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COSTUME BALL SAT., OCT. 26 AT 8:00 PM MUSIC MIX DJ WITH JIM SEVERANCE MONTPELIER

COSTUME BALL

SAT., OCT. 26 AT 8:00 PM

MUSIC MIX DJ WITH JIM SEVERANCE MONTPELIER ELKS COUNTRY CLUB TICKETS AT THE DOOR $15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE XX FOR DETAILS

JIM SEVERANCE MONTPELIER ELKS COUNTRY CLUB TICKETS AT THE DOOR $15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE
$15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE XX FOR DETAILS FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol.
$15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE XX FOR DETAILS FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol.
$15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE XX FOR DETAILS FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol.
$15.00 QUESTIONS CALL: 802-249-0414 SEE PAGE XX FOR DETAILS FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol.

FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT

Vol. 42, No. 24

DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol. 42, No. 24 Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors page
DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT Vol. 42, No. 24 Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors page

Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors page 2

Discovering

Downtown

Barre:

Nelson Ace

Hardware

page 6

2 Discovering Downtown Barre: Nelson Ace Hardware page 6 New Owners at “Delish- Montpelier’s Sweet Shop”
2 Discovering Downtown Barre: Nelson Ace Hardware page 6 New Owners at “Delish- Montpelier’s Sweet Shop”

New Owners

at “Delish-

Montpelier’s

Sweet Shop”

page 17

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SECTION 2

SSSSPORTSSPORTSSPORTSPPPOOOOOORRRTTTSSS SECTION 2 Airborne Speedway Hosts Vermonster 4x4 Invasion page 5b 403

Airborne Speedway Hosts Vermonster 4x4 Invasion page 5b

403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916

On the Web: www.vt-world.com

Email: sales@vt-world.com

October 16, 2013

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Tickets, info: 802-476-8188 • www.barreoperahouse.org

Club Membership: Fall Programs and Events: New New Couple $99 month • Family $133 month*
Club Membership:
Fall Programs and Events:
New
New
Couple $99 month • Family $133 month*
Member
Member
NO enrollment fee
Group Exercise Classes Included!
More than 50 classes offered weekly
Special
Special
Tennis Memberships available – Call for Special Prices
12 month contract required, prices do not include sales tax.
Family includes 2 spouses and up to 2 kids.
Offer Expires October 31,2013
•Speed School – Ages 9 and up –
Saturdays 9:00 AM Berlin Club
•Essential Pilates Series –
Begins October 13
•Tennis Leagues – Men’s and Women’s
Begin October 21
•Cardio® Tennis and Clinics –
Fall Schedule in session
•Pre-Season Hockey Boot Camp –
October 21 to November 15
•Introduction to Spinning® – November 2
www.firstinfitness.com
“Good For Every Body!”
Montpelier 223-1348
Berlin 223-6161
Like us on
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FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101
FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101
FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101
FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101
FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101

FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT • WINTERIZING 101

Home improvement projects perfect for fall

Home improvement projects can add value to a home and do-it-your- selfers know the sweat-equity that goes into such projects can give hom- eowners a greater sense of pride in their homes. But no two home improve- ment projects are the same, and homeowners should know that certain projects are best tackled during certain times of the year. Fall is a great season to work on your house, as the weather is often at its most agreeable once the summer heat has gone and before winter weather arrives. The following are a handful of fall-friendly home improvement projects for homeowners looking to improve their homes. Roof repair Whether you’re repairing or replacing the roof, fall is a great time of year to dust off the ladder and get some work done on your roof for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, fall is ideal for roof work because you won’t have to be up on the roof with the summer heat bearing down on you. This can make the project move along more quickly, which is especially beneficial if you are paying laborers to work on the roof. The fewer hours workers are fixing your roof, the less you will be paying in labor costs. In addition, fixing up the roof in the fall ensures those winter storms, be it rain or snow, won’t find their way into your home via leaks. A leaky roof in winter is hard to fix, as the roof surface could be treacherous in the winter and winter winds can make it dangerous to be up on the roof at all. Addressing leaks in the fall can prevent damage to your home’s interior, which can mount up if a leaky roof is not addressed until the following spring. Window work When the weather outside gets frightful, poorly insulated windows can allow cold air into the home. That often has a trickle-down effect on

finances, forcing you to turn up the thermostat in an attempt to offset the cold air pouring into the home. Whether you need your windows replaced or simply need to patch up any leaks, a proactive approach to leaky or older windows in the fall can save you from unnecessarily high heating bills come the winter. Addressing leaky windows also makes a home more comfortable for its inhabitants. Fall is the ideal time to address a home’s windows because the tem- perature outside tends to be pleasant. This means you likely won’t have to make much of an effort to offset the elements, and open windows in the fall won’t make your home’s interior very hot or cold like they might if you were to tackle the project during the summer or winter. Painting projects Painting is another home improvement project that seems tailor-made for fall. A fresh coat of paint or a new color scheme around the house can give a home an entirely new look and feel. But paint can be pungent and the aromas may last if it’s applied at a time of year when it can’t dry while the windows are wide open. Paint fumes inside a home can make the home uninhabitable, but painting at a time of year like the fall, when you can keep the windows open during and after the project, can help air the home out. But interior painting isn’t the only painting project homeowners can tackle in the fall. Many exterior paints are temperature-sensitive and need the temperature outside to be above 40o F. Paint that freezes won’t dry properly, and homeowners might be left with a costly and unsightly mis- take on their hands. Fall temperatures tend to be amenable to both interior and exterior painting projects, just be sure to check the weather forecast before making your first brush stroke.

HOUSEWORK Today, I washed my windows, cleaned my carpets, scrubbed and sealed my stone floor,
HOUSEWORK
Today, I
washed my windows,
cleaned my carpets,
scrubbed and sealed
my stone floor,
and got that nasty stain out
of my couch.
223-6577
I didn’t have to
lift a finger!
The
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407 BARRE STREET • MONTPELIER • www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com
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VISIT US AT ANY OF OUR LOCATIONS:
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SWANTON
MONTPELIER
NEWPORT
64 Harvest Ln.
(802) 288-1160
482 VT Rt. 78
(802) 868-4184
55 Country Club Rd.
(802) 223-7845
29 Industrial Dr.
(802) 334-7300
1-800-868-4184
1-800-370-7930
*Limited time only. See dealer for details.
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BUILT IN SOLD READY AMERICA * LOCALLY FOR YOU CHAIN SAWS STARTING AT $ 179
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Features powerful,
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through 12/31/13 at participating
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*A majority of STIHL powerheads are built in the United States
from domestic and foreign parts and components.
Demers Power Equipment
81 S. Main St.
| Barre
802-476-7712
DemersPowerEquipment.com
All prices are NES-SRP. † The actual listed guide bar length
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Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors The Barre Lions Club celebrated their 75th Anniversary on
Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors The Barre Lions Club celebrated their 75th Anniversary on

Barre Lions Club Bestows High Honors

The Barre Lions Club celebrated their 75th Anniversary on October 4 at the Canadian Club and presented the prestigious Melvin Jones Fellowship Award to Bob Sager (left) and Richard Thaken (right) for their “dedication to the Lions Club International.” The awards were made by Clem Cardinal, Past District Governor of Lions No. 45. The Lions Club is involved with many local proj- ects and is well-known for collecting and purchasing eye glasses and hearing aids for those in need.

■■■

BERLIN BARRE MONTPELIER 622-0250 479-0629 223-0928 Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun. Open 24 hours Open
BERLIN
BARRE
MONTPELIER
622-0250
479-0629
223-0928
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
Open
24 hours
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
5am M-S, 6am Sun. Open 24 hours Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun. GMUW Announces Annual Campaign

GMUW Announces Annual Campaign Drawing

Green Mountain United Way has launched its annual campaign and is happy to announce a grand prize that will be available to some lucky winner come spring when the campaign concludes. Worksites in the GMUW five-county service area may submit the names of employees who choose to donate or pledge, which will be entered into a drawing. The prize is a one-night stay for two at the Firehouse Inn in Barre along with a $50 gift card from the Ladder 1 Grille & Pub, both generously donated by Gardner Insurance Services, Inc. Pictured is Professor Gary Lord of Norwich University, who won last year’s campaign drawing - a two-night stay for two at Jay Peak.

LEAF REMOVAL & FALL CLEAN-UP ABARE LAWN CARE & PROPERTY SERVICES Eric Abare 476-6941 793-7472
LEAF REMOVAL
& FALL CLEAN-UP
ABARE LAWN CARE
& PROPERTY SERVICES
Eric Abare
476-6941
793-7472
Jeffrey W. Glosser, DDS Robert J. Lesny, DDS Extractions ~ Dental Implants ~ Facial Trauma

Jeffrey W. Glosser, DDS Robert J. Lesny, DDS

Extractions ~ Dental Implants ~ Facial Trauma Jaw Reconstruction ~ Botox General Anesthesia/Sedation

14 North Main Street, Suite 4001 Barre, VT 05641 (802) 223-2364

www.neos-vt.com

We’ve got what you’ve been hunting for Hobo, Baggallini, Vera Bradley, Victoria Leather pocketbooks, jewelry,
We’ve got what you’ve been hunting for
Hobo, Baggallini, Vera Bradley, Victoria Leather
pocketbooks, jewelry, cookware, candles & more
We can fit your feet and your lifestyle
Over 20,000 pairs of boots and shoes in stock
Always a good sale
Storewide Sale 20 % off
Tax free
at the Gift House through Oct 19 th
footwear
clothing
excludes some brands due to vendor pricing restrictions. Special LAZBOY sale pricing
livestock
and people
food
New Fall Arrivals : Free People, Canada Goose
Patagonia, The North Face, Ibex, Ice Breaker
Mountain Hardware, Horny Toad, Prana
Carhartt, Filson , Under Armour , Woolrich,
Silver, NYDJ and more
New Ugg arrivals
Hundreds of Uggs
in stock
Bargain
Balcony
Carhartt Fall
clothing 20% off
Summer & Fall
Footwear and
Clothing
40%-60% off
Plus great
deals under
the tent
Cabot cheddar
3lb $11.97
Backpacks
Free coffee, cider,
homemade donuts &
chocolate chip cookies
Saturday under the
tent
Tents
Ammunition
Vt Maple syrup
Quarts
Fire Arms
$14.95
1/2 Gallons
Binoculars
$ 24.95
Camo clothing
56#Winter Rye
Game cameras
$19.04
286 Waits River Road Bradford, VT
800-222-9316 local 802-222-9316
Conservation
mix 50# 79.50
DIRECTIONS FROM BARRE: Take Rt. 302 East from Barre.
Turn right onto Rt. 25 South to Bradford (approx. 28 miles)
Drive a little, Save a lot!

Bragg

Creemees

Good

Farm for everyone a Harvest of Things! And of course “World’s Best” Maple Creemees, Shakes
Farm
for everyone
a Harvest
of
Things!
And of course
“World’s Best”
Maple Creemees,
Shakes & Sundaes
Served Daily 8:30 - 6:00!
www.BraggFarm.com
Bob & Jini’s PUMPKINS are ready! Big Ones, Small Ones, Mini Pumpkins!
Bob & Jini’s
PUMPKINS
are ready!
Big Ones,
Small Ones,
Mini Pumpkins!

Hardy Vermont Mums

Bob & Jini’s Pumpkins

VT Apples & Cider Donuts

Manghi’s Bread

Manghi’s

Bread

“A
“A

We Ship

Anywhere

Quality

Donuts Manghi’s Bread “A We Ship Anywhere Quality Family Vermont Handcrafts Gifts Vermont

Family

Vermont

Handcrafts

Gifts

Vermont

Cheese

Farm

Shop”

OPEN

DAILY

Maple Farm

8:30AM

Tour

Maple

Products

to

802-223-5757 1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs)

6:00PM

E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs) 6:00PM AGC/VT Construction Career Day Event Proves Successful

AGC/VT Construction Career Day Event Proves Successful

Close to 400 students from eight high school technical centers in Vermont gathered at the Montpelier campus of the Associated General Contractors of Vermont this week for the annual AGC/VT Construction Career Day event. Students had opportunities for several hands-on experi- ences from operating huge con- struction machinery to experi- encing workplace safety issues such as impaired and distracted driving. “This event was a huge suc- cess,” said Cathy Lamberton,

AGC/VT Executive Vice President. “We owe a great debt of gratitude to the many equipment suppliers, the ser- vice vendors and the students who came from all corners of the state.” “The chance to see, touch and learn about a potential life career is priceless,” she said. “Since college may not be either available or of interest to technical school students, our career day event gives them a close up look at what can be a very successful career.” Students attended from Canaan Memorial Tech Center in the Northeast corner of Vermont and the Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, as well as Barre Technical Center, the Center for Technology in Essex, Cold Hollow Career Center in Enosburg, Green Mountain Technical Center in Hyde Park, Northwest Technical Center in St. Albans,

and Randolph Technical Center. Lamberton said, “One of the most important elements of AGC/VT is the education and training curriculum that covers nearly every aspect of work- place safety, both on the job site and on the highway.” Lamberton went on to say, “Our Construction Career Day event is a major component of that program, focusing on the future leaders in the construc- tion industry.” Lamberton voiced apprecia- tion for the Technical Center instructors “who look at our program as a meaningful piece of their education plan.” Lamberton said several equipment suppliers and ser- vice vendors expressed appre- ciation for the event saying it demonstrated a unique aware- ness of the potential in the future of the Vermont construc- tion industry.

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WE STILL
(802) 476-4342
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DO FILM!
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Wednesday, October 23rd, 6-7:30 PM
Come experience school
beyond
the classroom!
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�������������� CAPITOL CITY’S ★ WOODBURY AutoBody Rte. 2 • 1/2
CAPITOL CITY’S ★ WOODBURY AutoBody Rte. 2 • 1/2 mile E. of the Roundabout •
CAPITOL CITY’S
WOODBURY
AutoBody
Rte. 2 • 1/2 mile E. of the Roundabout • Montpelier, VT
In the Capitol City Kia Building
223-6283
-Norm Trepanier,
-Kristian Page,
Manager
Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-5PM
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-691-3914
Assistant Manager
“Yes, we’re still
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same quality
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over 30 years”
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ANY MAKE ★ ANY MODEL ★ ANY TIME

State Treasurer Pearce Recognized for Work at the State and National Levels

Treasurer Beth Pearce was recently recognized at both the state and national levels for her service and work within state government. The Vermont League of Cities and Towns presented Pearce with the Town Government Award at their annual Town Fair. She was rec- ognized for her focused con- cern for the welfare of stricken Vermont municipalities as they recovered from Tropical Storm Irene and more recent storms this summer. In granting the award, the league highlighted work by Pearce in 2011 and in 2012 to develop a financial assistance package to ease municipal financial stress dur- ing storm recovery efforts. The State provided for the advance of millions of dollars to towns for town highway aid, current use, education payments, and payment in lieu of taxes, at the same time deferring some edu- cation payments due the state. This summer the Treasurer’s office and Administration rein- stated advance of payments programs subsequent to storms and flooding. The league also recognized her work in the disbursement of Title III funds to towns with Green Mountain National Forest land within their borders for emergency service expenses stemming from the 2011 flood damage. The National Association of State Treasurers awarded Pearce with the Harlan Boyles- Edward T. Alter Distinguished

Service Award at their annual conference. She was chosen by members of the NAST Executive Committee to receive the award, which is presented to dedicated public servants whose outstanding career in government has provided a respected voice for NAST at all levels of state government. “Treasurer Pearce has been a passionate and tireless advo- cate for NAST and for the National Association of

Unclaimed Property Administrators,” said NAST President and Virginia State Treasurer Manju Ganeriwala. “She has taken on many respon- sibilities and roles in the last few years.” Pearce serves on the NAST Executive Committee and as the regional vice president for the east region. She also serves as president of NAUPA. Pearce is a resident of Barre.

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√ ATM access Barre and Montpelier (888) 996-5328 FALL FESTIVAL Sunday October 20th • 11 am
FALL FESTIVAL Sunday October 20th • 11 am - 4pm Central Vermont Academy Gymnasium 317
FALL FESTIVAL Sunday October 20th • 11 am - 4pm Central Vermont Academy Gymnasium 317
FALL FESTIVAL Sunday October 20th • 11 am - 4pm
FALL
FESTIVAL
Sunday
October 20th • 11 am - 4pm

Central Vermont Academy Gymnasium

317 Vine Street-Berlin, Barre, VT (up the hill across from Legare’s)

RUMMAGE SALE SILENT AUCTION FOOD • CRAFTS • GAMES
RUMMAGE SALE
SILENT
AUCTION
FOOD • CRAFTS • GAMES
What’s New in Business… Signature Styles welcomes Desiree to their team of professional stylists. Desiree
What’s New in Business…
Signature Styles welcomes Desiree to their
team of professional stylists.
Desiree Treon Mears has been a health &
beauty professional for 4 years and is now
a stylist at Signature Styles.
Desiree has a passion for being creative
and she is dedicated to helping you reach
your health and beauty goals from your
hair to your toes! And men, this includes
you too!
Desiree specializes in Paul Mitchell hair
care / and color, as well as bridal hair
and make up. Her work has been
featured in luxury Vermont weddings and
Vermont Vows magazine. She has
trained in downtown Boston, NYC
& Stowe, VT.
Call today and book your
next appointment with
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Signature Styles
100 State Street, Montpelier 229-2500 (located in the Capitol Plaza Hotel)
SignatureStylesVt.com
42 nd Annual Homemakers Craft Bazaar Artisans and Crafters Offering a Great Variety of Handcrafted
42 nd Annual
Homemakers
Craft Bazaar
Artisans and Crafters Offering
a Great Variety of Handcrafted and
Homemade Items and Baked Goods
Barre City Auditorium
Saturday, October 19, 2013
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
FREE
ADMISSION
FREE PARKING
Handicap Accessible
Sponsored by the Central
Vermont Regional
Homemakers
Food Concession Available
Contact 802-229-4351
Fall can take your breath away. SO CAN PANDORA’S AUTUMN COLLECTION. GOODFELLOWS FINE JEWELERS Available
Fall can take your breath away.
SO CAN PANDORA’S AUTUMN COLLECTION.
GOODFELLOWS
FINE
JEWELERS
Available Starting October 3
119 North Main St.
Barre, VT 05641
Phone: 802.476.4002
www.goodfellowsvt.com
*Purchase a Pavé Gift Set for $200, featuring a PANDORA
Clasp Bracelet or Bangle, two “You’re a Star” clips and one
pavé charm of your choice up to $65 (Retail value $240).
While supplies last. See store for details.
l k c u o r T a . d o C G y u
l
k
c
u
o
r
T
a
.
d
o
C
G
y
u
SALESALE
t
i
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n
u
c
S
OCTOBER 18, 19 & 20
e
Fri. Noon to 6PM • Sat. & Sun 10AM to 6PM
S
a
n
f
r
e
e
Keep Your Guns & Valuables Safe
& Save
~BIG SELECTION~
t
s
Route 12 • East Braintree, VT
802-728-5252
a
E

To Do List:

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(802)371-5011

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Berlin, VT 05602 (802)371-5011 yvonne.liguori@ingfp.com Registered representative of and securities offered through

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Discovering Downtown Barre: Nelson Ace Hardware

Bob Nelson, owner of Nelson Ace Hardware, recently spoke to the Barre Rotary Club at their weekly luncheon. Bob’s great-great-grandfather was a farmer in Middlesex at Three Mile Bridge Rd. His great-grandpa, Milo Algernon, sold and serviced International Harvesters, raw milk, and a saw mill. He lost everything in the 1927 flood, including four railcars of tractors. Although he had to declare bankruptcy, International Harvester sent him another shipment of the tractors. He was able to pay back everything he owed, and did it all from a wheelchair. He lost the use of his legs when his milk wagon flipped over. Following in the family tradition, Bob’s Grandpa Meriden moved to Montpelier and sold Philco radios and portable appli- ances. The local draft board refused to draft him because he was the only person in the area who could service and repair coolers, refrigeration and milking machines. In 1955, Carroll, Bob’s father, and his brother Milo opened Nelson Brothers on State Street in Montpelier. They sold and ser- viced major appliances, expanding to Barre in 1969 where Studio Place Arts is now located. After a fire in 1972, they bought the building next door in Montpelier. In 1978, a store was opened in Randolph, but it closed a few years later. Bob graduated from Montpelier High School where he played football and sang. He began working full time at the family busi- ness, now located at 188 North Main Street. Deciding not to attend college, his parents gave him stock in the company as he worked there, in lieu of tuition. By 1996, Bob and his wife, Linda, pur- chased control of Nelson’s. For 20 years he has been a singer in a local band, Native Tongue. In 1990, Nelson’s added firearms to their selection of goods. Although a smaller part of the business now, they still hold their firearms license. Over the years, they have expanded the size of the store, flip- ping space where Pool World is, and they became an Ace Hardware store. In 2008, the last expansion added their house- wares department. Bob is proud of how his storefront looks, but says it was all his dad’s vision. Over they years they have struggled with water prob- lems - Irene, Sandy, and in the May 2011 flooding they had 15 ft. of water in the basement, losing $150,000 in goods in less than two years. In the last 16 months they’ve had several “resets.” Light bulbs are a challenge because the changes come quickly. They have changed the power tool line, all the electrical supplies, cleaning products, and paint applicators. Coming up is a reset in the paint department, where they carry the Kensington line of paints. Nelson has worked to keep the same price points as they change product lines, and offering quality products has always been important. A carryover from Nelson Brothers days is their huge house- wares selection. They carry aprons, cookware, kitchen gadgets, glassware, gifts, local cards and candy. Also found at the store are gas grills, phones, faucets, bathroom accessories, water heaters, disposers, lawn and garden items, electrical, plumbing, and paint

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supplies. And they have regional sports selections. They sell and service vacuum cleaners, too. Nelson Hardware has consistently ranked at the top in customer service. The store has been voted “Best of the Best” hardware store in the Times Argus polls for five years. The Small Business Association honored them as the “Vermont Family Business of the Year” for 2013. Bob is proud of his staff, noting that Annette has been at the store for 22 years and Kelly for 15 years. Mr. B. is an institution and is famously known as Mr. Fix-it, and he is happiest when he’s solving a problem for a customer. Several Rotarians, including Carol Dawes and Karl Rinker, praised the store’s staff as being phenomenal, and always helpful. Responding to a question, Bob said he is a landlord too, with eleven apartments over the store. Karen Lane said she thinks it is great that he is bringing the “younger generation” along by offering part-time jobs where teens can learn a great work ethic about customer service. She and George Milne also thanked Bob for his commitment and leader- ship in the Barre community. Bob ended his talk by saying that at Nelson Hardware, “The customer comes first.”

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Town of Plainfield THANK YOU to all the businesses and people who made our 100th

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Largest Zipper in North America Coming to Downtown Barre

Studio Place Arts (SPA) and DEW Construction Corp., are teaming up to create a new pocket park in the heart of downtown Barre in the space between their two buildings. SPA will be install - ing on its property a 74-foot, granite zipper sculpture called “Unzipping the Earth.” DEW will be landscaping its adjacent property in tandem with the granite zipper sculpture where the main entrance to its new building, Barre City Place, is located. The new pocket park features a 74-foot long zipper that runs the length of the SPA art center. It will be made by artist Chris Miller in late October using both carved Barre gray granite and stacked granite elements. The long granite zipper will undulate along the side of the art center and it will be unzipped and filled with low plantings. On the other side of the zipper, there will be granite blocks placed for informal seating from which to enjoy the granite zipper and garden space. Chris Miller, the artist who designed the granite zipper sculp- ture, noted that, “The physical area essentially defined what could go into it.” He designed the zipper to flow through the long, nar-

row space between the 2 tall buildings with room inside the open zipper for lush plantings. Given the space, “the less linear, the bet - ter,” was a design goal for Miller. Two years ago, SPA created a Temporary Sculpture Park on what was then a vacant lot adjacent to the art center. Community members responded with great enthusiasm about seeing the vacant lot transformed from an eyesore to a space where people could gather, rest, play music and enjoy art. At the announcement of plans to develop the lot where the Temporary Sculpture Park had been sited into the new Barre City Place structure, SPA began working on a plan to create a new space in downtown Barre, this time combining its property with that owned by DEW. According to Sue Higby, Executive Director of SPA, “We real - ized that we needed to make another special place. The zipper sculpture garden will catch the attention of people, in part because of the curiosity factor and for its original beauty - imagine what fun they will have visiting what is likely North America’s largest zipper.”

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what is likely North America’s largest zipper.” nnn Barre Area Senior Center 135 N. Main St.,

Barre Area Senior Center

135 N. Main St., Barre • 479-9512

New Hours as of July 1, 2012: Mon-Thurs 9-3, Fri 9-12

The Barre Area Senior Center has two trips remaining this year. The first is to White River Junction for a scenic train ride aboard the Green Mountain Railroad on October 24. The cost for this trip is just $70 and includes transportation to and from the train sta - tion, a 2.5 hour train ride, lunch on the train and time to explore the White River Junction train station. The second and final trip for the year is to Indian Head Resort in New Hampshire for a White Mountain Christmas. The cost for this trip is $75 and includes bus transportation to and from the resort, free individual photos, cocktail reception, deluxe luncheon buffet, photo & gift from Santa, floor show and dance band. Please call 479-9512 or stop by 135 North Main Street to sign up for trips or for more information. Our Young at Heart Singers are preparing a patriotic mix of songs and will be performing in November. The singing group meets Tuesdays at 1pm. Also on Tuesdays, Denise will be giving French Lessons now at 11am. Mark your calendars for Cathy Harthshorn’s Write Your Story workshop beginning Thursdays at

9am and call Sandy at 479-9512 to sign up. In lieu of our monthly luncheon, the Barre seniors will celebrate Halloween with a party, costume contest and giving out candy to trick-or-treaters on Main Street, October 31st. Party starts at 3pm, costume contest at 3:30pm and trick-or-treaters coming by at

4pm.

Stop by the Barre Area Senior Center for lots of fun games and activities! Cribbage is now Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 9am; Mah Jongg at 1pm on Tuesdays and 10am on Wednesdays; Wii Bowling is Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10am; and line dancing every Friday at 10:30am! Don’t forget our special once-a-month events including Bingo on the second Wednesday of every month at 1pm, book discussions on the second Thursday of every month at 1:30pm, and Game Day on the third Wednesday every month, 11am to 3pm. As always, we welcome you to visit us and take part in activities at 135 N. Main St., call us at 479-9512, visit our website,

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The PlayCare Center is now open from 6:30 AM to 5:30 PM. We are also

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Granite Hills Credit Union Teaches Banking and Budgeting to CVABE Students

On October 9th and 10th, Granite Hills Credit Union provided two Financial Literacy workshops to a group of Central Vermont Adult Basic Education (CVABE) students. The group included students who are taking part in weekly math, reading, and/or writing instruction at CVABE’s Barre Learning Center. Sandra Poczobut, GHCU member Service Representative, focused the trainings on specific areas of interest to students: managing checking accounts, budgeting, becoming and/or remaining debt–free, and other per- sonal finance topics. “Everyone needs financial literacy skills,” stated Poczobut. “GHCU is proud to be part of a program that teaches the funda- mentals of money management to our neighbors who need assis- tance. Learning these skills changes the future for many central Vermont residents.” According to Carol Shults-Perkins, CVABE’s Executive Director, “We are grateful for financial professionals like Sandra who engage with us to provide our students with real life skills which will improve their success in life. Granite Hills is also a generous financial supporter of CVABE’s basic education servic- es. Our profound thanks to Granite Hills for this powerful volun- teer and funding commitment to the members of the communities we both serve.” For 47 years, CVABE has provided free adult education and

For 47 years, CVABE has provided free adult education and Sandra Poczobut, of Granite Hills Credit

Sandra Poczobut, of Granite Hills Credit Union in Barre, volunteers to teach financial literacy skills to students at Central Vermont Adult Basic Education.

literacy services in Washington, Orange, and Lamoille Counties. The organization delivers literacy instruction to approximately 700 adults and teens (ages 16-90+) annually in reading, writing, math, and/or English as another language. They also help students achieve their high school credential and prepare for employment and/or college.

nnn

VHAT Seeks Community Support for 2013 Matching Gift Program

Vermont Horse-Assisted Therapy (VHAT) is pleased to announce that two anonymous donors have generously agreed to match dollar-for-dollar all gifts of up to $4,500 received by VHAT by October 31, 2013. “This is the second year of this very successful program,” says VHAT Executive Director Donna Prudhomme. “We are so grate- ful to everyone who supports our efforts each year, but especially to these two individuals who have really helped make a difference in meeting our fund-raising goals. Fulfilling this objective is cru- cial. It represents a significant portion of our annual operating budget and ensures that we have the financial capability to offer all of our programs again in 2014.” Since January 2013, VHAT has worked with some 70 students ranging in age from five to 70 with a variety of disabilities. While some 30 percent of its students are on the autism spectrum − a primary area of interest for the local non-profit − other students come to VHAT with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, ADHD, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, moderate to severe developmen- tal disabilities, paralysis, Downs syndrome, hearing impairment, trauma and amputations. VHAT is also one of few local organiza- tions to address the economic challenges faced by many Central Vermont families, making scholarships available to students for therapy programs and to at-risk teens for riding instruction. “A substantial portion of this appeal will be earmarked for our Scholarship Program at the request of one of the donors,” says Sarah Seidman, Program Director for VHAT and a PATH-certified instructor (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship

(Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International). “Since its inception, VHAT has been

International). “Since its inception, VHAT has been committed to

offering affordable therapeutic riding experiences and lessons to the largely under-served region of Central Vermont. Meeting our matching gift goal allows us to continue offering our services to all families regardless of their economic status.” Checks may be sent to Vermont Horse-Assisted Therapy, 307 Culver Hill Road, Middlesex, Vermont, 05602 before October 31,

2013 in order to qualify for matching funds. Donations may also

be made online at www.vhat.org.

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Cyber Security Expert Kicks Off Norwich’s Todd Lecture Series

Norwich University will begin the Fall 2013 Todd Lecture Series with “The Future of Cyber,” a presentation by VADM John M. (Mike) McConnell on Thursday, October 24th, at 7pm in Plumley Armory, followed by a public reception in the Milano Ballroom at Crawford Hall. The first of two speakers in this series scheduled for this fall, McConnell is Vice Chairman of Booz Allen Hamilton, a leading provider of management and technology consulting services to the US government, where his primary roles include serving on the

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firm’s leadership team and leading Booz Allen’s rapidly expand- ing cyber business. McConnell joined Booz Allen after retiring from the Navy in

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continued on next page

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Kellogg-Hubbard Library News Montpelier

Kellogg-Hubbard Library News

Montpelier

On Wednesday October 16th at 7pm, join us for Behind the Scenes: Gardens of Paris. Tour guides Karen Kane and Charlotte Albers take you behind the scenes as they plan a tour and photo- graph a variety of gardens. You’ll be introduced to charming courtyard gardens, a medieval herb garden, green pockets and lush parterres, share insights (including do’s and don’ts of trip planning and garden design), and seek out hidden corners of the most fan- tastic city in the world. Almost as good as being there! Gus Speth, Dean of Vermont Law School and author of America the Possible: A Manifesto for a New Economy, presents Measuring What Matters, at 10:30am on Thursday, October 17, with video- conferencing in Burlington, Middlebury, and Williston. This event is sponsored by Gross National Happiness USA, The New Economical Institute, Global Community Initiatives, and Vermonters for a New Economy. A New Economy Week Program. Moonlight Madness is coming! Join us for some stargazing! On Thursday, October 17 from 6-9pm, Chip Darmstadt of the North Branch Nature Center will have a telescope on the Kellogg- Hubbard Library lawn, for star- and moon-gazing as part of Moonlight Madness in Montpelier. Thursday, October 17. Our director, Richard Bidnick, has hand-picked a selection of films for the Books to Film Discussion Series. On Wednesday, October 30 at 7pm, join Richard for Angel, a film based on the book by Elizabeth Taylor. Angel Deverell comes of age in Edwardian Cheshire, knowing she will be a great writer. Rising above her middle-class background, Angel finds a publisher and a wide audience for her frothy romances. With her royalties, she buys an estate. Angel is grandly self-centered, coloring her world as if it were one of her novels. When the Great War breaks out and reality begins to trump her will, can she hold on to the man she loves and her public? Screening followed by discussion.

And in the Children’s Department… The Dark Knight Comics Club returns to the Kellogg- Hubbard Library with co-facilitators Ben t. Matchstick and Ash Brittenham. Comic book enthusiasts and artists age 7-17 assemble Wednesdays from 3:30-5:00pm. Together we will take on draw- ing, writing, and collaborating on our comics using drawing and writing games, exercises, and group activities. Bring your creative spark and your penciling prowess as we generate characters, sto- ries, and epic tales. Whether you enjoy superheroes, manga, or graphic novels, this club is for you. As author Jack London once said, “You can’t wait for inspiration, you have to go after it with a club.” The Comics Club will run Wednesdays until November 20 (no club on October 30). On Tuesday, October 22, Story Time goes to the Fire Station! Come hear some stories and climb on fire trucks! Woo! Write On! Writing time for kids will be on Friday, October 25, 3:30-4pm. For aspiring authors ages 6 to 10. Are you full of ideas? Looking to spin a story? Willing to play with words? Be creative? Well, drop in once or join us for the series.

Groton Free Public Library

Groton Free Public Library

Beginner Conversational Spanish. Thursdays at 6pm. Perfect for an intro or brush-up on your Spanish skills! Six free classes provided by native Spanish speaker.

Crafts 4 Kids. Fridays: Oct. 18, 25 & Nov. 1 from 3-6pm. All supplies provided for a variety of drop-in kids’ crafts – something different each Friday!

Recipe Swap. Sunday, Oct. 20 at 4pm. This month’s theme:

Apples! Come swap a recipe that features apples. And, if you have time, bring some samples of your recipe to share – yum! We’ll make photocopies of recipes and/or share our websites.

YA: Between the Covers. Monday, Oct. 21 at 6:30pm. Book Club for teen and adult readers! This month’s read, Little Brother by Cory Doctorow, is available at the library for lending.

Book Discussion Group. Monday, Oct. 28 at 7pm. Night of Many Dreams by Gail Tsukiyama is the discussion topic this month. Available at the library for lending.

Crafts & Conversation. Every Wednesday from 1-3pm. Join us with your ideas and projects-in-process – or – just join us!

All of our programs are free and open to the public. Find us on Facebook (Groton Free Public Library) or contact Anne: grotonli- braryvt@gmail.com, 802.584.3358. Open Hours: Mon 2:30-7pm, Wed 10am-4pm, Thurs 10am- 12pm, Fri 2:30-7pm, Sat 10am-12pm.

HOST FAMILIES WANTED

FOR BRAZILIAN EXCHANGE STUDENT IN GREATER MONTPELIER AREA

The Montpelier Rotary Club is looking for two or more families interested in hosting an exchange student (female) for approximately three months each during the current school year 2013-2014. The incoming student will be qualified by Rotary International and is fluent in English. Please contact Dawn Provost, Executive Director of Westview Meadows at 223-1068, ext. 1.

and is fluent in English. Please contact Dawn Provost, Executive Director of Westview Meadows at 223-1068,
and is fluent in English. Please contact Dawn Provost, Executive Director of Westview Meadows at 223-1068,

Todd Lecture Series

continued from previous page

“Cyber warfare is one of the big questions for the near future— how imminent is it and how damaging will it be—and having someone of the Admiral’s stature and experience here to discuss the issue is really a treat for us,” said Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, Andrea Talentino, PhD. McConnell holds an M.P.A. degree from George Washington University, is a graduate of the National Defense University, the National Defense Intelligence College, and holds a B.A. degree in Economics from Furman University. The Todd Lecture Series is named in honor of MG Russell Todd (US Ret.) and his wife, Carol, in gratitude for their dedicated ser- vice to the University. MG Todd, ’50, serves as Norwich President Emeritus. With this series, Norwich reaches out to bring signifi- cant lecturers to campus. All events are free and open to the pub- lic. For more information: tls.norwich.edu or call (802) 485-2633.

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Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls,
Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls,
Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls,
Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls,
We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases, Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys,
We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases, Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys,

We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases, Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys, Jugs, Crocks, Canning Jars & Bottles, Lamps, Prints, Paintings, Knick-Knacks, Holiday Decorations, etc., etc.

Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations
Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations

Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations

Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations
Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations
Rich Aronson • 802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL
Rich Aronson • 802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL

Rich Aronson • 802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL

Dirty Tile? Dirty Grout?

Call today for an answer to your problem!

Dirty Tile? Dirty Grout? Call today for an answer to your problem! 802-505-1452 hssvt@yahoo.com HardSurfaceSolutionsVT.com

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NOTICE SNOW REMOVAL BIDS Washington County Mental Health Services is accepting bids for snow removal,
NOTICE
SNOW REMOVAL BIDS
Washington County Mental Health Services is accepting
bids for snow removal, sanding and salting at various
facilities (residential and commercial) in South Barre,
Barre Town, Barre City, Berlin, Montpelier, and
East Montpelier for the 2013/2014 season.
For a facilities list, please call 802-229-1399
Monday-Friday, 8:30AM to 4:00PM.
Bids must be submitted by Monday, October 28, 2013.
Sealed bids may be mailed to: WCMHS, PO Box 647,
Montpelier, VT 05601-0647,
ATTENTION MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT,
or dropped off at WCMHS, Inc., 885 South Barre Road,
South Barre, VT, ATTENTION MAINTENANCE
DEPARTMENT.
WCMHS, Inc. reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Contacting Congress U.S. Rep. Peter Welch Mailing address: 30 Main St.,Third Floor, Suite 350 Burlington,
Contacting Congress
U.S. Rep. Peter Welch
Mailing address:
30 Main St.,Third Floor, Suite 350
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.welch.house.gov
Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450
U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders
Mailing address:
1 Church St., Second Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 862-0697
U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy
Mailing address:
199 Main St., Fourth Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 863-2525

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper” 403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641 Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 Fax:
“Central Vermont’s Newspaper” 403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641 Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 Fax:

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641 Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 Fax: (802)479-7916 email: editor@vt-world.com or sales@vt-world.com web site: www.vt-world.com

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web site: www.vt-world.com GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION MEMBER CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Publisher:
MEMBER CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
MEMBER
CENTRAL
VERMONT
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
PUBLICATION MEMBER CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Publisher: Gary Hass and Deborah Phillips. Classified

Publisher: Gary Hass and Deborah Phillips. Classified Manager:

Ruth Madigan. Bookkeeping: Lisa Companion, Candy McLeon. Receptionist: Darlene Callahan. Copy Editor: Laura Rappold. Production Manager: Christine Richardson. Production: Kathy Gonet, Laura Rappold. Sales Representatives: Kay Roberts, Robert Salvas, Mike Jacques. Circulation: Aeletha Kelly. Distribution: Jim Elliot, Gary Villa, Elliot Ackerman, Stephen Daniels. The WORLD is published by WORLD Publications, Inc. in Berlin, Vermont. The WORLD is distributed free, and serves the residents of Washington and north-central Orange counties. The WORLD is published every Wednesday. The WORLD assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising but will reprint in the following issue that part of any advertisement in which the typographical error occurred. Notice by advertisers of any error must be given to this newspaper within five (5) business days of the date of publication. The WORLD reserves all rights to advertising copy produced by its own staff. No such advertisement may be used or reproduced without express permission. Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Closed Saturday and Sunday. Subscriptions: $8.00/month, $48.00/6 months, $96.00/year. First Class.

page 10

The WORLD

October 16, 2013

$96.00/year. First Class. page 10 The WORLD October 16, 2013 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the
$96.00/year. First Class. page 10 The WORLD October 16, 2013 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning pub- lic issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact telephone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit rates are available.

Montpelier FEAST Meals Program to Host Fundraising Dinner

Editor:

We at the FEAST meals program - a partnership between Montpelier Senior Activity Center (MSAC), Just Basics, Inc. and Good Taste Catering - owe a large thank you to all of the volun- teers, donors and diners who have helped our fledgling meals program get off the ground. We want to invite all of them, and the rest of the community, to celebrate with us at our open house and harvest-themed fundraiser dinner on Friday, October 18th from 4pm to 9pm. MSAC, at 58 Barre Street in Montpelier, will host the event.

Starting off the evening at 4pm will be a silent auction of food- oriented items, such as gift certificates to local restaurants, which you can peruse while enjoying appetizers and drinks from a cash bar. Bidding on the auction is open to all both before the dinner and at 8pm as the auction nears its close. At 5 pm, you may choose to dance as you listen to music by the Angie Zorzi Quartet. The three-course meal (which can be meat-based or vegetarian), including soup and bread, salad and entree, and a dessert course, will begin at 6pm. The cost of tickets for the whole evening is $50 per person. You can purchase tickets in advance at the MSAC office or by calling 223-2518. We think you’ll have a great evening, and perhaps you’ll join us again on a Thursday for our “FEAST to Go” lunches. They’re for sale to anyone, and help support the rest of the program which includes FEAST Together communal lunches on Tuesdays and Fridays, as well as FEAST at Home delivered meals. So, come to the dinner and bring your friends! Consider donat- ing above and beyond the ticket price to the FEAST program. And be in touch with us about how you can volunteer. Janna Clar, Director Montpelier Senior Activity Center

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM) is dedi- cated to increasing awareness about the importance of the early detection of breast cancer through a nationwide campaign held in October. An estimated 232,340 new cases of invasive breast can- cer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the United States during 2013, along with approximately 2,240 new cases in men. The American Cancer Society offers information, programs and services that help save lives. Being female and increasing age are the most important risk factors for breast cancer. Other important factors that increase a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer include certain inher- ited genetic mutations (BRCA1 and/or BRCA2), a personal or family history of breast cancer, being overweight or becoming obese after menopause, extremely high breast-tissue density as seen on mammograms, biopsy-confirmed atypical hyperplasia, a history of high-dose radiation therapy to the chest between the

ages of 10 and 30, and never having children or having one’s first child after 30. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammo- grams starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health. At this time, breast cancer cannot be prevented, which is why regular mammograms are so important. Still, there are things women can do to put their health first and help lower their risk of developing breast cancer. Women’s best overall pre- ventive health strategies are to:

- Maintain a healthy body weight throughout life

- Engage in regular physical activity

- Reduce alcohol consumption

- Stop smoking

To find the Society’s complete breast cancer early detection and nutrition and physical activity guidelines, visit cancer.org/breast- cancer. Today, one in every two women newly diagnosed with breast

cancer reaches out to American Cancer Society for help and sup- port. The Society offers people facing breast cancer free services to overcome daily challenges, like transportation, lodging, guid- ance through every step of the cancer experience, and information to help them make decisions about their care. The American Cancer Society invests in research to find, pre- vent, treat, and cure every cancer that affects women. This research has changed the course of cancer, contributing to ground- breaking discoveries such as showing that mammography is the best tool available to find breast cancer early, the widespread use of the Pap test, and treatments that are saving lives. Dr. Chris Holmes, a Society funded researcher at the University of Vermont, considers the American Cancer Society a pioneer in some of the most advanced thinking in the field of breast cancer research. Homes, M.D, Ph.D, is studying how platelets, which on average double in a woman with breast cancer, become activated in the body to help transport tumor cells and aid in the spread or metastasis of cancer. “We now learned breast cancer itself hijacks your own platelets and makes them different,” shared Dr. Holmes. “We think that causes them to be more cancer promoting. What we’ve learned may allow us to one day reverse the process of metastasis.” Making Strides Against Breast Cancer is a nationwide event that unites communities to walk together, one million strong, as the most powerful force to end breast cancer. Making Strides walkers turn awareness into action by raising more than $60 mil- lion each year so that the American Cancer Society can work to save lives from breast cancer. Take action by visiting making- strideswalk.org to register a team in the Chittenden County or Rutland County walk this month. For cancer information, all day, every day, call the American Cancer Society National Cancer Information Center at 1.800.227.2345 or visit cancer.org.

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Reiss’s Pieces By Judy Reiss W ell, we are finally back home from the Cape.

Reiss’s Pieces

By Judy Reiss

W ell, we are finally back home from the Cape. And it is probably just dumb luck, but the weather here is

much nicer and considerably warmer. But now that I am back, I have to spend a lot of my time going to the physical therapist.

We - the therapist who I absolutely love, and I - decided that five times a week is too much for me but that three times a week is definitely what I need. I think that it is going to work for me, especially since I am also going to follow every single thing that they give me to do while at home. So, this morning I got up and very slowly and in considerable pain came downstairs with comparative ease since Malcolm put up another railing for me to hold onto. It may look a little strange to see two railings on our staircase but it sure works and makes it possible for me to go up and down those stairs without any other help. This morning after coming down the stairs I sat in my chair by the computer and Malcolm made me a cup of tea and an English muffin. I sat in my chair and began to eat my breakfast and kept my eye on the clock because today is one of my “on” days and I have P.T. at 10:00. Just as I was about to thank Malcolm and tell him that my tea was prepared perfectly for me, I knocked the cup and sent half a cup of hot tea into my lap! And realizing that P.T. was only 45 minutes away, I took my wet and very unattractive pants off and put them in the dryer. Right now, I am writing this column and I can hear the dryer purring away. In about 10 minutes I am going to get my pants and pray that they are dry enough to wear and not look absolutely awful. That is how my day has begun, and I can only hope that it gets better, stiff and sore not counting. I had planned to write about Halloween, which is fast approach- ing. And I have to tell you that Halloween is one of my favorite holidays. At least it always has been. When I was young, my friends and I anticipated Halloween for weeks ahead and we planned our costumes with great care. Of course, back then there was no such thing as a “store bought” costume and our masks were made out of gauze and wax, I think. What I remember most about those days was putting on what we thought were funny or scary clothes and then our masks. The masks lasted about half an hour before they actually began to melt. By the time we had filled our paper bags with goodies, the mouth and nose of our masks had completely dissolved and sort of flapped every time we breathed. But did we care? Of course not, it was what Hal- loween was all about. And I kid you not, if I think about it I can still remember what those masks smelled like! Not bad, mind you, just strange. And when we were considered old enough, we went

Trick or Treating with groups of friends and no parents. The only ones who had their parents go with them were the “little” kids. Of course, back then we had nothing to worry about either. Halloween was fun and probably the only holiday except Christmas and Eas- ter where we got candy! Do you think that the children of today can imagine such a thing? When my children were young and still in elementary school, a few friends and I put together a Halloween party for them at the school. We made it as scary as we could and one year we had game booths, one or two years a haunted house and one year we had movies with a Halloween theme. The adults involved all wore costumes and I met each child and family at the door dressed as a scary mummy with a lantern to welcome them. I am still not sure how many were actually scared but they loved the idea of being scared and pretended to be. And then new people moved to town and demanded that the party be either cancelled or changed be- cause they didn’t want their children scared. And, of course, they won, and Halloween in our area was changed forever. Now my children have children of their own and the older ones are away at school and the younger ones live too far to visit Nana and Grumpy on Halloween. They do call me and let me know what their costumes are and they are lucky enough to live in areas that still let their children celebrate, and when they are done trick or treating they go to scary parties that of course, really don’t scare anyone. But the children still pretend and have a wonderful time. So, my advice to you on this Halloween is this… let the children be whomever they want to be and when they knock on your door, be amazed or scared. Don’t let them know that you recognize the accompanying parent and so you know who they are. Believe me, the younger they are the more they think that you have no idea who they are and they are thrilled. And let the children have a treat at your house. A piece of candy or a candy bar is what they want, but if you want to let the word get out and you never want to see another costumed gremlin, give out a graham cracker or an apple! I still remember the houses that tried to give out those graham crack- ers and even back then I wondered if they didn’t know why all the children boycotted them. And if you want to be a real sport and someone that the neigh- borhood children will talk about for the entire year, answer your door in costume. Believe me, the kids will think that you are the best and love every minute of trick or treating at your house. So, from our house to yours, have a very Happy Halloween and try to enjoy every minute. Believe me, the kids will always remem- ber this outrageous and silly day. And you can sneak a few tootsie rolls from their bags if you are careful!

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a few tootsie rolls from their bags if you are careful! nnn Senate Report: Women Gain

Senate Report:

Women Gain the Right to Vote

by Senator Bill Doyle

T he General Assembly

the direct primary, was

considered a “progressive”

group. Progressive legislation included Vermont’s initial workmen’s compensa- tion act, court reform, regulation of narcotics, and the establishment of farm labor and agricultural marketing bureaus. The Senate passed a constitu- tional proposal providing for women’s suffrage but the measure was killed in the House. The direct primary was referred to the people and passed by slightly over 3,000 votes. Dissatisfaction with the existing caucus procedures by which party nomi- nations had taken place was a basic reason for the adoption of the new primary law. In 1920 James Hartness, a self-educated inven- tor, engineer and political novice, used the primary to capture the governorship. Hartness believed management systems brought to government would produce efficiency and economy. Speaking before the General Assembly in 1921 he said: “It is su-

of 1915, which enacted

in 1921 he said: “It is su - of 1915, which enacted Edna Beard, the first

Edna Beard, the first woman to serve in the Vermont General Assembly. Beard represented the Town of Orange, and was

later elected to the Senate from

Orange County.

be done to promote their own success and also to

know what is deadly to their own interests and the interests of the state.” Hartness capitalized on another reform of the era - giving women the right to vote. He had been a leader on a state committee to ratify the nine- teenth amendment to the United States Consti- tution, the women’s suffrage amendment. When Hartness gave his Inaugural Address in 1921, sit- ting as a member of the House was Edna Beard, of Orange, a former school superintendent. She was the first woman ever elected to the Vermont House. In the beginning of his presentation Hart- ness said: “Women’s coming into full equality

We have a

in suffrage bodes well for humanity

thousand other reasons for being glad that woman has been granted equality in controlling and shap- ing the destiny of our State and Nation.”

Senator Bill Doyle serves on the Senate Edu- cation Committee and Senate Economic Affairs Committee, and is the Senate Assistant Minority

Leader. He teaches government history at Johnson State College. He can be reached at 186 Murray Road, Montpelier, VT 05602; e-mail wdoyle@leg.state.vt.us; or call

223-2851.

premely necessary for the workers and executives in our industries to get the fullest possible conception of principles governing life and engineering, so that they can see what must

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Hard to believe, but true - for just $20!

See participating merchants list at: www.ShopCentralVt.com

Subscribe online at: www.ShopCentralVermont.com

PUBLIC

NOTICE

BULLETIN

BOARD

This space will be reserved for all town offices to post their

Tax Notices •

Water/Sewer Due • Hours • Etc.

notices such as

NOTICE

WEBSTERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT #3

FLUSHING

OF

HYDRANTS

Websterville Fire District #3 will be flushing hydrants on October 27, 2013, between 8am – Noon

-Websterville Fire District #3

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1087-8-13WnPr IN RE ESTATE OF:

THEODORE B. PECOR, JR.

LATE OF:

BARRE, VERMONT

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the creditors of the estate of THEODORE B. PECOR, JR., late of Barre, Vermont. I have been appointed to adminis- ter this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred for- ever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Dated: October 7, 2013 Signed: Jodi L. Pecor 3 Morin Road Barre, VT 05641 Tel: (802) 272-8372 Name of Publication: The WORLD Publication Date: Oct. 16, 2013 Address of Court:

Washington Unit Probate Court 10 Elm Street, Unit #2 Montpelier, Vermont 05602

Receive the highest payout in the area GUARANTEED. Green Mountain Coins & Estate Jewelry Buying
Receive the highest payout in the area
GUARANTEED.
Green Mountain
Coins & Estate Jewelry
Buying gold, silver
and coins
We will evaluate your estate jewelry, sterling
flatware, tea sets and coin collections.
We will answer any question you have about
your item. If you are unsure if your estate jewelry
is authentic or costume, we will test your gold,
platinum, silver and diamonds to find out its purity
and if it's real. We base the value on the piece,
and the current market price of gold, silver and
platinum when you walk in the door.
John Kirby, Owner • (802) 777-5550
9 South Main Street, Waterbury (Next Door to Arvad's)
Owner John Kirby is a 1997 graduate of the American Numismatic Association,
Colorado Springs, for coin grading, certification and authentication.

The East Montpelier Elementary School District has a number of items to sell as a result of the renovation and expansion on our building. Interested parties can find a complete list of items, including photographs of the items, and bidding forms at the EMES Website:

www.emontpelierschool.org We will be conducting walk-throughs to view our inventory on Tuesday, October 15 from 8:00 a.m. -8:30 a.m., or Thursday, October 17 from 4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Bids will be due by 10:00 a.m. on October 28, 2013. Bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly marked “East Montpelier Sale #1: attention Alicia Lyford.” No electronic bids will be included in the bidding process: Post Office or Hand Delivery only. Notification of bids will be available on October 29, 2013 via email. Items must be picked up at EMES on November 1, 2013 or November 4, 2013 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

The Town of Orange has been awarded a $10,000.00 grant from The Vermont Better Backroads program. The grant funds are provided by the Vermont Agency of Transportation and the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. The program was designed to help towns correct problems with erosion control. The grant money is being used to stone line ditches on Bisson Road and Preston Road. Orange has realized the benefits of this practice during many of the flash flooding events that have occurred since 2011.

has realized the benefits of this practice during many of the flash flooding events that have
has realized the benefits of this practice during many of the flash flooding events that have
has realized the benefits of this practice during many of the flash flooding events that have
ANDRESS, CLYFTON P. "CLYF," 57, of Plainfield, died October 5, at Berlin Health and Rehabilitation

ANDRESS, CLYFTON P. "CLYF," 57, of Plainfield, died October 5, at Berlin Health and Rehabilitation Center. Born on Dec. 12, 1955, in Barre, he was the son of Romaine and DeEtte (Batchelder) Andress. He attended Twinfield School. Clyf spent his entire life living on East Hill on the family farm. He was self-employed as a farmer and logger. He also drove bus for Twinfield Union School and worked many years for Fowler Construction and then for Fowler Septic Service in Plainfield. Since 2001, he worked for the town of Plainfield. Clyf was a member of the Plainfield Fire Department, working up to assistant chief. He was a Freemason and a member of the Wyoming Masonic Lodge 80 of Plainfield. A lifelong out- doorsman, he loved fishing and hunting with his family and friends. For many years, Clyf looked forward to mentoring youth in the techniques of hunting and fishing. He is survived by his father and stepmother, Romaine and Edith Andress, of Plainfield; his sister, Debi Perry, and husband, Shawn, of Plainfield; four brothers, Andy Andress and wife, Carrie, of Solvay, N.Y., Edward Andress and fiancée, Allyson Holt, Doug Andress and Steven Andress, all of Plainfield; nieces and nephews Evan Perry, Kelsey Perry, Diana Tetreault, Kaitlyn Andress, Ashley Andress, Lucas Andress, Destiny Andress, Frances Watson and Juliana Watson; a great-niece and a great-nephew; a very special aunt, Gennie, and husband, Abram, of Tilton, N.H.; many aunts and uncles, and scores of cousins. Besides his mother, DeEtte Andress, and his grandparents, his uncle Stanley Batchelder; his favorite beagle, Buster; a stepsister, Delia Watson; and niece Sheri Watson prede- ceased him.

Delia Watson; and niece Sheri Watson prede- ceased him. BOYD, SUSANNE PERRY , 81, a longtime

BOYD, SUSANNE PERRY, 81, a longtime Greensboro resident, died October 3, at the Birches Nursing Home in Concord, N.H. She was born June 17, 1932, in Barre, the daughter of the late Courtland L. Perry and Bertha (Nason) Perry. She graduated from Spaulding High School in 1950 and continued her education at Vermont Junior College in Montpelier. On July 23, 1955, she mar- ried Ralph Sawyer Boyd Jr. at the First Baptist Church in Barre. They made their home in Cranford, NJ., for many years. Following the retirement of her husband, they relocated to Greensboro where they spent their remaining years. Susanne was employed by the National Life Insurance Company in Montpelier for several years. Following her marriage she stayed at home to care for her husband and young children. Mrs. Boyd was a member of the First Baptist Church in Barre, the Cranford Baptist Church in Cranford, N.J., and the D.A.R. She used her love of music to lead the two church choirs for many years. She was a member of the Wednesday Morning Club in Cranford and was an active volunteer for the United Way. She loved music and traveling. Survivors include a son, Ralph S. "Chip" Boyd III of Plainfield; three daughters, Laura Cote of Manchester, N.H., Ellen Boyd of Clearbrook, Minn., and Alison Boyd of Arvada, Colo.; five grandchildren; five great- grandchildren; many nieces, nephews and cousins. She was prede- ceased by her husband on Dec. 12, 2012; and four siblings, Viola Offensend, Courtland, David, and John Perry.

BURNS, RICKEY ALLEN, 52, of Barre, died October 4, at his home. Born Feb. 3, 1961, in Hyde Park, he was the son of Clayton and Priscilla (Miller) Burns. He attended Union 32 High School in East Montpelier. On Nov. 11, 1979, Rickey married Lisa M. Knowles in Brookfield. Following their mar- riage, they made their home in the Barre area. Rickey had worked in the foundry at Vermont Castings in Randolph for many years. He later owned and operated Burns Used Furniture and Antiques in Barre, which included restoring and refinishing furniture. He loved doing yard work around his home; his dog, Bear; going to yard sales; and playing cards. Survivors include his wife, Lisa Burns, of Barre; two daughters, Crystal Burns-Govea, and Heather Sayers and her husband, James, all of Berlin; five grandchildren; his half-brothers and half-sisters; nieces, nephews and cousins. His parents predeceased him.BURNS, RICKEY ALLEN

BUTLER, ALLEN GEORGE, 91, of East Montpelier, died October 6, at Central Vermont Medical Center. He was born at home April 11, 1922, the son of George Davis and Mary (Ormsbee) Butler. Mr. Butler graduated from Montpelier High School, and in 1948 he received a degree in poultry and dairy farming from the Vermont State School of Agriculture in Randolph. In 1952, Mr. Butler was married to MayBeth Fidelia Lowe in the Advent Christian Church in Colbyville. Allen was a lifelong resident of East Montpelier and spent his life career as a dairy farmer on the family farm on Center Road. He was a member of the Old Meeting House Church, for- mer member of the Vermont Automobile Enthusiasts, and a mem- ber of the Montpelier Senior Activity Center. Some of his special interests included antique cars, and he enjoyed dancing with his wife and friends. Allen is survived by his wife, MayBeth Butler; daughter Donna Butler; son Gary Butler, all of East Montpelier. Also surviving are three grandchildren. Allen was predeceased by a son, Bruce, on June 19, 2010; sister Ruth Schumpf and two brothers, Francis and George Butler Jr.

Ruth Schumpf and two brothers, Francis and George Butler Jr. CALLAHAN, WILLIAM R. "BILLY," JR. ,

CALLAHAN, WILLIAM R. "BILLY," JR., 60, of Waterbury, died on October 2. He was born March 23, 1953 to William Rex Callahan Sr. and Julia "Judy" (Draper) Callahan. He was married to Linda Thayer and later divorced. They had two children, Lorettalynn Callahan and Edward Elvis Callahan, of Waterbury; three grandchildren; his mother and a sister, Mary Forkey, of Waterbury; one niece and five nephews. He was predeceased by his father; a sister, Betty Forkey; and a brother-in-law, Edward Forkey Jr.

CAMPAGNARI, MARINA E., 55, of Orange, died October 1, at her home. She was born May 17, 1958, in Barre, the daughter of Edward H. and Olga (Campagnari) Venner. She attended Barre schools and Spaulding High School. On Aug. 6, 1977, she married Mark Lowery in Graniteville. The couple made their home in Barre Town. They later divorced. They enjoyed vacationing in Hawaii, Aruba, St. Thomas, Florida and California. She enjoyed gardening. Survivors include three

California. She enjoyed gardening. Survivors include three children, Christian Hammond, of Boston, and Amanda Lowery

children, Christian Hammond, of Boston, and Amanda Lowery and Jason Lowery, both of Barre; two grandchildren; her longtime companion, Fred Zullo, of Orange; two brothers and a sister.

companion, Fred Zullo, of Orange; two brothers and a sister. DAVIS, PHILIP , 83, of Braintree,
companion, Fred Zullo, of Orange; two brothers and a sister. DAVIS, PHILIP , 83, of Braintree,
companion, Fred Zullo, of Orange; two brothers and a sister. DAVIS, PHILIP , 83, of Braintree,

DAVIS, PHILIP, 83, of Braintree, died September 20 at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. He was born Dec. 17, 1929, in Bethel, the son of Fred and Emma (Walker) Davis. He attended Bethel schools and graduated from Whitcomb High School in 1947. Following his education he worked in the woods with his father logging. Mr. Davis served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After his discharge from the service he returned home and worked as a lathe operator at Fyles & Rice Plywood Mill in Bethel. He later worked for Hall Brothers Construction Co. before going to work at Waterbury Plastics in Randolph for 32 years until his retirement. He was married to Lyndell (Tabor) Delaney in May 1995. He had previously been married to Joyce Rhoades and Lorianna Davis. His memberships included White River Valley Snowgoers and Barnstormers Modeling Aircraft Club in Barre. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, gardening, bowling, snowmobiling, model airplanes and watching NASCAR. He also enjoyed the art of beekeeping. He is survived by his wife, Lyndell Davis of Braintree; two sons, Glen Davis of Hartford and Ralph Davis of Calais; a daughter, Donna Casey of Braintree, three stepdaughters, Sylvia Hunt of Braintree, Melanie Nattress of Winooski, and Patricia Cook of Braintree; grandchil- dren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. He was prede- ceased by his parents, an infant sister, Amelia, and three brothers, Ellsworth, Fred and Willis Davis.

and three brothers, Ellsworth, Fred and Willis Davis. GRAY, MARJORIE L. , 85, died October 2,

GRAY, MARJORIE L., 85, died October 2, at SouthwesternVermontMedicalCenterinBennington. She was born Sept. 29, 1928, in Shaftsbury, the daughter of Arthur and Abbie (Niles) LaClair. She attended Shaftsbury schools and graduated from

North Bennington High School in 1946. She married Lloyd Gray on Aug. 11, 1974, in Arlington, and worked at the IGA

store there. After moving to Brookfield in 1980, she worked at the P&C/Grand Union store in Randolph. She enjoyed sewing and doing crossword and jigsaw puzzles. Survivors include two sons, Reginald Jennings Sr., of Arlington, and Ronald Jennings, of Shaftsbury; a daughter, Janet Levine, of Pownal; 13 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren; two stepdaughters, Sonya Gardiner,

of Wakefield, R.I., and Donna Smith, of Westerly, R.I.; two sisters,

Betty Lukas, of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., and Joyce MacDonald, of Roanoke, Va. She was predeceased by her husband; a daughter, Sandra LaCross; a brother, Wayne LaClair; and a sister, Avis Whitman.

GRAY, RITA J., 94, of Bradenton, Fla., died September 27 at her home. She was born in Berlin on June 16, 1919, the daughter of James and Mary (Stewart) Towne. After graduating high school, Rita was awarded an academic scholarship to attend Trinity College in Burlington, where she earned a BS degree in mathemat- ics and science. She married Donald Gray Aug. 2, 1948. Their roots were in New England, but most of their married lives were

spent in New York, having lived in Plattsburgh, Moores, Perrys Mills, Buffalo, and finally settling their family in Staten Island. In retirement, they enjoyed wintering together in Florida for over 17 years. Her husband of almost 55 years predeceased her on June 3, 2003. Mrs. Gray grew up on a 50-acre family farm, she drove the tractor, planted, tended crops, fed and cared for livestock. She learned at an early age how to live "green," way before it was fashionable to do so. Rita had worked many jobs throughout her life. To help pay for her education, she sold bristle brushes, elder care, waitress and housekeeper. After graduating from college, she was a research assistant for Hoopers Radio Research, a lab assis- tant at Dartmouth eye clinic, in banking at Shawmut Securities, and was a medical transcriptionist for Dr. Pedley, of Northfield. She enjoyed being by the water and wanted a job that would allow her to have summers off, and that was the driving force that began

a teaching career. She secured a teaching job in Moores, N.Y.,

where she met the man of her life, Donald. Years later she began

a career in nuclear medicine at Staten Island Hospital, and contin-

ued working in that capacity until her retirement. She enjoyed camping, tending her gardens, horseback riding, skiing, music and dancing. She was a member of St. John The Evangelist Church in Northfield, St. Peter's Church in Staten Island, N.Y., and St. Joseph's Church in Bradenton, Fla. Rita was a piano accompanist in college, played the organ at parish churches, and also taught piano for a short while. She was a member of Staten Island Richmond Choral for 40 years, and The Saint Cecilia for about 15 years. She was accomplished on the piano, organ, spinet, recorder as well as the viola d'gamba. For the 17 years they traveled to Florida to winter, she was part of an early music group. Her love of music was a great way to become involved in her retirement home at The Woodlands Village. Soon after arrival she began playing for afternoon sing-alongs in the main lounge, and that expanded to include musical accompaniment at the chapel ser- vices. Survivors include her four children, Donita Aruny, of Guilford, Conn., Martin Gray, of Staten Island, N.Y., Mary Gary, of New York City, and Gary Gray, of Red Bank, N.J.; and nine grandchildren. She is also survived by son-in-law Dr. John Aruny, daughters-in-law Marilyn and Wendy Gray, and many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and -nephews. She is predeceased by five siblings, Monsignor Charles Towne, Sister Mary Cephas, and Norbert, John and Dora Towne.

LAMSON, LEONA M., 76, a longtime resident of Waterbury Center, passed away on October 5 at the home of her daughter and son-in-law in Berlin, with her family at her side. Leona was born in Burlington Oct. 31, 1936, the daughter of the late Andrew C. and Loretta (Champney) Fuller Sr. She married Stanley C. Lamson Sr. Oct. 2, 1954, in Richmond. He predeceased her Dec. 10, 1998. Leona attended school in Richmond and, once married, was a homemaker raising her and Stanley's children and caring for her father for many years in their home. She worked part time as a waitress at Spruce Pond Inn for many years; she also worked for Nichols Lodge and Commodores Inn in housekeeping, and Chittenden Bank doing custodial work. In her leisure time she enjoyed camping, traveling and in particu- lar spending time with her children and grandchildren, who were the love of her life. Leona is survived by her children, Stanley Jr. and wife, Diane, of Waterbury Center, Lisa Jennison and husband, David, of Waterbury Center, Lori Fisk and husband, Randy Sr., of Waterbury Center, Lynn "Peaches" Commo and husband, Don, of

Center, Lynn "Peaches" Commo and husband, Don, of Berlin, Scott and wife, Mary-Ellen "Em," of

Berlin, Scott and wife, Mary-Ellen "Em," of Waterbury Center; 13 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; three step-great-grandchildren; three sisters, Priscilla Young, Shirley Lamson, Sandra Auger; three brothers, William Fuller, Raymond Fuller, Andrew Fuller Jr.; many nieces and nephews; as well as her very dear friend, Ralph Vezina. She was predeceased by a son, Steven Lamson; three brothers, Rodney, Charles and Donald Fuller; and a sister, Alberta Felton. Leona was loved by many and had many special people in her life whom she consid- ered part of her family, in particular Gina Turner, whom she con- sidered one of her granddaughters.

Turner, whom she con- sidered one of her granddaughters. LOVELY, RALPH ELMER , 85, a long-
Turner, whom she con- sidered one of her granddaughters. LOVELY, RALPH ELMER , 85, a long-
Turner, whom she con- sidered one of her granddaughters. LOVELY, RALPH ELMER , 85, a long-

LOVELY, RALPH ELMER, 85, a long- time resident of Tilden House, died October 4, in the Garden Room of Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. His family had been at his bedside. Born Jan. 30, 1928, in Waterbury Center, he was the son of Irving and Julia (Magoon) Lovely. He attended elementary school in East Montpelier. Ralph married Lola Elizabeth Neun in St. Johnsbury. Following their marriage, they made their home in Cabot and resided in the Tilden House in Barre for over 10 years. She died in March of 2005. He had worked for many years as a truck driver and delivery man for several of the trucking companies in the Barre area. He later was employed at the Dessureau Machine Co., also in Barre. Hunting, fishing, his camp at Maidstone, snow machining, flower gardening and his GMC pickup were his special enjoyments, and he was a veteran of the U.S. Army from Jan. 16, 1946, to Jan. 23, 1947. He had been affiliated with the Cabot United Federated Church and was a life member of the Barre Elks Lodge 1535. Survivors include his step- son, George N. "Skip" Buck; a granddaughter; and two great- grandchildren; as well as special friends, Colleen Sanford and her son, Hunter, both of East Barre. Also surviving are his brother and sister-in-law, Robert and Dora Lovely, of Cabot, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his sister, Barbara Rollins, and brothers Philip, Paul, Joseph, "Pete" and Perley Lovely, as well as his stepdaughter, Cynthia Matthews, and daughter-in-law, Meryl P. Buck.

MARTIN, HILDA ELAINE HOLDEN, 87, of The Gardens, died October 3 at Berlin Health and Rehabilitation Center, with family at her side. Born March 11, 1926, in Barre City, she was the daughter of Wilman and Mildred (Thompson) Holden. Hilda grew up in Plainfield, graduating from Plainfield High School in 1944. On May 17, 1947, she married James "Jim" Martin at Grace United Methodist Church in Plainfield. They were married 39 wonderful years before his death in 1986. Jim and Hilda made their home in Barre and spent many summers at the family camp on Woodbury Lake. Hilda was an accomplished tap dancer and acrobat, performing with her father as a child. For many years she was employed by the New England Telephone Company in Montpelier. After leaving Barre in 1991, she lived in Royal Palm Beach, Fla., and Windsor, Vt. Since 2008 she had resided at The Gardens, in Williamstown. She enjoyed quilting, homemaking (especially baking), dancing, shopping, traveling, tennis, and photography. Family was an important part of her life and she enjoyed her many friends. She and her husband Jim will be remembered as faithful and active members of the Barre Congregational Church and its activities. Hilda was a Jaycee Ann and a member of the Home Demonstration Club. A loving wife, mother, sister, aunt, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Hilda is survived by her four children: son Robert Martin and wife Susan, daughter Cynthia Martin and husband George Longenecker, daughter Kathleen "Kate" Chatot and husband Jules, and son William and wife Nellie; 10 grandchildren; seven great-grandchil- dren; as well as several nieces and nephews and their extended families. She is also survived by her sister, Ila Perry and by her dear friend and companion, Frank Gaylord of The Gardens. Hilda was predeceased by her parents, her brother Willard, and her sec- ond husband John Kobe.MARTIN, HILDA ELAINE HOLDEN

MCBRIDE, DOROTHY, of Barre, passed away on October 3, one day away from her 90th birthday. Her daughter, Kathe, was at her bedside. Dot was born on Oct. 4, 1923, the daughter of the late William and Mabel (Lanigan) O'Brien in Elizabeth, N.J. Dot graduated in 1941 from St. Patrick's High School in Elizabeth, N.J.After her schooling, she was employed for many years for the Social Security Administration in New Jersey. On Nov. 23, 1947, she married her high school sweetheart, Richard Thomas McBride, in St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Elizabeth. They moved to Vermont in 1947, where Richard was a well-known figure throughout the granite industry until his death in 2004. Dot was well known for her community volunteer work, which included the American Red Cross Gray Ladies at the former Barre City Hospital. She was a Girl Scout leader for years and served as president of the Barre Girl Scout Council. She was a member of St. Monica Catholic Church in Barre and also a mem- ber of the school board of Marian High School and youth pro- grams at St. Monica's. Dot was also a member of the Catholic Daughters of the Americas, Court St. Monica 1181 and the Ladies of the Knights of Columbus. After her husband's retirement, they spent several winters in Pompano Beach, Fla. She was a wonder- ful, devoted mother, grandmother, wife and homemaker. She cre- ated lavish holiday meals over the years to which many people were always invited. She created a warm and loving atmosphere in her home that friends from all walks of life enjoyed. She had a passion for music and dancing. In her earlier years, she was in plays and variety shows in New Jersey where song and dance were the predominant themes. Both she and Richard had the fortune, over the years, to meet many notable celebrities and told great stories about these times. Dot opened her heart to people and they, in turn, did the same. Her endurance, strength and grace over the last several years is nothing short of admirable and inspirational. Survivors include her daughter, Kathe McBride, of Barre; one grandson; two sisters-in-law, Laura McBride, of Greenport, N.Y., and Lucille O'Brien, of Middlesex, N.J.; plus several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two brothers, William and Edmund O'Brien.

predeceased by two brothers, William and Edmund O'Brien. SMITH, JOSETTE MICHELLE , 66, passed away in
predeceased by two brothers, William and Edmund O'Brien. SMITH, JOSETTE MICHELLE , 66, passed away in

SMITH, JOSETTE MICHELLE, 66, passed away in the comfort of her family in Waterbury Center, on October 3. Born in Montpelier, April 28, 1947, she was the daughter of the late Leon and Lucia (Backus) Griffith. On Jan. 19, 1980, she married Christopher

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continued from previous page C. Smith in Boca Raton, Fla. Michelle was raised in a

continued from previous page

C. Smith in Boca Raton, Fla. Michelle was raised in a loving fam- ily in Waterbury Center. Since she was 13, she had been a con- tinuous member of the Waterbury Center Community Church. She attended Waterbury Center Elementary School and was a 1965 graduate of Waterbury High School. Following graduation she enrolled in the Mary Fletcher Hospital School of Nursing in Burlington. She graduated with honors in 1969 and promptly moved to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., with her best friend from nursing school. From 1969 to 1981, she worked at Broward General Hospital and Boca Raton Community Hospital. She steadily rose through the ranks from floor nurse to head nurse of critical, inten- sive, and medical care units. When she left Boca Raton Community Hospital in 1981, she had attained the position of nurse clinician, but even more impressive, the love and respect of all she came in contact with. In 1981, she and Chris moved back to Waterbury. She worked for a while at Dr. Robert Murray's medical office but soon decided to take a break from nursing. She went to work for Vermont Realty Exchange, achieving numerous professional rat- ings and awards. She finished her real estate career as the Vermont Realtors Association liaison to the Vermont Legislature. In 1992, Chris had a wonderful job opportunity, and they moved to Lake Wylie, S.C. Michelle spent 10 years with the South Carolina DHEC, caring for patients as a home health care nurse. In 2003, she and Chris moved to Palm Coast, Fla, where Michelle took on her last, and in some ways most rewarding, nursing challenge. She was the school nurse at Old King's Elementary School, responsible for over 1,100 children and the school staff. She always came home tired but so very happy to have worked with the kids. In the spring of 2007, Michelle retired and started enjoying time at their summer home in Glendale Springs, N.C. Michelle had always been an animal lover but had been especially drawn to boxers. Through the years she also had cats and was kind to any animal she came into contact with. Michelle's two favorite pastimes were golf and travel. When she returned to Waterbury in 1981, she became a fixture at Blush Hill Country Club. One of her favorite photos is of her and Chris riding an elephant in Chiang Mai, in the northern part of Thailand. In 2005, for their 25th anniversary, she and Chris spent 12 days on a safari in Tanzania. In her final years she bravely battled her cancer, lasting so much longer than expect- ed, and she was considered a miracle by some of her physicians. Her final days were spent resting at her sister's home in Waterbury Center, surrounded by the mountains in which she was raised and the family that she so dearly cherished. Michelle is survived by her husband of 33 years, Chris Smith, of Salt Springs, Fla.; her sisters, Betty Anne Libby, of Waterbury Center, Cindy Griffith, of Middlesex, and Noni Augustoni, of Largom, Fla.; as well as niec- es, nephews and extended family.

KELLY, BRENDA JOYCE, 62, of Waterbury, formerly of Carver, Mass., passed away peacefully at home surrounded by family on October 6. She was the beloved wife of the late Richard Kelly, who passed in 1999. Born in Norwood, Mass., on May 29, 1951, she was a daughter of Ellen (Christiansen) May, of Bolton, and the late George E. May Sr. Brenda grew up in Sharon, Mass., where she attended Sharon High School. She worked as a self employed home health care aide for many years. She cared for all and loved everyone as her own. Family was always the most important to her. She was always there to help her children, grand- children and anyone else in need. She will forever be remembered for her quick wit, refreshing sense of humor and a smile that would light up a room. In addition to her mother, Ellen, Brenda is survived by her children, Eric Preus, Joseph Preus, Lisa Champney, Karen Preus, William Kelly and Seanna Kelly; her stepchildren, Donna Baker, Paul Kelly and Leeann Givens; her siblings Cheryl Rendel, George "Skip" May Jr., Nancy Berry and Susan Lavigne; 17 grandchildren; and countless extended family. She was the sister of the late Tammy Relation.

family. She was the sister of the late Tammy Relation. SPASYK, JEAN HALL , 93, of

SPASYK, JEAN HALL, 93, of Montpelier, died October 7, at the Woodridge Nursing Home in Berlin. Her family had been at her bedside. Born

April 9, 1920, in Rochester, N.Y., she was the daugh- ter of Raymond A. and Anna (French) Hall. She was

a graduate of the University of Vermont in 1942 with

a bachelor's degree in music. On Feb. 22, 1943, she

married Army Lt. John J. Spasyk in Burlington. Most of their mar- ried life had been spent in Stowe, Essex Junction and Cabot, where John retired as principal of the Cabot elementary and high schools. He died Aug. 19, 1982. Jean had been a second-grade school- teacher for many years in Marshfield and Cabot. Survivors include her daughter, Marko Russell, of Montpelier, and son Michael Spasyk and wife, Joan, of Williston, as well as six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Also surviving is her sister, Nancy Baldwin, of Rochester, N.Y.; her brother, R. Avery Hall, of Burlington; and nieces and nephews. Besides her parents and her husband, John, she was predeceased by her son Peter Spasyk.

BENOIT, LANYARD E. "LARRY," 89, of Duxbury, passed away in the comfort of his home and family on October 8. Born in East Berkshire on Sept. 24, 1924, he was the son of the late Leo and Irene (Lawrence) Benoit. On July 7, 1942, he mar- ried the former Iris M. Sweet in Stowe. Iris, his wife of 66 years, predeceased Larry on Nov. 5, 2008. Larry attended schools in Montgomery and then at the age of 15 went to work with the Civilian Conservation Corps for two years. Following, Larry worked several years at the Eden Asbestos Mine before embarking on a long and successful career in construction. Starting out in highway construction, Larry later worked as a car- penter for many years with a brief stint as a crane operator for S.L. Garand Granite Co. An internationally known deer hunter and outdoorsman, Larry also was an author of several very successful hunting books and spent over 25 years teaching seminars nation- wide on the art and craft of deer hunting. Having personally bagged over 200 deer in his lifetime, Larry was recognized by Remington with the introduction of a special edition commemora- tive signature rifle, the first Vermonter to be bestowed that honor. Since the age of 13, Larry was a craftsman of custom handmade hunting knives that have been purchased from around the world. In 2012, he was inducted into the Vermont Sports Hall of Fame. His memberships included the Waterbury-Stowe Fish and Game Club and the Barre Fish and Game Club. It was Larry's desire toBENOIT, LANYARD E. "LARRY,"

wish all of his many friends, followers and fellow sportsmen a fond farewell, with gratitude for their patronage and friendship. Larry is survived by his children, Aloma Abner, of Middlesex, Serene Savarese, of North Bradford, Conn., Aleta Corriveau, of Duxbury, Zana Evans, of Duxbury, Lanny Benoit, of Montpelier, Lansing Benoit, of Duxbury, Lane Benoit, of Moretown, and Shane Benoit, of Middlesex; 23 grandchildren; 29 great-grandchil- dren; and two great-great-grandchildren; as well as nieces, neph- ews and extended family. Larry was predeceased by a daughter, Lona Burns; three brothers, Keith Benoit, Carlton Benoit and L. Cecil Benoit; and a sister, Avis Hatch.

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Thomas S. Costello 1971-2003 Tom, it’s been ten years since you left us and there
Thomas S. Costello
1971-2003
Tom, it’s been ten years since you left us
and there hasn’t been a day gone when
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your birthday and hope you have found your calm water. Karen Kitzmiller Memorial Winter Coat Drive
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your birthday and hope you have found your calm water. Karen Kitzmiller Memorial Winter Coat Drive
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Karen Kitzmiller Memorial

Winter Coat Drive

The Need is Great. The Time is Now. Help a Neighbor… Donate a Coat.

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Montpelier City Hall Saturday, October 26, 2013 9:00 am - 2:00 pm.

City Hall Saturday, October 26, 2013 9:00 am - 2:00 pm. Community National Bank is proud
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S.H.S. Class of 1943 Holds 70th Reunion

The Spaulding High School Class of 1943 held its 70th class reunion on September 21st at the Steak House Restaurant. Sixteen class members attended this last formally scheduled reunion of that class.

Pictured in back row (l to r): Darrow McLeod, Richard Pittsley, Angelo Ambrosini, Guy George, Robert Campo, Angelina Chioldi, Mary Garceau. Front row: Lyle Gauthier, Loraine Granai, Kio Granai, Norma Sassorossi, Nelda Rossi, Vilma Pinchetti, Noreen Murray, Marie Perrigo, Neda Lawrence.

■■■

Noreen Murray, Marie Perrigo, Neda Lawrence. ■■■ M.H.S. Class of 1963 Holds 50th Reunion Members of

M.H.S. Class of 1963 Holds 50th Reunion

Members of the class of 1963 of Montpelier High School, spouses and teachers recently held their 50th reunion in Montpelier. Attendees had a full weekend with gatherings at local classmates’ homes, a round of golf, a tour of the high school and the State House, a hike to the tower in Hubbard Park, and a dinner and wonderful evening of camaraderie at the Montpelier Elks Club. Classmates came from as far away as Finland. All are looking forward to the next reunion! Classmates and teachers in photo: Jim Adams, Mr. & Mrs. Alan Blakeman (Joanne), Roge Anderson, Pat Gandley, Harold Hoover Austin, Ilene Gillander, Bernie Barton, Mr. & Mrs. Johan Naess (Suzanne), Connie Bell (Hein), Mr. & Mrs. Conrad Rowell

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New Location with Ample Free Parking! Treating: •Acute & Chronic Pain •Asthma •Allergies •Headaches

Treating:

•Acute & Chronic Pain •Asthma •Allergies •Headaches •Anxiety/Depression •Stress •Hypertension •Sport Injuries •Insomnia

Pamela Brady, L.Ac.

250 Main St., Ste. 206, Montpelier, VT

802-229-1800

HEALTH CARE

Don’t have health insurance? Need to see a doctor? WE’RE HERE FOR YOU if you
Don’t have health insurance?
Need to see a doctor?
WE’RE HERE FOR YOU
if you live anywhere in Central Vermont
~ By Appointment Only~
553 North Main Street
Barre, VT 05641
802-479-1229

DENTIST

553 North Main Street Barre, VT 05641 802-479-1229 DENTIST CHIROPRACTIC L OWER B ACK P AIN
553 North Main Street Barre, VT 05641 802-479-1229 DENTIST CHIROPRACTIC L OWER B ACK P AIN
553 North Main Street Barre, VT 05641 802-479-1229 DENTIST CHIROPRACTIC L OWER B ACK P AIN

CHIROPRACTIC

Street Barre, VT 05641 802-479-1229 DENTIST CHIROPRACTIC L OWER B ACK P AIN • N ECK

LOWER BACK PAIN • NECK PAIN WHIPLASH • SPORTS INJURIES • HEADACHES

~MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED~

108 WASHINGTON ST., BARRE

479-3206

MASSAGE & SKIN CARE

Specializing in Carey B. Kimball Certified Bodywork ★Rotator Cuff & Repetitive Use Injury ★Frozen
Specializing in
Carey B.
Kimball
Certified Bodywork
★Rotator Cuff &
Repetitive Use Injury
★Frozen Shoulder/Nerve
Impingement Pain
★Neck & Whiplash
Related Injury Pain
★Medical Massage
Therapy
Insurance Billing Services
for Accepted Insurances
Practitioner
Professional Massage
& Skin Care
802-522-8976
15 Cottage Street, Suite 5
Barre, VT
www.pmsc.abmp.com
(above Benefit Shop)

MASSAGE

CARLY ABRAMS MASSAGE 802-272-8895 MASSAGEWEEKLY22@GMAIL.COM CARLYABRAMSMASSAGE.WEBS.COM $45 INTRODUCTORY RATE DEEP
CARLY ABRAMS
MASSAGE
802-272-8895
MASSAGEWEEKLY22@GMAIL.COM
CARLYABRAMSMASSAGE.WEBS.COM
$45 INTRODUCTORY RATE
DEEP TISSUE - TRIGGER POINT THERAPY
MYOFASCIAL RELEASE
SPECIALIZING IN NECK, SHOULDER & HIP PAIN
NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
WITT PLACE, MONTPELIER

HOUSING

802-479-8544 www.homesharenow.org
802-479-8544
www.homesharenow.org
Group B Strep Screening in Pregnancy By Donna Butler, Certified Nurse Midwife A standard part

Group B Strep Screening in Pregnancy

By Donna Butler, Certified Nurse Midwife

A standard part of prenatal care testing for pregnant women between 35 and

37 weeks is to have a swab of the vaginal/ rectal area taken to culture for a bacteria called Group B strep (GBS). Group B strep is a normal bacteria for some women to carry in their intestinal tract, but when present in large numbers can infect their

vaginal area and bladder. Although Group

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU’RE A GRANDPARENT! One man was recently heard telling another that he “had no

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU’RE A GRANDPARENT!

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU’RE A GRANDPARENT! One man was recently heard telling another that he “had no idea

One man was recently heard telling another that he “had no idea what it was like to be a grandparent!” The other responded by saying he could imagine it because he knew the joy of being a parent. “No,” the new grandparent insisted, “this is entirely different and

even more wonderful!” This marvelous declaration led the second man to ponder what it might be like to welcome the child of his

own most precious child into the world. He imagined it actually might be exponentially

greater than any joy he had

Seniors benefit in so many ways when they

   

ever known. After all, the birth of his children had

have the opportunity to interact with young

 

children. The benefits include improved well-

been

life-changing

events,

 

and

he

reveled

in

the

 
 

being, mental and emotional health, and a more positive outlook on life. At ROWAN COURT

 

HEALTH & REHAB CENTER, we strive to

expectation that the birth of his grandchildren could be

make the later years of life some of the very

equally exhilarating.

 

best years. We provide the finest quality health

   

P.S. Grown children often

care, rehabilitative and support services to our

cite a grandparent as being

patients and their families. For more information,

   
   

the most influential person in their young lives.

please call 476-4166. We are located at 378 Prospect St.

  the most influential person in their young lives. please call 476-4166. We are located at
The Health Center 157 Towne Avenue • Plainfield, Vt 05667 We would like to welcome
The Health Center
157 Towne Avenue • Plainfield, Vt 05667
We would like to welcome the
following people to our dental staff
Katarzyna Dionne, DMD
Attended Tufts Univ., Boston, MA
Richard Cordero, DMD, MD
from Burlington. An Oral Surgeon who will provide
services on a part-time basis on select Tuesdays.
Please call 454-1047 for an appointment

One Residential Care apartment

RESIDENTIAL CARE

available for immediate occupancy

Care that comforts. A community you’ll love.

occupancy Care that comforts. A community you’ll love. W ith our 24-hour staffing on-site, three superb

W ith our 24-hour staffing on-site, three superb meals daily in our dining room,

spacious apartments with kitchen and accessible bath, laundry and housekeeping service, personal care assistance, and a rich array of activities, Westview Meadows offers much more than great residential care.

It’s the warmth of a welcoming community.

care. It’s the warmth of a welcoming community. For more information, please call us at: 802-223-1068

For more information, please call us at:

802-223-1068

Visit us online at www.westviewmeadows.com

WestviewMeadows is proudly sponsored by the O.M. Fisher Home.

show that is important for the baby to have 4 hours of antibiotics on board before it is born to have maximum effectiveness to kill

the GBS bacteria. Mothers who have a history of fast labor may need to think about going to the hospital a little sooner in labor to allow time for the antibiotics to be given. Mothers with positive GBS cultures should remind staff that they tested GBS positive when they are talking to them on the phone with labor questions and when they arrive in labor as this can change their manage- ment. Mothers with positive GBS should call their provider if they have any suspicion that their water is broken even if they are not

in labor.

If a woman has not had GBS testing done she may be treated with antibiotics based on risk factors that occur during her labor. Risk factors would be if she went into labor before 37 weeks, if the bag of waters was broken for more than 18 hours, or if the pregnant woman had a temperature of 100.4 or over. Some hospi- tals have rapid GBS testing available and can get results back in

1-2 hours rather than days. Based on the situation, antibiotics may

or may not temporarily be started while waiting for the results of

the rapid test. Some women may have heard of using antiseptic washes of the vagina in labor to treat for positive GBS cultures rather than IV

antibiotics. This is being done in some places in Europe but is not currently a recommendation of the Center for Disease Control, the American College of OB-Gyn or The American College of Midwives. More studies need to be done before this can be seen as

a safe alternative to IV antibiotics which have been shown to

reduce infant illness and death. Some women may have heard of

using garlic cloves in the vagina during pregnancy to treat Group

B strep. This is not a safe alternative to IV antibiotics in labor for

the newborn. No one wants patients to have unnecessary antibiotics. Risks of

antibiotic treatment to the mother exist but are small. Treatment does not interfere with the mother’s mobility in labor as the saline lock can be capped off between doses. Treatment of GBS in labor has decreased severe illness and death in newborns significantly since the 1970’s. As a newborn intensive care nurse in l977 and l978, I remember what a devastating diagnosis newborn GBS was. Treatment of infants with GBS today is much more favorable, but

if the disease can be avoided, it is much preferable. An IV port in

labor with intermittent antibiotic treatment can help protect new- borns from a possible severe infection for mothers who test posi- tive for Group B strep infection.

B

strep does not cause problems in adults, screening in pregnancy

is

done so that measures can be taken to prevent the bacteria from

infecting the baby as it passes through the birth canal. Newborns are able to develop serious infections from the Group B strep bac- teria.

Infection of the baby with GBS can occur either right at the time

of birth or within the first week of life (early onset). In the l970’s

about 2 per 1000 live births were infected which resulted in many thousands of infected babies per year. In 2008, the Center for Disease Control reported that about 0.3 per 1000 live births were infected which is about 2000 cases per year. This decrease is thought to be due to screening for GBS and treating the bacteria with antibiotics in labor. GBS is the most common cause of blood infection in newborns called sepsis and infection of the fluid and lining around the brain called meningitis. The fatality rate of the babies that get the disease has also decreased from 50% to 4-6% due to improvements in pediatric care. Antibiotics in labor do not

help with late onset disease (onset after one week). This late onset

is thought to be acquired from sources other than the birthing

process. Women who test positive on their screen at 35 to 37 weeks are recommended to be treated with appropriate intravenous antibiot-

ics in labor. Oral antibiotics before labor starts do not properly treat GBS as the bacteria can grow back quickly. Women who have positive urine cultures for GBS during pregnancy do not have

to have a vaginal/rectal culture as they are felt to have high bacte-

rial counts. Women need to be tested with each pregnancy wheth-

er they were positive or negative with a previous pregnancy as

GBS can come and go. GBS is normally treated with penicillin, but women who are allergic to penicillin can still be appropriately treated with other types of antibiotics. Group B strep is not an STD. It is a normal intestinal bacteria for many women and causes no problems to the woman carrying the bacteria. She does not know it is there unless she is cultured. Studies show about one in four women carry the bacteria. It is important for women with a positive culture to allow time for appropriate antibiotic treatment in their plan for labor. Studies

■■■

Classified Deadline Is Monday Before 10:00AM
Classified
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM

Weekly

Health Tip

Weekly Health Tip by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph. Flu Shot Or Not? Being vaccinated can greatly

by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.

Flu Shot Or Not?

Being vaccinated can greatly reduce your chance of getting the flu. People age 65 and over are especially at risk, as well as those with asthma, heart, kidney or lung disease and weakened immune systems. Also at risk are those in close contact with these high-risk groups. People with allergies to eggs and women who are pregnant should consult their doctor before getting the vaccine. The best time to get a flu shot is between mid-October and mid- November.

to get a flu shot is between mid-October and mid- November. 20 South Main Street Barre

20 South Main Street Barre • 479-3381

M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm

Northern Vermont Oral & Facial Surgery is now New England Oral Surgery

Oral & Facial Surgery is now New England Oral Surgery Northern Vermont Oral & Facial Surgery

Northern Vermont Oral & Facial Surgery is pleased to announce their new name, New England Oral Surgery. The practice is currently located in Berlin, but will be relocating the first week of November to the 4th floor of the newly reno- vated Blanchard Block building in downtown Barre at 14 North Main Street. With their new state-of-the-art office and I-CAT imaging system, the surgeons and staff at New England Oral Surgery can work with your family dentist for your optimal treatment plan. Surgeons Dr. Jeffrey Glosser and Dr. Robert Lesny are Board Certified by both the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the National Dental Board of Anesthesia. They have

The Central Vermont Medical Center Auxiliary has been busy knitting comfort shawls used to

soothe people at the hospital in times of illness and stress. The group plans to expand distribution of com- fort shawls to Woodridge Rehab and Nursing, but

in order to do so, they are looking for more knit-

ters. The Auxiliary’s knitting group meets the first

knit- ters. The Auxiliary’s knitting group meets the first 1. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

1. Cloudy With a Chance of

Meatballs 2 (PG) animated

2. Prisoners (R) Hugh Jackman,

Jake Gyllenhaal

3. Rush (R) Daniel Bruhl, Chris

Hemsworth

4. Baggage Claim (PG-13)

Paula Patton, Taye Diggs,

5. Don Jon (R) Joseph Gordon-

Levitt, Scarlett Johansson,

6. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13)

Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne

7. The Family (R) Robert De

Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer

8. Instructions Not Included

(PG-13) Guillermo Rios, Leticia Lopez Margalli

9. We’re the Millers (R)

Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis

10. Lee Daniels’ The Butler

(PG-13) Forest Whitaker, Oprah Winfrey

(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

received specialized training that qualifies them as special- ists in the diagnosis and treat- ment of oral and facial diseases, dental implants, injuries and fractures of the facial region and jaw reconstruction. They have also received specialized training to provide these ser- vices to you safely using local anesthesia, seda- tion or general anesthesia. The capable and well-trained staff at New England Oral Surgery work in close cooperation with your family dentist and physician in an effort to provide you with the finest oral health care possible. For more information, please visit www.neos- vt.com.

Wednesday of every month from 1pm to 3pm in conference room 5 at the back of the cafeteria in the hospital. Anyone is welcome to join, even if you are not an auxiliary member. Yarn and knitting instructions are available or you can bring your own yarn. Lion Brand Homespun is a nice cozy one. Refreshments are served. If you have any questions, contact Robin Brandis robin.brandis@cvmc.org or 802-371- 4375.

■■■

Got Knitting Needles?

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Take action to improve your breast health with Gifford’s compassionate and

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Take action

to improve

your breast

health

with Gifford’s

compassionate and expert team!

health with Gifford’s compassionate and expert team! Call our Radiology Dept. today 728-2214 Time for your
Call our Radiology Dept. today 728-2214 Time for your well-woman exam? Call 728-2401. Accredited by
Call our Radiology Dept. today 728-2214
Time for your well-woman exam? Call 728-2401.
Accredited by
www.giffordmed.org
Integrative Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine National Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Day Thursday, Oct. 24 •
Integrative Acupuncture
& Oriental Medicine
National Acupuncture and
Oriental Medicine Day
Thursday, Oct. 24 • 6:00 to 8:00 PM
•Tai Chi
•Massage
•Acupuncture
•Herbal Teas
•Medicinal
Snacks
Kerry Jenni, L.Ac. and
Joshua Singer, L.Ac.
$5 fee for acupuncture
802-223-0954
for return patients,
156 Main Street, Montpelier
www.integrativeaom.com
FREE for new patients.
Card Shower for Edith Baldwin 95 th Birthday 10-25-13 Please send greetings to: 6961 County
Card Shower
for Edith Baldwin
95 th Birthday
10-25-13
Please send
greetings to:
6961 County Road
Calais, VT 05648
e l p S a M y e r r u P u 27 Years
e
l
p
S
a
M
y
e
r
r
u
P
u
27 Years Experience
t
n
BEEDE’S SUGARHOUSE
p
Hart Hollow Road
Washington, VT 05675
o
802-883-2364
m
802-883-5568
r
e
V
THE AMERICAN LEGION BARRE POST 10 320 NORTH MAIN ST., BARRE VT FLAG RETIREMENT CEREMONY
THE AMERICAN LEGION
BARRE POST 10
320 NORTH MAIN ST., BARRE VT
FLAG RETIREMENT
CEREMONY
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 20, 2013, 2 P.M.
PARKING LOT BEHIND THE POST HOME
Members of the public, businesses, and youth
and other civic groups with flags ready for
retirement are invited to bring their flags to Post
10 before the event, and to attend the retirement
ceremony on October 20.
For information call the Post at 479-9058
Happy Anniversary Botanica Florals and The WORLD would like to help you wish a special
Happy
Anniversary
Botanica Florals and The WORLD would
like to help you wish a special couple
a Happy Anniversary. Just send their
name, address & wedding anniversary
date. Each week we publish the names
plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each
week for a Gift Certificate for a bouquet
of fresh flowers from Botanica Florals
in Montpelier. No obligation, nothing to
buy. Just send anniversary names two
(2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to
The WORLD, c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY,
403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641.
Please provide name, address & phone
number for prize notification.
10 State Street
Montpelier
802-229-9885
www.botanicafloralsvt.com
flowers@botanicafloralsvt.com
Please Send Us Your October Anniversaries
& Be Automatically Registered
To Win A Gift Certificate from Botanica

OCTOBER 2 John & Delcinea Avery, 26 yrs, Graniteville OCTOBER 10 Kyle & Melissa Fowler, 1 yr, Topsham OCTOBER 22 Russell & Nancy Bragg, 50 yrs, West Fairlee

LUCKY WINNING COUPLE FOR THIS WEEK:

On OCTOBER 16, THOMAS & SUZANNE BEGIN of BARRE Will Celebrate 37 Years of Marriage

BOTANICA FLORALS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each week for a Gift Certificate from Botanica Florals. No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE

NAMES

ADDRESS

#

YEARS

PHONE

802-793-7417
802-793-7417

A Men's & Women's

Full Service Hair Care Salon

Call or Text!

& Women's Full Service Hair Care Salon Call or Text! 160 North Seminary Street in Barre

160 North Seminary Street in Barre

(near Yipes Stripes)

THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN

(near Yipes Stripes) THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN Family Owned & Operated for
Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years Mike & Amanda Peyerl -Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom
Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years Mike & Amanda Peyerl -Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom

Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years

Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years Mike & Amanda Peyerl -Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom Sets
Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years Mike & Amanda Peyerl -Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom Sets
Family Owned & Operated for 33 Years Mike & Amanda Peyerl -Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom Sets

Mike & Amanda Peyerl

-Reclining Sofas -Recliners -Bedroom Sets -Dinette Sets -Mattresses

97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Road • 802-479-0671

Fashion Know-How L e t ’ s t a l k a c c e
Fashion
Know-How
L e t
’ s
t a l k
a c c e s s o r i e s !
Now
that
the
cold weather is
creeping in, it’s a
great time to get
out the gloves and
scarves. Let’s start
with scarves~they
makeagreat accent
piece to any outfit. Winter scarves
can be worn not only outside with
your winter coat, but also inside to
accompany a sweater or top. Many
times I wear a scarf to replace a
necklace. It’s a great way to add
a print or pattern to a solid color
top. So consider the scarf when
accessorizing, and if you need scarf-
tying ideas, stop at No. 9 Boutique
for help! There are many different
knots and lots of looks the scarf
can offer.
Catch Fashion Know-How on
WDEV (550 AM) at 7:50am
Every Saturday!
Fashion Know-How is written by
Alyson Lincoln McHugh, owner of
No. 9 Boutique in Montpelier
www.shopno9boutique.com
E-mail us! Classified & Display ADS Now Placing Your Classified Or Display Ad Is Even
E-mail us!
Classified
& Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad
Is Even Easier!
Our E-mail address is
sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact person
& payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753

Happy Birthday!

FROM

( Only) 479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 Happy Birthday! FROM BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The
( Only) 479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 Happy Birthday! FROM BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.

OCTOBER 14 Steven Manwaring, 21, Williamstown OCTOBER 15 Gavin Hodgdon, 5, Jericho John Trepanier, 72, Barre Clifford Kenyon Sr., 77, Montpelier OCTOBER 17 Emily Badger, 3, Barre Sampson Ackerson, 16, Montpelier OCTOBER 18 Kay Roberts, Plainfield

Theresa Beard, 66, Brookfield Ayden King, 3, Middlesex OCTOBER 19 Katie Lynn Burt, 22, Barre Mally Duprey, 10, East Montpelier Daryl Fowler, 46, Topsham Taylor A. Poitras, 14, Malta, NY Nancy Lindsey, 81, Williamstown Gary Plante, 64, Barre OCTOBER 21 Kathy Holt, Barre

This Week’s Cake Winner:

October 16, GARRY DANIELS of WILLIAMSTOWN will be 72 YEARS OLD!

WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for Sharon Hebert (Bakery Mgr.) or Beverlee Hutchins or Penny Millette (Cake Decorators) by Thursday, October 17 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS

PHONE

accepted. BIRTHDATE NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS PHONE Paul Giacherio Jr., of Barre, got to meet

Paul Giacherio Jr., of Barre, got to meet his boyhood idol, Pete Rose, during a recent trip to Las Vegas.

■■■

Whoever said being a parent is easy? For help call Circle of Parents TM

1-800-CHILDREN

1-800-244-5373

SAVE $$$$! Curt'sCurt'sDrop-OffDrop-Off SATURDAYS JONES BROS. WAY near VT Granite Museum & Faith
SAVE $$$$!
Curt'sCurt'sDrop-OffDrop-Off
SATURDAYS
JONES BROS. WAY
near VT Granite Museum &
Faith Community Church
in Barre
$
per 30 gal. and/or
3.00
25
lb. rubbish bag
for 2 or more at
a time
$
3.25
per 30 gal. and/or
25
lb. rubbish bag
Free Recycling ~ Limits Apply
See You 7:30AM to 1PM!
bag Free Recycling ~ Limits Apply See You 7:30AM to 1PM! Tom Herzig’s recent article about

Tom Herzig’s recent article about the Survivor contestants with local ties contained outdated

career information for Candice Cody. Candice has a Masters in physiology and biophysics from

Georgetown University and an MD

from George Washington University. She is currently a 3rd year resident at Georgetown in anesthesiology. ■■■

year resident at Georgetown in anesthesiology. ■■■ ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A colleague might

ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

A colleague might offer to open

a door for you professionally.

But before you walk through it, be sure this “favor” isn’t attached to an obligation you

might find difficult to dis-

charge. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)

Your creativity, your persis- tence and your reliability could

lead to a major career shift. Be

sure to use that other Taurean trait, your practicality, when discussing what the job offers. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)

A changing situation might

require some adjustments you

might not have been prepared

to

make. However, flexibility

in

this matter could be the best

course to follow at this time.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You’re in a period of fluctuat-

ing

moods, which is not unusu-

al

for the Moon Child. Your

emotions stabilize by the 25th. Meanwhile, try to hold off making major decisions until

then. LEO (July 23 to August 22) That keen sense of perception helps you hunt down those

minute details that others over- look. And, of course, your Leonine ego will accept the expected praise with good grace. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Be careful not

to be confrontational when

raising a work-related issue. Better to make a request than a demand. And, of course, be prepared to back up your case with facts. LIBRA (September 23 to

October 22) Your ego might be hurt when a colleague turns down your offer to help. But accept it as a rejection of your offer, not of you. A friend from the past could re-emerge by

week’s end.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A flow of posi- tive energy turns a work proj-

ect you didn’t want to do into

something you actually love

doing. Now, take that attitude into your social, intimate life -- and enjoy what follows. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Working hard to meet your professional goals is fine. But don’t neglect your private life, especially where it

concerns your more cherished relationships. CAPRICORN (December 22

to January 19) “Patience”

remains the key word in deal- ing with an emotionally sensi- tive situation involving a close friend or family member. Help

comes your way by week’s

end. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) With new infor- mation coming in, it’s a good time to rethink some of your goals without taking sugges- tions from others, no matter how well-meaning they might be. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Making progress on your project is relatively easy in the early part of the week. A prob- lem could arise midweek. But

all goes swimmingly once it’s resolved. BORN THIS WEEK: Holding fast to your principles, no mat- ter what, inspires others to fol- low your example.

(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

The Sewing Basket “A Professional Sewing Service” Over 30 Years in Central Vermont Alterations &
The Sewing Basket
“A Professional Sewing Service”
Over 30 Years in Central Vermont
Alterations & Tailoring
for the Whole Family
Hems, Sleeves, Waists,
Zipper & Lining Replacement,
Leather Garment Repair
Bridal & Formal Wear Alterations
•Embroidery & Monograms
•Personalization •Screenprinting
•Garments & Gifts
Dry Cleaning Services
G R E E R S
provided by
Dry C
leaning & Launder Centers
Pickup & Delivery Every Day!
BARRE 476-8389
325 N. Main St.
MONTPELIER 778-9311
168 River St., Montpelier
www.sewingbasketvt.com

New Owners at “Delish-Montpelier’s Sweet Shop”

After working for five years and surrounded by some of the best candies in Vermont, the temptation to own the store became too great for Mary Kay Blouin along with her sister, Joanne Marcelle, when they decided to purchase Delish – Montpelier’s Sweet Shop, located at 5 State Street, this past week. Blouin had worked at the attractive little shop with previous owners “Pinky” and Lorraine Clark, and even the original owners Kelly Sullivan and her son, Heyden. “It’s always been a fun place to be and we love our neighbors next door at The Quirky Pet, says Mary Kay. For Joanne, who also works at Washington County Mental Health, there will be some “on the job training” but, according to her sister, she is a very fast learner and very excited to be part of the business. She’ll do the bookkeeping and also occasionally work in the sweet shop. “The Blouin Sisters,” as they like to refer to themselves, and as they are known on their LLC form and affectionately around town, try to stock “what our customers want” from “penny candy” (Mary Jane’s, etc) to well-priced bulk delicacies and up to very fine chocolates by Laughing Moon of Stowe and Birnn Chocolates from South Burlington. In addition, there are selections from Lake Champlain Chocolates and Nutty Steph’s of Middlesex. “We love to buy locally in Vermont whenever possible and ev- ery one of our suppliers is just fantastic to us,” note the Blouin

sisters, adding “they offer the best and finest and just plain coolest candies anywhere.” Customers can choose from small amounts of “retro candy and gum that we grew up with” to larger amounts of same priced mix and match bulk popular candies such as jelly beans, licorice, cor- dials, almonds and fruits or back to a single piece or two of hand- made top shelf treasures such as sea-salt caramels and thick pep- permint dark chocolates. “We want to carry what customers want. Let us know,” state the sisters, who plan on being open seven days a week (Mon-Sat 10- 5:30, and Sun 11-4). Almost every day is special at Delish: Maltball Mondays, Truf- fle Bear Tuesdays, Wormy Wednesdays, Thirteen Thursdays and Fishy Friday. The sisters are also excited about a program that is through WC- MHS called “Vermont Choco- late for Change” that helps

with youth and young adults. They hope to have some of their products on hand. Halloween is coming fast and the sisters have a wonder- ful selection of chocolate eye- balls, alien glow pops, candied corn, wax fangs and mustach- es, kreepy kliks, pet tarantulas, etc., etc. for parties and trick- or-treaters, or to mail to your college students or grandkids. Stop in soon at Delish or call the Blouin Sisters at 223-7933.

in soon at Delish or call the Blouin Sisters at 223-7933. CVMC’s Berlin Urology Welcomes Urologists
in soon at Delish or call the Blouin Sisters at 223-7933. CVMC’s Berlin Urology Welcomes Urologists
in soon at Delish or call the Blouin Sisters at 223-7933. CVMC’s Berlin Urology Welcomes Urologists

CVMC’s Berlin Urology Welcomes Urologists Scott Perrapato, DO and Peter Holoch, MD

Scott Perrapato, DO Peter Holoch, MD

Scott Perrapato, DO

Scott Perrapato, DO Peter Holoch, MD

Peter Holoch, MD

Director, Computer-Assisted Robotic Surgery, Fletcher Allen/UVM; Coordinator, Genitourinary Cancer Multi- disciplinary Clinic; Urologic Oncologist; Assistant Professor at the University of Vermont College of Medicine

Director, Urology Student Medical Education and Associate Professor at the University of Vermont College of Medicine

Medical School: University of Vermont College of Medicine

Residency:

Medical School:

University of Iowa - Urology

UMDNJ School of Osteopathic Medicine

Fellowship:

University of Iowa - Urology

Residency: Metropolitan Hospital, New York - Urology Fellowship: Roswell Park Cancer Institute - Urologic Oncology

 
 

As part of Fletcher Allen Partners Dr. Perrapato and Dr. Holoch, both members of the Fletcher Allen Medical Group, will be seeing patients locally at Berlin Urology. Practice areas include:

• Urinary stones and blockages

• Enlarged or painful prostate conditions

• Urinary and genital infections

• Male Incontinence (leakage of urine)

• Male sexual difficulties

• Urination problems of all types (including bleeding)

Male Infertility

• Vasectomy as a form of permanent sterilization

• Evaluation and treatment of the urinary symptoms related to neurological diseases

• Urologic cancers (prostate, bladder, kidney, testicle)

Both physicians are now accepting patients. Call 802.371.4820 for an appointment. Berlin Urology / Medical Office Building C, Suite 1 / on the CVMC campus

Central Vermont Medical Center

Central Vermont Medical Center

Central Vermont Medical Center

Central to Your Well Being

www.cvmc.org

Central Vermont Medical Center, with Fletcher Allen Health Care, CVPH Medical Center and Elizabethtown Community Hospital, are members of Fletcher Allen Partners which was established to develop a more coordinated system of care throughout the region.

nnn

Junkman to Perform with Waterbury Congregational Church Youth

Traditional hymns will be replaced by contemporary junk music when the Junkman per- forms with youth at the Waterbury Congregational Church on Sunday, Oct. 20, from 10am to 11am. The Junkman, Donald Knaack, will be working with youth at the church for two consecutive Sundays. A com- poser, percussionist, and envi- ronmentalist, he will be teach- ing kids to reduce, reuse, and recycle, as they create instru- ments out of recycled materi- als and everyday found objects. Together they will compose music for a junk music perfor- mance during the Sunday, Oct. 20, church service. The public is invited to attend. The Junkman’s HOP (Help Our Planet) program was a recipient of the Vermont Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence in 2008. A resident of Manchester, Vt., the Junkman frequently takes his hands-on environ- mental message to schools across the state. His junk music is well known. The Junkman has per- formed at The Kennedy Center and Lincoln Center and for events, such as the World Environment Day at the United Nations and the Sundance Film Festival. Though the Junkman is con- servatory-trained and a former member of the Louisville Orchestra and the Buffalo Philharmonic, he now per- forms only on recycled materi- als. For more information on the Junkman, visit www.junkmu- sic.org/programs.php. The Waterbury Congregational Church is located at 8 North Main Street. For more information, call

244-6606.

HHHHHHHHHHH

“Meteorites, Witch Balls and Halloween Beads” Moonlight Madness. Thursday, October 17
“Meteorites, Witch Balls and Halloween Beads”
Moonlight Madness. Thursday, October 17
Halloween Beads” Moonlight Madness. Thursday, October 17 ARTISANS HAND ContemporaryVermont Crafts 20% off Madness
Halloween Beads” Moonlight Madness. Thursday, October 17 ARTISANS HAND ContemporaryVermont Crafts 20% off Madness
ARTISANS HAND ContemporaryVermont Crafts 20% off Madness by Moonlight 6-9 only 89 Main at City
ARTISANS HAND
ContemporaryVermont Crafts
20% off
Madness by Moonlight
6-9 only
89 Main at City Center
Montpelier ~ 802-229-9492
artisanshand.com
Like on Facebook for more images
Moonlight Madness Thursday 6-9 Quality Meets 20 Off % Conscience Storewide 62 Main St. Montpelier
Moonlight Madness Thursday 6-9 Quality Meets 20 Off % Conscience Storewide 62 Main St. Montpelier

Moonlight Madness

Thursday 6-9

Quality

Meets

20Off

%

Conscience

Storewide

62 Main St. Montpelier • 223-1353

MONTPELIER PHARMACY 20 % PROUD TO BE YOUR LOCALLY OWNED PHARMACY SINCE 2007 OFF ALL
MONTPELIER PHARMACY
20 %
PROUD TO BE YOUR
LOCALLY OWNED
PHARMACY SINCE 2007
OFF
ALL BURT’S BEES
PRODUCTS
Call us at 223.4633
50% OFFGIFT ITEMS
with questions about
all your prescription
and pharmacy needs.
brought down from our Waterbury Pharmacy store
Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM

our Waterbury Pharmacy store Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM 1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to
our Waterbury Pharmacy store Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM 1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to
our Waterbury Pharmacy store Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM 1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to
our Waterbury Pharmacy store Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM 1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to
our Waterbury Pharmacy store Thursday, October 17 6PM-9PM 1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to

1 Day: October 17 3 Hours: 6:00 to 9:00 PM only

20% off EVERYTHING

(Yes, EVERYTHING!)

6:00 to 9:00 PM only 20% off EVERYTHING (Yes, EVERYTHING!) In-Stock Only. No Special Orders Or

In-Stock Only. No Special Orders Or Layaways. Includes Previously Discounted And Sale Priced Merchandise.

find us on facebook.Orders Or Layaways. Includes Previously Discounted And Sale Priced Merchandise. Main Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2393

Main Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2393

Athena’s 20% OFF STOREWIDE! (both stores, 6–9 pm) includes Dr. Hauschka, Thymes and Jane Iredale
Athena’s
20%
OFF STOREWIDE!
(both stores, 6–9 pm)
includes Dr. Hauschka,
Thymes and Jane Iredale
67 Main Street • 223-7752
54 Main Street • 224-1010
MoonlightMoonlight MadnessMadness SaleSale 20% OFF ENTIRE STOCK! Woodbury Mountain Toys OCTOBER 17 - 18 -
MoonlightMoonlight MadnessMadness SaleSale
20%
OFF
ENTIRE STOCK!
Woodbury Mountain Toys
OCTOBER 17 - 18 - 19
THURS. 10-9
FRI. 10-6
SAT. 10-5:30
24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272
FRI. 10-6 SAT. 10-5:30 24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272 HHHHHHHHHHH H 10/17 H 20% off STOREWIDE
FRI. 10-6 SAT. 10-5:30 24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272 HHHHHHHHHHH H 10/17 H 20% off STOREWIDE
FRI. 10-6 SAT. 10-5:30 24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272 HHHHHHHHHHH H 10/17 H 20% off STOREWIDE
FRI. 10-6 SAT. 10-5:30 24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272 HHHHHHHHHHH H 10/17 H 20% off STOREWIDE
FRI. 10-6 SAT. 10-5:30 24 State St., Montpelier 223-4272 HHHHHHHHHHH H 10/17 H 20% off STOREWIDE

HHHHHHHHHHH

H

10/17

H

20% off

STOREWIDE

THURS.

ALL DAY!

10AM to 9PM

SUMMER BLOWOUT SALE!

Items starting at $10.00

MOONLIGHT

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BLOWOUT SALE! Items starting at $10.00 MOONLIGHT MADNESS 27 State Street • Montpelier 802-229-2367 adornvt.com

27 State Street • Montpelier

802-229-2367

adornvt.com

Mon.-Sat. 10am-5pm, Sun. 11am-4pm

25% OFF STOREWIDE! OCTOBER 17 • 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
25% OFF STOREWIDE!
OCTOBER 17 • 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Montpelier 802-229-2367 adornvt.com Mon.-Sat. 10am-5pm, Sun. 11am-4pm 25% OFF STOREWIDE! OCTOBER 17 • 6:00 PM -

page 18

The WORLD

October 16, 2013

October 16, 2013

The WORLD

page 19

We Are Open For OPEN 'TIL 9PM Moonlight Madness Bring This Ad for 5% Discount
We Are Open For
OPEN
'TIL 9PM
Moonlight
Madness
Bring This Ad for 5% Discount
on Moonlight Madness
ASK ABOUT OUR NEW
ALL
CUSTOMER LOYALTY PROGRAM
Mon. - Sat.
10:30am -
OCCASIONS
10% Discount to
& BUDGETS
FIREMEN, POLICE &
MILITARY (In Uniform)
CATERING
2:30pm
8 State Street, Montpelier • 229-6788
See Our Daily Special & More
www.facebook.com/unclemikesdeli
Daily Special & More www.facebook.com/unclemikesdeli Classes to be held in Central Vermont area Winter Driver

Classes to be held in Central Vermont area

Winter Driver Ed Course

December 3 - February 6

Tuesdays & Thursdays 5:30-7:30PM

Contact: 1-802-775-9218

info@allstatevt.com • www.allstatevt.com

1-802-775-9218 info@allstatevt.com • www.allstatevt.com • Fresh Seafood • Steaks • Ice Cream OPEN THURS.
• Fresh Seafood • Steaks • Ice Cream OPEN THURS. thru SUN. 11AM to 8PM
• Fresh Seafood
• Steaks
• Ice Cream
OPEN THURS. thru SUN. 11AM to 8PM
till New Year’s Eve
Restaurant

Enjoy our dining room or convenient window service!

Route 107, Bethel, VT • 802-234-9400

HalloweenHalloween HeadquartersHeadquarters Rubber Bubbles BALLOON & PARTY SUPPLY COSTUMES • WIGS • DECORATIONS
HalloweenHalloween HeadquartersHeadquarters
Rubber Bubbles BALLOON &
PARTY SUPPLY
COSTUMES • WIGS • DECORATIONS • MASKS
October
Dot Sale:
o Yellow Dots
25%off
Barre-Montpelier Road, Berlin
o Green Dots
802-476-6011 or 800-244-6011
50%off
o Red Dots
HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 9:30AM-5:30PM, Sun. 11:00AM-4:00PM
Starting Oct. 18 Open Until 7:00PM Fri. & Sat.
75%off
Starting Oct. 18 Open Until 7:00PM Fri. & Sat. 75%off All calendar submissions should be sent

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00pm, Thursday preceding publica- tion. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community events, which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE- Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre- GED and high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46 Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588. Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have questions? We have answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 479-0531 to register. Line Dancing. Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St., by donation, Thursdays

6:30-8:30pm.

RCIA. For those who want to learn more about the Catholic faith. St. Monica Church, Wednesdays starting 9/25, 7pm. Pre-reg. 479-3253. Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your hurts/habits/hang-ups. Faith Community Church, 30 Jones Bros. Way, Mondays, 6-8pm. 476-3221. Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 So. Main St., Tuesdays, 5:30-7pm. Info 498-3030 (David) or 249-7931 (Sandy). Barre Rotary Downtown Walk. Welcome back Main St., walk to the beltline & back. Meet behind City Hall, Thursdays, 6:30pm. Community Drum Circle. At the Parish house next to Universalist Church, Fridays, 7-9pm. Info. 724-7301. Story Hour. Aldrich Library children’s room, Mondays & Tuesdays,

10:30am.

Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank, 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9am. Info. 777-5419. Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St., Saturdays, 10:30am. Info. 476-3114. Overeaters Anonymous. Church of the Good Shepherd, Tuesdays 6pm-7pm. Info. 249-0414. Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents welcome. Aldrich Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15pm. Info 476-4185. Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. 2nd flr Alumni Hall, next to Barre Aud., Mondays, 6:30-9pm. www.barretonesvt.com or 223-2039. Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thursdays during school year, 9:30-11am. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first Thursday of each month (not Jan. or July), 6:30pm. Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes year- round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.

Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St., 3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9am. 476-3966. Lupus Support Group. 9 Jorgensen Ln., teen meeting 3rd Wednesdays