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NECA 230-2003

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining

Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

Published by

National Electrical Contractors Association

NECA 230-2003
Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining

Electric Motors and Motor Controllers


An American National Standard

Published by

National Electrical Contractors Association

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Table of Contents
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v 1. 1.1 1.2 2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3. 3.1 3.2 4. 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 5. 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 6. 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 7. 7.1 7.2 7.3 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Products and Applications Included . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Regulatory and Other Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Receiving and Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Packaged Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Loose Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Motor Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Physical Damage and Moisture Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Motor Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Power Supply Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Motor Design Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Motor Branch Circuit Conductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Single Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Several Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Full-Load Current Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Motor Nameplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Full-Load Current Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Full-Load Current Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Conductor Temperature Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Motor Branch-Circuit Short-Circuit and Ground-Fault Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Locked-Rotor Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Rating or Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Individual Motor Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Taps from Feeders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 More Than One Motor or Motor(s) and Other Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Motor and Branch-Circuit Overload Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Continuous Duty Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Separate Overload Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Service Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Motor Temperature Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Disconnecting Means Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Types of Disconnects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 iii s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

8. 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 9. 9.1 9.2 9.3 10. 10.1 10.2 11. 11.1 11.2 11.3 12. 13. 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4

Motor Control Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Source of Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Overcurrent Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Control Circuit Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Disconnection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Motor Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Controller Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Controller Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Motor Terminal Housings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Dimensions and Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Equipment Grounding C onnections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Motor Wiring Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 High-Voltage Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Low-Voltage Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Motor Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Installing a 3-Phase Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Electric Motor Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Lubrication and Bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Disconnection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Annex A: Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Motor Starter Selection Data Sheet (Courtesy Square D Company) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 NEC Table 310.16 (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 NEC Table 430.10(B) (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 NEC Table 430.12(B) (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 NEC Table 430.52 (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 NEC Table 430.72(B) (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 NEC Table 430.148 (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 NEC Table 430.150 (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 NEC Table 430.151(B) (Courtesy National Fire Protection Association) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Annex B: Wiring Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Wiring Diagram: High Voltage and Low Voltage Delta Motor Windings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Wiring Diagram: High Voltage and Low Voltage Star (Y) Motor Windings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Wiring Diagram: One Three-Wire Stop-Start Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Wiring Diagram: Two Three-Wire Stop-Start Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Wiring Diagram: Hand-Off Automatic Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 One Line Diagram: Motor Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Annex C: Reference Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 s iv

(This foreword is not a part of the standard)

Foreword

National Electrical Installation Standards are intended to improve communication among specifiers, purchasers, and suppliers of electrical construction services. They define a minimum baseline of quality and workmanship for installing electrical products and systems. NEIS are intended to be referenced in contract documents for electrical construction projects. The following language is recommended: Electric motors and motor controllers rated 600 volts or less shall be installed and maintained in accordance with NECA 230-2003, Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers (ANSI). Use of NEIS is voluntary, and the National Electrical Contractors Association assumes no obligation or liability to users of this publication. Existence of a standard shall not preclude any member or nonmember of NECA from specifying or using alternate construction methods permitted by applicable regulations. This publication is intended to comply with the edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC) in effect at the time of publication. Because they are quality standards, NEIS may in some instances go beyond the minimum requirements of the NEC. It is the responsibility of users of this publication to comply with state and local electrical codes when installing electrical products and systems.

Suggestions for revisions and improvements to this standard are welcome. They should be addressed to: NECA Standards & Safety 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Suite 1100 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 215-4521 Telephone (301) 215-4500 Fax neis@necanet.org www.neca-neis.org To purchase National Electrical Installation Standards, contact the NECA Order Desk at (301) 215-4504 tel, (301) 215-4500 fax, or orderdesk@necanet.org. NEIS can also be purchased in .pdf download format from www.neca-neis.org/standards. Copyright 2003, National Electrical Contractors Association. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.
National Electrical Installation Standards,NEIS, and the NEIS logo are registered trademarks of the National Electrical Contractors Association. National Electrical Code and NEC are registered trademarks of the National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, Massachusetts.

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1. Scope

1.1 Products and Applications Included


This standard describes recommended procedures for selecting and installing stationary electric motors and motor controllers rated 600 volts or less. It also covers routine maintenance procedures to be followed after the installation is complete.

(ANSI/NFPA 70). Installers should always follow the NEC, applicable state and local codes, manufacturers instructions, and project specifications when installing motors and motor controllers. Only qualified persons familiar with the installation, construction, and operation of motors should perform the work described in this publication. Other National Electrical Installation Standards provide additional guidance for installing particular types of electrical products and systems. A complete list of NEIS is provided in Annex C.

1.2

Regulatory and Other Requirements

This recommended practice is intended to define what is meant by installing equipment in a neat and workmanlike manner as required by the National Electrical Code 110.12. All information in this publication is intended to conform to the National Electrical Code

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2. Receiving and Storing

2.1 Packaged Units


Generally motors are delivered to the jobsite attached to the equipment they are going to power, such as a pump. In many instances the motor controllers and associated controls are also parts of a packaged unit, such as a heating/ventilating/air-conditioning unit. In these instances, the handling of the packaged units is the responsibility of the trade supplying the equipment.

and that these devices have been properly sized. The responsibility for the furnishing of the overload protective devices should be firmly established by the specifications.

2.4 Physical Damage and Moisture Protection


When motors are received by the electrical contractor, for storage until the time of their installation, it is important to have a storage facility that is dry and free from the possibility of moisture-laden air. Storage trailers or sheds generally offer little protection from moisture or condensation and sometimes just hanging a medium wattage light bulb close to the motor frame while in storage to keep the air dry will prevent problems when the motors are installed. Keep motor controllers and associated controls in their cartons until the time they are installed, to prevent physical damage or abuse.

2.2 Loose Motors


On some job sites, loose motors and motor controls are supplied to the electrical contractor in accordance with the job specifications. The electrical contractor must be sure to examine carefully each piece of equipment for damage before signing and acknowledging receipt of this equipment. Before acceptance, check carefully for any watermarks or other signs of dampness. A visual check of any motors with open end-bells should be made, for damage to motor windings from penetration of foreign objects.

2.3 Motor Controls


Motor controllers or other motor controls provided with overload and overcurrent protection devices should be examined to be sure that the overload or overcurrent protective devices have been furnished

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3. Motor Selection

3.1 Power Supply Characteristics


Selecting electric motors is generally not the function of the electrical contractor. The architect and engineering consultants decide the type of electric motors necessary to properly perform the required duties. However, in many instances an electrical contractor is asked to furnish information to the suppliers of equipment that includes electric motors. This may be as simple as properly identifying the service characteristics provided by the serving utility or other power supplier to that jobsite.

Design C: High Torque Low Starting Current Motors with a design C develop a starting torque of approximately 225% of the full load running torque. The locked rotor current is approximately 600% to 650% of the full load running current. These motors are generally used where the loads require a greater starting torque such as compressors. Design D: High Slip Very High Starting Torque Low Starting Current Motors with a design code D develop a starting torque that is approximately 275% of the full load running torque. The locked-rotor current is approximately 525% to 625% of full load current. Design D motors are most frequently used where loads are difficult to start such as elevators and compressors. Design D motors have very poor speed regulation. Design E: Premium Efficiency High Starting Current Design E motors were included in the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). The construction of these motors results in lower fullload current but a higher inrush (locked-rotor) current. Some design E motors have starting currents over 1500% of the full load current. At present there are no Design E motors commercially available. However, their technical characteristics are included in NEC Article 430. Most Design B motors meet the requirements of Design E motors, and both and are shown together in NEC Table 430.52.

3.2 Motor Design Designations


In some cases, furnishing information relating to motors may be more involved and requires a working knowledge of many different motor characteristics. The following information is shown as a guide to understanding motor design designations: The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has established design codes for three-phase squirrel-cage induction motors. Design codes B, C, D, and E designate motors that have different characteristics. The National Electrical Code uses these design codes to determine overcurrent protection ratings (NEC Table 430.52) and locked-rotor (inrush) current [NEC Table 430.151(B)] during motor starting. Design B: Normal Torque Low Starting Current Motors with a design B are the most commonly found motors in industry. The starting torque is approximately 150% of the full-load running torque. The locked rotor current is approximately 600% to 700% of the full-load running current. Most motors do not have a design code, and are considered to be design code B.

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Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

(NOTE: It is important not to confuse design code letters with code letters identifying locked-rotor characteristics. As explained in this section, above, design code letters indicate basic design characteristics of a motor, while code letters indicate the locked rotor current rating.)

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4. Motor Branch Circuit Conductors

4.1 Single Motor


Installation requirements for motor branch circuit conductors are shown in NEC Article 430, Part II. Motor branch circuit conductors that supply a single motor used in a continuous duty application must have an ampacity of not less than 125 percent of the motor full-load current (FLC) rating. The full-load current rating shown on the motor nameplate is not permitted to be used to determine the ampacity of conductors, the ampacity of switches or motor branch-circuit short-circuit and ground-fault protection. The values as determined by NEC 430.6(A)(1) using NEC Tables 430.147, 430.148, 430.149, and 430.150 must be used.

type fan or blower motors, and motor-operated appliances. Further information on these motor types is found in the exceptions to NEC 430.6(A)(1).

4.4 Motor Nameplate


When a motor nameplate is marked in amperes, but not horsepower, the horsepower rating shall be assumed to be that corresponding to the values given in the full load current tables shown in Article 430, Part XIII, interpolating if necessary. The full-load current rating shown on the motor nameplate is marked by the manufacturer and is based on the voltage rating shown on the motor nameplate.

4.5 Full-Load Current (FLC) T ables 4.2 Several Motors


Conductors supplying several motors must have an ampacity not less than 125 percent of the full-load current rating of the highest rated motor plus the sum of the full-load current ratings of all the other motors served by that feeder, as determined by NEC 430.6(A)(1). There are two reasons that the full-load current (FLC) ratings shown in NEC Tables 430.147, 148, 149, and 150 are required for the ampacity of motor branch circuit conductors, the ampacity of switches, and for motor branch circuit short circuit and ground-fault protection. 1. The supplied voltage almost always varies from the voltage rating of the motor, and the current varies with the voltage applied. 2. The actual full-load current rating for motors of the same horsepower may vary, and requiring the use of the tables ensures that if a motor must be replaced, this can be accomplished without making changes to other component parts of the circuit.

4.3 Full-Load Current Rating


The requirements relating to the full-load current (FLC) rating of a motor in NEC 430.6(A)(1) make the use of the table values found in NEC Tables 430.147. 430.148, 430.149, and 430.150 mandatory to determine the ampacity of conductors or the ampere rating of switches, branch-circuit short-circuit, and ground-fault protection instead of the actual current rating marked on the motor nameplate. There are exceptions relating to full-load current ratings that allow for the use of FLC listed on motor nameplates. These involve multi-speed motors, equipment that employs shaded-pole or capacitor

4.6 Full-Load Current (FLC) V alues


The FLC values taken from the tables are used to size the motor branch circuit conductors and the branchcircuit short-circuit and ground-fault protective device. Once the FLC value has been established for

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Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

a motor, this figure must be used in all other computations required for the sizing of conductors such as voltage drop considerations or ambient temperature adjustment, before choosing the conductor size.

conductors for circuits rated for 100 amperes or less (14 AWG through 1 AWG) must have their ampacity selected from the 60C column, for that conductor, regardless of its actual installation temperature rating. This doesnt mean that conductors with insulation temperature ratings other than those listed in the 60C column cannot be used; however the ampacity used must be less than or equal to that shown in the 60C column. Information regarding temperature limitations is found in NEC 110.14(C).

4.7 Conductor Temperature Rating


When determining conductor size, the temperature rating of the equipment terminals must be considered. Conductors must be selected as to not exceed the lowest temperature rating of any connected device or conductor. NEC Table 310.16 has ampacity columns for 60C, 75C and 90C. In most instances, the temperature rating of the equipment terminals can be found on the equipment or in manufacturers instructions provided with the product. For some components, temperature ratings of terminals can be found in product listing directories. When the termination temperature is unknown, then

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5. Motor Branch-Circuit Short-Circuit, and Ground-Fault Protection


The motor branch circuit is the circuit between the branch-circuit short-circuit and ground-fault protective device and the motor terminals. It can be either a motor circuit tapped from a feeder, or an individual circuit to a motor that is connected directly to an overcurrent device in a distribution panel. Motor branch-circuit short-circuit, and ground-fault protective device, sizing requirements for motors rated 600 volts or less are in NEC Article 430, Part IV. These requirements add to or amend the provisions of NEC Article 240, Overcurrent Protection. These additions or amendments are required because of the particular characteristics of motors regarding lockedrotor current (LRC). If the motor cannot be started using protective devices rated as shown in NEC Table 430.52, the exceptions to NEC 430.52(C)(1) may be used. However, the installer should determine that high inrush current is the problem before increasing the size of the protective devices, and that the motor is capable of handling the physical load attached to it.

5.3 Individual Motor Circuit


For an individual circuit feeding directly from an overcurrent device in a distribution panel to a motor, the motor branch circuit conductors must be sized as shown in Section 4 of this publication and these conductors must be protected in accordance with NEC 430.52. If the value of overcurrent protection specified in NEC Table 430.52 does not correspond to the standard sizes or ratings of overcurrent devices, a higher size, not exceeding the next standard size, is permitted. Where the rating or size shown in NEC Table 430.52 is not sufficient for the starting current of the motor, the size or rating shown in (a), (b), (c), or (d) of Exception No. 2 to 430.52(C)(1) is permitted to be used.

5.1 Locked-Rotor Current (LRC)


The moment a motor is started, during the acceleration period, the motor draws a high inrush current. This inrush current is also called locked-rotor current (LRC) and can be as high as from 4 to 10 times the full-load current (FLC). Most motors have a LRC of about 6 times the FLC, and this figure is the one generally used.

5.2 Rating or Setting


The short-circuit and ground-fault protective device for a motor branch-circuit must be capable of carrying the starting current (inrush current) of the motor. A protective device with a rating or setting not exceeding the value calculated in accordance with the values shown in NEC Table 430.52 must be used. This table lists the types of motors in the first column and the following four columns show the various overcurrent devices that are used for motor protection. (NOTE: Follow the provisions of NEC 430.52(C)(2) for listed components that are marked to restrict their use with fuses only, or are of a maximum ampere rating less than that permitted by the NEC.)

5.4 Taps From Feeders


Where a motor branch circuit is tapped from a feeder, the tap conductors must have an ampacity not less than required in NEC 430.22 for a single motor, or NEC 430.24 for multiple motors and must terminate in a branch-circuit protective device. In addition, the tap conductor must meet one of the following requirements: a) The tap conductors must be not more than 10 ft in length enclosed in a raceway and be protected on the line side of the tap conductors by an over7 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

current device, the rating of which does not exceed 1000 percent of the tap conductor ampacity. b) The tap conductors must have an ampacity of at least one-third of the ampacity of the feeder conductors being tapped, be suitably protected or enclosed in a raceway, and must be not more than 25 ft in length. c) The tap conductors must have the same ampacity as the feeder conductors, or meet the exception to NEC 430.28(3).

highest rated motor plus the sum of all the full-load current ratings of all the other motors in the group plus the ampacity required for the other loads. See NEC 430.24, Exceptions No.1, 2 and 3 for short-time duty, motor-operated fixed electric space heating equipment and interlocked circuitry. One or more motors may be connected to a single branch circuit. The requirements for sizing of the conductors, overload protection, and branch-circuit protection can be found in NEC 430.53.

5.5 More Than One Motor or Motor(s) and Other Loads


Two or more motors or one or more motors combined with other loads must have an ampacity not less than 125 percent of the full load current of the

s 8

6. Motor and Branch Circuit Overload Protection


Overload devices are intended to protect motors, motor-control apparatus, and motor-branch circuit conductors against excessive heating due to motor overloads and failure to start. An overload is an operating overcurrent that if permitted to exist for a sufficient length of time would cause damage or dangerous overheating of the motor and its associated equipment. Short circuits and ground-faults are not overloads. The installation requirements for motor and branch circuit overload protection are shown in NEC Article 430, Part III.

6.3 Service Factor


Service factor is a motor rating established by the manufacturer. It is a safety factor that means the motor can develop more than its rated or nameplate horsepower without damage to the motor. A 10 hp motor with a service factor of 1.15 can develop 11.5 hp without damaging the motor. While it is acceptable to operate motors up to the limit of their service factor rating, motor life may be reduced.

6.4 Motor Temperature Ratings


When planning electric motor installations, ambient temperature and temperature rise must be considered. The ambient (surrounding) temperature is the temperature of the air where the motor is installed. Standard motors are subject to a 40C (104F) ambient temperature rise. This means that a 40C rise motor will stabilize its temperature at 40C above the ambient temperature. The motor windings temperature rises after a motor is started due to current flow in the windings. In all motors a certain amount of input energy is lost, dissipated in the form of heat which raises the temperature of the motor. As the load on a motor increases, the temperature rises. If too great a load is put on the motor it will become excessively hot and damage to the insulation on the windings will occur. Standard motors are designed so the temperature rise produced within the motor windings when the motor is delivering its rated horsepower, added to the industry standard 40C ambient temperature rise, will not exceed the safe winding insulation temperature limit.

6.1 Continuous Duty Motors


Continuous duty motors are motors that are permitted to operate for an indefinite time at their rated load. Some motors have continuous and intermittent duty ratings and they are permitted to operate continuously at a particular load and intermittently at a higher load.

6.2 Separate Overload Devices


Overload protection is accomplished by separate overload devices or by protective devices integral with the motor. For continuous-duty motors rated more than 1 horsepower, separate overload devices are selected to open and shall be rated at no more than the following percent of motor nameplate fullload current rating. Motor overload protectors are selected using the motor nameplate full-load current rating, and not by using the motor full-load current tables. a) For motors with a marked service factor of 1.15 or greater 125% b) Motors with a marked temperature rise of 40C or less c) All other motors 125% 115%

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7. Disconnecting Means for Motor and Controller


7.1 Motor
7.1.1 Disconnecting Means for Motor A disconnecting means must be installed for each motor and must be in sight from the motor and its driven machinery, or meet the exceptions to NEC 430.102(B). The disconnecting means provided for the controller may serve as the motor disconnecting means if the controller disconnecting means is in sight from the motor and driven machinery location. 7.1.2 Disconnecting Means for Motor Maintenance A disconnecting means provided solely for maintenance purposes need not contain overcurrent protective devices. For other than Design E motors rated greater than 2 hp and stationary motors of 2 hp and less, the ampere rating of the disconnecting means must be not less then 115 percent of the full-load current (FLC). single disconnecting means may be used to disconnect all of the controllers. The disconnecting means must be in sight from the controllers, and both the controller and disconnecting means must be located within sight from the machine or apparatus. (NOTE: De-energizing the coil circuit of the motor controller alone is not an acceptable manner of disconnecting the controller.)

7.3 Types of Motor Disconnects


Determine the type of motor disconnecting means to be used according to the requirements of NEC 430.109, and the design characteristics of the installation: 7.3.1 Motor-Circuit Switch Motor-circuit switches rated in horsepower are capable of interrupting the maximum operating overcurrent of a motor (of the same horsepower rating as the switch) at the rated voltage. A motor-circuit switch must also have a continuous rating of at least 115 percent of the full-load current (FLC) of the motor. If this switch contains the overcurrent protective devices for the branchcircuit short-circuit, and ground-fault protection, follow the requirements of NEC Table 430.52 to determine the maximum rating of these protective devices. 7.3.2 Molded-case Circuit Breaker Molded-case circuit breakers are manufactured in both instantaneous trip and inverse-time types. Follow requirements of NEC Table 430.52 to determine the maximum rating or setting of these devices. 7.3.3 Other Types of Disconnects Other types of disconnects listed under NEC 430.109 include molded-case switch, instantaneous trip circuit breaker as part of a listed combination motor controller, self-protected combination controller, or a listed manual motor controller marked Suitable as Motor Disconnect.

7.2 Controller
7.2.1 Disconnecting Means for One Controller Disconnecting means are required for each motor controller. The disconnecting means for the controller must be in sight from the controller or be an integral part thereof, or meet the requirements of NEC 430.102(A), Exc. No 1. The disconnecting means must open the motor circuit conductors and must not be a general-use snap or other type of switch in the coil circuit of the controller. When the controller disconnecting means is open, closing the controller motor contacts manually must not establish a circuit to the motor. 7.2.2 Disconnecting Means for Multiple Controllers Where a motor circuit supplies a group of motors on a single machine or apparatus using several controllers, a s 10

8. Motor Control Circuits

Motor control circuits carry the current that controls the operation of the controller, but do not carry the main power current to the motor. These circuits because of their usage and power limitations are differentiated from electric light and power circuits. Motor control circuits have alternative requirements to those of NEC Chapters 1 through 4 with regard to minimum wire sizes, overcurrent protection and wiring methods.

If opening the motor control circuit creates a hazard, such as stopping a fire pump, the motor control conductors may be protected by the short-circuit, and ground-fault protective devices for the motor branch circuit.

8.3 Control Circuit Transformer


Where motor control conductors are supplied by the secondary of a single-phase transformer having only a 2-wire (single-voltage) secondary, the conductors are permitted be protected by the overcurrent protection on the primary (supply) side of the transformer. This protection must not exceed the value determined by multiplying the appropriate rating of the overcurrent device for the secondary (conductor) as determined by NEC Table 430.72(B) by the secondary-to-primary voltage ratio. Transformer secondary conductors (other than twowire) are not considered to be protected by the primary overcurrent protection.

8.1 Source of Supply


Motor control circuits are permitted to be tapped from the motor branch-circuit conductors or supplied from the premises supply system wiring. Motor control circuits tapped from the motor branch circuit must be installed in conformance with NEC 430.72. Motor control circuits supplied from a source of power other than the motor branch circuit must be installed in accordance with NEC 725.23. Where a lower voltage is desired, a control transformer may be installed in either of the two supply methods used. Where a control transformer is used for motor control circuits and is supplied from the motor branch-circuit conductors, the transformer secondary must be wired in accordance with NEC Article 725, Part II.

8.4 Disconnection
Motor control circuits must be arranged so that they will be disconnected from all sources of supply when the disconnecting means is in the open position. a) Where the motor control circuit is supplied from the motor branch-circuit, the controller disconnecting means may serve as the motor control circuit disconnecting means. b) Where the motor control circuit is supplied from a source other than the motor branch-circuit, the motor control circuit disconnecting means must be located immediately adjacent to the controller disconnecting means. c) Where a transformer is used to obtain a reduced voltage for the motor control circuit and the 11 s

8.2 Overcurrent Protection


When a motor control circuit is tapped from the load side of the motor branch-circuit short-circuit, and ground-fault protective device to control the operation of the motor controller, that circuit must be protected against overcurrent in accordance with NEC 430.72. This tapped circuit can be protected by the motor branch-circuit protective device or by using supplemental overcurrent protection, if required.

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

transformer is located within the motor controller enclosure, the transformer must be connected to the load side of the motor control circuit disconnecting means. The control circuit transformer must be protected in accordance with NEC 430.72(C).

s 12

9. Motor Controllers

The motor controller is any switch or device that is used to start and stop an electric motor by closing or opening the motor circuit current.

If torque requirements are not indicated, it is recommended that 7 lb-in be used. Enclosures for motor controllers cannot be used as junction boxes, or raceways for conductors feeding through to other apparatus, unless designed to provide adequate space in accordance with NEC 312.8.

9.1 Rating
The power or circuit contacts of the motor controller must be sized on the basis of motor current. The rating of the motor controller or starter is directly related to NEMA sizes. Motor controllers are supplied in Size 1 through 8 and the electrical ratings of each size are available from manufacturers of AC magnetic contactors and starters. A typical Application Data for Selection chart is shown in Annex A. Each controller must be capable of interrupting the locked-rotor current of the motor. Motor controllers are very susceptible to damage due to short circuits. Extensive damage may occur if the short-circuit protective device is not carefully selected. The most vulnerable parts of the motor starter are the starter contacts, which may be welded by the fault current. Using short-circuit protective devices that are current-limiting and are sized as close as practical to the full-load current (FLC) is recommended. Excessive currents will cause motors to overheat and cause deterioration of the motor winding insulation. Proper overcurrent protection levels and overload relay ratings will open the motor circuit before current levels are reached that will damage motor winding insulation.

9.3 Controller Classification


NEMA 250-2000 defines ratings for electrical equipment enclosures. The common designations are: NEMA 1 General Purpose. Suitable for indoor use in general-purpose applications. NEMA 3R Rain Proof. Outdoor use in rain, sleet or snow. NEMA 4 Water-tight and Dust-tight. For indoor use in dusty environments or outdoor use in rain, sleet or snow. NEMA 6P Water-tight and Corrosion Resistant. Indoor or outdoor use in wet or corrosive locations. NEMA 7 & 9 Hazardous Locations. Cast-iron or cast-aluminum for use in hazardous (classified) locations. NEMA 12 Industrial Use. Dust-tight and driptight for industrial use. Indoor use in wet, corrosive and oil or coolant seepage locations.

9.4 Wiring Space in Enclosures


The minimum wire-bending space within enclosures for motor controllers must be in accordance with NEC Table 430.10(B) where measured in a straight line from the end of the lug or wire connector to the wall of the enclosure.

9.2 Controller Enclosure


A controller enclosure must be marked with the manufacturers identification, the voltage, the current or horsepower rating. The terminals of motor controllers are marked to indicate the use of copper or aluminum, conductors and the torque requirements.

13 s

10. Motor Terminal Housings

Motor terminal housings must be of substantial metal construction except that nonmetallic housings may be used in other than hazardous locations (classified) provided an internal grounding means between the motor frame and the equipment grounding connection is provided in the motor terminal housing.

may be located either inside or outside the motor terminal housing. Equipment-grounding conductors must be connected by listed means such as, pressure connectors or lugs. Connection devices that depend solely on solder are not permitted. Sheet metal screws cannot be used to connect grounding conductors to enclosures. Conductor compression lugs bolted to the motor frame or motor terminal housing is a recommended procedure. NEC 250.8 provides the requirements for the connection of grounding and bonding equipment.

10.1 Dimensions and Space


a) Where wire-to-wire connections are made, the motor terminal housings must have minimum cover opening dimensions and usable volumes as shown in NEC Table 430.12(B). Motor terminal housings are the point in motor wiring systems where short circuits to ground are likely to occur. It is recommended that where possible, oversize motor terminal housings be provided to gain a greater usable volume for the wiring connections. b) Conductors must be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the purpose and the splices must be covered with insulation equivalent to that of the conductor. The use of identified manufactured splice insulators to cover wire-to-wire connections is recommended. c) Where terminations are provided in the motor terminal housing instead of wire-to-wire provisions, the connection of conductors to terminals must be made using pressure connectors, solder lugs, or by set-screw lugs. It is recommended that compression type lugs be used wherever possible.

10.2 Equipment Grounding Connections


A means for attachment of an equipment-grounding conductor must be provided at motor terminal housings for wire-to-wire connections or fixed terminal connections. The equipment grounding connection s 14

11. Motor Wiring Connections

Most motors furnished on electrical projects may have dual voltage ratings. It is extremely important that the installer of these motors use the motor voltage rating that matches the characteristics of the premises wiring. For 3-phase motors wound in either Star (Wye) or Delta configurations, the dual windings are connected in series for the high voltage connection and in parallel for the low voltage connection. Always check the motor nameplate for the numbered winding lead connections. (NOTE: Diagrams for motor lead connections described in 11.1, 11.2, and 11.3 are shown in Annex B.)

11.3 Motor Rotation


CAUTION: After completing the installation of an electric motor, always check the direction of rotation before energizing. To change the rotation of a 3-phase motor, reverse any two leads of the branch circuit (T1, T2, or T3) feeding the motor. To change the rotation of a singlephase motor, reverse the connections of either the main or auxiliary windings.

11.1 High-Voltage Connections


Motor winding leads in both Star and Delta wound motors are connected in a numerically identical manner for the high-voltage connection. Winding leads 4 & 7, 5 & 8, and 6 & 9 are spliced, insulated, and placed inside the motor terminal housing. Winding leads 1, 2, & 3 are connected to the motor circuit leads T1, T2, and T3.

11.2 Low-Voltage Connections


Motor winding leads are connected numerically different for Star-wound motors and for Delta-wound motors when making the low-voltage connection. Star-wound motor. Motor winding leads marked 4, 5, & 6 are spliced together, insulated, and placed in the motor terminal housing. Leads 1 & 7, 2 & 8, and 3 & 9 are spliced together and connected to the motor circuit leads T1, T2, & T3, respectively. Delta-wound motors. Motor winding leads marked 2, 4, & 8 and leads 3, 4 & 9 and leads 1, 6, & 7 are spliced together and connected to the motor circuit leads T1, T2, & T3

15 s

12. Installing a 3-Phase Motor

The following example is the recommended procedure for a basic motor installation. It incorporates the six basic steps for the installation of an electric motor. The example assumes a 10 hp, 3-phase, 208-volt, design B, squirrel cage motor with a code letter F and a service factor of 1.15. The motor is manually started by means of a Start-Stop button located in the cover of the motor controller. There is a remote Stop button located away from the motor controller. The motor controller is within sight from the electric motor and contains the motor overload protective devices. Dual-element fuses provide overcurrent protection for motor circuit conductors. The terminals of all equipment being used are rated for use at 75C (167F). The motor has a full-load current rating of 28.5 amperes marked on its nameplate.

mined in Step 1, by 125 percent (30.8 x 1.25 = 38.5 amperes). In NEC Table 310.16, the 75C column indicates that an 8 AWG THWN copper conductor has an allowable ampacity of 50-amperes.

STEP 3: Determine the fuse size (dual-element) to be used as motor branch-circuit short circuit and ground-fault protection.
NEC 430.52 refers to Table 430.52 for the maximum rating or setting of motor branch-circuit short-circuit and ground-fault protective devices. Dual element (time delay) fuses are permitted to be rated at 175 percent of the FLC determined in Step 1. Multiplying the FLC of 30.8 amperes by 175 percent (30.8 x 1.75) gives 53.9 amperes. NEC 430.52 permits the next higher standard rating of overcurrent device, to be used where the values determined by NEC Table 430.52 do not correspond to the standard sizes or ratings of fuses or nonadjustable circuit breakers. The standard sizes or ratings of fuses and circuit breakers can be found in NEC 240.6. The next higher standard size above 53.9 amperes is 60 amperes.

STEP 1: Determine the full load current (FLC) of the


motor to be connected. NEC 430.6 requires that for determining the ampacity of conductors, or ampere rating of switches, or the branch-circuit short-circuit and ground-fault protection, the FLC of motors be determined using the values given in Tables 430.147, 430.148, 430.149, and 430.150, instead of the actual current rating marked on the motor nameplate. NEC Table 430.150 covers 3-phase alternating current motors and using this table we find that a 10 hp, 208-volt motor has a FLC of 30.8 amperes.

STEP 4: Determine the rating required for the motor disconnect switch.
NEC 430.110 requires that the disconnecting means for motor circuits must have an ampere rating of at least 115 percent of the full-load current rating of the motor. A listed non-fused motor-circuit switch having a horsepower rating equal to or greater than the motor horsepower is permitted to have an ampere rating less than 115 percent of the full-load current rating of the motor. Multiply the FLC of 30.8 amperes times 115 percent (30.8 x 1.15 = 35.42 amperes). Since this exceeds 30 amperes, a motor disconnect switch rated at 60 amperes is required.

STEP 2: Determine the size of the motor branch-circuit conductors.


NEC 430.22 requires that the branch-circuit conductors supplying a single motor to have an ampacity not less than 125 percent of the motor full-load current rating. Multiplying the FLC rating as deters 16

Installing a 3-Phase Motor

STEP 5: Determine the motor and branch-circuit overload protection required.


NEC 430.32 requires a separate overload device that is responsive to motor current or a thermal protector integral with the motor that will prevent overheating of the motor due to overload conditions or failure to start. In this installation the motor overload protective devices are located in the motor controller. For motors with a service factor of not less than 1.15, NEC 430.32(A)(1) allows the overload protective devices to be set at 125 percent of the FLC of the motor. For this requirement the actual motor nameplate full-load current rating (28.5A) must be used. Multiply the actual nameplate FLC rating times 125 percent (28.5 x 1.25 = 35.6 amperes). Where the overload relay selected above is not sufficient to start the motor or carry the load, the next higher size overload relay is permitted to be used provided the trip current of the overload relay does not exceed the percentage of motor nameplate fullload current shown in NEC 430.32(C).

Summary
Motor full-load current (FLC) Motor branch-circuit conductors Motor branch circuit overcurrent Motor disconnect switch rating Motor overload protection Motor control circuit overcurrent protection required 30.8 amperes 8 AWG THWN CU 60 amperes 60 amperes 36.5 amperes None

STEP 6: Determine requirements for motor control circuit conductor overcurrent protection.
NEC Section 430.72 shows the requirements for motor control circuit overcurrent protection. The motor control circuit extends beyond the motor controller enclosure to a remote stop button. Motor control circuit conductors are permitted to be protected by the motor branch-circuit short-circuit and ground-fault overcurrent protective device if the motor control circuit overcurrent protective device does not exceed the values specified in Column C of NEC Table 430.72(B). The motor branch-circuit protective device used in this installation is 60 amperes. Using 12 AWG copper conductors there is no requirement for supplemental overcurrent protection.

17 s

13. Electric Motor Maintenance

Todays electric motors require minimal maintenance. However, proper maintenance is still cost-effective. The following are recommended maintenance procedures to ensure a maximum life for an electric motor.

13.3 Protection
Motors, motor controls, and ancillary equipment must always be properly guarded against inadvertent entrance of foreign materials, which may cause damage to the equipment. Personnel protection should always be a primary consideration. Proper signage warning of live voltages and rotating equipment dangers is recommended.

13.1 Lubrication and Bearings


a) Most motors built today have sealed-bearing lubrication. This should be checked periodically to insure that the sealing has not been compromised and the bearing lubricant lost. b) For installations using older motors that require regular applications of lubricant, a monthly check of the lubrication level is recommended. c) An annual check of clearances between the rotor and the stator using a feeler gauge indicates unusual bearing wear. Misalignment between an electric motor and its load, or improper pulley belt alignment, are the major causes of bearing wear.

13.2 Cleaning
a) Electric motors require a clean and well-ventilated environment. Dirty motors run hot and overheated winding insulation can dramatically reduce the life of an electric motor. b) Electric motors should be periodically shut down and cleaned. Using an air pressure hose to blow debris out from the interior of the motor and cleaning the exterior with an identified solvent is recommended. This procedure should be done in conjunction with the bearing check shown above. c) Keeping the area around electric motors clear so that proper ventilation is always present is necessary to prevent overheating of the motor windings and will help ensure a long motor life. s 18

(This annex is not part of the standard)

Annex A: Tables
Motor Starter Selection Data Sheet
(Courtesy Square D Company)

19 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

s 20

Annex A: Tables

21 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

s 22

Annex A: Tables

23 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

s 24

(This annex is not part of the standard)

Annex B: Wiring Diagrams

Wiring Diagram: High Voltage and Low Voltage Delta Motor W indings

Wiring Diagram: High Voltage and Low Voltage Star (Y) Motor W indings

25 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

Wiring Diagram: One Three-Wire Stop-Start Station

s 26

Annex B: Wiring Diagrams

Wiring Diagram: Two Three-Wire Stop-Start Station

27 s

NECA 230

Standard for Selecting, Installing, and Maintaining Electric Motors and Motor Controllers

Wiring Diagram: Hand-Off Automatic Control

28

Annex B: Wiring Diagrams

One-Line Diagram: Motor Installation

29

(This annex is not part of the standard)

Annex C: Reference Standards

This publication, when used in conjunction with the National Electrical Code and product manufacturers literature, provides sufficient information to install and maintain electric motors and motor controllers. The following publications may also provide useful information: National Fire Protection Association 1 Batterymarch Park P.O. Box 9101 Quincy, Massachusetts 02269-9101 (617) 770-3000 tel (617) 770-3500 fax www.nfpa.org NFPA 70-2002, National Electrical Code (ANSI) Current National Electrical Installation Standards published by NECA: NECA 1-2000, Standard Practices for Good Workmanship in Electrical Contracting (ANSI) NECA 100-1999, Symbols for Electrical Construction Drawings (ANSI) NECA 101-2001, Standard for Installing Steel Conduits (Rigid, IMC, EMT) NECA/AA 104-2000, Recommended Practice for Installing Aluminum Building Wire and Cable (ANSI) NECA/NEMA 105-2002, Recommended Practice for Installing Metal Cable Tray Systems (ANSI) NECA 111-2003, Standard for Installing Nonmetallic Raceways (RNC, ENT, LFNC) (ANSI) NECA 200-2002, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Temporary Electrical Power at Construction Sites (ANSI) NECA 202-2001, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Industrial Heat Tracing Systems (ANSI) NECA/FOA 301-1998, Standard for Installing and Testing Fiber Optic Cables NECA 305-2001, Standard for Fire Alarm System Job Practices (ANSI) NECA 400-1998, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Switchboards (ANSI) NECA 402-2001, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Motor Control Centers (ANSI) NECA/EGSA 404-2000, Recommended Practice for Installing Generator Sets (ANSI) NECA 405-2001, Recommended Practice for Installing and Commissioning Interconnected Generation Systems (ANSI) NECA 407-2002, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Panelboards (ANSI) NECA 408-2002, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Busways (ANSI) NECA 409-2002, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Dry-Type Transformers (ANSI) NECA/IESNA 500-1998, Recommended Practice for Installing Indoor Commercial Lighting Systems (ANSI) NECA/IESNA 501-2000, Recommended Practice for Installing Exterior Lighting Systems (ANSI) NECA/IESNA 502-1999, Recommended Practice for Installing Industrial Lighting Systems (ANSI) NECA/BICSI 568-2001, Standard for Installing Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling (ANSI) NECA/MACSCB 600-2003, Recommended Practice for Installing and Maintaining Medium-Voltage Cable (ANSI) s 30

N A T I O N A L

E L E C T R I C A L

I N S T A L L A T I O N

S T A N D A R D S

National Electrical Contractors Association 3 Bethesda Metro Center Suite 1100 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-657-3110 fax: 301-215-4500 www.neca-neis.org
Standards & Safety Index: NECA 230
7K/12-03