edu/today